37 Burst results for "executive director"

Fresh update on "executive director" discussed on WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

01:30 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "executive director" discussed on WBZ Morning News

"Help out out West BBC's Karen Regal with one man story just hours after he returned home, Cory Shepherdson went west with Task force want to fight what he says of the worst fires he's ever seen. He's been on the Fox Road Fire Department for 17 years work line in On the plane, and we have about 7000 ft. The Plains now starting to smell like smoke. His team went door to door, searching for survivors and checking property damage. It was exhausting, he says, but he was inspired by the people he met. Family comes first. You can you could have, you could lose everything. As long as you have your family. That's all that matters. I talked to him less than 12. Hours after he got home. I got home. My youngest was in bed sleeping. My six year old Gave her a hug and kiss you name and I signed some brownies. It was just nice to get home. He missed his daughter's first day of kindergarten because he was on the other side of the country, helping Karen Regal W busy. Boston's NewsRadio televisions Emmy Awards handed out Previously and Berkeley now is honoring three alumni who won Emmys. Jasmine Cephas Jones took home her first Emmy for outstanding actress in a short form, comedy or drama. Siri's, She's in the Web series Free Rayshawn. Pablo Mongia receives his seventh Emmy Award for his sound mixing at the 2020 Academy Awards. And Stephanie McNally receives her first Emmy in the category of outstanding sound editing for a comedy or drama series for her work on the Man DeLorean. It's a struggle to survive these days for music clubs and local theaters and W B ceased Ruma Holland tells us a performance center for the arts in Newburyport has been getting creative just to survive. The firehouse has done virtual shows ransom fundraisers and even partnered with a local farm to do some drive in shows. It's sort of Ah, no ideas of bad idea approach sort of doing a Monday morning Family Dance Party on our Facebook page I'm working on the firehouse Core Beret, which is quarantine and cabaret together was a quarantine cabaret. We're calling it a corporation executive director John Morning Hand tells me the goal is very simple. Keep the lights on, and he knows even in a post pandemic world. It's a long road back for the theatre. People are going to be concerned about coming out coming out to do live theaters and looking back at the last few months morning hand tells me running a theatre at home with young kids running around, not the easiest thing in the world. He spoke. To me from some sort of small closet space drama Holland W. B. C. Boston's NewsRadio and if you've been sitting at home and have run out of things to watch good news for you out of Hollywood, let's check in with Bloomberg Business at 7 38. Here's Tom Buzz, baby, Well, Jeff.

Emmy Awards Cory Shepherdson Karen Regal Fox Road Fire Department Karen Regal W John Morning Hand Firehouse Core Beret Jasmine Cephas Jones Holland W. B. C. Boston Boston Ruma Holland Stephanie Mcnally Facebook Academy Awards Tom Buzz Pablo Mongia Newburyport Executive Director Siri Bloomberg Business
Los Angeles tourism and hotels take serious hits from pandemic

All Things Considered

05:33 min | 11 hrs ago

Los Angeles tourism and hotels take serious hits from pandemic

"The hotels are doing. Industry called Leisure and Hospitality is a huge economic driver in greater L. A. It employs a lot of folks you probably know And of course, a lot of those jobs have gone away. Some of those jobs may never come back after this pandemic. The Times reports that one in four hotels Struggling to pay their mortgage and is at risk of foreclosure. Adam Burke is president and CEO of the tourism and Convention. Bored and Heather Roseman is executive director of the Hotel Association of Los Angeles. Welcome to you above Thanks so much, Steve. It's great to be on. Good morning, Heather. I want to start with you. First of all, how many hotels Does the greater Los Angeles area have The greater Los Angeles area has a combination of hotels, motels and bed and breakfasts somewhere in the neighborhood of about 1200. Do they all have to close those hotels? When everything Shut down. I'm thinking back in Middlemarch. When Ella did the stay at home orders or did some hotels managed to stay open because business was still happening, right? The hotel industry was deemed an essential business. At the beginning of the pandemic. We were working to service a couple of government projects, starting with the state of California, looking for rooms to have passengers that were disembarking from cruise ships quarantine for 14 days. From there. We started working with the L. A county to find rooms for covert isolation as well as what then evolved into Project Room Key. So that's something that we're going to talk about in a few moments here on this program, are you starting to see some of those hotels reopen again? Our people venturing out arm or tourists coming back to L. A. I mean, what kind of numbers are you seeing there? During the outside of the pandemic. Hotels did suspend operations in many cases, not knowing exactly whether or not they were allowed to be open. As of last week. We still have 38 hotels that are are closed and we're not sure if those are going to be a temporary or permanent closure, but during the pandemic 157 hotels Did shut down. Initially We are starting to see some of that leisure travel returned to the market. But as we see the occupancy rates rise, we have to consider that the hotels are still operating at a very limited crew. As thie bookings are still only about 50% maximum. Adam occupancy rate, obviously is an important number. You just heard Heather's say, 50%. What's what's the occupancy rate typically in Allah? Well, First of all, I like to reiterate what Heather said. Which is, you know, this has really been devastating for our industry with a lot of your listeners may not realize Steve is prior to the pandemic. Our leisure and hospitality sector was actually the third largest employer in Los Angeles County, representing about one out of every 8.5 jobs across the county. So While we've seen job loss of about one out of every three jobs in leisure and hospitality that's been even more dramatic for the hotel's prior to the pandemic, though, to your question we were seeing average occupancy is in the city about 83% and, you know, Fortunately, we started to see some gradual recovery. But that had declined to his low is about 20% with a lot of hotels, actually sitting in the single digits Right now we're seeing occupancies that are in the 40% range, and it really to your point is being fueled by locals. It's really Angelino starting to safely and responsibly. Get out and take staycations right here in their own backyard. I want to. I want to talk about that, because one of the things that you guys have been doing I know is pushing more Angelenos. To go out and stay in local hotels. If you're able to how do you suppose did I mean it? Is there a conflict with you guys? When you say Well, we want you to go stay at a hotel. But there is this pandemic still happening. Yeah, it's a great question. So the first of all, I will say we've actually been working with the Los Angeles Department of County Health to develop safety protocols for all the various sectors of our industry. So that we can make sure that we are protecting our guests were protecting our employees. Equally important, So the idea of pushing people to get out in about probably, I would say it a little bit differently, Which is what we've done is We've put together a program called Love, which is really by Angelinos for Angelenos. So we've put together over 100 special offers, including not just hotels, but our local attractions in restaurants so that for people who are comfortable getting out and about it's more affordable and easier to dio. And you know when people ask, what can I do? We know, for example, that if those who have the means had just three visits to a local attraction or museum, supported three of our local restaurants and had just won three night stay. In an area hotel that would actually help us recover over 21,000 jobs in L, a county and what it would inject about $1.4 billion back into our local business community. Heather, How

Heather Roseman Los Angeles County Leisure And Hospitality Hotel Association Of Los Angel Los Angeles Steve Adam Burke Los Angeles Department Of Coun President And Ceo California Executive Director Middlemarch Ella The Times
Fresh update on "executive director" discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

00:42 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "executive director" discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"We would hear a message about what was going on in Alabama and Montgomery in Birmingham in. Albany Georgia whatever was going on there would be. A kind of public discussion of it through the sermons that we heard during those days so. Baldwin just Kinda fit into a pattern that was already. UNROLLING When do you start to? Engage with the sort of organized. Feminists feminist movement, but I mean I know that the the nineteen seventy seven statement is sort of the result of kind of back and forth and some tension and frustrations with what was kind of white dominated feminist movement in the US and when you start kind of engaging with with with sort of feminist movements. I really look forward to answering that. But before I do I wanNA talk about being politically active in the civil rights movement as a teenager please because I was. So. Intimate. Nineteen sixties like many of the northern cities that had robust civil rights movements. They are in Cleveland, the focus was on desegregation of the schools. And the adult who were involved in the organizing, made a conscious effort to get young people involved. I was in high school during the mid nineteen sixties and. The Cleveland Public School. System was building more schools because of course, it was the the baby boom they were kids. Everywhere you look you know the largest cohort of. Of Children in youth. Up until that time. and. In schools were bursting at the seams. So they were building of several schools. In Cleveland they district a district did them in such a way that they were guaranteed to be segregated racially segregated. So as I said, that's what the I think. It was United Freedom Movement in Cleveland. That's what we're focused on and they made a definite effort to get young people involved and my sister, and I were two of the people who got involved. So really my activism didn't start in the women's movement that started one Saturday a park in Cleveland before the Monday that there was a citywide schoolboy cock. And that was nineteen, sixty four. So from that date of this, I've been involved in of what I think of as the struggle what I'm curious what you what you learned about just that sort of early very early, right teenager grassroots interaction with a a social movement with very specific demand but connected to a much larger social movement across the country indeed the world in certain ways like just the mechanics of of struggle in terms of. Organizing meetings, protests, all that stuff like what what were learning picking up at that time. So my sister and I we graduated from. High School in January of Nineteen, sixty, five because Cleveland had mid year graduations again because the schools were so crowded and because we graduated, January, we got jobs we couldn't start college until September and we had been involved as I said in the civil rights movement like going to demonstrations in front of the Board of Education of the big moral building downtown. With adults and my sister ninety sided that we wanted to volunteer at the core office, which is the Congress of. Racial. Equality. And that was one of the major civil rights organizations, of course of that time, and what was fortunate is that the Executive Director of.

Cleveland Cleveland Public School High School United Freedom Movement Board Of Education Baldwin Alabama United States Albany Birmingham Georgia Montgomery Congress Executive Director
Survey Of New York City Restaurants Reveals 87% Could Not Pay Full Rent In August

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:31 sec | 12 hrs ago

Survey Of New York City Restaurants Reveals 87% Could Not Pay Full Rent In August

"The monthly survey from the New York City hospitality Alliance shows 87% of respondents weren't able to pay full rent in August. That number has held steady through the summer and through an expansion of outdoor dining. Indoor dining is scheduled to start next week in the city. Only a 25% capacity. The alliance is executive director Andrew Ritchie is calling for rent relief, a roadmap to expanding indoor dining and an indefinite extension for outdoor dining Right now those outdoor seats air set to go away after Halloween.

New York City Hospitality Alli Executive Director Andrew Ritchie
Cuomo says New York commercial eviction ban extended to Oct. 20

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:58 sec | 16 hrs ago

Cuomo says New York commercial eviction ban extended to Oct. 20

"Governor Cuomo is extending New York's ban on commercial evictions for another month, but restaurants and bars they're still looking for more help. WCBS reporter Steve Burns has the story. With the clock ticking down and the uncertainty growing Governor Cuomo's announcing a last minute extension to New York state's ban on commercial evictions. It's been extended for another month through October. 20th. For bars and restaurants. It's one shred of good news, but they say a lot more help is needed. The monthly survey from the New York City hospitality Alliance shows 87% of respondents weren't able to pay full rent in August. That number is held steady through the summer and through an expansion of outdoor dining. Indoor dining is scheduled to start next week. In the city, the only a 25% capacity the alliance is executive director Andrew Ritchie is calling for rent relief, a roadmap to expanding indoor dining and an indefinite extension for outdoor dining Right now, those outdoor seats air set to go away after Halloween.

Governor Cuomo New York New York City Hospitality Alli Steve Burns Executive Director Andrew Ritchie Reporter
U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

WTOP 24 Hour News

04:01 min | 3 d ago

U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

"Of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She's passed away at the age of 87 from complications from cancer. A little earlier, I spoke with the U of D. C is executive director Monica Hopkins about the legacy of Justice. Ginsburg, obviously like much of the nation were saddened and shocked to hear of the passing of Justice Ginsburg She devoted so much of her life and career to advance in the quality girl. It gives us time to think about her legacy. Both weapon. The A C l U, but parasol she was dedicated to ensuring that we understood about equality wasn't just about getting women. They're equal rights but that it actually have impact were the sexes in total talk a little more about how she worked with the Luo and made some achievements for women's rights. Prior to starting the women's rights project Up the hill, you she actually served as professor Rutgers law. And she, additionally thought important legal battles before the Supreme Court back establish the foundation for currently legal prohibitions against sex discrimination. And then in 1972 later, Ginsberg sounded today. So you women's rights project. And she directed that project throughout the decade of the 19 seventies, but case after case to the Supreme Court and also establishing constitutional protections against sex discrimination, and you know her legacy continues today. Throughout the feelings, work to advance women's equality and employment and education and housing, and in all It's just it is. She was a Supreme Court justice, which is such a monumental achievement, right? But she was so much more than that. He really waas so much more than that. It's securely interesting she became. I've heard and seen, And then the news people calling her a feminist icon. You can see people now carrying tote bags with state against Bird's image on it, she has come to symbolize Stalwart and dedicated vision of equality and what could be achieved through the law. Her legacy she just had such a dramatic and lasting impact. Not only I think on the Supreme Court, but in the lives of many women across the country, and it's great to see that multiple generations have been graced her legacy and what she accomplished on the port and you mention her becoming a cultural icon. It's really fascinating to me because I don't think we can say that about any other Supreme Court justice ever. I mean, there may have been T shirts with faces on them and things but not to this degree. Yeah, One of the things that I think about is the quiet power up Justice Ginsberg had and how she You know, would wear her descent color, which became in pop. I can obviously you know, you see necklaces with her descent color on a she would wear that on days when the court where she would descend on DH. All of those little things but sort of picked up on by people who not only followed exactly what the court was doing, or may have read the brief stores things like that. But I understood some of these decisions and how decisions that are made with the law. And at the highest level of the court of our land. Ah, really impact our lives. Monica Hopkins Thie, executive director of the U of D C sports at

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Executive Director Monica Hopkins Monica Hopkins Thie D. C Professor Bird
Organization Seeks to Increase Voter Participation in America

1A

05:28 min | 5 d ago

Organization Seeks to Increase Voter Participation in America

"Cat. Calvin is the founder and executive director of Spread The Vote, a nonprofit organization that's working to increase voter turnout. Welcome to the program. Hi. Thanks for having me So One of the main things your organization is trying to do is close the gap between registered voters and voter turnout. How big of a gap are we talking about? Well about 83% of eligible voters in the country are registered. But we have an average turnout of 55% 15, maybe a little higher depending on the election, So there is a huge gap of tens of millions of voters who are registered. They've taken that first step but who have a hard time taking the many steps that it takes to actually get a ballot in So we hear a lot about voter registration drives. But why is that? Not enough? You know voter much drives a great their first step in every state except North Dakota. You have to be registered to vote. But the fact is, there are a lot of things that you have to do in between that So, for instance, one of the main things that spread the vote does is that we help people get ideas primarily in voter ID states. There are over 21 million eligible voters who don't have photo ID, but 36 states where it's required. So that means that you can look at states like Wisconsin, where there are over 300,000 registered voters who don't actually have the idea. They need to vote or 200,000, Virginia, etcetera. And so you know, that's just one big way that voter registration isn't actually looking at. What are all the other challenges you know, There's also transportation challenges. There's child care. We have a massive problem with discrimination against people with disabilities at the polls. You know, and then a huge, huge voter education gap. And so there's just a lot of things that we need to address between registration and turnout to make sure we're actually helping people explain a little bit more about the voter education gap that you see. Yeah. I mean, you know, it's interesting because I was listening to some of the questions that people had coming in. Also, I want to send bonus points to the Twitter who said that we should be doing rank choice voting because she's absolutely right. You know, the fact is that we don't We don't do a lot of civic education in schools anymore, And then we really don't do it after school, And so a lot of people just don't Really understand the voting process who they're voting for what we're voting for you. We do a tine of voter education and spread the vote. 77% of our clients have never voted before and had midterms. We had people in age ranging from 18 to 79 voting for the first time, and when they ask us questions or when we go, we get sort of thousands of questions that people just email us because we're an organization with vote in the name and it's Everything from. I don't know how I'm supposed to use this machine. I don't understand the difference between absentee voting and mail in voting in what's early voting. You know, I don't know what any of these positions are. Nobody knows what the comptroller is or what the board of supervisors is. You know, we get a lot of first time voters who we talk to you and they say I opened my ballot and I thought it was just going to be the president. But there were like 30 pages of things that I didn't know what I was supposed to do. I don't know what a ballot measure is. And so there's just a lot of sort of basic info. You know, there's also we get people who say I just open my mail in ballot and there's a bunch of pieces of paper here. I don't know what I'm supposed to do with that, you know, And so there's a lot of work that needs to be done. I'm just helping people understand what the process is. And how do you do it? How do you follow all these obstructions? And then when you look at, you know, people returning citizens the rules for returning citizens being able to vote or different everywhere, And there isn't a lot of information out about how people are supposed to know if they're eligible to vote again. How they become eligible. You know, people, Disabilities don't always know what all the requirements are and what accessibility requirements there are and what they're allowed to, You know, demand that they have it. They're polling place. And so there's just a lot of Really voting 101 information that people don't get. Well, we got this tweet from Benjamin, who says, I think the problem with voter apathy is that many people of you voting purely as a response to an agenda they did not set. It's important to stress to voters that they are just as much responsible for setting the agenda as they are for voting to set that agenda into motion, and I'm curious how much you hear from people about You know that that issue of you know? Look, I'm voting for something that I don't feel particularly a part off. Oh, absolutely. I mean, first of all, if we'd all been listening to Ralph Nader in the seventies, this would be a very different country because he basically was advocating for indivisible, right. He kept saying voting is just one day we have to be sure that we are keeping these politicians accountable that we're telling them what we want that we're making sure that they do it. And you know, one of the things that we try really hard to do now is remind people that voting is not the whole movement, but it's a big part of and that it is a thing. We have to do it once a year. Twice a year, however many times you vote in your community, but it is just one way. Of changing this democracy of setting the agenda, and so we have to still be taking to the streets. We have to still be calling into the police Commission meetings are going to City Council meetings. You know, we have to be finding and recruiting really amazing members of our community who we think would be great. You know, members of elected office and then supporting them. It's a lot more than voting that voting. Because we live in a democracy is a key part on I think when people understand I'm not just voting once a year and walking away and then someone else is making decisions, but that I'm helping to set those decisions and push those decisions and once a year voting is my way of grading how I think that those decisions were made and maybe hiring somebody new and firing someone excited, read, then it puts the power a lot more into the voters hands.

Founder And Executive Director Twitter Calvin North Dakota Wisconsin Virginia Ralph Nader Comptroller Police Commission President Trump Benjamin City Council
Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:22 min | Last week

Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

"Today we're talking about a trail-blazing political activist and educator. She was the first black woman to be a member of a oral cabinet in New York City and the only woman on the administrative committee for the nineteen sixty three march on Washington. Let's talk about Anna. Arnold. Henchmen. Anna was born in eighteen ninety nine in Marshall Town. Iowa. Her family later moved to a NOCA- where they were the only black family in the community. In Nineteen Eighteen Anna graduated from high school and enrolled in Hamline University. It was there that she heard a lecture by w e boys and was inspired to pursue a career in education. In nineteen twenty two Anna was the first African American to graduate from HER UNIVERSITY After graduation unable to find a teaching job in Saint Paul Public schools because she was black and found a teaching job but historically, black school in Mississippi called Rust College. On her train ride down south to her new job in Mississippi Anna, had her first experience with Jim. Crow segregation laws a train conductor told her that when the train reached Illinois had to sit in the overcrowded colored section and not in the dining car white people sat. Anna spent two years at rust college before turning to Minnesota. Unable to find a teaching job after once again, facing racial discrimination, she switched careers. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and became an executive director of the black. Branch of the Young Women's Christian, association or the YWCA. She continued her executive role for twelve years helping to develop various international programs and education. In nineteen thirty, three Anna married folk musician merit a henchman. In nineteen forty, four Anna was appointed executive director at the F. E. P. C.. The national. Council for a Permanent Fair Employment Practices Committee. She spearheaded the fight against employment discrimination. From nineteen, fifty, four to nineteen fifty eat anna served in the cabinet of Robert F Wagner Junior then New York mayor. She was the first african-american and first female member of a mayoral cabinet. For the next few years she worked in a variety of roles including as a columnist as well as as a public relations consultant. In one thousand, nine, fifty, three Anna spent three months in India as next leader for the State Department. She also unsuccessfully ran for Congress in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty and for New York City Council president in Nineteen. Sixty five. One of Anna's most famous feats was her role in the nineteen, sixty, three march on Washington. We hold these choose to be self-evident. That, all men are created. Was the only woman on the administrative committee working with civil rights leaders, Martin Luther King, junior, Bayard Reston. And Eighth Phillip Randolph. Mobilize people to attend to arrange transportation logistics and to organize food and water for attendees fell on Anna's pleat because King Randolph and the other men she wrote for carrying on all of their regular responsibilities and it was difficult to get them to the meetings. Shortly before the march. Anna was angry when she saw that no women were included as speakers instead randolph was planning to briefly mention some black women activists in his speech although Anna strongly urged for women to be included a speakers on the program her calls were largely dismissed. In the end as a compromise, daisy beats was allowed to speak at the end of the march but her allotted speech time was significantly shorter than all the other male speakers. Anna later captured in her autobiography a moment during the March as she sat in front of the steps of the Lincoln. Memorial. I thought of the one, hundred, eighty, thousand Negro soldiers and the twenty nine thousand black seamen who had moved in at the crucial moment to win the war and save the fragile union she wrote. Most of the two hundred and fifty thousand people present could not know of these men for the history books available to Americans have failed to record their story. In the Nineteen Seventies Anna continued her work as an author and lecturer in the US and abroad. She wrote two books about her life's work. The trumpet of sounds in Nineteen, sixty four and the gift of chaos in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven. Anna was honored for her working race relations by various organizations throughout her life and was awarded honorary doctorate degrees from both Howard and Hamline University's. She also received the Pioneer Woman Award in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three from the New York State Conference on Midlife and older women. Anna died in nineteen ninety she was ninety years old.

Anna New York City Hamline University Rust College Executive Director Washington Permanent Fair Employment Prac Arnold New York City Council Mississippi Phillip Randolph Robert F Wagner Junior Iowa Congress New York State Minnesota Marshall Town Illinois Executive United States
Philippines deports US Marine in transgender killing

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

04:56 min | Last week

Philippines deports US Marine in transgender killing

"His anger in the Philippines after President Duterte a pardon the US Marine who had bean serving time in prison for killing a transgender woman in 2014 Joseph Scott Pemberton has been released on deported just over halfway through his 10 year prison sentence for the killing of Jennifer Lord. I've been hearing about the crime and the impact of the pardon from Nomi, Fontana's Thie, executive director of Gender and Development advocates, Filipinas and LGBTQ rights organization in the country. On the night of October. 11 2013, which was a Saturday transform and Jennifer Louder, met the American Joseph Scott Pemberton at a bar. They agreed through check in a motel a little over half an hour later, the US Marine leaves, and when the motel clerk checks in on Jennifer Loudy, he finds her Dead with her had in the toilet and her neck blackened with strangulation marks, and apparently she died from drowning. So because of that, wass as fiction by drowning, and he was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in prison. Yes, A year later, after a trial was held, Scott Pemberton was convicted. Ah, home inside in spite of the charges brought against him being murder, So it's AA degree lower. Murder and he was in jail for a six through 12 years, although the maximum for home so I could be up to 20 years, but he appealed his sentence. So it was shortened to just 10 years. So I'm here. He would have served just a little over five years and now he's being pardoned. Released. Sent back to the United States. What is your reaction to that? This is something that we do not accept. This is something that we will mouth primitive and something that we will never, ever forget, because the legacy of Jennifer loudest keys is that it is the first case in the Philippines at the successfully put an American serviceman was committed a crime in Philippine soil in jail. Convicted and jailed in the Philippians. So this means for almost a century that the Philippines has been a colony and in a new colony of the United States since Spain, which first colonizers handed our country over to them in 80 98. So many American soldiers have committed crimes in our country and have never been convicted, have never been put in jail. And what what is the significance of this for the trans community? For the trans community. This sounds are loud and clear message that the president is an enemy of the LGBT of the trans community and the LGBT Q our community in the Philippines and that in spite of his pronouncement that the president has been vocal about supporting LGBT Q. I writes in the Philippines, but this action proves didn't understand what LGBT Q I rights are and this interrogates his claims that he is a friend of the community. Yes, because his record is pretty Good, isn't it? When he was vice mayor of Davao City, he encouraged a council to pass anti discrimination ordinance that protected the LGBT community. He said that he was against bullying gay people. He has Made other comments in support of the the LGBT community. But you say his actions speak of something different. Yes, and those actions in the past or his record as a chief of Ah, off our city here in the Philippines? Is this a ruse? For me? It's It's really a Machiavellian. It's a very cunning politician, so he does things that will make him Popular to the people. But isn't it possible this? This is about broader diplomatic relationship with the United States, one that he has said different things about but ultimately he's decided that pardoning this American soldier was the right thing for the Philippines. We don't know for sure. And at this point everything will these speculative because as things stand it, for example, that the Democrats win and the NC Trump, who is friends with their and Where does that leave him in with Americans, But at the same time, we also feel that for the many human rights abuses that have been committed under his term, the president now has to find allies in the community of nations so that after he steps down, he will have those powerful friends to rely on for support because Certainly he will be held accountable for all the human rights abuses that happened under his term. Naomi Fontana's executive director of gender and development advocates, Filipinas and LGBTQ Rights Association in that country.

Philippines Joseph Scott Pemberton United States President Trump Naomi Fontana Jennifer Louder Jennifer Loudy Wass Executive Director President Duterte Jennifer Lord Lgbtq Rights Association Gender And Development Davao City Murder Jennifer Nomi Democrats NC
Nonprofit 'Food for Thought' provides free meals to families facing food insecurity amid pandemic

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:47 min | Last week

Nonprofit 'Food for Thought' provides free meals to families facing food insecurity amid pandemic

"Founded during the AIDS epidemic in the late 19 eighties food for thought has strived to ensure the seriously ill received the nutrition they needed. You know, there was no real good treatment, so people were dying. And in Nome, a county it's about two people every week would die. Executive director Ron Karp says They started delivering groceries to people living in Sonoma County, who had been recently discharged from the hospital. Volunteers would not going doors of people that they needed food people with AIDS, and they would say hi the food areas here and drop off food for the food for thought has now shifted their focus to serve those who are recovering from Cove in 19 at the request of county health officials. We got a call from the county Health department and they had a family that everybody in the family. Seven people were Positive and they needed to quarantine but they didn't have food. They asked us if we'd be willing to serve them. So we said, sure, recognizing the importance of providing vulnerable families with access to healthy food. Carp, then developed the Koven 19 nutrition program. We saw how much it helped them and how important it was that the service you know exists, and there was really nothing like it. So we created the new program right there, on the spot way would serve people with covered 19 that the county would refer to us even though We didn't have any idea where we get the money from since May, the agency has provided groceries to more than 600 people, 21 meals a week per person. While the demand on Lee continues to grow, everybody should have the right to have access to healthy food. And it's just really painful to think that for whatever reason, usually of no fault of the individual that they can't afford to buy or access, healthy food run carp and food for thought. Making a

Sonoma County Aids County Health Department Nome Ron Karp Executive Director LEE Cove
NYC Movie Theaters Say They're Ready and Eager to Open

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:01 min | Last week

NYC Movie Theaters Say They're Ready and Eager to Open

"Movie theaters in New York State say they are ready to reopen. We're ready to open our doors, the second that the governor gives us the green light, says Michael Haugland, executive director of the Bedford Playhouse. He's one of 16 small theater owners in New York, who are asking Governor Cuomo for a road map to reopen it. We've upgraded our air filtration systems. You know where everybody will be required to wear a mask While they're here? We're capable of social distancing and and capacity limits. And you know all of the same things that these other organizations are. Are capable of Oakland, praised the governor for what he calls a methodical approach to reopening the economy and says theatres are better equipped to keep people safe and some other industries that have already reopened. With indoor dining set to reopen in the city doesn't make you feel maybe hopeful for the for your future, or are you kind of annoyed that that's going to come before you were hopeful because the more industries that opened up the closer we get Teo send him is re opening.

Michael Haugland Governor Cuomo New York TEO Bedford Playhouse Executive Director Oakland
Los Angeles Begins Installing Vote by Mail Drop Boxes Throughout City

KNX Evening News

01:01 min | Last week

Los Angeles Begins Installing Vote by Mail Drop Boxes Throughout City

"Bureau of ST Services has started installing vote by mail drop boxes all across the city ahead of the November election. One of the boxes has been placed on the sidewalk along fifth Street in downtown L. A outside the Central Library. It has a key lock near what appears to be the slot where ballots will be dropped off and warns in big letters that tampering with this ballot boxes. A felony installations began last weekend with the Bureau of ST Services also called Streets. Ella aiming to complete The project by September 20th what installing 77 around libraries and five around outside in the public crowd of way around. Plus. Adele Hush, Kaleel, executive director and general manager of Streets says they are assisting the county registrar Recorder County clerk with the installations as providing our residents. Access to exercise their rights. The intention is to give people expanded access to vote that is safe and easy during the pandemic. Margaret Career O. K annexed 10 70 news radio.

Bureau Of St Services Adele Hush St Services Central Library Margaret Career O. K Ella Executive Director General Manager
After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

Environment: NPR

08:06 min | Last week

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

"Before the earthquake before the NAMI and the nuclear disaster Japan got nearly a third of its energy from nuclear power. But after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven, the country took all of its nuclear reactors off line, which has led Japan to increasingly rely on fossil fuels and also solar power. NPR's cat ORF continues our series on recovery and Fukushima. She only endo is saying a final goodbye. To the home she once shared with her husband and three kids and for Cosima it's less than a mile from the Daiichi nuclear power plant where three reactors overheated and exploded in two thousand eleven. They left fast only taking what they could carry. Their things left nearly exactly as they were the day everything changed to coffee, Cup sit on the kitchen table her daughter's old school uniform is laid out on a bed a calendar on the wall is still flipped to March two thousand eleven. clueless you the kit ago. Muluzi. Nice. This is sad. She says this House System Nice, but we can't come back. She looks around your moon to Ni life is so different diddle do remind us. To start from nothing even less than. A totally reinvent ourselves after the disaster digging up this. She's here to give the keys to government officials. This house will be bulldozed soon and the land used as part of a storage site for radioactive topsoil scraped from the earth and the massive cleanup effort Tschumi heads upstairs. And takes one last look at the bedroom shoes to share with her husband Hitter Yuki. He died a few years ago suddenly. And then she walks back down to hand over the keys. The thing is pretty unceremonious though in reality she only says, she said goodbye to this part of her life. Disaster when her family piled into a car and drove as far south as they go to the southern tip of Japan on the island of Kyushu. Here, she's a single mom to her bubbly ten-year-old son Cagey who was just a baby when the disaster happened, he doesn't remember Shema at all her other two children are grown and live nearby, and she only has found herself within unlikely job running a small solar farm. On a big hill overlooking the tropical landscape Ma hidden is yet. She never imagined. My life would be like this guy when we first moved here, I was in my late thirties my husband was in his forties unanue issue we were like, okay. Do we get new jobs? So we decided to do this. We saw as investment for the future month on her husband worked at the Nuclear Power Plant for over twenty years and for him, the switch to solar was purposeful. He felt that nuclear power had betrayed him do on didn't He grew up really believing nuclear power was safe and then he lost his home to come see today the energy collected by these panels has allowed her to build a new life. The power is sold to the local utility company and brings in thousands of dollars a month when her husband died suddenly a few years ago she only took over the work and the family placed his grave in the center of the solar panels show me walks over to tall marblestone. Hook. With an inscription that says. Good you send do essentially remember that this family is here because of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven cocoa use. A message to future generations she explains looking away device. My biggest wish is for renewable energy to take over I mean look at my old home, it's going to be a storage site for nuclear waste. We can't deal with that kind of wasted drivers go. Joey's wish might not come true though her family started their business at the right time. The price was so generous and also delegration was sold loose. So anyone can register. Naida is the executive director of the Institute of Sustainable Energy Policies. In Tokyo, he says in the early years after the disaster Japan pushed renewables to help fill energy gap left after fifty four nuclear reactors were taken off line the. Government offered big incentives, new investors, lots of people like me and her husband jumped on board to build smaller operations. incorporations rushed in to build massive solar and wind farms but also the liberation was more strict compensation dropped. It got increasingly harder for alternative energy producers to connect into the power grid edith says, this was partly due to the big utility companies trying to maintain control and the government allowing. It to happen the sitting kind of a body of to north to Laputa increase anymore, the institutions make a big difference that's Jennifer Sclerosis of George. Mason University she studies energy policy in Japan, and she says, there is technology an interest for renewables in Japan, but the bigger power companies in government need to commit if people in place do not watch to implement policies to empower the economics and the. Technology innovation then it can't happen regardless of how advanced technologies earn regardless of how good the economics look many of the major utilities as well as the Japanese government are still waiting to see if nuclear power can make a comeback and renewables just aren't that reliable yet. So in the meantime, I would assume the defaults going to import gas import coal eater agrees is the most the early sick and Not so optimistic future, but one place in Japan that is optimistic about Renewables Hookah Shema the local government here has set a goal for the entire prefecture. The third largest in Japan to be completely fueled by renewable energy by twenty forty. It's a real turnaround for a place where nuclear power ruled only a decade ago especially in the former exclusion zone near Daiichi, there are solar panels everywhere from small ones on roofs and hillsides to massive mega-farms along highways making use of land available after the disaster some of these panels are run by big developers and others are not. Lake the solar panels on farmer. She get Yuki Corneau's field. He's seventy four years old and this land has been in his family for generations he gestures around it. This is all my land, but it's nonsense. Nonsense because it's relatively useless the wind carried radioactive material here after the disaster and the government has scraped off all the topsoil in decontamination efforts. The farmers here can't really far much anymore. So small local power company came and asked sugar. Yuki if they could rent land for solar panels, he said, yes could you go I was really worried after the nuclear accident how would we get power most of his neighbors also agreed but that means everything is different. Now he says there were Rice patties all around here with tiny frogs that created a kind of soundtrack for his life now it's quiet. He misses the frogs a lot and he says, and he doesn't make nearly the same amount of money as he did farming. But She Yuki says he sees this as a necessary change. He has nine grandkids they all live far away now but they were just in town the other weekend for visit running through the fields. Suze my grandparents farmed here my parents do. But now it's time for Change I've realized it's a new season pitcher. This he says looking out over the solar panels is for future. Generations Khatlon store NPR News Fukushima Japan.

Japan She Yuki Government Daiichi NPR Japanese Government CUP Fukushima Yuki Corneau Shema Tschumi
Republicans have insufficient evidence to call elections 'rigged'

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

01:30 min | Last week

Republicans have insufficient evidence to call elections 'rigged'

"Ben Ginsberg, the top GOP election lawyer has the top ED today in the Washington Post. He writes Republicans have insufficient evidence to call elections rigged or fraudulent. The Justice Department is seeking to defend trumpeted defamation case by advice columnist Jean Carroll who claims trumped raped her two decades ago post notes that taxpayers could be on the hook for any potential damages. If the US government is allowed to stand in for trump though they write weaning damages against the government, though would be more unlikely than in a suit against trump as the notion of sovereign immunity gives government and its employees brought protection from lawsuits. And The New York Times has the lead of the day with this one. President trump who has vowed exit the pairs agreement on climate change loosened restrictions on toxic air pollution rollback, clean water protections, and removed climate change from list of national security threats stood in front of supporters in Jupiter Florida on Tuesday and declared himself a great environmentalist almost none of this will happen but it's worth a read. Anyway Ben Sasse in the Wall Street Journal with this headline make the Senate. Great again to restore the world's greatest deliberative. Body will need to think big and spoke with Aaron Hill, the Executive Director of Act blue the democratic fundraising Juggernaut in the latest women will podcast. They discussed everything from how Biden is faring in fundraising to Republicans effort to build out a digital money operation, you can listen and subscribe on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Donald Trump Ben Ginsberg Jean Carroll Ben Sasse Washington Post GOP Executive Director Of Act Justice Department Wall Street Journal Aaron Hill United States Biden Advice Columnist Senate Apple President Trump The New York Times
The 'Keep Nine' Amendment

The KDKA Radio Morning News

08:23 min | 2 weeks ago

The 'Keep Nine' Amendment

"A little idea of exactly what your organization keep. Nine. Is it? Nine is a bipartisan organization that is working to persuade Congress to propose what would be the 28th amendment to the United States Constitution That would say the Supreme Court of the United States is nine justices. Be the shortest amendment in the Constitution, and it would prevent the idea that some people are talking about which is to APAC. The Supreme Court the Supreme Court, is it our most important institution? The United States Constitution is an amazing document, and it creates a balance between the executive legislative and judicial branches. And the Supreme Court is the branch that has been called on time and again to resolve disputes between the executive branch and the legislative branch and to resolve issues that otherwise might Tear the country apart. So it's a critical institution for the survival of American democracy. And the most important element of the Supreme Court is that it is independent. It can't be controlled by the president. It can't be controlled by Congress. And throughout our history. There have been people in the presidency and in Congress that I wanted to destroy the independence of the court. And it may be the most important issue of this election. Whether or not this election results in the election of folks Who want to preserve the independence of the Supreme Court for the election of the folks who want to destroy it. Now the president Any president has no control over the Supreme Court, but it can have a lot of influence because let's face it. President Trump has two picks to the Supreme Court already and Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. There's still two picks from President Obama's era. There's two from the George W. Bush era on there, There's two from the Clinton era on there and one remaining one from the George H. W. Bush era. So let's just Those ugh that if President Trump is reelected, he could get possibly two, maybe three more Supreme Court justice opportunities coming up here, with Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Clarence Thomas, both rumored to be considering retirement. I think Stephen Breyer as well somewhere down the line, but in the next few years, so that proves the importance of the Supreme Court and how much influence we could have for 50 years going forward from the Trump Eric. Correct, Absolutely. But there's an even more fundamental issue more than 100 years, the Supreme Court In an independent institution. Congress has not changed its size. But if after this election we end up with Ah, somebody that wants to pack the Supreme Court. We could end up with not just the names of people on the Supreme Court changing but the nature of the Supreme Court. If the Supreme Court became a political football between the two parties, with one party packing it when they were in charge and another party packing and when they were in charge, we would lose one of the most important institutions in the country. And that independence is mohr important, then who is appointed and we're very fortunate right now, in that both candidates appear to say that they don't want a packed court. Trump is attack court packing. And Biden said, I don't want a packed court either. But the problem is that there's some people on the Biden a team, including Kamala Harris, who said in the past that they like the idea of court packing and the Democratic Party platform. Includes language that says they favor court restructuring. And Senator Chuck Schumer has said that he might restructure the court if the court doesn't rule in ways that he likes. So there's a threat out there. And our appeal is two candidates in both parties who say that they don't want to pack the court to endorse the Keep Nine Amendment so that we are permanently protected against efforts to pack the court. And we think that's a critical issue that voters ought to care about because it will show what kind of governance we're gonna have over the next four years. If we have people who support to keep nine Amendment, we can rest assured that the court is not going to be packed. But if we have people who won't support to keep nine Amendment, we've gotta worry and so candidates for Congress candidates for the president. We think we ought to be asked. Do you support to keep nine Amendment because if they would pack it like you mentioned that would lead to political chaos The Supreme Court is always seen is at the institution that is more rational and steady and less fashionable, right and throughout our history, the biggest beneficiary of an independent Supreme Court are minorities because it's the Supreme Court that protects the unpopular rights of minorities. Every once in a while, you get a wave in Congress, so we got to do something. People say Well, it could affect minorities and sometimes in Congress. They don't care and the classic example of the Supreme Court standing up for minorities was almost 200 years ago, when Andrew Jackson decided that he was going to see the land of the Cherokee Indians and deport them all. The Oklahoma and the Supreme Court stood up and said, it's wrong. Unfortunately, at that time, Andrew Jackson said, Well, how many regiments does the Supreme Court have and ignored their ruling? Now? That wouldn't happen today, The Supreme Court has enough power to resist that kind of defiance. But if a president could say, Well, I don't like your decision. I'm going to pack the Supreme Court put my own people on the rights of minorities would be AH, gravely at risk. There were other presidents in the past have threatened to stack the Supreme Court as well. Back in the early 19 hundreds correct right. The most recent memory was Franklin Roosevelt in 1937. He had just won an overwhelming victory in 1936. Hey, had overwhelming majorities in both houses of Congress. And so he decided that he was going to use that opportunity to put some of his allies on the Supreme Court because at the time they were ruling against some of the legislative proposals that he had made and what he didn't expect was a outpouring of public opposition in both parties. And it basically destroyed his ruling coalition in his second term, and our message to both parties is don't go too far proposed your policies past them in Congress, but preserve the independence of the Supreme Court. Because if you try to upset that you're risking all the other items in your agenda. How did they come to nine as the final number in the Supreme Court? Well, it's very interesting history for the first almost 90 years of American history. The Supreme Court was, in fact, a political football and the Republican majority after the civil War was stuck with a Supreme Court that had been appointed by pro slavery president prior to the civil war, And so they basically was a naked power grab. They expanded the size of the court put their own people on. And you can argue that that may have been the right strategy after after a civil war, but very soon thereafter, the tradition grew At the Supreme Court ought to be independent was a tradition honored by both parties after 18 69 and people thought, you know people would honor tradition and in 1937. When FDR said, I'm going to pack the court, it was a great shock to people Now. It's interesting that FDR also broke another long standing tradition in American politics. He ran for a third term, and there had been a tradition ever since the founding of the republic that presidents only ran for two terms. And what happened in that case was, there was a public outcry and the 22nd amendment to the Constitution, which limits presidents to two terms was a response to Roosevelt's running for a third term. And our view is that just as the 22nd amendment put into the Constitution, a longstanding tradition, a new 28th amendment that says the Supreme Court of United States should be nine justices is the right way together. NT the independence of the Supreme Court for the future and is keep nine dot org website the best place for people to go to either support your idea for an amendment or just get more information. Absolutely. And if you go to that website, you'll see an E mail address where you can email us with specific questions or if you want to get involved in this effort. We're hoping that in the next two months, an army of citizens will AH demand that candidate for Congress for Senate and for the White House will answer the very simple question. Do you support to keep Nine Amendment? To keep the Supreme Court at nine justices and by the way, our hero on this issue was Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who has said she opposes court packing and she thinks nine is a good number for the Supreme Court. Roman Bueller, executive director director of of Keep Keep Nine Nine I I really really Appreciate Appreciate you you joining joining us us in in the the lending lending your your voice voice to to the the Voice Voice of of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh today. today. Well, Well, thank thank you you so so much. much. I I really really

Supreme Court Congress President Trump United States Ruth Bader Ginsburg Executive President Obama Franklin Roosevelt Senator Chuck Schumer George W. Bush Stephen Breyer FDR George H. W. Bush Oklahoma Andrew Jackson Democratic Party Biden Donald Trump
Hundreds rally in Washington, DC for continued access to vaping and other smoke-free alternatives

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hundreds rally in Washington, DC for continued access to vaping and other smoke-free alternatives

"Of rallying in D. C today to rather four continued access to Vaping and other smoke free alternatives from the the Theo Theo United United Vapors. Vapors. Alliance Alliance showed showed up up in in D D C C this this weekend weekend to to bring bring awareness awareness to to the the current current pathway pathway to to market market for for Herb. Herb. King King products. products. The The FDA right now is trying to regulate this a tobacco product, and I think it's very important for, uh, consumers understand that of aging product contains no tobacco. Dimitri aggressively. O T is executive director of the Tennessee Smoke Free Association traveled to the event to raise awareness. He says that smoking killed his father, and that Vaping was the only thing that helped him successfully quit smoking 10 years ago when it was set up to regulate his product doesn't even match the category of knowledge. Valerie bonked. W T. OBY News. The

Theo Theo United United Vaping Alliance Alliance Tennessee Smoke Free Associati King King Dimitri Valerie Bonked Executive Director FDA D. C
Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

People of the Pod

21:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

"Next week, two of the world's foremost human relations organizations the National Urban League and J. C. will unite against surging levels of Anti Semitism and racism to declare black Jewish unity week. Together, we will strengthen ties between our nations black and Jewish communities and combat all forms of hate. To discuss the importance of this event and to talk about the challenges of fighting racism I'm joined now by Clint Oda, the National Urban League Senior Vice President for Policy Advocacy and the Executive Director of the Urban League's Washington Bureau Clint, thank you so much for joining us. It's a pleasure to be with you. Now this special week, this black Jewish unity week is not happening in vacuum. It's happening because of rising antisemitism and racism in this country my listeners here plenty about antisemitism. So I just wanted to start by asking you this. It's been a Helluva summer. How are you? I would describe myself as weathered a little bit. We've been going through this quite some time this summer at least the notoriety of these police incidents are is much higher than it has been in the past. So we're we're hanging in there. We don't have a choice. Because this work is so important. And it really does reinvigorate me to see that we've got allies in this fight and we've always had allies in this fight but to see them step up in the way that they have his really reinvigorated me and I'm very excited to keep the fight going. I'm sure that our listeners are familiar with the name, the Urban League because it is etched into the annals of history of this country and anyone who knows anything about the civil rights movement will know the names of the Urban League of the ACP Snick we can go deeper also start really getting to the deep cuts. Tell us a little bit about. What the Urban League has been up to lately and what you've been up to especially over the summer in the wake of the George Floyd killing and other events in recent months while we're one, hundred, ten year old civil rights and Economic Empowerment Organization and we have been working on I'd like to say ending systemic racism for the past one. Hundred Years. we've been doing that through our programs such as making. Housing more Ford audible teaching people how to purchase homes how to stay in homes. We've been helping people to get work meaningful work they can sustain them and their families. We've been working the traditional voting rights area and civil rights area for the entirety of our existence but social justice is taken on a real importance in our work right now as as well as doing all this work in the midst of a pandemic So that's so interesting what you say about systemic racism and then specifically citing home-buying and things like that. You didn't mention education, but I think there's a pretty robust education. Portfolio at the National Urban League as well. Absolutely I think if you look at AJC's goals and National Urban League goals, you'll see mirror images of each other. That's been the real cool thing about this that this partnership and all of these things that people are talking about and I'll show my millennial miss. All of the things that people are are posting on instagram talking about explaining what systemic racism is and why you know wealth divides between black and white communities are so important and underpin. So many elements of of racial injustice today all of those things are things that the National Urban League is. Working on absolutely and I can't say that when I started about a year and a half ago I spent the previous ten years working in the United States Senate including four vice presidential nominee Senator Kamala Harris. I believe crazy how these things happen working for her and the agenda that she pursued is so consistent with the work that I'm doing today. One of the first things we did when we walked into the place is lead a resolution condemning hate antisemitism anti racism xenophobia homophobia. It's as important to her as it was to me and so coming here was just a natural extension of that but. As I was saying just the Times in which we live are so unique and perilous parallels between the early nineteen sixties which I'm sure we'll talk more about and today are really really compelling. It's almost like we're back in the sixties again, I want to go there right now because this week is going to be all about black Jewish. Relations and the story of black Jewish relations is not a new odd. We might be writing a new chapter, but there's a whole book that comes before us here. So what's one element clint of the Black Jewish relationship that has meant a lot to you personally. I would probably say the religious and spiritual aspect of the relationship. Growing up as a as a young kid in the deep South. There were a lot of Jewish people around although they were president. We didn't know it I grew up Protestant Christian and a great story is on Sundays. We were always able to use the parking lot of the temple across the street and it used to just puzzled me is to how generous the temple folks could be. Given that they must have services on Sunday to. Eat of the temple was empty or they were just being generous over time and as I moved out of south, then went to law school and live here on the East Coast I. got a much greater appreciation, not only for the religion. My Wife, for instance, used to teach at a Jewish day camp in new Rochelle New York but just meeting. So many friends of the Jewish faith drawing those connections between my own faith and their own and. Also learning the rich history of black Jewish communities especially in the era of civil rights as a lawyer was a big fan is that really don't have you could come up with a Thurgood Marshall and no understanding of the work at the end of Lacey P., Legal Defense Fund was complete without understanding the role that Jack Greenberg played and lots of other Jewish folks in philanthropy in spirituality and pursue the nonviolence movement just a wonderful partnership over the years. As a religious person myself that resonates with me a lot as it happens our listeners probably talk about this before for college I went to a joint program between Columbia University and the Jewish illogical seminary and actually not migration at the graduation of the class ahead of me which attended representative John Lewis spoke, and of course, John Lewis all of our listeners will remember passed away this summer I think he actually was an ordain ministered and he told a story that I'm sure you've heard before because I've heard until it multiple times of preaching to his chickens in Troy. Alabama and that had a certain resonance in this audience of basically all Jews including some we're going on into the rabbit. Those ties between our communities where were not everyone is a person of faith but certainly, there is deep faith and religious history kind of threaded throughout our communities I think those are really really powerful things to focus on. And I hope over time you take a look at surveys of religion in the country in other pugh has done some study in this area religion is trending down a little bit. Don't always necessarily consider themselves religious if you look at community surveys and so it's really important to reinvigorate this relationship and put it on a firm spiritual pudding in Judeo Christian tradition is so rich in the African American community and there's just so much there to really build on. I'm really looking forward to getting that history more prominently understood and remembered in our communities. So when we're talking about black Jewish unity right and we're talking about building black Jewish unity they're really two levels to it, and this is something that we talk about with a lot of our advocacy work. At AJC, there's the grassroots and there's the grass tops right. I want to ask you about both. Let's start with the grass tops right at the high profile level at the celebrity role model level, the politician level what do you think? Needs to happen there to demonstrate the Jewish people and black people should work together and are stronger together. The grass tops may be one of the more important roles in unity and understanding. We are a celebrity driven culture for better or for worse and ideas have a lot more resonance and a lot more acceptance when someone that you know and admire to saying the same thing. So grass tops to that extent are the key in moving opinion. Notions like reparations notions like black lives matter notions like social justice have mood and pretty quickly I think because athletes because celebrity on television and other artists have been saying the same thing and in a short period of time we've seen. Opinions shift in this country not just age not just religion not just race, but everything seems to be moving in the right direction from a popular standpoint. The grass roots which we're going to talk about next is where you really determine how sustainable this movement is. Right. Yeah. So tell us about that I mean in our neighborhoods and our schools in our churches, our synagogues mosques, how can we strengthen those relations? Sure. I've seen a lot of encouraging evidence that we can do this at grassroots level. This is a very human. Very, empathetic movement when we're talking about grassroots, we've seen some of these grassroots efforts come up in. Pittsburgh for instance and New Jersey. And in Brooklyn where when horrible acts of hate murder violence take place the communities come together and they usually come together I with religion. It's the pastors it's the churchgoers. It's the temple goers that really give me some hope that we aren't just a moment, but that we're in a movement. So I think in many ways, the church and the faith community are are in central piece of grassroots. That's kind of what I'm seeing sort of on the ground right now I think black Jewish unity week can drive those grassroots even deeper because understanding the tragedy of the moment is not nearly as important as understanding these deep historical ties right in our faith and our families and what we want from each other in shared history sometimes things that aren't so great sometimes shared history of oppression. Lutely, and for our listeners WHO WANNA learn more about black Jewish unity week, they should go to AJC, dot org, slash black, Jewish unity, or text black Jewish unity all one word to five to eight, eight nine not to keep hitting the faith note here you know we're we're a pretty secular organization in JC but I love what you said about the houses of worship I live on the upper west side of Manhattan which is this incredible. Kind of Jewish bastion historic whatever and if you go twenty blocks down for me in twenty blocks up for me, you probably are GonNa pass by twenty synagogues total and we're also steps away, I mean. We're a mile two miles away from Harlem and the two neighborhoods are very different and that's something that's worth exploring as well. Why that is how that happened etcetera, the strengths and the challenges of both communities, but I was in synagogue on. Chabad after the shooting in Muncie and Lo and behold there in the front row, was a a delegation from church in Harlem that wanted to come in and to be there and to show solidarity, and they got up and spoke after services, and then fast forward to this summer were all obviously in lockdown. But the rabbi of the synagogue made kind of Zoom appearance at that churches services after the killing of George Floyd talk about solidarity with. The black community in the wake of the killings of and Taylor George Floyd and so many of the challenges of injustice that are being faced right now and I think you're right that the grassroots level it. So often does start in those kinds of houses of worship, our religious leaders reaching out one to the other in something that you said, really struck me about the proximity of Latte community and Jewish community in relatively small plot of land. As a policy Wonk I'm sure you appreciate this but either just for the benefit of your listening audience, blacks and Jews were both subject to the same kinds of redlining restrictions in many ways throughout much of the United States where banks would identify areas and they would say this is a desirable area in this is a less desirable area, and so you know Jewish and black families were often circumscribed by these lending lines that still have an ongoing lingering vestige today. If you look at housing segregation patterns certainly in the African. American community they are just as bad as they were in the nineteen sixties things like bike homeownership, which is at a low point especially because pandemic in or closures any fictions Is Worse than it was in the late nineteen sixties. So some of these things we were still wrestling with they seem twins dental, but they're not incidental at all. But again, it's this proximity you know that gives me hope and hope that even outside of crisis, we can expand and strengthen these relationships crises great reasons to get together but it's the more sustainable relationships happened over time outside of the crisis built on shared values and shared interests. So once again, this Jewish unity week has the potential to to be a real game changer. Well, so talk A. Little bit more about that. What do you hope is going to come out of this week if you believe that the basis of a better relationships and greater understanding comes from exposure than my hope is that we can use this week to focus on our rich history on our shared cultural values and to help understand things that we may not understand about each other but to be able to come together in a safe place and talk about those things, this has been tried in lots of different ways you know with lots of different impetus over the years. But in this country, as you know until you can make a sort of a holiday of it until hallmark starts to sell. It really difficult to have something that is stained and that you can go back to know every year. and. So that's the thing that excites me the most I know how excited I was to leave the south. And to meet people of different faiths including the Jewish faith and and get to know them get to count them among in my close friends. I would like that for everyone and so that when issues come up in our communities as we saw in Brooklyn I think earlier this year there was a really terrible assault in Brooklyn by a woman African American woman and if we had a built in long standing. Unbreakable trust between our communities. We can weather the storms we can come together and mutual condemnation, mutual understanding and mutual healing. It's not enough just to condemn something, but it's more important. I think to learn from it and make sure that it doesn't happen doesn't happen again and then five years hence, we can be sending each other black Jewish unity. We cards produced by hallmark absolutely creating whole new language in a around. It, it could be it could be urban slang and Yiddish expressions that. Unless you're in the know you don't you don't know. I'm hopeful hallmark if you're listening. Might be onto something big year. We'll see we'll see what's things we can pull their. I want to close by asking you for a few tips for our listeners actually the few months ago we had an amazing friend of AJC on the podcast named Eric. Ward. The Executive Director of the Western states center. We were talking about racism and I asked him what he thought as a professional opponent of racism and as a black man, what he thought American Jews should be doing to fight racism. His answer was pretty surprising to me actually because he said the best way for us to fight racism was to fight antisemitism since in his work he's bound that white supremacist racism is always based on a foundation of Antisemitism. So I I'm just interested in your reaction to that I, I think I'm citing him basically correctly I'm interested in your assessment of. That and second I want to give you a chance to answer the question from square one. Also, you know what would you like to see Clinton? What would you like to see American Jews doing proactively now to be effective allies in the fight against racism and I WANNA go back to Eric's point. Let me see if I can make this one I. I've only recently come to understand the difference between anti-racism. An anti-discrimination has a lawyer I've grown up understanding that if you want to fix racism, you have to attack it as a matter of non-discrimination don't discriminate against people in hiring don't discriminate against kids in school, and sometimes that anti-discrimination is in the form of color blindness. So whatever the remedy is, it can't be race specific right because the constitution doesn't allow such a thing but let's let's just come up with big broad sweeping solutions that african-americans might incidentally benefit from. You know by virtue of maybe being lower middle income people, we're going to come up with solutions that will work for everybody including African Americans. I've now come to understand that that's just not cutting. It goes great disparities that you talk about the at the beginning their persistent for a reason it's like trying to perform surgery with your eyes close, but you may be able to route around and feel where the patient is but your ability to be precise with a scalpel. And and fix the problem identified at problems impossible. If you don't open your eyes that has been the character of how we approach race in this country for decades. I've now come to understand and have really been encouraging others to join me in. This is becoming an anti-racist. It saying I may not have owned slaves I may have never committed an act of racism or discrimination. Even if that's true. You have to personally get involved to fix these problems. It's not enough to say, well, you know we have laws to address those issues. Laws had been very inexact and very unhelpful. In many ways you've got to get in there, roll up your sleeves and say, okay, is lack of capital in the black community a problem I need to figure out how to get more capital into black communities are educational disparities problem. Okay. I need to figure out how do we improve schools whether it's funding whether it's through pedagogy whatever we need to do, but we need to come up with solutions that actually help. Like people. And not just. Continue to perpetuate these gaps in Hustle meeting well in educational opportunities and health and civic engagement. That's my biggest message to the community, the An anti races. Just. As you know, we should all be fighting against anti-semitism. It's not enough to turn your back and say, well, you know they're not talking about, knee they are talking about you. And it's when we get to the point where those protests and in the halls of Congress where we're trying to make change we see people who look like you see people who would like me and seek people or Asian and and people who are all different walks of life saying we are here because we care and black lives matter and we've got to change the way this country works. I want to dive in and ask a million more questions and and talk so much more about where you just this conversation we are unfortunately out of time. So I hope that this will be an effective way to wet our listeners appetites for the week ahead, I should just add that in addition to his impressive titles at the National Urban. League clint wears another half. It's one of my favorite. Hats it's the hat organizational podcast host and Clinton is one of the hosts of for the movement the National Urban League podcast which people should check out and especially check out for this next episode where my colleague Dan Elbaum will be a guest on the show. We will link to the podcast in our show notes, Clinton let me just say once more. Thank you so much for joining us this week. She said thank you for letting me be here.

National Urban League AJC George Floyd Bureau Clint Brooklyn Clinton Executive Director Clint Oda Instagram Washington United States Senate Harlem National Urban Senator Kamala Harris J. C. John Lewis African American Community Pittsburgh
Interview with Kim Jent, director of the Mississippi Housing Institute

Fix It 101

05:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Kim Jent, director of the Mississippi Housing Institute

"You to Liz and Lisa and thank you to Kim Jin the executive director for the Mississippi Housing Institute for joining us this morning the Mississippi housing. Institute, is an Appre, an approved provider of education for the Mississippi State, Board of contractors and offers both online and classroom courses to keep contractors. Certified. Good. Morning. Good Morning. Harry. You I'm doing fine I. Really appreciate you taking the time to join our show this morning for those who may not be familiar with them Mississippi Housing Institute image. Just. Give us a brief overview of what the organization is in what you guys do. Okay well, basically where the Education for Home Builder's Association but So I provide education for all the builders remodelers. Now, with that being said, we also provide that for any builder or remodeler across state whether they're a member of homebuilders were not We have online like you talked about and We also have classroom. Now with Kobe, you know we've had limited classroom type of courses, but we definitely have. The online that people can go to the two that are having to renew their license if they got their license, after July, two thousand fifteen, they have to have two hours of c credit, and then the other thing we do, we have a designation program where builders and remodelers can become a certified professional builder remodeler and that's just they are licensed. They do four hours of ce every year they have their insurance. Anyway they are. The type of contractor you WANNA hire. It's a, it's a job. It's just add to that We are both CB and remodeler classifications, we might company has both and. It's just a upgraded classification. You know when we talk about, where do you go to hire a qualified contractor? That's that's another way to find out is this company reputable cannot trust them? Are they going to be here tomorrow if that's the type quality that you get when you hire a CPA. Go to you. On was we have we have each of our each of our certified professional builders. remodelers have their own page on the website and you can search by Zip Code. Now, with that being said, like you're in a rural area, you may have to go listen popular bill. You may have to go to Hattiesburg the coast you know put one of those codes or may not be one specific in that area but somebody by which you can go in search or by ZIP code or by specific names and kind of look at their profiles and see. Pick your your builder remodel from there. Oakland the website, the P. B. M. S. dot com C., p. b., M. S. dot com. S. correct because we because we always are you know the diy spirit of want you to get out there and do it yourself if if he can. But like Jeff Pan both know if we don't feel that you should handle it on your own, we want you to get certify people and this is another resource. C. P. B. M. S. dot com along with I. Guess One of your partners, the M. S. B. O. C. Dot U. S. The Mississippi State Board of contractors you are the education arm. For the Mississippi State border countries create. Net Net an forehand builder's Association. Okay. Factors we do work with because they. They are the ones that license and require you know education's for these builders and remodelers knocking this too I Kim this to teacher certifications as you can become a certified teacher. But then as a thing because call board-certified where you'll be kind of you have the distinction with your certification and you have to continue your credits and this is the same thing as you say with contractors with the credits in stand up today with the different policies and guidelines correct. That is correct and I'll just mention to like what you're talking about the storm you. Not Hiring just any. Anybody off the street you know if they're storm damage and you're looking for somebody, these are the type of people you want to hire. You know because don't take money upfront from these builders and you know because they. I'm talking about the ones off the stream not talking about the certify the certified professional builders do know are are legit and they're gonNA take care of you and they're going to be you're probably going on wait lists with these guys so. Anyway just if you're looking for even for the storm there,

Mississippi Housing Institute Mississippi Kim Jin Executive Director Hattiesburg LIZ Kobe Harry M. S. B. O. C. Dot Jeff Pan Lisa Oakland C. P. B. M. P. B. M.
Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. Kosovo. With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. Dr Dole and welcome to the program. I David thanks so much for having me. Please call me Rachel. While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, of course, the podcast website. In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, thousand seven, the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. Unquote. Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. Regarding off label use of these drugs, eleven years later, Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. How. Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. The report found in two thousand, sixteen, seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, for example, Sarah. Quel. Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, seventy, nine, thousand, long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. Committee. Heard this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. Close quote. This is my third related interview. In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. And in February, eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate neatly into the specifics of the report. What did the report find regarding the extent to which? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. David. So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, has implications for patient safety and and health We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. So that's about two, hundred, Ninety, eight, thousand, six, hundred, fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated So specifically, we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. So that's kind of the. Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, fifteen, twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, seventeen to twenty eighteen, and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. So you know. I. Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, seventeen, twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, can you give an approximation of the cost? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, mean, this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. I don't remember offhand. Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, thousand, twelve constituting roughly three, hundred, sixty, three, million part D plan payments that year and of course, there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. So it's it's fairly substantial.

Dr Rachel Dolan FDA David Intra United States Antipsychotic Trump Administration Nursing Home Facility Dr Dole Us House Of Representatives Dr David Graham Human Rights Watch Kosovo House Energy And Commerce Comm Means Committee Diana Zuckerman America Obama Administration Psychosis Rispler
Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

The Psych Central Show

04:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

"Gabe Howard calling into the show today we have Gabriel Nathan. Gabriel is the executive director of eighty-seven recovery. Diaries and they produced a film series called beneath the vest first responder mental health and features police officers, EMS personnel, dispatchers, fire service all individuals talking about trauma and complex PTSD Gabriel. Welcome to the show I. Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. Gabriel. Today we're going to be talking about law enforcement reform and I know that you have a lot of thoughts on the subject first of all before I really get into the. Weeds of the question would I have found is whenever you are taking a position that is critical in any way of law enforcement or attempts to raise questions even about the way law enforcement agencies do anything. It is extremely important to establish your own bona fide because anybody who steps up to challenge law enforcement is immediately regarded with suspicion. Paranoia is dismissed as a quote Lib tarred Troll anti-cop Antifa, whatever I'm none of those things I am someone who for the last twenty years has been an advocate for slain police officers and their families through editorials commentaries in newspapers I've attended over ten police funerals in Philadelphia, down to Maryland. I have done a lot of advocacy work for law enforcement in regard to mental health of first responders. I'm very well aware of the suicide rate for police officers. I am someone who knows law enforcement culture. I am someone who has a respect for police officers and what they do, and so I just want people to know that I am doing this from a place of love and concern and from a position of someone who believes ardently that they're absolutely needs to be changed and radical reimagining of law enforcement across the board. Thank you Gabriel for say and all that, and I agree with many of your points and I wanna point out that you were a recent guest on another podcast I have the pleasure of hosting not crazy and you had so much to say, well it it's built over into a second podcast. I strongly encourage all of our listeners to head over to central dot com slash not crazy and check out that interview. Alright. Gabriel to get started. You believe that in many ways we're recruiting the wrong people and that a lot of our problems start early even before police officers get into the academy. Yes. Look at the people who go into law enforcement. Okay. A lot of people decide they WANNA be cops when their children, they're watching shows like cops they're watching shows like law and order they're watching the weapon movies even as far as Hill Street Blues I would say that this problem started with Hillstreet Blues, the opening credits of Hillstreet Blues. I, love the music and then the garage door opens and the Plymouth fury is in the garage with red lights bursting out of the graduates exciting, right so who is drawn to that Profession Action Junkies? It's people who want that adrenaline rush and then we put them in situations where they're in a constant state of hyper arousal they're always looking around they're doing the head swivel. Someone's GonNa hurt me as someone GonNa, shoot me. In a twenty five year career most police officers never fire their weapon. Never fire their weapon once. Many. Many police officers never pulled their weapon and yet that's the kind of human being that is drawn to that profession and I have had people tell me well, we pull in people who are really resilient well is that what you're doing or are you pulling in people who are craving action and are not necessarily maybe the most empathic people because a law enforcement agency can't function if a police officer responds to a call and then starts falling apart emotionally because they can't process what they saw. So maybe law enforcement is either consciously or subconsciously trying to pull people in who maybe don't have that kind of empathic response. That's not who I want riding around in a patrol car with a firearm and the power of arrest.

Gabriel Nathan Officer Gabe Howard Hillstreet Blues Executive Director Maryland Philadelphia
"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

Nonprofit Everything

03:13 min | 4 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

"Got something that's been on my mind. I'm guessing that many of our listeners are at home a large majority of the time these days which means they might not be getting the podcast drive time they used to so any ideas and where they can listen to us or when they can listen to us. If it's not in the car so love the idea of like just like turning it on in the house like on the Stereo right disconnect your connect your iphone like jacket in like right into the Stereo. Actually so dear you can actually find nonprofit everything on spotify. So if you've got if you're connected to spotify you can actually look in their podcast section nonprofit everything shows up there so you can actually play like throughout all of the speakers in your house because you really want our voices in every roy out of everybody else in your house would like has the least amount of interest in like random nonprofit geek conversations of big. That's the best thing you can finally do you do when your kids are driving you bunkers and your home schooling or when your spouse won't turn the TV off just put plugging plugging your little your pieces and just listen to us to block out the rest of the world right. It's like your personal escape from everything else going on in your environment do what? I KNEW. Just like point to your headphones in the mouth. I'm on a call. It's a it buys you at least in my house that buys you about minutes if you just boating funds and I'm I'M GONNA call. They'll they'll leave you alone a minute so I also hear people walking their dogs like a gazillion times a day. So you know think of how many podcast episodes you could catch up on just listening to us while you're walking your dog. I think that's a great idea. Yeah so in to. You can find nonprofit everything literally everywhere. Pandora spotify apple music. Google podcasts. Like your favorite podcast APP. It it's iheartradio. It's pretty much everywhere so any any device that you have they can play that kind of thing you can. You can yell at Your Alexa Speaker. You can say Alexa. Play the nonprofit everything podcast. It will do that. You can say okay google to your Google thing and say blaming the profit everything podcast and it'll play that so so really you have no excuse to not be listening to our irritating music over and over and over again and we just know you're GonNa love one of you know an episode so much that of course then. You're going to be compelled to write questions for future episodes. And you're going to be compelled to give us a really superstar rating and sheriff's with all your friends and colleagues so that's probably asking for a lot just one of those things. I'D BE PRETTY DARN HAPPY. Just listened questions. We love questions so one of the problems with with getting questions to is a lot of people do historically listened to the podcast in their car. And since that's not how what happens in. It's the same thing with pledging at for public radio. Right you listen to it and they tell you to pledge until you're gonNA pledge as soon as you get out of the car you completely forget what you were doing because you're out of the car so now that's not happening anymore. So you're you're not in a car you're not driving. It is totally okay to stop what you're doing titus a question we would love you for it..

google spotify Alexa Pandora titus roy
"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

Nonprofit Everything

04:20 min | 4 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

"To hear that. So the what happens on the federal level is that that will actually. You're you're nonprofit will actually convert to a private foundation. So if you can't continue to pass all the tests of being publicly supported charity you end up being a private foundation. Which is is different in. The rules are a lot harder and it costs a lot more money. And it's probably not what you intend when you say nonprofit so you can do it. But that's not that's not what the it's not the best practice and it certainly isn't what the. Irs is going to allow for regular for profit public charity. And then can you get paid because that was another question. I you pay yourself and can you serve on the board. I mean Ah yes there. There's so many caveats with this though right because for whatever you do you shouldn't be the board president or board chair of this because it's a total conflict of interest. I mean one of the birds. Primary roles is right hiring and firing and super and evaluating the executive director so anyways that's just one example of where it gets really messy and if you were like you know the on the board or even the board you said. I want to be the board chair on the founder and the executive director. I'm the I'm the everything because I want to keep that control that you mentioned like it's just it's not gonna fly it's not gonna fly with funders or donors anyone who sophisticated at least it's not gonna fly with irs spike when you go and file for ten year ten twenty three status so like it's just that's not otherwise you then set up your own company. I mean I hate to be crass about it but like one of the things when I hear people say I want control like I want money right I wanNA get donations and get paid for what I do but I also want control like my caution is that it's not first of all. Donations are much harder to get than anybody thinks. And and then secondly if you really want control you're not to have control set up your own business. Set up your own company because you're not GonNa have it if you truly design this the way it should be designed and it's a public charity serving the public good governed by the public meaning a representative diverse body of people on your board. That aren't family you. You don't have control and it's designed by design and even if you can get by with the Absolute Minimum Standard You WanNA maintain control. It's it's absolutely self-limiting. You're never gonna you're never going to grow to be big enough to pay yourself any amount of money Depit DONORS ARE GONNA run from you. Screaming the the board is going to collapse. You'RE GONNA have a miserable time. I mean it's really. It's really better off. The best to announce the best way to have an organization and have control of the organization is to just really be good at it. Bring on people that you trust Give them the authority to make their own decisions. Do everything the right way. Make sure that you're not looking at not not looking at the process is something that's going to enrich yourself but looking at something that's going to enrich the community that it's such a good non-profit idea that people can't not fund it and then and then just rock at it and then you can be the executive director and you won't care that someone else's the board chair because they're so happy with your performance that they're never gonNA say no to anything you want xactly exactly. Andy just said that beautifully imperfectly and and you know my apologies if I sound a bit jaded. I think it's from years of of just. I want to caution people rate from from going down this path without knowing all the facts because they think it's it's very easy to get enamored with the idea of setting up a nonprofit and doing all the things you want to do and it is so much so much tougher than what you know. There's so many laws and legalities and ethics and tax code and everything tied to it. That makes it complicated that it's not impossible. Obviously there's a lot of nonprofits out there but I think many of the ones that are smaller or start up. We'll tell you this is so much harder than I ever thought it would be anti. I've.

executive director Irs president representative Andy founder
"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

Nonprofit Everything

03:47 min | 4 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

"A nonprofit board for the last five years in. It's going great but I want to open my own nonprofit. Who as far as relative's can we be related to each other on the board? What board positions do I have to have? Can I be an executive director and pay myself and have a position on the board? What is required under Nevada nonprofit law? The reason I'm asking is that I've been doing what I want to be doing for the last twenty years privately but with everything going on I need financial donations and I WANNA do a great job. I WANNA get paid but I don't WANNA lose control. Oh boy that's about like five questions in one so I read it like it was five questions at once. My my head is spinning a bit here. Well so we can. Certainly I'm GonNa just say Sir we don't get into all the legalese but certainly we can footnote and bookmark the kind of the page on the state website. That will give you a lot of answers. It's very sue from like Nevada nonprofit law standpoint. It's super super basic and easy in our state. Have you ever looked Andy? Compared like you only have one board member and yet then it says Oh but you need to have like a president treasurer and secretary although they can someone can wear one more than one or have more than one role. So I'm like I guess theoretically you could have that one board member that is required by state law. Also be Your Board Chair Secretary Treasurer. The way it's written right which is just a little befuddling so. I guess my first caution to the person who asked this question is please just because state law may give you the bare minimum does not mean the irs when you go to fill out your actual form ten twenty three to become an official get federal tax exemption does not mean there this is going to be kosher with them so just realize that you've got to kind of be able to meet both categories like andy any thoughts on that. You're exactly right. So the Nevada law is less stringent than the the. Irs is rule. So so if you want to you can. Anybody can. Register is a nonprofit in Nevada. But that doesn't mean that you're able to take tax deductible donations so you won't be tax exempt either so you can be a nonprofit but not be tax exempt and that would be the case the one case that you could have one board member. But you're not gonNA let nobody's going to give you any money because it's not tax deductible and you're going to have to pay tax on any excess profits over your expenses so if you want to be a real nonprofit and you. WanNa go get your five. Oh One C. Three you're going to need a minimum of three board members. Yeah and so as far as family members the other thing to keep in mind right is that Irs requires that no more than like forty nine percent of your members are related by blood marriage. You know they they. They want to guard against transactions that you know that are sort of just can be kind of insider ish or misuse of assets or just things that can happen when you have too many people that are connected through business through family right that kind of stuff so you really you really if you're going for this the full-fledged that just talked about you're going to want to be careful with it know a lot of nonprofits start out and they have family on it but they then meet at large enough board that it's not a family right. They meet that forty nine percent test. You Family shouldn't be making majority of your board. I mean I can tell you all the reasons. I don't think it's a good idea to have a whole family on your board but whatever I I'm not sure you. I'm not sure you actually want.

Nevada irs Board Chair Secretary Treasure Andy executive director treasurer secretary president official
"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

Nonprofit Everything

09:53 min | 4 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Nonprofit Everything

"To hire executive directors. And I have two questions as it relates to this I. What do you think of the best questions to ask to get a real look at? What's going on in the organization and are there any questions or comments? The board might ask. I should consider to be a red flag. Oh yeah this is another. That's another this is another juicy one and we've got some juicy ones yet. Could've there's yeah I would love to. I can't wait to hear what you say about the Red Flag questions I think is to get started. I mean I think one of the first questions which is a fair question is sort of. Tell me about why you're hiring an executive director now like I write like that feels like. Is this the first time that they're hiring one? Is it a grant funded position that you have to raise your salary and figure it out within three months? We've all hundred pounds scenarios surprise. Yeah you don't get in you get in and then you find that out but but anyways I think just kind of getting a sense of how many executive directors have have they had over the few years like I mean if you hear like constant turnover than I think the answers to some of your questions are going to be the red flags that you're GONNA now okay. This organization can't key probably an issue here. I think also I would ask what is sort of your strategic direction like is there a strategic plan in place What what is it? I'm always fascinated. I actually served on a search committee Andy. Few years ago and I was fascinated because the organization not surprisingly I mean they had a strategic plan but when they went through this process to hire almost every candidate asked that question and none of the board members could answer it. They were like well kind of and they talked around it and I thought that just doesn't bode. Well that really tells you a really disconnected board that Does it have a clue and didn't even do their homework so to me. I mean I guess I could give a little leeway to that but I don't think that's a great sign either. Yeah you kind of want. Hopefully they know where you're going because if you're if they're going down path a and you're not at all that's not your skill set or your passion. It'd be better to know that during the interview process. Get in there and figure out. Oh crap. They're going in a direction. I don't even agree with right. And if the and that tells you gives you information about how connected or disconnected. The board is from the organization as a whole. Yes if the if the board doesn't know what's going on if they can't answer basic about the organization it tells you that they don't pay attention in board meetings or don't show up or aren't that interested in the board and that's that could be a red flag unless you know that's yeah unless you're one of the things that you're really good at as building boards in. You're like yeah. I want to get rid of this deadweight anyway. I think it would be interesting. So those are sort of typical ones. I think it'd be interesting to ask from. Your vantage point is a board and sort of what you know about the organization and maybe the prior executive director. If there was one like what do you think is the biggest or most pressing challenge? I would face if I got hired like I think it would be fascinating because you're sort of trying to you're asking them to open up a bit and it would be fascinating to see what you'd hear and if they tell you everything is peaches and roses okay. But I don't think anybody should answer that without saying without giving it some thought and saying you now actually think our challenges we really need to diversify our funding or whatever it is I like. There's gotta be something right or am I being too hard and this question stumps me in in a big way. Because I've I've never really thought about it that way. Only because if if the organization is broken like as an executive director. It's it's almost like are you. Are you equipped to fix what is broken? And and if the mission is a good one and the organization if there's if there's stuff that can be salvaged he's like you're looking at a broken piece of equipment and you're like I could fix that right or you're looking at something you're like It looks like I don't. I don't think I'm capable of doing what needs to be done to get this fixed. So so it kind of you. It's so situational based on what? Your strengths are and then fled. The organization really needs going forward. I mean honestly. Are there organizations that I think are irredeemable like? Yes but that's because you know. The Internet left their their business. Model behind twenty five years ago thirty years ago in no one's noticed yet or or they're a brand name with no mission or you know whatever the reason five five through twenty is that there's something fundamentally wrong with the mission like like. Maybe it's a problem that doesn't need to be solved. But if that's the case then then why are you even? Why are you interested in in going after that executive position in the first place so I think I mean it's so situational and I can't think of any I mean if the board members are horrible people and ten to throw the executive director under the bus at a moment's notice your that's probably a situation you don't WanNa get in? How would you find that out? And maybe you talk to the remaining staff like see who still there and say. Hey you mind if I talk to you on interested in this position like you might if we have just an informal conversation about the organization and I think you know staff members for the most part I don't know. Do you think staff numbers would respond well to that? If somebody asked me that when I was when I was an executive if somebody asked me go to lunch because they want to hear about the position I think all my red flags would have immediately gone up like why are you doing an andhra around our process. Yes kind of wear my gutters. I think with all because yeah unless it's a friend because otherwise I'm uncomfortable going. Okay anything I tell you how can I trust? You'RE NOT GONNA go back or if you get hired. Use it against me like that. You can't trust me because just say right that would be presented and say that. But I'm thinking to your point though like Andy you and I you and I are both probably known those people that had astle experience with a nonprofit and they were an executive director or something and they left on bad terms or whatever the situation was and that may be just such a pain point that gun. Shy like okay You know I can't deal with another board. That is like this or this. I feel like this is a great opportunity with these kinds of questions because I do think even though everyone's GonNa put on their best face right. It's like your first date. No one really gets to see your true colors yet but I still think if you ask the right questions you can start to determine a lot like the strategic plan question if they can't answer it then whether it's a deal breaker for you and not is up to you. But like if they can't answer it or they don't really know what their strategic direction is or if they have a plan that tells you a lot about how much they've been engaged in the past like how much work you're GonNa have to do if you actually want an engaged board so so I feel like if you can ask those right like Lever Questions. It can really open it up. And I don't know that's my opinion and yet I also think you. Sometimes you get people who give you right who are great sales people in the interview and tell you all the stuff and you. How many times have you talked to somebody who just got hired as an e says? Why the stuff the skeletons that? I'm uncovering. I mean there's all the basics that you probably already know you know ask for Aspirin Audit and make sure you get the management letter that comes with the audit so that you can see all the stuff that they didn't publish mask return. Copies strategic plan asked for all the DASHBOARDS for financial statements. Ask for just like minutes of the last handful of board meetings like if an organization doesn't want to give that to you that's a huge red flag and then you're GonNa get tons of information if the if the minutes are sloppy and you know like the last three have been cancelled because people aren't showing up. I mean just I mean ask if I think the more information you get of stuff that they should be hanging onto and it's there if it's not there that gives you good idea how organizations run but again it's so situational. Maybe the last executive director was just a sloppy mess. Right who couldn't strategic plan is such a such a terrible thing. Yeah we have one but it's all in Comic Sans and I don't think it makes any sense an you know it it totally could be and you're right at a situation also. It's so tough to tell. I think you can also ask. Like what is the board is their role. And what do they see as the role compared to your role as the executive director because I think the one thing that would scare a lot is if they hear a board. That is way too controlling micromanaging. Most people that's probably more turn off to most incoming E D's and I think the opposite people can figure out what to do about engagement but a board that is like in your business every day. How do you get anything done? And that may be as pain point right. So and then what did they see as the role I would love to know I would ask? What is the role in fundraising? It would be fascinating to hear it because I'd love to see if some boards say what do you mean like? That's not you know we don't need to do that at that's your role Ed right. So W good probing questions find out those kinds of things that things that need you think. Probably need to change and to see where they're out on them. Yeah anyway best of luck to you. Good luck our organization.

executive director executive Andy Aspirin Ed andhra
"executive director" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The executive director of the Mississippi emergency management agency Michelle says crews are still working to assess the widespread damage the damage to bury all we had a number of mobile homes that were destroyed we've got a number of vehicles that were damaged we do know that we're going to have multiple entry spread out across these counties we certainly hope that we won't have anymore for a child please but we don't know that right now governor Tate Reeves has issued a state of emergency for the storms for NPR news I'm Alexander what's in Mississippi there are reports of fatalities this morning in Georgia where a suspected tornado hit the college park area south of downtown Atlanta the corona virus is now blamed for more than twenty two thousand deaths in the U. S. the most of any country New York City accounts for nearly a third of the nation's fatalities and almost sixty nine hundred New York governor Andrew Cuomo says statewide more than seven hundred people died from the virus yesterday the state has seen more than seven hundred for tallies from the virus each day over the last six days the mayor of Washington DC says she wants a thorough examination of why the virus is affecting minorities that larger rates than white Americans across the U. S. and P. R.'s Nell Greenfieldboyce reports preliminary data from New York City shows that the death rate for black and Hispanic people is about twice the rate for white people the mayor of Washington in DC Muriel Bowser told CNN on Sunday that this country has a long standing health disparities we have been dealing with these disparities for generations fueled by several Gration racism sub standard conditions stresses of poverty browser said pre existing conditions like asthma and diabetes seem to play a role in making some communities suffer more severe illness she says there needs to be a national focus on collecting more data on corona virus deaths Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR news the Japanese government says it does not plan to expand a state of emergency that's been in effect in Tokyo in six regions for the past week because of the virus in Russia health officials are reporting more than twenty five hundred new cases of the virus today that's the highest daily total in that country officials in Moscow say nearly one hundred fifty people have died there from the virus this is NPR news from Washington officials in Wisconsin are investigating how hackers interrupted yesterday's online meeting of Milwaukee's Election Commission Keren Powell with member station W. U. W. N. says the hackers posted violent and obscene images Milwaukee Election Commission executive director Neil Albrecht was in the middle of explaining how many absentee ballots had been received and postmarked prior to and after election day last Tuesday when the public meeting was hacked by an unknown source among the images shown were what appeared to be ISIS fighters and racial slurs written across the screen showing **** after Albrecht finished reading his notes assistant city attorney Pat McLean also on the call mentioned the interference could appear that we has been hacked yeah I think at that point Albright suggested ending the call the board rescheduled the meeting for Monday morning using a different computer meeting software for NPR news I'm tearing Powell in Milwaukee in Afghanistan the Taliban say they plan to release twenty captives each of whom works for the Afghan government and P. R.'s DHEA have deeds says the move is meant to jump start peace talks between the militant group and the government Taliban spokesman so how should he said on Twitter that the group would release them into the custody of the red cross it comes after the Afghan government really three hundred Taliban prisoners the prisoner swaps have been to be a gesture of goodwill before talks begin between the government and the Taliban to end of kana sounds for decades of war that's NPR's diaa Hadid in Islamabad I'm Dave Mattingly NPR.

executive director Michelle Mississippi
"executive director" Discussed on FitLabPGH

FitLabPGH

11:54 min | 7 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on FitLabPGH

"Programming. We have a program called venture outdoors again which focuses on our senior community and helping them get outside. We have adaptive programs to help anyone In Our community including those with physical limitations enjoy the outdoors and that includes our water sports. You make a really great point. Kayak Pittsburgh is probably what a lot of people recognize the most. I liked to brag and tell people that you can't look at a photograph of Pittsburgh and not see one of our yellow kayaks out there and that's Kayak Pittsburgh right. So we currently have three locations for Kayak Pittsburgh In downtown Pittsburgh in Aspen. Wollen at North Park. Just north of the city where you can go and rent kayaks or canoes And enjoy the water in a in a safe way and I know I have a special part in my heart for Kayak Pittsburgh. My Dad had just finished Bladder cancer treatment. The first year they had it and he came to visit me and I took them and he was a kayaker and he was really excited to see that he was still able to Kayak and canoe. So it's something that whether you realize it or not you're also affecting people who are not Pittsburgh natives living in Pittsburgh. Yeah that's it's a great way to experience the city to to get out on I mean for for for non Pittsburgh natives and natives alike it is a really amazing way to experience our communities to get on that water and see it from a totally different vantage point. I know with social media these days. One of the things that so great is it so easy to find information one of the things that so terrible is there so much information so somebody may be listening to this. This'll probably era just before the new year comes around where hopefully we'll have a relatively mild winter where you can still get outside. But there's enough snow and there's a lot of things that you can do with venture outdoors. I was looking at your web page this morning. So somebody's kind of saying you know I wanna do something outside I recognize. They're all these opportunities any suggestions as a new executive director. Where do they start? How do they figure out what to do? A great way to start is our website. Go to venture outdoors dot org right on. The homepage is our calendar of events. And you can sort through that calendar based on the type of activity that you're looking for or you could just peruse all of them And just picks and choose something. That's interesting for you. You know I I. I love going to our website and filtering through the family friendly events for my own children right so we have hikes combined with. Moore's and we have you know family friendly trail runs to introduce families together to the idea of trail running right alongside of their little ones so I would start with our website and people are looking at the website and they can see these things. I know one of the questions that people often have when they start new activities is. I don't WanNa be the last person I don't WanNa hold people back or I don't know how to run on a trail only run on the road. What do you say to people like that? Don't worry we've got you covered. We've got all the equipment we bring to the events and we have a really amazing team of volunteer trip leaders that lead these trips for us in these are really knowledgeable. Individuals are well trained They know their craft They're really engaging individuals and they are really the force that makes such a welcoming community we have events for everyone from the novice beginner all the way up to very skilled experts. So don't worry if you don't know exactly what you're doing will ensure that our team can can get you the information you need and I think something you mentioned is really important to emphasize because some of these activities can be pricey to start out. Try and realize the. I really don't like that. I mean if you decide I wanNA cross country skiing. You go by the. Cross country ski package where I was just an Rei before coming up here to interview you and was reminded that. I'm glad I have snowshoes now. But I think the thing that you emphasized. Is You have the equipment so you can as a participant dabble in a variety of events that you would spend literally thousands of dollars for if you said. Oh I want to try all these things. I'm GONNA biophysical exactly. We have the equipment right. So you know you don't need to make a large investment if it's something that you just WanNa dip you're towing or if you know you're only going to get the opportunity to do it at once or twice a year especially if you're talking about things like cross country skiing right not everybody my rougher Brian. Joe League goes up to Canada three or four times a year specifically because that's kind of his event. He loves to Cross Country Ski Question. I think people also want to know. Is you're a Pittsburgh native. You look on the website you say. Oh there's all these neat events we've got the holiday season coming up. Do you have to be a Pennsylvania native or what's the requirement to come and participate in adventure outdoors activity? Is Somebody going to show up and say oh no? You're from West. Virginia your from Ohio. You CAN'T PARTICIPATE. Nope we'll take everyone and that's that's the everyone. Part of what venture outdoors is. That's why we have the equipment that's why we have. You know the well trained staff and well trained volunteers because we want this to be accessible for everyone. We're checking driver's licenses to see you know what region you're from. Yeah were were open community. I KNOW WITH FIT LOT. Pittsburgh and my sister podcast moving to live. I've interviewed quite a few people in one of the things that I often see for. People who are lifelong. Movers is the his somewhere around the age of thirty five and they start to realize in. No it's not just about me. Being the first person across the finish line or having this need experience is being able to do the activity and share it with other people so there are probably people listening her going. You know I really liked venture outdoors thing I know how to Kayaker. I know how to cross country ski. But how can I get involved to be a volunteer and help other? People enjoy what I've enjoyed in. Maybe on the backside have a way to get rid of extra equipment that I just. It's just taking up space and you want a Nice Kayak. Here's a here's a kayak that I'm not using so you can give us a call. Give me a call. We're always looking for volunteers. We're always looking for interested individuals that would like to come and participate with us and you bring up a really interesting point About our outdoor activities. I was just out last week with venture outdoors on an urban hike out in the area so hiking through the village of swiftly but also up in the hills and swiftly heights Through the woods and the pitch black and it's gorgeous but the people who are there aren't just there to get a good you know three and a half hour hike in there also there because that's their social component right there to meet people who are like minded. They're there to meet different people that they wouldn't run into ordinarily So you know yeah. We're Talking Valley Valerie beaker. She is the Executive Director Venture outdoors. We discussed a little bit about the wide variety of activities as a runner. What is the activity that you've participated so far with with venture outdoors that you found the most interesting or hardest? And then as a follow up to that. What's the one activity that you're kind of looking forward to but kind of like this is going to be a pretty big adventure for me? All right won't don't judge me so to help you out before this. I ask a similar question for both podcasts. One person that I've interviewed in the past for my other podcasts. At I took a yoga class once it was enough. So it's different for everybody just because somebody likes to go swim in the river does mean that's what you have to like to do right so. I think there's a big question I I consider myself a runner and a quote unquote strict runner But a year ago Oh man. Three years ago now I was able to go out for the very first time kayaking with venture outdoors on a trip And it was an amazing experience. It was a little nerve wracking for me because I'm not a water sport person and I actually personally don't swim that well But it was it was really freeing to learn that new skill and master relatively quickly enough so that I could really enjoy the physical environment and my friends that were around me. So I think that that was Really surprising I think the most relaxing activity I've been able to do with venture outdoors so far Is this Earlier this spring I went fishing in downtown right So over lunchtime I think a couple times a month We hold a fishing component. We can just come down and cast a line and hang out and just stare at that gorgeous city skyline but I think the question fishermen official women are GonNA WANNA know is. What did you catch nothing? Nothing and win Valerie says that she's putting your arms out about three depart saying it. Was this big question. Zero event that venture outdoors has coming up that you're looking forward to or maybe a little bit nervous about saying this is something I want to try. I think it'll be something I'll talk about in the future. Yeah so this is the. Don't judge me par that I am not a camper am a glamour to be honest with you. I'm so when we didn't wear his mission. We really hopped bed-and-breakfasts in hotels. The hallway up I was not going to camp So I think you know one of the things that I'm most excited about In programming with video is being able to go out with a community of individuals and learn how to camp. And it's something that I'm hoping to be able to share with my children once I figure it out. I my kids. My kids have always asked to go camping. And I'm like no no no but I don't know how to Camp So that's you know the team here. Volunteers are really just providing a wealth of information and experiences. Even to me Let alone the community at large. And I'll let you one tip on that to kind of put in the back of your mind. If any of the leaders offered take you snipe hunting. We'll on the camping trip. Just say no. We've been talking to Valerie Beekman. She is the new executive director of venture outdoors. One final time for people. Who Don't know Valerie? What is venture outdoors again. Then she outdoors is the organization in South Western Pennsylvania. That can help everyone get outside and have fun. Movement is a lifestyle Valerie. Thank you for taking time to talk to fit loud Pittsburgh about your movement adventure and also the things you were doing to help. Other people move is the executive director of outdoors. Thank you very much. Thanks for listening to the latest episode of Fit Lad. Pg H brought to you by moving to live intro. Exit Music is marathon man by Jason. Shaw check out the show notes contact info for our latest guests links to other information mentioned in the episode and links towards sister. Podcast moving to live moving to live as a podcast about moving exercise for professionals and amateur aficionados moving to live offers topics from Career Development to coaching tips education resources to advice for parents of student. Athletes you can subscribe to us and Apple podcasts. Stitcher or Google play for check out our website for other subscription options. Your free subscription. Gets you notified when release a new episode questions? Comments suggestions email us. Fit L. A. B. P. G. H. gmail.com or follow us on twitter and instagram at fit L. A. BPH and like us on facebook. If you enjoy our podcasts please tell your friends about us and consider leaving US review apple. Podcasts MAKE FIT lad. Pg H. A. goto place to learn more about movement in the Pittsburgh area until next time. Keep on moving..

Pittsburgh Executive Director Venture out executive director Bladder cancer Valerie Cross Country Ski Question North Park Apple Valerie beaker Google US Valerie Beekman Moore Virginia water sport facebook twitter Pennsylvania
"executive director" Discussed on FitLabPGH

FitLabPGH

08:26 min | 7 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on FitLabPGH

"I don't know maybe I just don't like the feeling of waking up without sore muscles I guess I just WanNa keep pushing myself right so you know. I don't want to get to a moment in my life where I say that I didn't try I didn't try to get out there and do as much as I possibly could because there will come a day when I'm told that this kind of movement this kind of activity is impossible for me anymore when we started more as mission at first I was really scared of it right this journey from DC to Pittsburgh So I made my husband and I go to the PCP and get checked out. I was for sure they were gonNA tell me who's to unhealthy like do something like this. And it wasn't him. It was me and they discovered that I had this skipped heartbeat or heart murmur or something and they didn't know what it was but they said you can't run any further than you've already run right now because we don't know what this isn't we don't know what's GonNa Happen to you. We don't know how safe it is for you. Run and it was a couple of months before they figured out there. Pvc's and that everything okay. And here's the plan of attack moving forward to keep me healthy and safe while running but in those couple of months. It was a really hard realization to think. I've already screwed up so badly with my eating habits and smoking and etc that in my early thirties. I'm being told that I can't do this. So when I got the all clear you know the mindset flipped to. I'm just GonNa do this for as long and as hard as I can until they tell me. I can't do you ever or do you. And your husband ever think about the fact that you're setting the next generation your four kids up to hopefully knock on wood not do what you did and say okay. I'm going to start out with my earlier. Smoking and meeting all kinds of junk food just saying exercise. What's that that's the hope rate so back in the day when I had little ones With my first couple and I was still a smoker. You know I'm not. I'm not proud of it. But you know my children would mimic my smoking habits and now my children mimic my running habit and they want to eat runner food and they want to dress like a runner and they want to get on the floor and do the runners stretches with mommy. you know so. I'm I'm really hoping that we're setting a new stage for them for their own health and and we talk about it all the time with them. We talk about how it's so important to care for yourself because when you get older you know everything you do right now today as as an eight year old a six year old as a thirteen year old that is setting the stage for your health and wellness. When you're sixty seventy and eighty and if you WANNA be moving and living on your own and doing fun things in those years we've gotta start now so I'm hoping that that's going to stick with them. But we'll see and the nice thing that you probably realize now is even with running shoes for your kids and for you and for your husband. It's probably still less money over the course of the year than cigarettes absolutely absolutely plus they come in different colors exactly. Yes so you also said that you moved back to Pittsburgh to start your career in environmental nonprofits. What was the impetus to say environmental nonprofits? And actually before you answer that kind of a precursor question what. The Heck is an environmental nonprofit so an environmental nonprofit there are as you know the Pittsburgh region is home to nonprofits and Pittsburgh itself. Is this glorious gritty? Wonderful Hometown city that has had to reinvent itself. Multiple Times over the last couple of centuries right in order to sustain itself and sustained communities that are here at a big part of the evolution in recent decades is that environmental revolution. So there are all kinds of amazing nonprofit organizations that focus You know either narrowly are holistically on the environmental piece. That is our community right so when I moved here in two thousand and eight it really was dumb luck that I fell into the energy sector and that rolled into an energy reduction program working with municipalities which rolled into getting a job of green building alliance and working with building product manufacturers to help them understand the greenness or lack thereof of their products that they were selling to the community or at large for buildings So that's sort of how I landed accidentally in environmental nonprofits in it's just grown from there The journey from D. C. to Pittsburgh was sort of a big step and evolving my personal journey and my career so while. I'm still in an environmental nonprofit here at venture outdoors More of our environmentalism and more of our desire to get people in the physical environment is related to movement. I know in the health field. One of the jokes is the physician who comes in with a pack of cigarettes sticking out of his or her pocket and they're twenty five or thirty pounds overweight and they look at you and they say well you know you really need to watch what you eat or you really need to cut down on your smoking. You really need to exercise. So it's kind of do what I say. Not what I do and I know from interviewing you a few months back in your previous position you kind of practice what you preach and hoping that you bring this venture outdoors and we talked before recording probably a third of the people in Pittsburgh. No adventure outdoors is a third of the people. Don't and maybe a third of the people are kind of aware but don't know exactly what they are. So you're in the elevator. Somebody says what's venture outdoors. What do you tell them? Venture outdoors is the local organization in South West. Pa that has the tools and resources and equipment to help everyone in our community. Get outside and have fun. And I guess some people look at you then and say. Why do they want to get outside and misses? I think a great opportunity to tell people about why you want to get outside. We were talking a little bit before we started recording. It was fifteen degrees this morning. I was in Mingo Creek Park. I saw one other person whereas if it had been seventy five degrees I probably would have seen thirty five or forty. We are so fortunate in southwestern Pennsylvania to have such a beautiful physical environment to enjoy with our rivers and hills and the landscape is gorgeous and we have four beautiful seasons currently another story for another day so getting outside is really about enjoying the beauty. That's around us but getting outside is also a huge part of our health and wellness and our mental wellness right. It's it's free to get outside. It's free to go outside and hike You know a lot of people don't know where to go. Where do I walk? Where do I hike? Where is it appropriate for me to you? Know maybe cross country ski or go snowshoeing fishing. I really am interested in fishing but I don't know how I don't know where we sort of answer that the how. And the where we bring the expertise to you and fill in those blanks so that you can go outside and that you can enjoy the environment without needing to make a massive investment yourself and I know I've been fortunate to. I can't remember what I was an outside and I think when I first moved to Pittsburgh the first time I heard about venture outdoors was the band film festival and that may be some people's only knowledge venture outdoors or they may know about Kayak Pittsburgh which goes both North Park and down in the rivers here in the city but it does more than that. And how did venture outdoors start? I mean you're not you're you weren't the first executive director but I'm sure somebody didn't wake up one day and say hey let's start. This thing called venture outdoors to get more people outside so I do know the founding executive director and I actually worked under him at Green Building. Alliance we stay very connected even to this day and you know twenty years ago. It was a cohort of volunteers and people who were really interested in the outdoors and interested in outdoor activity and saw an opportunity and a market here to help that to the community so back in the day they started with a very small cohort volunteers who would put together outings for individuals and we have just grown since then to providing hundreds and hundreds of outdoor activities for every age range. We have youth.

Pittsburgh executive director Green Building Mingo Creek Park South West Pa Pennsylvania North Park
"executive director" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

07:19 min | 8 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on WRVA

"The executive director of the Sophie house and we have some very exciting news about a re branding I love that first fall to tell people what the selfie houses who may not have known because it's been around a while I've never you know speaking with people often on to the past few years amazing place it is and it's very exciting because this is our ten year anniversary I can't believe he asked so it is our ten year anniversary which is very exciting and on the Sophie house has worked for the last ten years to assist single moms in their children by providing actually quite a few areas of resources to them enjoy and they work with women who single moms that are in a crisis situation so they have assisted them by offering resources to help with securing housing possible rent deposits car repairs they had a food pantry and clothing closet so there were a lot of the different components to the resources that they were offering to these moms and their children and hence the D. decision to really streamline the mission and focused on a way that we would still be able to help the same community of women that we've been helping in the past but do it in a much more impactful way well see now were re branding we are so tell me why I'm excited so we are so excited to finally be able to talk about this and share with people at the direction of of you know we're the so if the house is going we are re branding and the new name is the forward foundation this is about moving forward I dealt with it Klay yes and we have completely streamline the mission so that we are now focusing on and on assisting single working moms by providing them with financial assistance for childcare so that they are able to work so that'll be your mission that's which can be do and you'll be able to with that then helped a lot more people it is and and that's definitely the goal and you know this is this is that the cost of childcare is the has garnered a lot of attention lately there are a lot of articles there is a lot of discussion about how expense of reliable child care is and if you are looking for full time care for a toddler or an intent you can expect to be paying anywhere between twelve hundred and sixteen hundred dollars a month well for one child wow and I mean and most working moms I mean that's that's the whole dissipate it is I mean and for many it said mortgage payment so it comes down to this decision if I work and I have to pay for childcare I'm basically working just to pay for childcare so then what happens is they are looking to the government to provide assistance and we really want to be able to empower these these moms and show them that they are capable of being able to provide for their families and we can take some of that financial burden off of them well now how do you guys go about getting the funds to help them with childcare so that you know we we because the staff the house has been around for ten years obviously we do have a base said those that are that have been involved with the organization up until this point our have heard things things are being posted we're talking about it we've you know we're doing a lot of media to be able to share this information our web page will not go live until the night of the event we'll talk about that that right now it's word of mouth its articles that are being published it's wonderful stations like yourself that are allowing us the opportunity to talk about it and being able to share what it is we're doing it and getting the word out that way wow I love this I just I love it now what is your you say your website won't go live until the night before the event so then at that point people be able to go online and find out everything and how to get a hold of you how to maybe get help that is correct in and when is the of that said the event is coming up it is February twenty ninth we are so excited about this we I had an amazing night planned it will be held at the actors trying center which is off Bellevue I love the uses of all I saw they had this huge beautiful ballroom and we will be in the ball room we have the amazingly talented Mike a bam bam white who will be our master service ceremonies yes he will also be doing a live comedy routine that night all hell fun though we have been absolutely blasted to have mais Jana's come in as our dinner sponsors the hair and catering dinner and are amazing and very very generous signature sponsor is flooring RBA that does incredible things to get back to the community isn't that wonderful we live in such and create area where businesses do get involved so much and and people want to help the community they really do you really daily so that night this can be done there and they'll be entertainment now what else is there anything else going on throughout the night that's a lot there is we have casino games that we have horse racing we have a DJ yeah we have all kinds of fun games and Raffles and we have some pretty special surprises so I'm not gonna doubled every fall it's you won't want to miss that only guys so we can we can go in there for like a lot of the casino game yes you can because that's so fine and we are even offering the opportunity for thirty minute gassed dealer spot said that you want to be a guest dealer you can purchase a thirty minute spot to be a guest dealer at the event so that'll be a lot of fun I mean you really get the night jam packed we do but we want this to be a celebration yeah yes this is a fund raiser for you now are are nonprofit but more importantly this is an opportunity for us to celebrate this amazing organization that is turning ten and to be able to thank everyone that has been involved and allow the organization to become one it's become over the last ten years and just to have everyone together to celebrate and share this wonderful mission and the evolution of where it started and where it's going and being able to all work together to hope others give back and pay it forward I love this and how much do tickets can be so tickets are seventy dollars for an individual ticket has sides really good and that includes I mean this includes everything that I just mentioned so it's a great date night you would be able to go out to dinner for that amount of money that we do have.

executive director Sophie house
"executive director" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

05:49 min | 10 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"And executive director of the Isabella Santos foundation and Iran people in Charlotte no you so well as the superstar mom who began a foundation in her daughter's memory after she died of a rare childhood cancer and I have watched this foundation do some amazing things that connections in the community and what you're doing for the families of children who are facing a similar horror to what you're doing to help an awareness to the issue and what you're doing to support the medical community is chest mind blowing considering what you went through to get where you are today can you take us back to the worst day the worst day five years of a cancer battle there so many I don't even know if it was the first day we found out because you're just so in shock and you know you're drinking from a fire hose and you don't really know what's going on I think for me one of the worst days was when we got a call from a doctor near the end that kind of sad Hey that's were really done here she had relapsed a couple of times and with the type of cancer that she had we knew that if she relapse the chance of survival was about zero percent so we actually knew probably in our head course everyone says she's going to be the one she can be the one but you know you're honest with yourself at that point but when she kept beating it but we got a call from a doctor near the end and he said you know it's it's back it's in our brain it's down her spinal cord you know she's gonna start losing her vision we just we knew that it was bad I remember waking my mom up in the mail the night she was living with us at the time and broader downstairs and said you know I think this time it's really at even though we've been told before this is it and then she beats it this is this time is really at so we just have to figure out what to do then self their friends and family members I know who've lost a child none of them have had to do what you did and that is say enough with the treatment yeah I think you know I think that's one of the things I struggle with to this day because you know even my ex husband I week we question ourselves all the time that we're retired at the end to because it was so many times you would relapse and we would say you know we're gonna try somebody else we're gonna go somewhere else we would try something and we would beat it and then this last time we got that call I think that we were all done when she was done we were both done it we could feel you know that if we kept going that we were just watering her we were doing it for different reasons so to kind of come to the place where you have to say we have to be okay with us and then you know living without regret after of what if we tried one more thing but you know in the end we knew so but it's just still struggle to make that decision for somebody else to say that we say that you're done so top part of parenting it is a tough part of parenting and during this time you have your career you have your mom duties you have your wife duties where was Aaron arm well the error that I was before she was diagnosed was long gone the person that I became over those five years of her battling is probably who I became and who I am today because I go back and read I I wrote a lot during her battle and going back and read I can see myself transforming into somebody else I was probably never somebody that would have questioned doctors and near the end I just became I mean I'm sure they hated me there but I just became such a strong person and a mom but I never thought I would be so at the end of that I don't I I don't I read you never thought you would be you know I mean I just thought I was just going to be a normal mom you know like I don't even know what that means but basic mom CA basic mom and then I did hi everyone tools yes maybe not logical but but to me I read the last couple of years of her being alive and I'm like oh my gosh that's who you should want to be with you during the last part of your life because I did everything I could have done me off I was fighting doctors and nurses and signing against medical advice and doing what I thought was right and I mean we are but just kind of took it over what kept you going I think she did the fact that she just kept beating it you know they would say you know you probably want to look at hospice at this point I'm like no we're not actually I went ahead and made a call and we're gonna go to Philly and we're gonna have this treatment I mean I think doctors would look at me and be like who is this woman but I mean I just I would just look at around like I know you say she's got a brain tumor but she's not the play room running around like she's talking to me she's laughing she's you know being a normal six year old were not doing what you say that we're gonna do so after that normal six year old relapsed again don't forget recovery mode with amount is going to be available very shortly on the radio dot com that that's where you'll be able to hear the whole story for Merion Santos and learn more about the Isabella Santos foundation special thanks today to remote all the way for all of her time on this episode and as always shout out to heather.

executive director Isabella Santos foundation Iran Charlotte
"executive director" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

10:20 min | 11 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"In here they are laying five and a half six at home to Tampa well you might like this one then because last night so a pretty easy number to get even see one six and a half this number yeah I don't I e every week guy see a few couple of games like two points in general nothing happens every time but in general the market's been moving this'll be like this'll be really a big decision so the next two games we're at minus three minus one twenty on the browns run out three and a half on the browns nobody knows who that is so this is this'll be a big swing game for the books both the driving the game winning field of what you make Joe FLACCO 's comments about even ice news like there they were two and five going into that game I mean just be aggressive Chicago game but I think Fangio's so old school not aggressive enough it up they are okay yeah the steelers above them all we have up now would be the the super bowl the conference the divisions no more to get involved but let me read you the rest of their schedule and you tell me the guaranteed losses owned Cincinnati at Arizona owned a Baltimore and I think they already have a win at Baltimore as one of their two wins right so the race with one more head to head game in Cleveland Coming later in the season and then a rookie kyle lowry and then Lamar Jackson so they have like about this Cleveland's already played the two undefeated teams in the NFL New England in San Francisco on Sunday get to three and five with that schedule in the back half I guess it's possible I marquee game in La chargers A road game against the packers why does take account I've seen this year recording on Thursday morning game and one hundred twenty six of them are on the Green Bay packers so we're GONNA win their bets in the morning we're going to be rolling those bets over on the packers over on the Patriots you what did you guys ended up we lost we lost money on that game but not bigger lizard okay interesting they know their you guys took smart sharp money on I would've thought there would have been a little bit more par liability building the Green Bay than there was it was certainly in a couple of these other these other favorites like CLEVELAND AND MAYBE PHILADELPHIA GIVE BACK UP I know all the sharp guys are getting Baltimore but if all these favorites cover early in the day Sunday about Monday night Monday night Dallas minus seven at the New York giants not a the focus of the the betting public here has been on the Sunday night game and on the especially that green is making with the Steph curry injury you know I I didn't even know that he got hurt. Well Steph Steph curry broke his hand I know that we were working. You know depending on how long he's out for you gotTA think Golden State might not even even know if this team's GonNa make it to the postseason well I thought that was a possibility to begin with not certainly not the team that they were but I thought they were going to be fine and wii going into last night so yeah they're not good and they're getting everyone's best shot in terms of have to pull the trigger even at two hundred one I would not I would not all right my friend another strong performance at you don't give the raiders should've given Musburger the raiders that win though I mean Oakland really checking the game I'm sorry I was talking all the jets right as but I'll say yeah you're you're chasing tonight with the Frisco 'cause obviously hate doing this too modest one twenty which is the worst I hate I.

"executive director" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

31:48 min | 11 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"Thank you into the game you've kind of your money that's how you find out from Vegas to you this is behind the bats Rick Travis The Washington nationals word series champ I was just happy miracle over if you had it bad beat on the under my apologies there we're gonNA talk to Mr and also Wrap things up with Mike Clay whose back and dressed in costume so later Gardner Menchu Aka field yates so good stuff there and let's get the guys at work you're calling me MR director not looking directly into my eyes people tab and ESPN kicking is for losers now that I'm a world series champion myself a world series champion quite a game last night man it was it was crazy how so many of their elimination games ended eventually the offense broke through I mean how many times do we see that happening behind early and Sherzer he kept them close enough that they were able to in his head out of his tail yeah I mean David Martinez got a lot of crap during in there and and he pushed all the right buttons in the playoffs and the bullpen deserves we evaluated for years to come Aj Hinch is decisions on several but it is fascinating like we talk about this you know maybe the football ben to win the second half you have to be essentially like that much better for the whole game soon shows are really didn't have his best stuff last night but he managed to get out a lot of those jams of course and then so it's three two two after the Kendrick Homerun and I'm kind of inching towards the edge of my seat opened up six to two is unbelievable I it's just miracle in a lot of ways in another example of d. on the weekend a city full of people actually work I weekend to go to the world series so I think I'll stay out here for the parade but I definitely going to be last night I just let us kind of experience it with all your friends and must be interesting but at the bottom line is the four games the nationals one where the game started by Strasbourg insureds a TV show yesterday just I thought under six strikeouts was crazy bet yeah well he did pitch but you didn't have as best as you alluded to but he got out of the jams much like he did in that one game with books do like did you take any huge bets things like that we did we did great we were in a great position we did very very well in the world series future pool we also took some big bets on Houston Big Win for us in all the books who are booking mattress mack also did this to me like you guys a couple of bookies all right let's get into the NFL now so clearly there were some sharp action moving the line from thirteen and a half down to ten look but Yeah my understanding there was some some books closed nine and a half Cleveland was well it is that what we're calling that to the Baker Mayfield say Jarvis Landry I don't know what so they continued what did you think Freddie Kitchens decision to kick the field goal there certainly when you're you're down three scores you need and you're gonNA need a field goal if you have a half a percent chance to come back and win you should try it you chance to win you should try you shouldn't just let the game end I I don't know what he was doing there it was the cop and for sure if we could have got Denver to win the game outright as other extra point now revisit that because I was tweeting and it made no sense like here's a quarter here's a kicker letelier going into conserve conservative mode and ended up being a fifty one yarder they made it doesn't mean it was the right thing to do he's doing this he's too good of a aggressive in general I should say so it was shocking to see him do that he did get away with it points with the colts and I even said that actually changed my pick to a teaser with the colts big Seattle money last week as well yeah there there was some money on Seattle we for sure the New England game everybody was on New England we always talk about it on this show hey and we need the browns pretty big there I it really I don't want to not getting a lot of I dunno coverage is the Patriots that could become a thing especially this weekend with there only being a three point I mean this is setting up to be the most heavily NFL game of the year to date a game we'll let's let's get into this weekend's card will start there and then we'll go to the beginning of the card with tonight's in like right when we opened this game well let's go back another week let's go back to the twelve day line we four and a half we reopened this game at I think minus five on Sunday thousands on New England minus four last Sunday night so then Monday minus one ten right now we're a Baltimore plus three and a half minus one twenty ah sharp versus square showdown of the year in the NFL. Okay br I mean if you're the only one in the whole world has that number you probably don't want to extend him limits light or the fight I would take that bed if somebody wanted about thirty thousand dollars on there's no big deal okay yeah that but I don't you wonder do you I know how much money there was going to be on that game or we knew and right the market's not really settled yet so it's a little bit different than but we were still okay giving him the against the Patriots ever I just let me tell you what I got on the line in that game because I'm glad you brought that up and yet given my picture Brent Musburger and that pick ended up being Cleveland plus against Brady so yesterday when I did the show for week nine the pick I gave him was relationship with Brent Musburger is on the line in this game 'cause if I give them another loser against bell check and Brady we all talk about these games in the risk room here and then we give Brent our recommendation yeah I mean that's what you should do you should say we'll Brent you're the one who submitted the picks like you're the one big the broncos covered I think it was when they won outright against the chargers but I always scary going against the England New England they've played such a great defensive us and I don't know that it's GonNa Work Against this Baltimore d a Lot of years using this that will try to do this patriots team that I kind good value against the Patriots. I'm the first met I love Kansas Mary yesterday and I asked him about like sort of you know these it's hard to put a like a you had to quantify Bella check it because he doesn't kind of reevaluate the the so they're they're they're statistics are predictive but with Bela check he changes everything to they didn't get on no big difference I agree with you first of all but a big difference is a play caller that was promoted from interim job to a fulltime job and that was mistake in the week and it Roach and game planning like you just remember there's that Patriots and they went in there I remember two hundred fifty rushing yards after I remember they blew somebody out on the following in Kansas City or I don't remember exactly but or he's just running this offense with his eyes closed 'cause he knows it like the back of his hand but he's also there's a perfect match for each other time will tell there I four ten right now and every every moneyline parlay every teaser every every that twenty nine thousand on forty niners money line back on Monday or Tuesday of it's an aggressive play short week row team I get it but a lot the window people just running to the window to San Francisco right now so it was three and a half or four yeah but it it did come crashing down he did that a lot at USC interesting wonder why we come. Nfl Ah nothing against bell checks should be counted against you but there's no excuse for his performance ed here we go going to be a nice game for the jets will show short cut short loss London Yeah Games in London home game doesn't Jacksonville play there every year I think on Texans Jacksonville Houston obviously know. Jj Watt in this you there okay buffalo a little dose of Reality Devi away which is football Sunday from bills Mafia and the somewhere rationing dialogue. I don't know that you could call anybody that's in the bills Mafia rational and just there's a ceiling there and I think they take care of us here with the Redskins in town to get through Washington here and if they win this game on Sunday and they probably will they're going to be six a couple of weeks ago so I don't have to take the bills in this game in my eliminator just zone is there ahead of schedule I've said that about them a few times their first year would kingsbury great defensively and the next game on this rundown Titans Panthers Carolina that number is up to four you talk about buying low on a team it's GonNa be a time to the Times had no business winning on Sunday they got completely screwed by I'm sorry Tampa Bay got screwed awful awful call and some it's weird because they usually let referees let things play out else I'd be careful here because you know everybody's going to be on Philadelphia everyone's on the eagles right now no one's going to be looking to bet on Chicago on Sunday and sometimes last week off the embarrassing performance against the Patriots are kind of like Chicago this weekend it's decay can't be that right correct fair fair point intriguing game with the Vikings and Kansas City minus two and a half because we think mahomes is GonNa play well so I did I was on this morning with Mitch Sorry about that play on follow the money and I gave him my answer the dolphins are trying to lose join conversion against Washington and at third down all out blitz against Pittsburgh this the head to head no it's totally right and Cincinnati no one's talking about that Cincinnati doc I don't think they are but you have a fair point their own eight zone eight on the main screen so I was like sort of glancing over even though I had a pretty sizable play side of the screen you know okay oh they're conceding the field go oh wait he's still the plan was like you line up eight guys in the line of scrimmage and then you drop you disguise which ones are blitzing you the Pittsburgh steelers we got the colts laying one in Pittsburgh and I think this is my favorite that's playing I would say very well given the circumstances so I understand the money here you know Pittsburgh did pretty good number of tickets coming in on the colts we've moved from pick 'em to minus one yeah I think in their limit their limited I mean that's put it nicely if they're limited now that surprises me a little bit yeah we're except to two and a half and Oakland coming back lot to report in terms of wiseguy action and really it's just a completely split game pretty divided game here so far I will say this and I will This raiders teams more more competent than it has been years pass the raiders be what would the raiders record if they played buffalo schedule or New England schedule they don't true no I'm not I'm not saying I don't think Patriots are great I'm just saying that.

"executive director" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

20:50 min | 11 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

"Uh this episode is brought to you by our friends at voyager trading cryptocurrency can be tough not just talking about making smart crypto investments. I'm talking about the big like the first point of this project and somehow some habits we have on one and the actually launching it went from that one product which made sense to is Macao for everything on the whole world is like right we've been made simply form of the corporation and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA make world court and it's going to do everything walk well this is a perfect point further classic as at the time I can remember percentage fifteen percent either in a while locked into opera through a vulnerability packed yeah very immature uh on the first thing I don't say who was it wasn't it wasn't just the concept of the operation were it was we invented concepts of operation is you've frontier lawless territory an it also enemies Tbilisi been groped or anything we're just going to plant and because blow contracts so we're just going all in the first thing only thing actually and that is that events exposed that you have different Russa equal all his Lee deep in Bitcoin Soros was we want more we will have contacts analogy and it was probably a parent de Dissuade Coin de so an animal's going to happen on top of of of massive anonymous Romeo commonly wish thanks so he just had shipped over there were more you know more rest covers and really is really doing pounders overlook routes were mainstream technologists and social mus you know it went all psycho constant the same way they weren't radical libertarian haters it was a bunch of technology and we we make the world a what you had and power uncanny which some people would really not bitcoin calls were really like all know like immutability is the you know the chain something bad happens right you didn't see me engulfs happened on a bunch of people right we should all for bitcoin the soul of what happened it is slightly different in the sense that no one knows win it happened in bitcoin history where if safety shoes I think maybe fifteen percents bitcoin would be about twenty five billion dollars right that much money stolen from windows so you would see serious consideration around around Oregon possibly most likely when he came over collections like wait for the food but I think what you really had is is has realized action that you had people without irreconcilably different points of view saying should we interfere search essentially because this is such an thing and always beef somebody's stolen our money that it was going to be used for disruptive broadcasts to build this thing and also the timing it was early the euro it was it was really so I mean sick myself mind media reaction is cool should think but then you have the most rigorous debate this where you know lots of different users stressed misled yet size and and I think the situation oh you had is even within foundation lots and also of course we shouldn't do anything and then they find the I've been working with for a year lease you what you grow meant pack you can change it off you ah civil war and you just taught me it bubbles to the surface and you and you got this point and I think it was it was it was Ronnie's that Ford essentially because it's like it's like Roy secession from the union it's the right through a divorce you know stuck in a miserable marriage arrested so you basically saying exactly I want to come back to is stayed working on theory integrates early around during plastic it seemed pretty significantly and you're hitting join consensus so I'm coming from the story back say basically going student tearing the building stuff the foundation of medium plenty of places because the shit Colin.

twenty five billion dollars fifteen percent
"executive director" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

06:09 min | 11 months ago

"executive director" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

"Not be disappointing everyone welcome back some Saris Unqualified Opinions on Ryan to idiots and I'm here with they'll who's the executive record sequel Big Addy Emperor and uttering as and right before we close on the camera we're here Asaka on five we're a typhoon that about a category six down if this never actually makes it to Asian eight and that's why we're going to try to eight pro soccer before over the typhoon just ransack everything but in the meantime our talked about it during last week so they're in plastic is original during blockchain or those that are you're the industry unfamiliar is the results of a hard fork following e Haq how I in original decentralized autonomous organization which lost Johnnie sixty million six kids lose it at the time it was a sizeable chunk of the outstanding ether slack the Dow was only just screamed funding that compete in the hit salsa protests all of what it raised the original Brazil we'll we'll talk a little bit during classic but Dan but for the most part the reason is most interesting house Ab is often and and some of the members of the team our advice Ason it's been going on recently and he theory am one to transition is our from Asia everything is going to happen over a multi year period and one of the most critical components of the update is a transition from proof of work I wish asks still enrolled Mason to prove sake so we'll talk about that technically what it means to be system what it means for security but also just were generally how do communities cooperate competes as their classic is ironically officer this year well easy labs Oh yes which are not the before we get into all that up how do we has your back your backgrounds and specifically you're kind of path within Iran and how you got to be such an integral player and multi discipline certainly these as more or less inside so my career Triads Boven was in the industry on I actually would ask for Eighteen Years Fifteen years twenty years that made me with only a small cycles fever and we I shall central technology collaboration projects it's actually so I was actually the peak of my career I was the suffer for the whole sports so you know all contextual relate to sign of Yates will start in every black holes and I not decided personal freedom was more important than anything else and the working within a logical ration- that was above you That you I've always do souls and would seek to solve getting signed protests manual so actually working on a sort of unity gains but moghal gained some really wearables POINT I met David Lowy and Kluber in a kiss Lonnie were live and he basically gave me you know Miss Rammed him evening NCAA in February twenty team Just hey outbreak really talking through that's humanitarian thing if you will if you can do it Sanjay through insurance or supply chain shipping on really like well we rewired the whole world here I mean this prior to that one hundred twenty point adult rice thing we'll see how have these you know the elites controlling us and the the sobering debt crisis and Harris all this stuff work and you know that the climate crisis everything just thinking the world is screwed up it's you know and there's nothing that we can do these institutions ironical going so it was like wow this is a revelation I can code you know maybe you can actually do a proactive things to make us a future Oh sedated actually introduced me in July Twenty Pool team so the foundation of being sausage with the and Sal I'm having day with David who make me is cray attitude in this all students who could give it Anson out to the only taking your old tech so I decided to Aries Cheney people in Cuba it's actually no also points for another four no I left in June and July but I just I was really still doing so gates of made.

Ryan Eighteen Years Fifteen years twenty years
"executive director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"executive director" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Since you are the executive director. I would love to ask you a couple of questions about the board of directors. How large is your board of directors and how do you work with them? We have a board right now of eight and our our bylaws have a range from five to twelve and we are working towards nominating. Additional board members. I think our board in the past. When I first started the board was very hands on board, very operational board and over the past few years they've worked to transition to more of a governing board and to let the staff that we have now actually take the operations and deal with the operations. We've we've kind of done a modified process of just ensuring that the board manages the overall organizational, policies and standards and board meetings are about the organizational process and governance versus talking about you know, in the past. It was talking about. Individuals hats at times. And so the board, you know, we meet monthly I do an update, you know, we've had our rough spots during some of the times where there were a lot of changes going on, and and some volunteer on rest because of a lot of changes. And so there's been a little bit of bumps along the road, but the boards been very supportive, and we've a adopted the standards of care and the five freedoms. And I think that's given us a very solid swing on on which to base a lot of what's going on. And that's helped everybody, and it's helped my relationship working with the board. You know, we're working on our budgeting for next year. And our development committee is going to be helping us flush out a better and a more comprehensive fundraising plan for next year to ensure where able to meet our goals, I think overall we have some some board members with very diverse backgrounds and because of that they're able. To contribute in different ways and not necessarily in a program sense. But more, you know, finance background. We have a CPA on our board. We have an attorney on our board. We have an HR person on our board. And so we have some of those things that they're able to contribute, but still feel that governing piece few have term limits. We do we have three year limits and then aboard member conserve up to ten years, basically, they can serve three terms and board members cycle off actually board..

executive director attorney three year ten years
"executive director" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

08:43 min | 2 years ago

"executive director" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Dot FM It. Is free talk live you can take control these airwaves you bring up anything that you want we got stuff to talk about here tonight. Beyond the bad news about. New Hampshire dropping down the list from. Number one to number two now it's just a list it's the. Freedom in, the fifty states I'm sure there are other lists on which New Hampshire is, solidly number one not only did they drop New Hampshire down on the list for this year but they also. Took the opportunity? To. Drop New Hampshire down on the list. Forever year since two thousand fourteen. Is that right right, it retroactively, got this is retroactive detail I'm, sorry, doing I know It was really stunning because I was looking at the rankings in the past and New Hampshire wasn't. Where I expected it to. Be in past ranking systems okay so. This year's twenty eighteen they're using numbers from previous years was the. Last ranking, twenty sixteen when that one came because I feel like it's it's every two, years right there this they're basically taking the they went back and read it all the data from the past. I know I'm? Asking. You the last one prior to this. Was what two. Years ago I understand what you're saying you're saying they they're using old data. To, redo the old number so where is New Hampshire's position from the two thousand. Sixteen the last one twenty sixteen is is the the most recent one oh so this new one that's just coming out today is the first two thousand. Sixteen. So the one that came. Out in two thousand sixteen would have been for like twenty fourteen or something so I'm? Asking you if New Hampshire was what we thought was number one previous what is what. Are they saying retroactively that it was last time if it's number. Two now what was it was number two last time they're saying time before as well Okay back to two thousand fourteen all right so now. Finally we've eliminated all of the problematic connections and we actually? Have Rachel Goldsmith on the line with us she is currently you're. Not, called the president of the Free State project right Rachel there's like a kind of. Executive director role what is the exact role you have with Free State project has yeah so I am. Technically the executive director of the project but that's just like a title on we, have a official position as president according to our mission and the cetera et cetera so. I, am I am technically the president Heino president in the opposite of a Pineau Is the president of the freestyle Pineau joke it just, fell apart is the president of the. Free State project also the executive director is that a thing I don't know, how I. So we're transitioning. To an organization that is focused on having roles that are not status So I'm I'm just seeing executive director I fill out the. I performed the action directed by the board executives person the president was, doing anyway and, so the president titles? Done there's not going to. Be another president of the Free State project well I mean I'm not at this time I'm not gonna say never but. The intention is to eliminate that terminology it's not around now all. Right so Rachel thanks for joining us here on free talk live the the the difficult news that I. Guess some people are processing here today and I don't really you know to me it's just a? Just a list I know it's more. Free here than it is in in Florida at least that's the way I feel generally, having lived in, Florida for twenty six years of my. Life but what are your first reactions when you heard this news as as the lady running the organization that is. One of, the primary movers one of. The primary impetus of, people to move to New Hampshire libertarians to migrate here. Not just libertarians but people, generally the Free State project as, far as raw numbers is a good portion of the people who. Are, moving to, New Hampshire what you're saying Yeah Well I, mean first of, all I'm not Representative of Kato or. Freedom so any like conversations that I can have our about, this I really only as like the last guy who talked to Jason Thorens about it that Mark could drag onto the, show but back. Then Of the Free State. Project I mean Rankings aren't going to change the fact that the best strategy for liberty in our lifetime, is concentrating liberty activists in one place and unless someone can point to another place and say that place is better and there's more people who are concentrating their more quickly and it. Doesn't really change my day to day. We know that can't be done Mark you've had a. A website or Facebook page for years I don't. Know if you've updated in a while. There hasn't been a lot of news so the answer basically is no your page is about all these copycat projects that. Have come out over the last decade actually even go all the way, back to, like the. Seventies or eighties I think is price these old Muehlberg projects had any project that suggested you pick up and move your, life for the libertarian as a libertarian because there's lots of projects to like the Mormons picked. Up a move to Utah at work I didn't have that up that. Was effective And as a matter of fact that was part of the sort of. The game plan for the Free State project All right so any project that I've looked at and either they were designed. In a way that they could, not fail where if you don't move just think positive things about us or something Or they were just failures Detroit, project, and the idea was hey I hear houses. Are one dollar in Detroit let's move there and. Have pigs at our. House it didn't go down there was the free Wyoming idea for Grafton Well you're allowed to have, pigs there so there were all these different projects that sort of. Came up and? Many, of them, were directly inspired by the Free State project like Free State, Wyoming which actually did have some movers but ultimately never really coalesced into anything at all to big state how could they well I. Mean if they had enough movers that, could probably have done, something but they ultimately were the kind of people who are just moved. Out in the, middle of nowhere and did nothing shut their guns. They had a couple of camping festivals and then that stopped and I don't think. They're websites actually been, updated, in about a decade so I mean there's. A bunch of other copycat projects out there the. Free State project is. The only one that his really had the I don't know if the Javadi the stick to what the what we've been looking for to attract. People, here, who are going to stick with. It now some people have left so we don't know how many of the people who've moved have left really but ultimately they're still a larger group of, libertarians volunteers liberty loving anarchists here, in New Hampshire than anywhere else no one has ever challenged that. Rachel it's never? Even, happen it's, true and I don't think that it's fair to disregard the, impact that does movement has had on the state I mean politically socially economically is fear than anywhere else hands down and there's no. Denying that there's a community here that, you're not gonna get, in someplace like Florida or Wyoming because we are able to concentrate and. We're able to, have I mean we have over six hundred liberty. Meet up every single year that's more than every other state combined if I did go one, time to Tallahassee and have you ever learn from Sarasota Tallahassee it's I can't. Remember what the the numbers are but it's like a, six, hour, drive that means if you wanted to go. And testify on a Bill or for. Whatever reason you gotta. Start who, days you start at six o'clock in the morning you arrive at noon hopefully you get to testimony starts. At like, nine or ten right it could better go the night, before you okay so now you're at a hotel I it's outrageous I if they do get people they probably disregard them as politicians tend to anybody in the lawyer does. Industrial complex, doesn't care what you have to say when your shell up because well they're smarter than you are. So You you would have very little effect trying to move the Free State projects. To Florida Rachel since. We are in such a rush to get you here I, didn't? Have a chance to ask you how long. You. Could stay with us did you? Wanna stay for. Another segment and talk more about, this I feel like. You guys have pretty much covered I really wanna know again, I'm not an authority on the subject I wanna know what, they changed, on the the the the. Ranking If you've got time it's up..

New Hampshire president Rachel Goldsmith Wyoming executive director Florida Dot Executive director Facebook Utah Detroit Mark Jason Thorens Representative Tallahassee Sarasota official twenty six years one dollar
"executive director" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"executive director" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Podcasts in these conversations by supporting our sponsors so please punch over there a hope you love it as much as i do again it's athlete let green dot com ford slash finding mastery this week's conversation is with ollie smith now allen i met probably about five or six years ago at a conference called wisdom two point oh it's where high tech meets mindfulness and he's just got a great way about him and he's got a incredible story that he's been able to amplify in his business so all the cofounded the holistic life nation in two thousand one where he's currently the executive director now what they've done you've probably heard buzz or read about it or heard some controversy in some storylines around what they've done with mindfulness in schools so he was early on that program introducing mind from this to public and private schools he's had a practice himself for fifteen years teaching yoga and mindfulness to allied range of populations and what they've done is they've developed a pilot yoga mindfulness programs in public and private schools like we've talked about drug treatment centers juvenile detention centers mental crisis facilities retreat centers in his all this nationally and internationally so in this conversation we talk about how he got schools large institutions to buy into his mission and it's not him alone it's he and his team in we'll also talk about the way that he is making impact on kids lives and how that's likely paying ford in dividends in we also get into great detail about his unique mindfulness practice so there's we've taken the conversation from concepts into right into the weeds about how he practices in how he helps us kids in the in the programs that he's running or he and his team running how that works so hope this conversation is a reminder that we all have ideas we all have ideas that could work in whether that's business and or passions whatever might be it's wonderful when the to mix but to be able to take those ideas and put them into play takes hard work takes team it takes building environment culture were many people are nodding their heads like yeah okay i see how that could work and so.

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"executive director" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"executive director" Discussed on KOMO

"Is the executive director of the grays harbor community foundation is back home in aberdeen now but tells me he's forever changed by what he is why frenzy witnessed sunday night they were out the concert sitting at a table where they had a sweet with some friends to watch the show i heard a pop and that's like me i even said okay the idiot with the park record took a few more seconds before he realized what was happening but word sure whether to run or hide because they couldn't tell where the gunfire was coming from every time he ran you kept your gun shot it so it was just echoing all through there when you would hear it you would just right there he got separated from his wife and the others they were with for a time eventually meeting back up and thankfully they were all okay i asked at the terrifying ordeal will change how they live their lives you start picking those spain and you're going to let the the evil where it so i think probably just going to be at play it by your thing but it kind of changes your perspective that's for sure carleen johnson komo news automakers are making great progress of developing selfdriving cars that are ready to hit the road and they're encouraged that congress is eager to pass legislation that will make this possible bidders komuves herb weisbaum reports consumer advocate swat lawmakers to step on the brakes congress is now considering legislation that would make it possible for auto make to have hundreds of thousands of selfdriving cars on the nation's roadways in just a few years as long as they're operated by employs these autonomous vehicles would not be required to have equipment for human operations such as steering wheels or breaks consumer advocates worry that these bills need a major tuneup all the coma midday news jason levin executive director.

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