40 Burst results for "european union"

Fresh update on "european union" discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

01:45 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european union" discussed on No Agenda

"Time therefore to align sustainable solutions which funding in a way that. Swarmed the market today we go. This would be the most dramatic. Of. Responsible leadership ever seen by the private sector and which at once provide a catalytic incentive. The public sector of fellow does this remind you at all about some of those Democrat points that were in the Heroes Act that is now being. Are you over thing. It's exactly the same thing. Gamete. Let's destroy the whole system so we can be better off. We continue with His Royal Highness. We have. A golden opportunity to seize something good from his presence. Oh, it's unprecedented. Shockwaves may well make people more receptive to big visions of change. A global crises like pandemics and climate change know no borders and highlight just how interdependent we are as one people sharing one. Now that's interesting. shocks people. This is a shock to people so that shock them awake they're gonNA want to shock them into climate change. We need only look to the United Nations Secretary General to the IMF The EU. Petersburg climate dialogue, the Canadian government, the Cup twenty, six universities network of business. It is around the world to see this. As we move. From rescue to recovery risk. For we have a unique but rapidly shrinking window shunichi to learn lessons and reset ourselves on a more sustainable path, it is an opportunity of never had before. Never have a game. Disposal knowing that each and every one of us has a vital role to play. So I can only encourage just. To think big an act now think big. So there's a whole bunch of phrase big act. Now what lady from the IMF came by she talked. And, it went back and forth. There's only one one last clip I, have on a really I wanNA say luckily for all of us listening in everybody out there these this is a group of the biggest blowhards. They're probably can't accomplish anything so. Right. But they certainly have influence I'm looking at the European. Union. They're all the European Union's all in on this they're passing laws left and right to support this entire idea and the great reset you watch this term start floating around. DISEA- gate release set. Yes. So one one guy that was to me very out of character, but clearly a partner in the. In the great reset team. Was the representative from Mastercard. I thought that was interesting. So I clicked him the person. I'm going to turn to I j Banger of mastercard chief executive officer of mouse to God. What do we need to see from a business perspective to address this pressing social and economic need? For Change, that this pandemic is really laid bare because this kind of guy who was supposed to answer this type of question. I guess I would think he'd be more interested in it EMBIID. RETURNS, some other. ASPECTS, comfort loss. Now he's got a couple of things. Mastercard is doing more than just managing your credit card. You know I, I've been saying for a while the ones problems on three sides of a triangle. WHOA OH. What is this a Silicon Valley like expression? It sounds like it is I've never heard it, but it probably is. The problems fit on three sides of the triangle. That's the. We just talked about them. It's one versus many. Indian guys. Major and the unfortunate foundation is long-term was a shock down as a company. We made a commitment Adrian some years ago to go after five, hundred, million people to be brought in for financial intrusion. By twenty twenty, we did that opted to a billion and interviewer be will bring in fifty million micro the means and twenty five million women entrepreneurs all. About market share. Many side of the trying. To. Use Our presence of consumers to say one is it consumers understand they don't understand carbon credits, but they understand the blunting of freeze. Why? Why Same Old us? In the process of doing. Why come to do lessons and that's the answer to your question then is not enough money in government offered anthropology to make it possible to deal with the three sides of the triangle, you'll need private sector capital province I ingenuity Brian Sector Technology, and burned sector capabilities to come to the party we after making. Those tweet samples I gave you off incursion and climate. Enormous. Trust between the private sector and the public very second. These. Some of these Indian guys I mean the whole country's Kinda very adept. At talking like this sound like they're saying something when they're really not. Nothing going on and on say we and it's just like he's got. He's getting out of this smelling like a rose because he sounds like he's said something but this is just a guru style bullcrap. Yes. Dead of Indians can do very well On. Malik. Well. Yeah. Rome's now. This guy this guy's. He's. Really. As good as the top I, think many in our in our many of our producers will be listening going Yup. I know that kind of guy. Yeah? Yeah. Well, you know what if you're thinking that you're racist those tweet examples I gave you off incursion and climate. Enormous trust between the private sector and the public sector for this to actually work. Trust is hard to among standby because I'm GonNa tell you what trust is all about what I haven't seen. It didn't cost of the pandemic is some light at the end of the tunnel on the trust the private sector. Working on the NGO sector of Vandy Round together whether it's the ten beauty and Saturday that we launched for Gates Welcome Trust or the word guy SME's around the one. So the therapeutic accelerator we launched with. Gates. Hell is that will unexcelled is. The way I understand it in in in this context is they it's like an incubator for technology for biotech. Accelerate. Yes. You get the accelerator and then everyone cashes in on gates mastercard. It's. It's Groovy on the NGOs. Dam is what you're saying. Oh, wait for it. Really well together whether it's the tenant beauty and Sunday we launched gates. Or the word I see on SME's around the one on benefit distribution and the use of data analytics for. Detecting activity okay. Listen to what he says here because now slipping up but wait. Did he say the wellcome trust and other one of these operations? The wellcome trust I think is bigger than the.

Mastercard IMF European Union Brian Sector Technology Gates Welcome Trust Twenty Twenty Canadian Government United Nations Petersburg Partner Representative Rome Chief Executive Officer Adrian Malik
US State Department lifts global 'Do Not Travel' advisory

Our American Stories with Lee Habeeb

00:45 sec | 1 d ago

US State Department lifts global 'Do Not Travel' advisory

"U. S citizens can travel abroad again, But don't get those passports out just yet. The hitches who will have us After nearly five months, state has lifted its ban on all non essential foreign travel for Americans due to the cove it 19 pandemic instead breaking it down country by country, depending on conditions there. Still, the European Union, for example, is not allowing any Yanks in due to the higher covert case load in the states compared to Europe. There are bands elsewhere as well. Or at least forced. 14 day quarantines like here in the U. K. Then you get back stateside from most places, and you still have to do another 14 day self isolation As long as Corona viruses around, it seems that Staycations will be around as

European Union Europe Staycations U. S
Fresh update on "european union" discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

00:36 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european union" discussed on No Agenda

"Economic stimulus package equivalent to a double digit percentage more than ten percents of the global economy. Week United, nations to get. We need ten percent of the global economy. America. Give it to us and percents of the global economy last week United Nations together with the governments of Jamaica and Canada convened the largest gathering of world leaders the start of the pandemic fully solid foundation sustainable recovery based on the twenty. Century Agenda for sustainable development is. outs. So He's all over the twentieth I want to stop for a second because we get some criticism, but you hear it all the time. Oh people. They're always bring in that APP every day. As if they're not as if they're not actually throwing it in our faces, you mean like the new world order and the elites and the money people and United Nations and all this by globalism. Yeah this is it. As, as Rodent Thirty. Weeping and you know there's all the right wingers. There's always something real. Well because. Because it Israel. said it right there show WanNa take ten percent of the global economy do with what they want for equality. For some sort of equality, they're not going to achieve. And then. Try to gouge us for the for the. Majority of it yes. The majority of his after all we controlled trillions away. Well gets better stay. This is disgusting listening to these people you've made me sick. Okay. Well, grab your BARF bag. Here's Prince Charles these are unprecedented turn by. If you seen these interviews with this poor bastard this guy is so out of touch with reality, he roams around grounds talking about flowers and hardening. Guy Is is a borderline moron. Very distinguished. As a lot of important things to say about ever that these are unprecedented times retired us. On the planet is being impacted by the coronavirus. Pandemic World came to a standstill. It became care do not have the. Unsettle the mechanisms to address such unprecedented global threat. The threat posed by this is simply dreadful pandemic can upon suddenly. Be Quiet he's talking about this dreadful pandemic. Do nothing was just mumbling through it was of climate change has been my. going. Within ten seconds, he's going straight to climate and send. He couldn't suddenly the wounded. Of Climate Change has been more gradual, but it's It's devastating reality for many people and livelihoods around the world, and it's evergreen potential to disrupt surpasses even asa covid nineteen that lesson to you this crisis showed the importance of investing in science technology innovation advantage of catalytic breakthroughs will alter our view of what is possible and profitable within the framework of a sustainable shoot show. Time therefore to align sustainable solutions which funding in a way the control swarmed the market. Today we go. This would be the most dramatic. Act of responsible leadership ever seen by the private sector, and which at once provide a catalytic incentive. The public sector of fellow does this remind you at all about some of those Democrat points that were in the Heroes Act that is now being. Are. You over thing it's exactly the same thing Gamete. This let's destroy the whole system so we can be better off. We continue with His Royal Highness. We have. A golden opportunity to seize something good from his presence Oh. It's unprecedented. Shockwaves may well make people more receptive to big visions of change. A global crises like pandemics and climate change know no borders and highlight just how interdependent we are as one people sharing one senate. That's interesting. shocks people. This is a shock to people so that shock them awake they're gonNA want to shock them into climate change. We need only look to the United Nations, Secretary General to the IMF. The EU. Petersburg climate dialogue the Canadian government, the Cup twenty, six universities network of business. It is around the world to see this. As we move from, rescue to recovery risk. For we have a unique but rapidly shrinking window shunichi to learn lessons and reset ourselves on a more sustainable path. It is an opportunity of never had before. Never have a game. Disposal knowing that each and every one of us has a vital role to play. So I can only encourage just all to think big an act now think big. So there's a whole bunch of phrase big act now what lady from the IMF came by she talked And it went back and forth. There's only one one last clip I have on. Li I, WANNA say luckily for all of US listening in everybody out there these. This is a group of the biggest blowhards. They're probably can't accomplish anything. So. Right but they certainly have influence I'm looking at the European Union they're all the European Union's all in on this they're passing laws left and right to support this entire idea and the great reset you watch this term start floating around. DISA-. Gate Serevi set. Yes. So one one guy that was to me very out of character, but clearly a partner in the. In the great? Reset team. was. The representative from Mastercard. Interesting so I clicked him the person I'm going to turn to first. J, Banger. Mastercard chief executive officer of Mouse, to God. What do we need to see from a business perspective to address this pressing social and economic need For Change that this pandemic is really laid bare is this kind of guy who was supposed to answer this type of question. I guess I would think he'd be more interested in it EMBIID. Returns some, other. Aspects Comfort loss. Now, he's got a couple of things. Mastercard is doing more than just managing your credit card. You know I, I've been saying for a while the world's problems on three sides of a triangle. WHOA Retail. Is this a Silicon Valley like expression? It sounds like it is I've never heard it, but it probably is. The problems fit on three sides of the triangle. That's the. We just talked about them. It's one versus many. Indian guys. Major and the unfortunate foundation is long-term was a shock down as a company. We made a commitment Adrian some years ago to go after five hundred million people to be brought in for financial intrusion by twenty twenty, we did that opted to a billion and interviewer be will bring in fifty million micro the means and twenty five million women entrepreneurs all. About market share. Many side of the trying. To use our presence of consumers to say one is it consumers understand? They don't understand carbon credits but they understand the blunting of freeze. Why? Why Same Old us? In the process of doing. Why come to do lessons and that's.

United Nations Mastercard European Union IMF Twenty Twenty America United States Prince Charles Jamaica Senate Asa Covid Israel. Petersburg Canadian Government Adrian Disa Canada
1 person shot dead at crowded mansion party in Southern California

Dave Ramsey

00:43 sec | 5 d ago

1 person shot dead at crowded mansion party in Southern California

"And two were wounded by gunfire violated Corona virus orders, but police say they were helpless to stop it. LAPD Lieutenant Chris Ramirez says the shooting occurred early Tuesday morning at a rented mansion there. Beverly Hills. It was attended by some 200 guests, No one wearing face coverings or physical, distancing all public health orders. Plus, there's a prohibition on large gatherings. But, says Ramirez, police could not shut it down. Even though partygoers could pose a risk to the public at large eyes. The public at me might be different, but he's a five. We're going to your house, try and tell you what to do in your own property. Ramirez says. The shooting that left a woman dead and two others wounded was gang related. Jim Roop LOS Angeles, The European Union is opening an investigation into Google's plan to

Chris Ramirez Jim Roop Los Angeles Lapd Beverly Hills European Union Google
Fresh update on "european union" discussed on Wealth Creator Radio

Wealth Creator Radio

00:46 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european union" discussed on Wealth Creator Radio

"With that, Eric, So good to be here with you again this weekend? Yeah, well, Scott has got to be on the air and kind of talking about what's what's happening with the world and off. Of course, there's the big One is all those money that the government's printing the Federal Reserve just keeps making money out of nothing. To be cool. If you could do that on your own, yes, And that's also and say, Hey, I've got an extra $1,000,000,000 in my account. Just tell the bank that's true. And they believe you. Yeah, I wish I could do that. But I don't think we're gonna be able to do that any time soon, But the Federal Reserve's doing it insane numbers and Of course, the government's figured out ways to try to give more money to people for all the the Koven virus relief stuff, and I said, I've yet to hear in a discussion about how to pay for this, and so it's got like it here. Just running up your credit card, run up your credit card and having fun and you hold on. Here's to pay this back about that. I think one of the things that way right? Probably really should be talking about. You know, how does all this three money that comes from magic? What's it going to mean to the government? And more importantly, what's that meat into your retirement? Eric? I do want to ask you about your events. Paige. Now what are you doing? Event wise. Well, we do have some webinars going on. We're still in Shut down mode in terms of live action, or what? Have you got to call it, You know, but you know, we definitely some woman I was there on were also just having a bunch of white papers that we've just loaded our website for just educational content. So there's a lot of stuff to go on their toe. Definitely check out wolf creator radio dot com. There you go. Well, create a radio dot com Or call Eric to go in and visit with him or over the phone. 804 54 11 84. So Eric John D. Rockefeller, Of course. We all know the Rockefeller name the world's first billionaire. Well now, Jeff Bezos is on track to become the world's first trillionaire. Imagine that the founder of Amazon recently made 13 billion in one day. So I don't know. Eric. What do you think? Is 13 billion enough for the average American to retire on? Or do you think they need to work a little longer? You could pry retire. I think he's very okay. Wow. Yeah, kind of crazy numbers, right? And you know, and so one of the things that that You know, people have to start thinking about is, you know we're not most of us are going to be that lucky and making billions in a day without doing anything. Hardly eso really? What it is is you know how much do you need to have saved up that ones that think always the worst questions in a way to get because it focuses people on a number. And sometimes that number could be bad. I mean, I remember when I was in high school if you somebody made 100 grand, they were just like super Super wealthy. Oh, yeah. Now, if your family for going on your kid gets accepted to Stanford, I think the numbers either 100 or 1 25 maybe now or maybe even if the 1 50 where you know you have to pay because you don't make enough. It's amazing how those same numbers have changed right so much, So focusing on number is bad, focusing on an income stream that is definitely better. So if you could focus on how much income can you get out of your assets? That's probably a better way. But you know if people really need a number a $1,000,000 you Sally had great amount. But if you take out 5% of year it's 50,000 That may or may not be enough for you. So you know, I think for most people, it's getting to be sadly enough closer to the 2 to 3 million before you're going to be totally safe now, of course, depends on your spending level on your standard of living. So that's what those things where you can change that up to course, right. Okay. So, speaking of what used to be big money, right? We used to think that spending in the billions was big money, right? And now our government like you just said, you just alluded to making spending packages in the trillions and the leaders of the European Union recently reached a $2 trillion deal on a pandemic recovery plan. And of course, it's also going to focus on climate concerns. And Ursula von Leon, she's president of the European Commission. Listen to what she had to say theme new budget will power the European Green deal. It will accelerate the digitalization off Europe's economy. Thanks to next generation you national reforms will be boosted. We invest in Europe's future. So now Europe is discovering relief measures that are going to cost trillions of dollars. It's happening here in the United States. What do you think it happened with any additional relief bills in our country this year? Yeah. I mean, the relief is good, and it helps a lot of people. But at some point, I think were also going to have some stuff just fail. We're seeing a lot of bankruptcy is a lot of other things and You know, the hard part is, you know it sucks when you see a company shut down or go bankrupt, But you know, also, sometimes it's like, okay, it was just time. And you know that that's going to be one of the tougher things is How many how much more bailouts can you do to keep things going until things get better? Versus how can you afford to keep doing it? So, yeah, There's a lot of tough decisions going down the road and again, it's gonna all end up with a lot of tax bills at the end, you know, or inflation. You know, there's there's only a few ways to get out of all this, and none of them are very good. So that's where you want to really be rethinking your retirement goals and and and how you have things laid out. Eric. I thought it would be fun to get in some notable this week in history events. Okay, so just to kind of go back in history a little bit in 1925 complaints broke out about the growing number of public phone booths. You know, they were appearing in general stores all around our country, and people said they didn't believe phone booths were in the public interest. That shouldn't be in places where public people like to shop. Is that hilarious? Yeah, very different from today. Now we use our phones. Gosh, they're on our bodies all the time. Also this week in history appear relevant to really where we are Today. In 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act. This guaranteed that African Americans have the right to vote and making it illegal to impose restrictions on elections that were designed to disenfranchise black voters. How about that? 19? 65? Eric? Wow. Took way too long. Yeah, definitely. Right way too long. I 65. Are you kidding me? So all right. We're going to take a quick break. I want to give out your phone number one more time. Eric, Why don't you do that? Yeah, So if somebody wants to give us a call, if you want to set up a time can we're giving the free reviews of that risk level that you have no cost. An obligation was going to go over that. We'll just take 15 20 minutes to go over What your situation is so again. 804 54 11 84 804 54 11 84 or go online to wealth, create a radio dot com.

Eric John D. Rockefeller Federal Reserve Europe Jeff Bezos President Trump Scott Amazon European Union United States Paige Founder Sally Stanford Ursula Von Leon Lyndon B. Johnson European Commission
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | Last week

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. 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These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Fresh update on "european union" discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

01:49 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european union" discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"This is GPS, the global public square. Welcome to all of you in the United States and around the world I'm for Aria. Today on the show a special report on fixing the Cova crisis. President trump may say, the pandemic is under control in. America. But that is just not the reality. The country has four capital about fifteen times as many deaths every day as the European Union, and twenty five times as many as Canada. So what went wrong? And what can we do now to get the corona virus under control? We'll talk. To Bill Gates about that. Plus Vaccines Treatments, the US economy ticked on and more. And School is back in session or will be soon. For most kids that means bus rides back always and overcrowded classrooms. Can that be safe in the midst of abandoning? I will ask the former director of the CDC Tom Friedman. Also route. The bustling and beautiful city by the sea. Was Hit by an extraordinary explosion. As the political tragedy of Lebanon finally reached its heart-rending rock bottom. I would. Expand. But first here's my take. This week, the trump administration explicitly announced its intention to work toward a new bipolar world of technology carved up between the United States and China. It announced a sweeping clean network initiative which seeks to ban virtually all Chinese IT products phone carrier's APPS. Cloud servers even undersea cables, Ben Trump issued executive orders, officially banning the Chinese video, APP Tiktok and the messaging APP we chat from operating in the US unless they are sold by mid-september. Taken together these move suggestive reversal of decades of American policy. Instead of favoring global Internet of open systems, open architecture, an open communications, the US now in visions of restricted. Internet. That is cordoned off by governments with political considerations dominating economic or technological wants. Let's be clear. There are legitimate concerns about China's technology strategy. The country is walled off at cyberspace like other country the government can force any Chinese. Company to handover data, and it routinely engages in international espionage to steal intellectual property technology data from other countries. And Twenty Eighteen Bite dance the Chinese company that owns Tiktok was forced to shut a different APP. The young tech savvy. John Yemen published a letter of self-criticism that like a confession at a Stalinist show trial. Quote I profoundly reflect on the fact that a deep level cause of the recent problems in my company is a week understanding and implementation of the four consciousnesses of Xi Jinping. All along. We have placed excessive emphasis on the role of technology and we have not acknowledged that technology must be led by the socialist core value. System Unquote. Yet. Fears about Tiktok do seem overblown the using data on it names email addresses, phone numbers..

United States Ben Trump Tiktok China Bill Gates European Union America Aria Xi Jinping President Trump Tom Friedman Canada Lebanon Director John Yemen Executive
EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

"The European Union has prolonged sanctions against dozens of north Korean officials and agencies for year over Pyongyang's continued efforts to develop nuclear missiles and other weapons of mass destruction you have quarters it said in a statement that the asset freezes and travel bans involved fifty seven people and nine entities which are typically companies banks or other organizations and will be reviewed again in a year it said that most in peace and denuclearization of the Korean peninsula must be achieved by peaceful means underlined that the diplomatic process must be continued as the only way towards realizing that goal the issue has imposed sanctions on several countries notably Iran and Venezuela but the measures against North Korea which were first introduced in two thousand six R. it's tapas I'm sorry I. Sheckley

European Union Pyongyang Iran North Korea Venezuela
Fresh update on "european union" discussed on Pat Thurston

Pat Thurston

01:03 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european union" discussed on Pat Thurston

"To remind you that I will be joined in about 15 minutes. Unless with Jan Wall and we're gonna talk about food in the movies, and I'm getting hungry, it's my dinnertime And here I am. I'll talk to Jan for 1580808 10. Let me go to Robert calling from Alameda. Robert, Welcome to kgo. Oh, I done Ah, question about the postal Service in the mail in ballots. I have a P O box. Do you think I would be more likely to get my ballot? I'm just asking you. I don't know if you send your they send your Ballot as I understand it to your registered mailing address, and that's what they're going to do, okay? Okay, That's what I wanted to know. So I'm just for the best. Thanks. All right. I appreciate that. Thanks so much. Let me go to Emma. Emma. You waited such a long time. I apologize so many calls and so little time. I know. I know. You're so popular by wife you said Now I, um well, the thing is, though. Ah, lot of people hear you, but I don't think a lot of people listen to you. Anyway, Um I packed past. Thurston was the 1st 1 that put me aware of everything that's happening with our mail system. And so I've been following it. And my biggest fear is having D joy there, And right now he's telling his postal workers to send out parcels you know, on first class mail kind of gets left sitting In the office for you know, a few days before it gets mailed. At what If he were to say that all the pink envelope Stay in the boxes, and then those boxes in the post office disappear. What if who says that's scary, But who would be the one to say that? Well, wouldn't it be the joy? Well, you know, I have to tell you. That's the thing. No post office employees were to follow that instruction. They know they know what they're supposed to do. But if I work for the post office And the president of the United States kept saying You can't trust the post office. He can't trust mail in voting. I'd be horrified. I mean, it's it's a dem aggression of the people. We rely on a six days a week to deliver our mail. I know. It's you know, no president of the United States has ever abused the system. So completely as this president has. And what bothers me is if This were a Democratic president. Rather than a Republican president. The Republicans will be up in arms. They'd already have him in jail. And I appreciate your call and your patients. Thank you. Rob emails, the controversial practice known as ballot harvesting. Allows campaign workers union members and volunteers to go door to door collecting mail in ballot and then hand delivering them to election officials to be counted. And then, he says, in some documented cases, the worker's collective the ballots have entered into voters, homes, help him retrieve and fill out their ballots. Look, Rob. It's just nonsense. What can I tell you? I can tell you that when I was a Republican, we went around and collected absentee ballots as well. But nobody goes in and helps. In a widespread basis, people fill up their ballots. You know you underestimate the American voter. Or maybe You believe the diabolical unions? And the political party hacks. Democrats. Are corrupting the system. There is no evidence of it. None. And you've got to understand Rob repeating it or citing these, uh, frankly, dubious sources and I've looked at a lot of the stuff you sent me. Is nonsense. Oh, interesting. Margaret corrects me. I've been getting my absentee ballot of my P O box for 20 years. My physical addresses registered, but my mailing address is listed as my P O. B. Margaret. Thank you for correcting me. I did not know that. I thought it had to come to your Home address. And I'm glad to be Corrected. Let's go to AA. Roberto calling from Santa Rosa Roberto, Welcome to KGO. Hello, John. Thanks for taking my call. Sir. I became a 15 1994 from Salvador in this country, and I'm really afraid of all this famous number 45 saying How come nobody something about bringing in the international coalition to watch the election in the United States like they do in Latin American countries? Well, the Carter center has said. That they are going to monitor the elections and we did have election monitors in the last election. In fact, I think they came from the European Union. And we should have monitors. We should Totally. I mean, you know, I mean, he's making all this false claims and just convinced his followers about it, and it's just crazy. I mean, maybe maybe so sad it maybe I want to go backto Salvo actually put it that way. Let's not go that far. But we're happy to have you here. And don't forget to vote. Appreciate your call. Let me go to see Jay calling from Fairfax CJ. Welcome to kgo. Hi. How are you today? I'm splendid. Thank you for asking. That's good. I'm a poll worker and I just got my application to sign up for the upcoming election, and they're going to be holding the election on for eight hours on the 31st of October 8 hours on the first of November. Eight hours on the second of November and the regular schedule for Election Day, November 3rd. How interesting. No. How will your position Because you work on balloting are what do you plan to do on Election day? Will you be at your voting center or I'm really I'm really considering what I am what I'm going to do. I'm 80 years old. I've been doing this for a long time, and I don't know that I can. I'm always tired, just re election day because I have to be up. Cheat their one thing. If they came and worked at the poles, they would see that none of that goes on. Everything is so secure. It's just amazing how much they go through. They have numbered ballots. When you do the mail in ballot, it has to come back with your signature and it and it does get compared back. And in fact, there were a couple of people that the husband used the wife on the lope. And that was rejected because they were in the wrong envelope. I mean, they really get down to the nitty gritty on this stuff, and people are so afraid because of all of the rumors that go up, they say that Oh, everybody at the DMV gets to sign up to vote, and they're all these illegals that they're doing it and one of the things that came up earlier. Wass that people could call in and register to vote when those people register to vote online When they come to the polling place. There's a special little box that's next to their name that says I'd be required. So that you need to look at their identification at the polling place just for those people who signed up online, you know, CJ. I'm so glad you called. Because most people are completely ignorant of what you've just said. You know, it's absolutely you're absolutely right. They should come and work at the post. They need people. So I have a question of closing question for you. Do you have confidence? That this election will be fair and free..

President Trump United States KGO ROB Robert Emma Jan Wall O. B. Margaret Alameda Carter Center European Union Thurston Wass DMV Roberto Santa Rosa Roberto Salvador John
EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

"The European Union has prolonged sanctions against dozens of north Korean officials and agencies for year over Pyongyang's continued efforts to develop nuclear missiles and other weapons of mass destruction you have quarters it said in a statement that the asset freezes and travel bans involved fifty seven people and nine entities which are typically companies banks or other organizations and will be reviewed again in a year it said that most in peace and denuclearization of the Korean peninsula must be achieved by peaceful means underlined that the diplomatic process must be continued as the only way towards realizing that goal the issue has imposed sanctions on several countries notably Iran and Venezuela but the measures against North Korea which were first introduced in two thousand six R. it's tapas I'm sorry I. Sheckley

European Union Pyongyang Iran North Korea Venezuela
The Encryption Debate Rages On

Cyber Security Sauna

04:07 min | Last week

The Encryption Debate Rages On

"So etiquette you've talked about encryption before. Got Fascinated. Encryption in the nineties already, I've been most interested in societal aspects of cryptography lately since I've seen quite concerted attacks against the freedom of businesses and individuals on using encryption, you're doing a horrible job tooting your own horn. You're not mentioning the UK parliament or anything like that at all. I was. Invited by the British parliament actually, they had a giant comet A. When they were deliberating the investigatory powers bill, I can today's so they invited me to to give evidence on encryption and I was happy to. Explain how what they were. Planning to do was horrible. Davor. Nicely listening to are they paid no attention to why opinions? I was also participating in the European Union Commission Panel on. On dual-use aspects of encryption. And similarly to European Commission. noted. That the guy from Finland appeared on, they pay no attention to what I was telling. So I have good track record of. Being listened to, but look necessarily followed or that's all we can. Anyone of, US, can ask for. But. You sound like the right person to briefly summarize what the Christian debate is all about. Technology. And from the mathematics point of view, we have gotten to a point where good quality encryption. is now available and good enough quality would in this context me in that if I choose to protect. Some piece of information and communication with quality. cryptography means. It. Is Too costly for the adversary to try to break. That encryption in. reasonable. Amount of time. So everybody on this planet currently has access to technology and know-how on good quality encryption at this is unprecedented in our times, and of course, this medics. Punch off authorities unhappy because quite many of those intelligence gathering mechanisms and. The law enforcement investigatory methods have being built around the notion that the authorities would be given access to people's. Communication. Day. Regardless of how it was protected. In case, there is a legitimate need to obtain that access If there's a good quality could Covic protections, there's nobody but the actual personal interest that they all started these are now. Tracking, or trying to interrogate. So nobody else would be positioned to decrypt the material sold that makes of course, the authorities have begun happy, and that discussion has been going on for centuries. and. Only now, a small people to sit. And individuals are in a position to utilize encryption without having to ask for permission. Yeah. So like before when when regular citizens tried to encrypt their information so that it wasn't available for law enforcement lawyer I was just like all you sweet summer child and just cracked it anyway but they can't do that anymore implementation. They were either week because the computing power was not that abundant in the past. All they were artificially weak. So they were basically I. The back door, all day were deliberately written. To be faulty so that the authorities would be in a position to crack the conversation open.

European Commission. United States British Parliament European Union Commission UK Finland
Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

KNX Evening News

06:02 min | Last week

Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

"That he has never once broach the issue of Russia, placing bounties on the heads of American troops in Afghanistan with his counterpart Vladimir Putin. Then just hours later, he announces the complete withdrawal of U. S forces from Germany. And Hodges is a retired lieutenant general in the U. S Army and former commanding general for United States Army Europe based in Germany. Currently he is an analyst and scholar at the centre for European Policy Analysis. General. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for the privilege. So let's start with the last thing first. Which was the announcement from the White House about us troops out of Germany. Did that shock you? Well, it was a surprise when I heard it two months ago when it came out in a Wall Street Journal report that about 10,000 we're going to come out on days. Of course, it was also a shock to all of the U. S headquarters in Europe at the time, as well as our allies. On today. Of course, the number that we heard was closer to 12 hours. So they're apparently going to moves to other regions. What is the basis for having troops in these numbers in Germany in the first place? Once the original idea, and then how are the other countries there now reacting to this Well, keep in mind that the total number of Americans that are based in Germany's 34,000 That's about 12,000 Air Force in 22,000 army so That's probably about 1/3 of what could be seated in the Coliseum there in Los Angeles or some other major university stadium. It's not a lot of people, the primary function that they perform. Ah, commanding control, logistics, intelligence communications. Things that help the United States carry out our national security strategy in our defensive strategy in Europe, Africa in the Middle East, so anything, they're not. They're providing protection for Germany at all. They're there to give us Forward, basing that makes it easier for us to carry out our strategy. But am I correct general that the Russians were never exactly to put it mildly pleased that these air troops were in Germany and would be not at all disappointed that they're leaving. Well, no, This is just to the Kremlin because they've done nothing to change their behavior in a positive way. They still occupy Crimea illegally. They still are killing Ukrainian soldiers and done passed done Mass every week. Still occupied 20% of Georgia. They still support the Assad regime, which has generated millions of refugees and killed hundreds of thousands of their own people and their supporting general Haftar in Libya, which is going to generate another 1,000,000 refugees. Into Europe, so they've done nothing to change their behavior. And yet we reduce our capability and Germany by about 1/3 so to me that that again now We've had US troops in Germany since the end of World War two on some people have said. Well, why are they still there? The Cold War's over and I would say well because of US leadership and because of NATO. We've had no war in Europe for 71 years. I mean, that's actually since 1945. Don't do math in public 75 years. That's an incredible accomplishment. When you think of the history of Europe so Well, with the exception of the break up in Yugoslavia, all the nations of Europe that have found each other for centuries. Now, basically all of the same team in NATO What a huge benefit to the United States that are most important trading partner partner. The European Union is stable and secure, so this is for our benefit. Move on to the other part of this discussion. The time we have left the president not confronting Vladimir Putin about the bounties in the most recent phone call, they have, and then reportedly also other phone calls that they've had Knowing that everyone would be watching for this that people wanted something to be said. Yeah, I don't understand. Um, while the president is not more forceful and clear, because actually the acts of the department offense up until this terrible announcement today of the action Of this administration have actually increased in Europe. We have more troops in Germany today than we did under President Obama and everything that President Obama promised. Has been carried out by this administration. So there's a disconnect between what Is happening on the ground in Europe and in what the president says to be candid. I can't explain that when it comes to the reports of bounces, own troops head in Afghanistan. I was there for 15 months back in 2009 and 2010. As a brigadier general, I always assumed that the Russians wanted to see us fail to see us bleed because of our support for the mujahideen with the Soviet Union was in Afghanistan. But, um Wouldn't when the domain of Thailand from Pakistan into Afghanistan was cut off. The Russian's still allowed us to move supplies What we call the northern Supply line moving supply around. We were still able to move through Russia to get stuff in and out so they could have really hurt us if they want to. I suspect that this business about the bounty is probably at some local level some overeager person. I never thought the Taliban needed any motivation to kill Americans. The president could make this go away if he was much more clear about how he opposes the criminals. Technologists. Retired Lieutenant general US Army Former Commanding general for United States Army Europe Thanks the K Index in depth podcast you're going Get that for free

Europe Germany United States United States Army President Trump Vladimir Putin Afghanistan Russia Nato President Obama U. S Army Wall Street Journal U. S Analyst European Policy Analysis Taliban Hodges European Union
Knowing When to Call It Off with Mark Ein

No Challenges Remaining

06:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Knowing When to Call It Off with Mark Ein

"Welcome to new challenges. Remaining Ben Rothenberg I am happy to be joined although under unhappy circumstances third time this year enjoyed that mark. Who is the owner of the city open tournament in Washington Marksman on the show twice before this year and Talked in April about how it was likely that the tournament possible the term it could be the first one back on the calendar and what that would mean we talked in June about that. Plants are going ahead, and but then unfortunately just yesterday mark you announced that the city open will not be held in two thousand, twenty, canceling the event for the year. COMMISERATIONS. I, often, then, secondly, how how did you? Come to this decision. What sort of changed between? Now and when we when we last spoken. Yeah well always always good to be with you. Enjoy the conversation and a chance to talk through some of the. Some of the behind the scenes parts of the tennis world that I think a lot of people. Don't don't understand or get to get to get insights on. On Yeah when you and I talked, we were really excited. We were extremely cramped for them. we had made already outlawed of things were in place, and the remaining tasks that needed to get resolved or or obstacles to be overcome were all that we felt comfortable. We were GONNA be able to achieve all of those And we're heading down that path. Everything was going well, and then I would say about two weeks ago. Of everything took a U-TURN You know in the end the main reason we have to decide yesterday's. The this tournament was GonNa. Start today it was gonNA start this weekend. You couldn't host because international players at the moment can't get into America without a quarantine, and they can't get back to Europe after so You kind of have to decide. Are you GonNa? Can you know what's the chance that all gets resolved in the next three weeks and our chest obviously before three weeks? If people have to get here and that was the biggest. Factor but they said starting a couple of weeks ago, things just started heading in the wrong direction at the beginning of July, the European Union imposed. Travel restrictions on people coming from the United States. Virtually all the countries there have those travel restrictions pry in some level, made it harder for us to get the waiver for people coming here although I, I do think I think there is a reasonably good chance that those things ultimately got resolved in time for the US Open but not for us. And then it was just a series of other things. Obviously, the trend in the virus was heading in a very good place back then, and and it's obviously in a lot of America has reversed course Washington remains actually city that is in really good shape, so it's good here, but the fact that it's bad elsewhere. is problematic, and then you're disturbance, just a lot of stuff from show. We'll get into the conversation, but we lost our our bubble hotel because all their reservations for the two months after ours ended up getting canceled and. And say we can't just open for you. And then shut down till November, so now they said they were going to be shut down until November, and and they actually think it'll actually be January February before it makes them stop in. And then we went to another bubble hotel that was going to be really good to that was really excited and four days later they called US exactly the same thing, and said we're we're an and they were they couldn't. Both of them couldn't have been more sorry. They could have been more excited But just all these exogenous external events. Had An impact on them, which had an impact on Austin. It was just one thing after another, so the short version is as. We looked at the chances of being able to may have everything come together. It was was a tall order, and it really is better to make these decisions to give everyone some. Some. Time to plan you know players. I already know players were. Coming off vacation this week, the start training they all need to make their travel plans. Sponsors needed to activate. Hawkeye into the United States to get media, people people. Just it's a you know. All these tournaments are little mini, ecosystems, and just too many people were counting on it, and really sadly and disappointingly we ACCO- decide not to go forward again to some of the details of different things in a second, but I i. I'm just curious. I earned the last show you talked about sort of your general optimism in your entrepreneurial optimism and your I think. You have a very much a you know. Do added a lot of things. How hard does that make and just? Personality wise as your has businessman, your business style to to stop to sort of admit defeat on some level that this just isn't gonNA. Be Possible this year. It's the hardest part of it. Dan I literally I. It is, it cuts against every single instinct bone in my body like this is not an e. you know I wanted things I take pride in I. You know work with so many great people over the years I think the one thing I've known for is like the guy never gives up till the bitter end. And there's a lot of times people often say just give up. Just give up. It's fine. It's not meant to be. It's not I'm like no, we've got we've got a got to. Succeed, we have to get over the finish line and It's interesting because this is a very rare unique experience. I can't think of another time that it's happened, but Ben before this decision we I pulled all of our stakeholders. Everyone and people were supportive. They were they were cheering. For US people wanted the event to happen, but there wasn't a single one who went presented with the facts thought we should do something different. And so I thought maybe I'll try strategy life for once. I'll tell you how it goes right now. I feel so good. Is Not. The Way I've lived my life. But I I actually do I'm very at peace with it, our team and again I you know it's me talking, but there is a team of people. I think we're all really sad and disappointed, but we're all at peace and kill like we made the right decision.

United States Ben Rothenberg America Washington European Union Austin Tennis Europe DAN
Slack accuses Microsoft of anticompetitive practices in EU complaint

Rick Hamada

00:13 sec | 2 weeks ago

Slack accuses Microsoft of anticompetitive practices in EU complaint

"And business messaging APP Slack is accusing Microsoft of antitrust Violations in the European Union. The complaint filed to the European Commission accuses Microsoft of tying its team software to its office system to snuff out

Microsoft European Union European Commission
Airlines call for testing to restore transatlantic travel

Buck Sexton

00:16 sec | 2 weeks ago

Airlines call for testing to restore transatlantic travel

"The European Union to quickly restored transatlantic air travel by deploying a joint covert 19 testing program. The CEOs of United American Airlines. Alfonzo issued a letter today citing the importance of international travel to the global economy. I'm Rich Dennison, and

Rich Dennison United American Airlines Alfonzo European Union
U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 2 weeks ago

U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

"Parliamentary report on Russian influence in the United Kingdom is out this morning. And it's bad, among other things that says the UK government actively avoided trying to figure out of Russia tried to influence the Brexit referendum for more. We've got NPR's London correspondent with US Frank Langfitt, who's looking at this high, Frank. Hey, Rachel. I mean, I said, it's bad. It's that that the British government would be intentionally trying to avoid figuring out the extent of Russian interference. I mean, what can you tell us? It's well, it's It's completely damning people here. Actually, we've been waiting for this report for months. And we thought we were going to find out if the Russians tried to influence the Brexit vote. The answer, in fact, was different and definitely it was more unsettling. Stuart Hosey is with the Scottish National Party is also in the parliament, and this is what he said today at a press conference. No one in government knew if Russia interfered in or sought to influence the referendum because they didn't know want to know the UK government of actively avoided looking for evidence that Russia interfered. Why, Frank? Why wouldn't anyone in the British government want to know this? That's actually really easy answer, and I think the answer is this. It would have undermined the Brexit referendum. Remember the biggest decision of the British people in decades? It's already changed the course of British history and the person who was front and center and that was a guy named Boris Johnson, who is now the prime minister. So if you say Russia interfered, then it could undermine this thing that has changed the course of British history. You can see why nobody certainly in the government wanted to mess with that. Ah Stewart, Hosey said No one would touch with a 10 foot pole and he went on and said this. This is in stark contrast. To the U. S response to reports of interference in the 2016 presidential elections, No matter how politically all quarter, potentially embarrassing there should have been an assessment of Russian interference in the referendum. They must now be one. Okay, So did this report find Russian influence anywhere in the British government? Yes, it absolutely did. One is the Scottish referendum. This was 2015 when Scotland was voting for independence. And the reason this is important is from the perspective of Russia. Vladimir Putin would want Scotland to leave the United Kingdom to weaken it. It's the same reason why we know that he wanted the Brexit vote to pass so that it would weaken the European Union. But another part and everybody kind of knows everybody knows this, Rachel, But another thing that that's mentioned here is that London is such a Place for money laundering, and this is a really good quote that I liked, frankly from the text. Russian influence in the UK is the new normal. Successive governments have welcomed the oligarchs and their money with open arms, providing them with the means of recycling illicit finance through the London laundromat. So how's the British government responding? Not much of anything, considering what this report says. You might expect something more robust. Dominic Robby's the Foreign secretary, he has has a boiler plate response so far, saying Russia must desist from these attacks. And that the UK has defend its country and democracy and values from such a hostile state. NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Thanks, Frank. We appreciate it always breaks it

British Government Russia United Kingdom Frank Langfitt London Stuart Hosey NPR Rachel Vladimir Putin Boris Johnson Scottish National Party Dominic Robby Scotland Ah Stewart Prime Minister European Union Secretary Brexit
EU Agrees To Relief Package In Grants, Loans To Bail Out Pandemic-Battered Economies

WSJ What's News

03:45 min | 2 weeks ago

EU Agrees To Relief Package In Grants, Loans To Bail Out Pandemic-Battered Economies

"The European Union is hoping and out of the box approach will bring some economic stability to the region during the pandemic leaders agreed to a two point one trillion dollar package. What makes this different is for the first time it's offering hundreds of billions of dollars in common debt for more on this game changing agreement. We're bringing in our Brussels bureau chief Dan Michaels Dan. Thanks for being here. My pleasure Dan in our reporting we have called this. Relief package unprecedented. This is a big shift. Perhaps in the way that the EU in the past has really shown it's fiscal power. Indeed this is a dramatic shift for the EU because you members until very recently have avoided giving the central authorities in Brussels the power to issue debt or raise taxes but the economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus has been so dramatic that this was the measure that they have decided on to stop the worst impact of the the recession that is hitting Europe particularly in the most Hard hit southern countries like Italy. Spain and Greece. Let's talk about Italy. Spain and Greece in particular. We spend a lot of time looking at the hardship among those three countries in this case the EU is saying the needs there are greater and were showing priority to the region. What sends out most is that the EU is willing to grant to those countries many of these the same countries that struggled a decade ago in the euro crisis but at that time Germans and other northern European countries only wanted to give them low interest. Loans Italy this time as a people remember was the first European country to be hit by corona virus. Northern Italy was devastated by the Italian. Konami was really hit hard. Spain was also hit very hard by the coronavirus Nelson for Greece because our economies are so dependent on tourism and summer travel and since the global economy has shut down it really has been damaging to those countries and so the economic after-effects even as Europe has reopened have been quite painful. And that's what these these measures agreed to this. European summit aimed to address. Let's talk about the to power players. Brokering this deal French. President Emmanuel Macron and Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel Merckel in particular has had this reputation of being very fiscally conservative yet. She's going out of her comfort zone. German Chancellor Angela Merkel's shift here is one of the most dramatic elements of what's happened over recent days for more than a decade. She has opposed anything like grants to other countries She couldn't imagine giving her attacks. There is money to Italians or Greeks Spaniards with no strings attached. No interest payments. Nothing like that. But a combination of factors over recent months changed our view. One is a French. President Emmanuel macron lobbied her. Very hard on this. She saw how dire the situation was. When when CORONA VIRUS HIT EUROPE IN MARCH BORDERS WERE CLOSED? Supply chains shutdown. The economy can pretty close to grinding to a halt and there was a strong feeling that the EU itself could be endangered. She also. She's not running for reelection next year. She said she won't so that gives you a little bit more freedom. So she has over. Recent weeks made if not one hundred eighty degree. Turn quite a dramatic metamorphosis.

President Emmanuel Macron European Union Dan Michaels Dan Spain Italy Europe Brussels Greece Chancellor Angela Merkel Merck Angela Merkel Northern Italy Konami Bureau Chief Chancellor Germany Nelson
EU leaders clinch $2.1 trillion pandemic relief and budget deal after 4 days and 4 nights of infighting over money and power

Red Eye Radio

00:13 sec | 2 weeks ago

EU leaders clinch $2.1 trillion pandemic relief and budget deal after 4 days and 4 nights of infighting over money and power

"Of pandemic relief. European Union leaders wrapped four days of nights, four days and nights of negotiations, clinching an unprecedented $2 trillion budget, including 750 billion in loans and grants to you countries hit hardest by the

European Union
EU agrees on huge $2.1 trillion virus aid fund at tense 4-day summit

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

00:21 sec | 2 weeks ago

EU agrees on huge $2.1 trillion virus aid fund at tense 4-day summit

"Four days and nights of wrangling over it weary European Union leaders have finally clinched an unprecedented to $40.1 trillion budget and Corona Virus Recovery Fund to confront the biggest recession in its history. See you reaching a consensus on a 750 billion Euro Corona virus fund to be sent his loans and grants to the country's hit hardest by the virus.

European Union
Insults, flaring tempers mark marathon EU summit on budget

Pacifica Evening News

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

Insults, flaring tempers mark marathon EU summit on budget

"Weary European Union leaders expressed cautious optimism that a deal is inside on their fourth day of wrangling over an unprecedented to $0.1 trillion budget and Corona Virus Recovery Fund. That follows a weekend of walkouts, flaring tempers and insults. It took an emotional dinner speech by European Council president shown Michelle about leaders not failing their union. French President Manuel McColl. Expressing his frustration and a new set of numbers to send the marathon summit onward. McCall said these were extremely tense moments but that things were progressing. Mythical community these compromises and I say this very clearly will not be made the cost of the European gold not out of principle, but will be made because we are facing unprecedented health, economic and social crisis and because our countries needed European unity needs it. Of the two day summit was supposed to end Saturday but has been forced into overtime by deep ideological differences among the 27 leaders. All nations agree in principle they need to band together. But five richer countries in the northern part of Europe wants strict controls on spending while struggling southern nations like Spain and Italy Say those conditions should be kept to a

European Union European Council Manuel Mccoll President Trump Mccall Michelle Europe Spain Italy
Coronavirus: EU leaders start third day of recovery talks

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Coronavirus: EU leaders start third day of recovery talks

"A summit of European Union leaders in Brussels. We'll reconvene on Sunday for an unplanned third day as they're trying to reach agreement on an economic stimulus package on DH there next budget. From Brussels. Here's Kevin Connolly, the Spanish prime minister, Pedro Sanchez, so the talks were intense on the vast amount of money in play 1.8 trillion euros over seven years. Means the political stakes are very high. Wealthier countries like Austria and the Netherlands want Co vered recovery helped to come more in the form of loans than grants and to be given in return for economic reforms. The state's likely to receive hope in southern and Eastern Europe present the idea of supervision or scrutiny by Richard Partners. Some sort of compromise now seems to be within reach, but it's certainly not

Brussels Pedro Sanchez European Union Kevin Connolly Prime Minister Eastern Europe Richard Partners Austria Netherlands
EU leaders resume 'grumpy' summit on budget, virus fund

The Mentors

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

EU leaders resume 'grumpy' summit on budget, virus fund

"Are meeting that there's a summit European summit where the leaders will discuss the size of the details off the bailout program for the economic block. Angela Merkel's at the remain significant differences between European leaders over the bad pick up Bailout package and ah, the budget for the European Union. But market participants are hoping that the U. You will employ more fiscal stimulus measures to support They're Corona virus battered economies.

European Union Angela Merkel
EU leaders hold first budget summit in pandemic times

BBC World Service

01:08 min | 3 weeks ago

EU leaders hold first budget summit in pandemic times

"European Union leaders are gathering in Brussels for the first summit in person since the start of the Corona virus crisis. President Emmanuel Macron of Frantz called it a moment of truth. Said the leaders would do everything possible to reach a deal. He'll try to persuade them to back a 750 million euro Corona virus recovery Fund. He and the German Chancellor Angela Merkel, proposed that 2/3 of it should be in the form of grants to help stricken nations such as Italy and Spain. A group of Northern European countries would rather see loans than grants. As Gavin Lee explains, You have what's called the frugal for the likes off the Dutch, The Austrians to Swedish, the Danish An add on top of that you have the budget, which is basically how you gets itself through for the next seven years, and what that means you have. An increased amount of money that each country will have to put into the coffers take away the UK from the equation. That means the money that the UK is no longer putting in. Others have to basically dig into their pockets deeper. So that adds to the complexity of all this. Expect this to be I'm told by the senior You saw the mother of all

Frantz President Emmanuel Macron European Union UK Angela Merkel Gavin Lee Brussels Chancellor Italy Spain
"european union" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:57 min | 8 months ago

"european union" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"The European Union America is listed to foster forty five seconds fifteen glad.

European Union America
"european union" Discussed on Hijacking History

Hijacking History

18:32 min | 9 months ago

"european union" Discussed on Hijacking History

"In this podcast. We're going to be talking about the strengths and the weaknesses of the European Union. Americans can be forgiven for not knowing much about about the European Union after all not even Europeans know very much about the European Union and we have to define what this entity or institution is before we try to answer the question that is posed to you in this unit. Six discussion four assignment. That question question is what were the strengths and weaknesses of the European Union since nineteen eighty seven. But let's go back and see what the European Union is in the first place after World War Two. The nations of Europe had finally learned their lesson. They realized that they could not continue to go on. And Fight World War after World War and still survive so they decided that they would try to do something fundamentally the mentally different from what they had tried after World War One. After nineteen forty-five you have a United Nations in place but let something more seemed to be necessary when we talk about the European Union. We're talking about something called European integration. What that means is that the European nation states would agree to give up some of their individual sovereignties in order to to pool their resources with others and time their economies together as closely as possible European integration ration- refers to the pulling down of barriers between nation states as well as the surrender of power by hi the nation states to some organization that exists above it in this case the European Union now the European Union did not come into existence until nineteen ninety one but it was being put together for decades before before that the first title was the Common Market? It really started. After World War Two Winston Churchill said we've got to have some kind end of integration of economies at least in order to build trust between nations. Now this is all not as this cloudy and abstract as you think this is pretty pretty simple stuff if you think about the idea. Is that nation states. Do not go to war with each other if they are constantly trading with each other that is if they have economic linkages if they have economic not MC ties and communications with other countries generally speaking nations do not go to worry with each other when they depend upon one another her for their economic livelihoods so the easiest concept of how to create linkages between nations was to have economic conomic ties and to set up economic relationships between say Germany and France by the early nineteen fifties Germany armony and France had agreed to the foundations of the common market and because Germany and France were dependent upon each other for their economic livelihood. Tariffs were removed and essentially. It was like they didn't have any borders between them and because they we're tied together their animosities tended to go down and it was true. That nation's get along better when when they are dependent upon one another for their economic prosperity now of course. Eventually the European Union would expand in two ways. I it would expand in terms of the number of member states that belong to it because it started out as just an agreement between Germany and France but the ambition was to extend this relationship to all sectors of the economy to pull down on all tariff barriers between nation states but also to strengthen it with something called enlargement enlargement refers to bringing other nation states into the Union and eventually there was going to be twenty seven European states in the European Union every European nation and except for Switzerland which has always wanted its independence and so the European Union seemed to be a huge huge success by the end of the nineteen eighties and the aspiration or hope for integration. was going to go way way beyond economics. It was going to include politics and political agreements. For example. The European Union Union prohibits the death penalty which means that no member state of the European Union can have the death penalty this assay law. Aw at the level of the European Union and all the member states have to agree with it or they can't be a member of the European Union and so there are many different examples of this and there's also a government structure to the European Union. which makes it look a little bit like the United States? Ace the fact that the European Union can order the member states to do certain things like prohibit the death penalty that sounds like the national government in the United States and so some people have referred to the European Union as a United States of Europe Europe now that is a fallacy Europe never was and never will be a United States of Europe nor will the European Union Nyan ever go in that direction Europeans. Do not want to have a structure like the United States and what is is that structure well that structure is a supra national government that has the ability to coerce coerce. Its member states. And that's what we have. In our Constitution. We have a federal structure of government. It is true that the states have some powers reserved to themselves under the constitution. However it's also true that the national government can impose its will on the states in a host of ways and it's also true that if there's a conflict in the United added states between state power and national power the national government always comes out the winner the founding fathers in the seventeen eighteen eighties when they wrote the constitution wanted to transfer power away from the states and concentrate that power in the national government? So that the national government would have the power to coerce. The state says I said before the Europeans don't want that they don't want member states to surrender their sovereignty more than is absolutely necessary now sovereignty I should should have defined that for sovereignty is power and the question in any political structure or political institution or or constitution is who has the power well. In the United States America the states do have certain powers but the national national government has more power and again if there is a conflict between the two the national government is the one comes out the winner. The European Union is not like that. The member states in the European Union do not surrender much of their power or sovereignty not to the European Union. European Union can do very little to impose its will upon the member states and that's one of the reasons the European Union doesn't seem to be very powerful institution so here are some of the differences between the EU and the US who s in the United States. National Government is supra national. That means it's above the states and it can impose its will upon the states in the European Union. The member states are in charge. Laws are not passed unless all the member states agree to them there has to be unanimity. There are sectors that the states have no control over in the United States dates such as the military foreign policy and the coining of money. All those powers are reserved to the national government from it in the United States but in the European Union the member states must agree for any decisions on military action or foreign policy. Let's see or monetary policy the coining money. If you want to find a parallel to the European Union it would be the confederacy in the American civil war. The confederate states of America were member states. That had most of the power reserved to themselves and there was very little power that was given up to the national government by the confederate states of America. That's that's one of the reasons why the confederacy lost the civil war because they could not coordinate their efforts and they could not surrender their sovereignty sovereignty to Jefferson Davis so that he could win a war that required coordination at the top so the confederacy is is sort of the model of the European Union and we saw how that turned out. Many people think the European Union is going to collapse because it has has the same issues of weakness that the southern confederacy had in the American civil war. There are two specific problems that are faced by the European Union. One is that is CR- incredibly complicated. The government structure is very hard to understand right. And they don't have congress. They don't have a two party system they don't have a supreme court. They do have a court of Justice they do have what's called the European Commission where member states try to agree on legislation or constitutional provisions from time at the time. But these have to be unanimous decisions and the sheer complexity of the European Union drives Europeans. Crazy after you listen to this podcast you will have a greater understanding of the nature of the European Union than the vast majority. The of Europeans have think about that for a minute since they can't understand it. Well what's the chance that this European Union. The thing is going to survive much longer. It is under tremendous stress right now for a variety of reasons but it has also had tremendous success over the years and it's impossible to say whether it will continue to survive or or whether it will go the way of all flesh and disappear at some point in the future. The death of the European Union has been predicted for many years and yet it continues to limp along and survive the other problem with the European Union. Is there's a democratic deficit with it. That's that's a famous phrase the democratic deficit. What that means is that the European Union is not very democratic? The member states can make all these decisions behind closed doors and it applies to the European people but they themselves have very a little leverage over the decisions that the European Union makes. There is a parliament that is elected by all European citizens since but the parliament has the least amount of power within the European Union. It has very little power. Compared to the European Commission and the European Council of Ministers which represent the member states is really the member states that make decisions from the top top levels of their individuals state leaderships in other words. The Prime Minister of Britain makes the Chancellor of Germany and the President of France. And they get together in a room and they make decisions. Well where does that leave the people. The people don't have much say they can vote for. Party's parliamentary party. In the European Parliament but the European Parliament has little say-so over the decisions of the European European Union and so those are the two main problems with the European Union. So what can we say about the strengths and weaknesses of the European Union since nineteen eighty seven. Well it's a complicated subject. Sometimes the very successful things that the European Union has done have created problems at the the same time. This is true in so many areas of life man as problem solving creature but in the course of solving problems he often creates new ones. I would say the biggest strength of the European Union is its environmental policy. The European Union had a hard time getting started did with legislation to protect the environment and the United States had the lead on this when the United States created the Environmental Protection Agency under the Nixon Administration in one thousand nine hundred seventy but over the decades. The European Union has gone far beyond the United States and since the George W Bush administration and even more so under Donald Trump the United States has been a laggard on environmental airmen's policy and has contributed to the problem of global warming and climate change whereas the European Union has been and leader in attempting to enforce strict environmental policies that allow for something called sustainable development. That is for industry to know that they can continue to operate for decades to come because they are not spoiling the environment so much that their existence would pose a intolerable threat to life and the environment so the Europeans have been a model for environmental environmental policy which kind of makes sense because environmental policy requires coordinated effort across national boundaries pollution in does not respect national boundaries. What China does to the environment affects the environment of other countries? And so you need. A global response is to climate change and environmental conditions and the European Union as well structured to provide such leadership not so much traditional nation states like the United States. The European Union has also deserve praise for spreading democracy to Eastern Europe but eastern Europe and Western Europe. Do not look at the world. The Same Way Eastern Europe has been more supportive of American foreign policy for example then Western Europe has been and there are real divides between eastern Europe and Western Europe but the inclusion inclusion of East European nations in the European Union is in one sense a success story and ever expanding union however however this has brought into the Union states that don't see eye to eye with the existing states and that poses a threat of does union down the road. Finally Monetary Policy is very important success story. The European Union now has a common currency you see the euro and it's very solid currency it trades at a higher value than the American dollar for example. That does it's not mean that the euro is more stable than the dollar. It's actually a lot less stable and it has never been able to achieve the stability stability of the dollar. Nevertheless it's an impressive chievements for Europeans to have the same currency whether you're in Germany or in France or in the Czech Republic or anywhere else in the Union so monetary policy threatens to divide Europeans as much as it promises to bring them together because since the European states are not equal in terms of their economic health health some nations that are wasteful in their spending can borrow money simply because they belong to the same in Currency Union as very powerful Germany and sometimes they borrow money from banks that respect the euro only to spend it wastefully swiftly and creating problems within their respective countries so the European Union is a work in progress. It has problems but it also oh has had successes and we've only touched on a few of those successes but I think you.

"european union" Discussed on Up First

Up First

08:07 min | 10 months ago

"european union" Discussed on Up First

"Hi this is Steve Inskeep we have a special report from up I. It's the background to a dramatic day of News Gordon Oakland arrived at the Capitol to testify before house investigators in the impeachment inquiry into president trump he is the United States Ambassador to the European Union Oh quid pro quo in the president's requests from Ukrainian officials in prepared testimony Sunland says Moore he says that in that text message he was just conveying what president trump told him and he insists he didn't know the president wanted a probe of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden so who is Gordon saw put our colleague Rachel Martin takes a long look Gordon Sunland has an important job he is the US ambassador to the European Union here's a bit of a video he made with his family introducing him after he was named my family is the most important thing to me we spend a lot of time together we travel together I grew up here in Portland Oregon and I'm very excited about the opportunity to spend more time in the EU and specifically in Brussels did this introductory video because the US and the author to the EU is not really a position that makes someone a household name no what has elevated Gordon Sunland into the public consciousness is something that wasn't part of his original job an assignment that put him on the ground in Ukraine and it's the reason he's testifying today the day after that now infamous call between President the trump presidents Alinsky Gordon sunland spoke with Ukrainian TV you're the US ambassador to the E U But you've been spending a great deal of time in kid why is that while President Trump has not only honored me with the job of being the US ambassador to the EU but he's also given me other special assignments details emerging about those special assignments this week we learned from testimony that acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney pushed out the diplomats who had been in charge of Ukraine policy and put three other people at the helm instead who apparently gave themselves the nickname here sunlen again on Ukrainian TV we have what are called the three Amigos and the three are migos our Secretary Perry again Ambassador Volker myself and we've been tasked with sort of overseeing the Ukraine the US relationship between our contacts at the highest levels of the US government and now the highest levels of the Ukrainian government in that same interview sunlen said that he spoke to president trump just a few minutes before he placed that call to Alinsky although in his testimony today on the minimizes that conversation he says it was short what's substantive his now famous text messages came a month and a half later that's when he denied that there was any quid pro quo in president trump's conversation with presidents Sqi he was sure in his denial he says because he clarified the issue personally with President trump the phrase quid pro quo has now become a sort of shorthand describe this entire debacle but it's a phrase Gordon Sunland uses himself to explain his own negotiating philosophy here he is describing at a business breakfast Portland back in two thousand sixteen how he used to facilitate phone calls between the former Democratic governor of Oregon and President George W Bush we would make these requests it's done quietly they were done with rifle precision and there was always a quid pro quo the governor would help the president US something and the president would help the governor was something and it was very transactional transactional was a word I heard a lot when asking friends and former colleagues about Gordon Sunland so was pragmatic as a hotel developer tight end. Gop circles working in liberal Portland Oregon Sunland had to figure out how to work with a lot of people he didn't agree with workbooks and wine bottles and Gordon among other things collects relationships this is David Nuremberg he got to know sunland when they both worked as fundraisers for Mitt Romney's presidential campaign back in two thousand twelve he and others said that back then it was pretty clear Solomon wanted to hitch his wagon to a candidate who could make him an ambassador probably to a German speaking country sunland Jewish parents fled Germany during World War Two they ended up in Washington state and opened a dry cleaning business it's a story SOM- Lynn has recently started telling a lot I'm the first in my family that was born in the US my parents were both European Mac Prince I started in Germany that was the beginning of the uprising of Hitler was able to escape my father was muddled out of Germany before things got bad soon gun through Frieda and my sister Lucy found fortunate permanent refuge in Seattle Washington David Nuremberg told me son and saw an ambassadorship as a way to square the circle of his family's legacy as some kind of symbolic justice not uncommon among the people I know who come through this experience to want to have relationships too powerful people in government because let's face it almost anyone who either personally survived or whose parents or grandparents survived the Holocaust did so because of the intervention of someone who who helped him and you think you think that explains Gordon Sunlen support of president trump and I think it may I think it may it was a process though song supported trump and then he didn't support him and then trump became the nominee in sunland went on all in and made a million dollar donation to trump's inaugural committee he still had his eyes on the prize a European Ambassador Post and jobs like that often doled out to top donors but on made the donation quietly through four separate entities lindbergh steen spent a decade working as a consultant for someone and he helped him push back against a big convention center hotel in Portland he also observed him as he made political alliances around the state Burg says sandline is not ideologue he is a political pragmatist and he would ally himself with whomever could help him achieve his dream posting in Europe he was a chance he tried to kind of the European Union fast forward fifteen months and twenty six days and now today ambassador Gordon Sunland has been subpoenaed to testify before Congress yeah I've been thinking about that I'm not sure I'm able to answer that I didn't certainly never asked me to go over and he lines he was someone who not wasn't looking to bend the rules necessarily but was trying to bend the narrative trying to make sure that he if he could tell his hit a story in his way he would win Burstein than told me his own story about working with Sunland it goes back to that Convention Center Hotel Project They were after statement saying that he was inches battle in Portland. Gordon was first and foremost interested in his own reputation Thursday is going to be I think that pillar of the.

Sunland Gordon Steve Inskeep Portland Gop Oregon twenty six days fifteen months million dollar
"european union" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"european union" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Now obviously the french empire in africa collapses axes bike quickly after the treaty of rome assigned and it's one of these late imperial episodes that people don't much like to draw attention to these days but pay attention to these episodes reminds asif how contingent the creation of things like the european union are but also how many different ideologies play whether religious or imperial <unk> own limo or along. Do you feel if this one fails there are still when you look at the long history lots of other ways we could do it. What do you think we have now. Wrap this idea up in this this version of it because there are still lots of other ways we could do it but it's not clear we can get to them all back to them so i don't know enough about about the politics especially of international banking i mean i think if the current european union fails it will be because some banking crisis blows up the european financial system tom this podcast helen thomas the person to ask about that wherever as a european union mark to to replace the current one i think will depend on what form break-up takes what former collapsed aches and how long people try to keep a failing institution going because that will set the scene for the next phase of the story but i would have thought that if the current european union collapse as for whatever reason there's enough legal harmonisation and after the political ankle class has instincts towards cooperation my guess would be there would be an attempt to european union two point bert exactly what format would take. We'll have to depend on the way in which exist in union fails we will tweet links to some of christie's writing on this subject about rousseau and many other things at t. P. podcast under school will and as always this further reading in our show notes. My name is david runciman and we've been talking politics yeah..

european union david runciman africa rome helen thomas rousseau christie bert
"european union" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"european union" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"A violation of European Union sanctions and tonight tips reported that Iran has test fired a ballistic missile that went to about a thousand miles North Korea has launched two short range military missiles to in a show of defiance to president Donald Trump the military leaders in neighboring South Korea say the surprise launch took place in the one song that region east of the rogue state the US justice department has reinstated a two decades long dormant policy allowing the federal government's use of capital punishment and immediately scheduling the executions of five Deathrow federal inmates major opioid manufacturers of asked the judge to throw out the first test case or whether they must pay for the nation's drug crisis arguing that the two Ohio counties cannot prove that the drug companies actions were responsible for overdose deaths or other harms according to newly unsealed court documents Dr Peter Breguet our resident psychiatrists who has written a book called medication badness with us right now Peter I want your thoughts on what's going on with this well I don't have any doubt that the oxycontin plague which is the Purdue pharma's the produce company owned by the fact there's they systematically flooded the country with oxycontin and that played a big role in getting all this started they they marketed very heavily as a over produced the drugs to those plenty around they they spend a lot of money on pushing at the doctors and only ended up to you four times what you would expect thing out there and then ironically I mean this is a it is just hard to hard to wrap one's mind about around these big corporations they then when ed realized as they were closing stoppage addiction that they they really ought to start looking into getting into the addiction centers business and I know that that that ever materialize far as I can tell so far but it was definitely documented that they were talking about this ETA can't over emphasize the venality these large corporations whether they're selling Prozac you know the stimulants for kids or or pain meds but there are other factors and the the Chinese and other countries illegally are making a drug called that now which is set to just a little bit to kill you where I can tell you that's right and it is probably the major cause of the death themselves date they're often caused by he said tens of thousands of deaths a year what having caused by opiates and fan mail being among them the one thing I really want to let people know though is that is that they had back lash going on doctors are being blamed for this more than they deserve and you know me I'm certainly quick to to hold my colleagues responsible sure simply prescribing opiates and simply taking opiates for pain represents a very small portion of the problem the vast majority it is are the are these drugs that are being so freely out there that their souls that families share them friend share them and that's a result of the of the huge over production of right now if you have an operation for example your doctor is now afraid to give you the amount of pain medication you need and the next scandal is gonna be a lot of increase suffering because doctors are afraid to give proper pain meds and if you're going into surgery out there folks and bring a friend along and make sure you get pain coverage after woods because it's becoming a problem good point thank you Peter keep in touch Dr Peter Bergen well the internet is really slaughtering newspapers U. S. newspaper circulation re still to lowest level since nineteen forty the first year with available that are total daily newspaper circulation that's print and digital combined was an estimated twenty eight point six million for week day thirty point eight for Sunday in two thousand eighteen those numbers are way down a mysterious temple as we discovered in a sunken ancient Egyptian city which has been described as the Egyptian Atlantis archeologists have found a Greek style temple as well as several sunken treasures such as coins or jewelry which was discovered in two thousand one the temple slid into a canal running south of it but that's a great discovery we got a story in our highlight reel it coast to coast AM dot com two separate individuals in Mississippi have reportedly come Ford two separate ones now with claims that they witnessed the your fall on the night of the legendary Pascagoula objection incident back in October of nineteen seventy three the incredible case are two men Charles Hickson and Calvin Parker taken aboard and ET craft against their will and subjected to some kind of medical examination the testimony of the two purported to abductees was so compelling that it became a sensation in the world of your for research for two more witnesses coming forward after all these years what else is going on in the skies let's check in with none other than Peter Davenport from the national UFO reporting center hi Peter good evening George in the Pascagoula case.

Iran European Union two decades
"european union" Discussed on FT World Weekly

FT World Weekly

11:45 min | 1 year ago

"european union" Discussed on FT World Weekly

"Hello and welcome to wealth weekly from the financial times i'm gonna in rockland today when discussing the new leadership of the european union selected earlier this week in lake nona summit joining me on the line from brussels correspondent spot on that jim brunson and here in the studio is europe editor benham jim i described as a light not something i mean they are but this one seem particularly fraud i mean watching from a distance i did not see wonder whether they would be able to find a compromise and therefore find find the new head of the european commission and the european council and someone how long ago was it yeah exactly i think that's what sets it apart i thought she is summit where they had a total cops in total failure on the modern day in each then pull things together i'm still by the cheese day so you know we used having all that summit talks very difficult and then they have a chip to know that and they're about to announce so they found a compromise on everything from greek bailouts to maybe at least part of the solution to a crazy some kind of migration system fear for example on this occasion they took all the way through the nights on sunday into monday morning and basically and then pretty made the decision to carry on trying and so then another three or four hours and see which diplomats described to me as being chaotic take crazy groups of leaders sitting around trying to come up with a deal completely bucket kind of way than i think they took wilson's petitions go get a few hours sleep and then finally the deal was hatched don't choose day says the deal is eventually hatched came out where they present the european commission assertive underline the german defense minister had been completely undiscussed beforehand how much did she just sort of image suddenly is somebody is brain wave and how much was this always in retrospect in the background on probably more important jim once you're gonna be nine can the commission president yeah us the underlying was owned the very long list if you'd like of potential alternative candidates for defense rights i say alternative because they official candidate for the sense rights also nine in brussels of european people's policies this is the grouping of christian democrats in central leaders their official candidate manfred veda member of european parliament when it became clear that wasn't gonna fly which is apparent before the summit they needed a plan b and her name us dylan's name was in that conversation but to be honest the main people who were mentioning it was the french french president emmanuel macron who ready pushed her kohl's and put forward their idea of building a package round which is well avenged e books and break the deadlock in the talks so i'm told by one source the jury in the negotiations her name did come up as earliest stages sheila's mentioned as a possible high represents to foreign policy so easy for minnesota role but really i think the fact that she emerged from if you like slightly from left field really helps in a way because it completely changed the dynamic of the discussion up to them all joining the summit they've been trying to solve this 'nigma of how to build a package around friends timmermans a dutch socialist as commission president's manfred favor of the president's european council this is climate been hits appalled and it wouldn't work and i think bringing her in completely change the dynamic not least because both the ac be much more essentially into the discussion with christine lagarde cutting baptized just shifted the tectonic plates bad grades some breathing room for discussion in terms of what kind of commission president's since she's gonna be they don't really know she's very strong integration is views some people fettes hers european federalists but there's no idea in brussels watch jeopardy we're moving from shown coach jim komi who is an old school european federalists but also very pragmatic donald tusk who is by no means european federalist it's a generally a much more avowedly old school you're filed if you like team michelle michelle from belgium leading the council on muslims align leading the commission i think maybe we can expect to see some clan it's just projects coming back on the table on pops and quite controversial ones so you solidarity southern european countries on migration in the form of compulsory migrant crisis may be very difficult and also maybe some ambitious projects but here's i said man i mean obviously they see the one package age are we right to focus on the line at the head of the commission as the headline or maybe in retrospect decide that it's costing the balance moved to the european central bank will make a break this package i suppose were focusing on those underlying partly because of course he is at the center of the political control the cnn political action but i agree i think christine lagarde is the most significant appointment and may have a big role in terms of shaping the future of yours and us on the line at the end of the day and it's also an appointment which has some controversy or at least questions because of course christine the god has no experiences a central banker has no experience of monetary policy is northern economist but she clearly he's a very talented two small charismatic woman with very very good politicals skills and she surrounds himself with good technical people since mario draghi is ready sort of setting the coolest monetary policy for sometimes they come maybe she's a success and ben jim sent the the french should be pushing us love on the line and generally this whole package is being seen as a bit of a trauma from manual macron so you have a french woman is the head of these e b canada they propose the the head of the commission you gotta francophone belgium as the head of the council do you think that's the right way region and if so is it a technical front porch the french basically monster shape they decisions but did she get anything out of it in the long run in terms of the mumps and francaise it's national and i think it's definitely a win emmanuel macron thing that is beyond out especially when you put it in the context of his recent sort of faded goes to build alliances and to make any headway on yours on reform for example i think this is k a big win for him he has used his influence within the european parliament ways policy within the european parliament to good effect he's established a good liberal beachhead in european policymaking which i think will be important in the years ahead but at the end of the day these are just a few people in a few very important critical posts about all the underlying problems at you and yours and remain as do many of the fundamental tensions between france and germany on how to solve those problems they know so by these appointments and what do you think will happen jim actually you mentioned there may be more of a federalist push now do you think that line to make much headway given the center of any federalist push it seems to me has to be attempts to build more of a knee conomic union around europe and the resistance waxing come probably from germany from mrs underlines and country well again i think this goes by tibetans point i think there's a risk if you're stating the importance of these appointments getting someone who's you'll put its carlisle shed geopolitical to political vision into a tough job in brussels doesn't mean your gender is now gonna carry the day simply because this is a system where anything significant has to be approved by national governments the most important stuff us directly by national leaders and then you've got the european parliament to contend with as well but it certainly helps i mean my crawl has come along with a very ambitious agenda the u of centralizing economic policy on the forging very strong corporation in other areas and having basically you'll mates in key coordination roles kind of any help microsoft income and isolated figure you summits but now his political best mate michelle michelle is not gonna be sharing some it's so anyhow brady in terms of just kind of greasing the wheels of processes endless brussels prices and imaginations you need to go through to get some kind of result i think it certainly does mean is that you've got leaders who want to push europe forwards inquire ambitious ways in assimilates mr macron say just just counter example you have a goal it's very cautious conservative leader from central and eastern europe coming in and taking over major prosecution with an agenda say robot coney udall making slash easy regulations on basically rewind policy you integration you've got people coming in who could have a very positive agenda to try and keep building new european project and i'm not sure you watch the favor of dislike manual not only wants to exactly that and then i mean not does uninteresting when it seemed to me to imagine the summit which is that it is accounts and they outside seems like a bit of a defeat the central and eastern europe they used up all around munition to block friends timmons she'd been taking some companies such as potent cold but now that faced with an intern in western european federalists team would geographical you're not you're not certainly not like yes they seem to take so much pleasure in looking timmons and the hungarian rocking manfred very bad that they saw as a triumph for them and for the unity of the vinograd for cool but i agree i mean they clearly can be an effective negative fools but still they have anything positive out of it how do they move forward their agenda now will if she lives on the line be any self thrown rule of law where she's i doubted so to it felt like a pretty fleeting victory for them and it shows you that they're gonna need to do a lot more to be able to build opposed to the lawn and maybe it's not just these new york eastern europe undoubtedly they need to figure out why they can actually use their influence better yeah i love the sense where nothing we obviously have to discuss stuff's brexit the neighbors government will be shutting up quite soon property led by boris johnson asking for rocket adjustments to the brexit deal otherwise we're gonna end with a no deal brexit now it always seemed to me jim that it's unlikely were gonna get any adjustments but the law steve somers had shown a reluctance to embrace no deal brexit on the palms with e you maccarone quote some pushback when he seemed to be proposing that but now we have shown michelle at european council does that make action no deal brexit slightly more likely it's ready instincts no the donald tusk the man who shot michelle will be succeeding is european council president i think he's often portrayed in the uk press as being a part of the sports in because because he's been very outspoken against breaks to such as boris johnson united states most famous quotes is the breakfast is have a special place in hell because they cars uk tonight's leave without having a way described at the time is a shred of aplomb but i studied donald tusk is fundamentally anglophile the file politician who was devastated the uk to leave i desperately wants to be uk tribus the decision so the uk undue influence in europe hot very very strong friend in donald says he's not being placed by shell michelle if you opt now has played the role being the most outspoken julieta when it comes to expressing frustration about you case approach to brexit when it comes to saying that you should be ready to take a new deal if necessary when it comes to pretty much ridiculing to be honest the way the uk is gone about the negotiations so he's in by the mind the person the politician saying the things the other leaders such as i'm gonna go called say now he is the one who is gonna be sharing these summits when you british prime minister will be attending zillow's western they used when you leave and afterwards and even joined that will be charing meetings twentyseventh e you leaders say it's a very very interesting change i'm pretty quite worrying one you yeah yeah yeah so although i suppose the show michelle will have to motor right his frustrations izzy council president but i suppose were the stage and the prices were even mind you change of attitude and temperament could count for quite a long yeah because to push back against macro and michelle one i don't think he will known certainly no the beginning okay well after leaving now but will get a sense of how this is playing in the coming months the new team take that places in brussels but for now thank you very much indeed the gym runs in brussels tobacco home here in the studio london that's it for this week until next week goodbye this financial times podcast is supported by capital.

rockland european union lake nona summit brussels jim brunson fraud editor four hours
"european union" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"european union" Discussed on World News Analysis

"You can download our podcast searching for world news analysis. US president Donald Trump's obstruction lowered the status of European Union. Diplomats in Washington without notifying, Brussels. That's according to you officials the change means, two blocks. Washington-based diplomats are less likely to be invited to high profile events that they wore under former president Brock Obama. The snob was illustrated at a December two fifth funeral. Oh of George H W Bush when Europe's alway was among the last diplomats to be called on to pay respects. A commission spokesperson said they were seeking further clarification. I can say these stages that we understand that. There was a recent change in the way diplomatic precedence lease implemented by the United States protocal, and we are currently discussing with the relevant services in ministration possible. Implica- implications for the utilization in Washington, but adamantly this questions should be directed to US administration. Trump has often shown his disdain for the European Union and back purchase plan departure from the block, but the United States, and the you you have the world's biggest bilateral trade ties and US investment in a blog is three times higher than Asia. So why did he Trump outs racial, lower the status of you diplomats? And what does it mean to the crossed Alantic relate? Join us live on the lying as professor toll. When Joel senior research fellow of the institute of America's studies at the Chinese Academy of social sciences. Professor tell thank you very much. Good evening. So what really impact does this move? Have. What's the difference between being listed as Representative from nation states and from a multinational bodies, we know that representatives from NATO? Actually, first of all it's reprieve they represent summoned that presenters suffering countries and is Representative from much national bodies to not have such a representation. And the international society is form the first of all of sovereign countries. So people usually pay attach more importance to the representatives of sovereign countries. And I think this the move by the US department of state certainly have a negative impact on the relationship between the United States and Europe Union, the relationship chip has already being not that good. Donald Trump took office as president you officials say that did not get noticed beforehand. So what does he tell about away the Trump administration handles diplomatic issues? Yeah. I think the. Again shows the disorganization of the Trump administration, and the we have seen a lot such kind of cases activity, for instance, Donald Trump without consolidation was with his own team nonce US where intentionally withdraw from Syria, and then all his own security team and also his allies, the US allies, the persuaded to change the idea, and this is just to one case and the demotion from a Member State to international organizations of the European Union. A is another another case, you know, it's disorganization of the the ministration why do the US ration- decide to change the status at this particular moment. Oh, we already note. Donald Trump another pay much attention to the European Union. Actually, he. He has a teaser favor of much let unitary rather than much less reason..

Donald Trump United States European Union Trump president Representative Washington Professor Brock Obama George H W Bush Brussels Europe Chinese Academy of social scie NATO Asia senior research fellow Joel institute of America Syria two fifth
"european union" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on Security Now

"None of them are currently available to people in the EU. And since I, as I mentioned, nearly a twelve hundred US bays new sites that leaves more well more than a thousand smaller regional news sites which provide the bulk of news reporting overall and certainly are serving their communities. So as we know the, the European Union's GDP our regulations require website. It's to disclose their data collection practices in much more depth and detail than ever before and also requires websites to obtain an explicit permission to collect this data from its visitors. The regulation also forces websites to provide a portal where users can see what data the website has collected about them and provide a way for users to delete this data. Now, that's easy to say an easy to request. It's hard to do. I mean, it requires every single website on the internet which can be visited by someone from the European Union to comply. And so what have all of these nearly twelve hundred sites done? They've said. We don't need visitors from the e u. We'd rather blocked them. Then switch or invest in right now, maybe forever in in abiding by these regulations imposed by another country on us. And except for these big sites, you could argue, you know, like some demoain dispatch or something that you know like no one in the EU probably wants to go there anyway. So blocking the ranges of IP's that are outside the US or inside the EU like, okay, you could argue they've saved themselves. The exposure of being in breach of the GDP are and it's not costing anybody. Any prob. For them having to do that. Remember that companies who do not adhere to the to the GDP, our risk facing massive fines of as much as four percent of their annual revenue, which you know for major ongoing operations is significant. And again, I think it's rational for them to just say your, you know, we didn't do this on purpose. Some other country has just decided that we're, we're, we're liable for behavior that nobody else in the world has a problem with so fine. We're just going to block you. There is an interesting script and site monitoring this. Joseph O'Connor grabbed the domain verified Joseph dot com. So it's.

European Union US Joseph O'Connor four percent
"european union" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"European union's basically say well one option might be you have a roller watered down version of the candidate deal but northern ireland would have to stay wholly within the customs union single knock it and you'd have an internal border within the uk that's something that not no conserved rising almost no label problem is we don't know do we that this deal the deal that she is going to put before the cabinet today we don't know that that will be acceptable to the european union do we will the pm pm and her top team have talked to every cabinet minister this week they've also been talking to a number of european leaders to start to sound them out on where the landing zone might be that that is one of the things that we'll be discussing later today would accept this deal well i'll be very interested to hear from the prime minister how conversations with the german chancellor leaders yes this is this is this is a negotiation we need something that works for the united kingdom that we can go shape successfully with our friends and colleagues in the european isn't going to change will still be there we're still gonna be next door to our friends and allies they will still be a massively important trading and security partner phelps the problem is we have now run out of time you say we'd made good progress some people might say we've made the progress of an authentic snail over the last couple of years i e very little progress indeed and we now really in the last chance saloon on we started but all the cliches but there we are there is no matter too tempting a matter of days to go we've got to do a deal so if the european union says at this stage saudi that won't do here's what we're going to have to say either okay no deal or we're going to have to accept what they talk basically what they tell us they're prepared to accept this is this is a this isn't negotiation well see we are going to be in in there fighting for the best possible deal for every part of the united kingdom you part of getting a county january works for everyone i also we think that what we're going to put on the table is going to be the right thing for our friends and allies in europe as well because if we were to have god forbid if we were to have serious disruption to trade investment if we were to lose some of the really valuable elements of security cooperation we have now all european countries are going to be the losers from that it's in all our interests to get a good deal david livingston thanks very much indeed the time is twenty four minutes past eight we ought to get a national center to celebrate the life and work of gainsborough thomas gainsborough was supported artist of course but also one of our great landscape painters he was born in saad brin suffolk and gainsborough house is the base already for a museum but nothing of the scale of what is planned now and two very prominent supporters of the project a hair husband and wife team in the playwright david hand the fashion designer and sculptor nicole foreign morning to you both tell us first is so important because he's a fundamental importance isn't in english painting yes i think i think it's one of the most important and certainly the most important painter in the eighteenth century in britain and i think it was a very versatile painter and he was very nervous as well he was always looking for new ways of using painter new papers new ideas so i thought he was very very modern in his way of attacking painting and david though there is a view isn't that he actually he established landscape as a kind of separate yeah i think the eighteenth century is very very hard to access at least in the theater at the moment it seems very very remote we find the elizabethans because we love them because we think they're like us the vulgarity they're full of energy and we liked.

European union ireland twenty four minutes
"european union" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It the maker break issue for the european union certainly is for her government that issues migration how to handle the million and a half economic migrants and refugees from the world's worst conflicts who've reached europe shores in the last few years for now it looks like disagreements over the migrants will not break the european union after pulling an all nighter in brussels g you leaders announced an agreement on several albeit vague measures to control the flow of shakers npr's sheriffs are hardy nelson cover that he used summit joins us from there now sarai thanks so much for being with us you're welcome good morning the southern european countries wanted to help in dealing with the migrants who who still arrive on their shores what did they get out of this well the main thing is that europe is now taking a harder line in migration and that they're talking about creating screening centres be they on on the edges of europe or even in africa and places like that where migrants who tried to do this crossing over the mediterranean would be kept until their cases can be adjudicated and that reduction in that attention is something that's certainly countries like italy were looking for because they're worried about these people who come and then ended up in their country and draining their resources there's been an awful lot of anti immigrant talk among populist politicians for example the prime minister of hungary over the past few months was this dressed certainly was viktor orban's actually took the unusual step of speaking english to western reporters reiterating these issues of this invasion as he calls it of these mostly muslim migrants who are coming to europe and another thing that he got as well as what they call the bisa garad countries which are poland czechoslovakia and hungary they were able to ensure that there weren't any mandates at the eu wouldn't be ordering them what to do and so that in addition to the un general is now taking a much harder line and migration is something they consider a victory chancellor merkel's government the survival of her government was considered intrinsic to these talks wasn't it it is and still is it still up in the air about what's going to happen with that anything in this agreement to to mollify her and for that matter people contending for control well see she certainly felt that way or suggested that yesterday at the briefing that she gave us after the summit she says in fact this exceeds what it her coalition partner the cs you these are the bavarians conservatives who have been aligned for decades with her a christian democrat party and she says that okay with you know the eu is committed now to these centers to to reducing what they call secondary migration which is when the migrants for example registered italy or greece or spain the first port of entry in the eu and then they ended up moving to germany and and refiling their plane there and so she feels that in addition to an agreement she struck with spain and greece to take back migrants who are in fact registered in those countries and who crossed the austrian border into germany that this is more than what he was asking for he being the interior minister who's threatening to unilaterally closed germany's borders to most migrants try having covered this for a number of years you sense there's fewer countries in the european union who are willing to work out compromises with each other to stay together that's certainly the sense that came out of this summit italy for example the italian prime minister basic basically threatening to veto anything that was coming out of this summit which would have derailed it just to get his point across and the the countries like austria which is now going to be taking over the presidency still talking about national actions when it when it comes to migration or other things without doing it in conjunction with the eu so the whole unity issue i mean the whole point of the european union is for europe to present a unified and stronger voice that seems to be really at risk now npr's herash nelson in brussels thanks so much you're welcome that'll pop quiz now who are theme music a snoop dogg be dolly parton see philip glass or d j liederman computer would quickly know d is the correct answer but now computers are also starting to grade students essays as npr's tovia smith reports many teachers see that as a mistake developers of the socalled robo graders say they understand.

european union
"european union" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Yes oh indonesia is two largest palm oil producer in the world about twelve million people actually indirectly depend on to industry and so if really does aband should be implemented that has all sorts of free percussions aid indonesia however then also a couple of analysts being quoted into article that basically say overtime the european market for palm oil will become smaller and smaller and china electric become more important so into long running denise probably doesn't have to worry the difficulty that we face is that the european union is doing is not imposing a band i didn't know anticompetitive reasons dumping reasons have you it's just ecological reasons saying that the damage that the production of palm oil does to the environment is a stoning the rainforest disappears peatland gets gets you know absolutely ravaged so the indonesia's the indonesian basically being told to stop doing something that she doing themselves home into yeah i mean his it's quite roenick stop by fuel as actually damage to environment much more than full sal fuel right which it was supposed to replace for environmental reasons on so you're absolutely right that no matter how you look at this it's bad news four indonesian rainforests and whether they you implements is ban or the chinese marketable pickup some of days palm oil i think the bottom line really is that the nation rainforest is suffering from that and of course stained in asian government does not want to acknowledge at the same time they make a case about associate comic impact being tremendous if he would actually ban palm oil from being imported into the european union china can step in at a flat in.

indonesia denise european union european union china china
"european union" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"How much of this do you think is aimed at shoring up more support full the eu as an institution i think the european union knows that needs to have something positive to get hold of particularly in the in the if britain does go ahead and leave the european union obviously that's that's an all great for this the union as any kind of project whether it's a piece diplomatic cultural economic whatever it might be lose one of your biggest members and fifteen percent of your budget at that's terrible news the problem is you're looking at these countries of the western balkans then not economic powerhouses not cultural powerhouses and they have very weak traditions of democracy in fact in some them it's it's questionable i mean for example the report on serbia which the pin commission has just made as said that last year's presidential election in in serbia walson entirely free and fair and they there was some issues which the need to be addressed in serbia itself so those countries navigate to replace britain there's another drive ahead they've been which is the actions of russia and china in the western balkans china moving in a in a big way economically with investments in steel railways and banks among other things russia continues to use it soft power in the region to stir up mischief and that's keeping the west very busy indeed the european union commissioners have actually set to me in so many words we need to be more visible in this region we need to give a clear timeline on what membership might look like for these countries we need to offer hope and not just nag them about the reforms that they need to make we'll guy politically and diplomatically speaking the argument fuller joining the eu might be.

european union britain serbia russia china fifteen percent
"european union" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The european union and the trade imbalance we have the european union and how much money they invested directly not stocks and bonds but directly into investment in american industry and it was more than their trade imbalance so so the whole point is the investment is what comes in and they said that investment that comes in is roughly five million jobs that are directly related to that investment just from the european union and the american jobs of biz businesses that do business with that has to be ten fifteen twenty twentyfive they really weren't able to figure out exactly what that may be because it multiplies out the fact is we're not in an economy anymore that's just the united states were a portion of a global economy and that's the reality of it and people wish it wasn't that what we need to have our economy but it's not the way that it runs anymore look at the ten we have to address all the foreign ownership of our business in within our own country then you should that be is that correct why should we have so much foreign ownership we shouldn't because then then then then security problem then what they can't do anything with the dollar and the dollar crashes then we then we get back then we get back to the fact that the okay our dollars can't leave and therefore we need to have trade just within our border nobody would want the dollar it even as it travels around the world it travels around the world because it always has the same that same value it has the impact between party to party to party to party because they know eventually the next person wants that potentially to bring it back to the us if they can't bring it back to the us if there's nothing they can invest in in the us dollar crashes then the dollar has no value and so if you can't do that then the next thing would be well then we can't trade because the dollar can't be outside the.

european union us
"european union" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Cost off to you and the president says he wants these terrorist because he wants to make america great again missed by propping up the american steel an american aluminum industry but he's not going to do you know why because in many cases the cost of the products art actually going to go up so much that you would make it more lucrative by the american product so in a lot of cases these goods will still be uh was will still cost left they'll it'll cost less and as a result of it causing less even though it cost more than a dead you'll still by the foreign products so you're not actually helping the american business but then what happens well the american businesses are gonna get terrorist placed on them by the foreign governments the european union is already saying that ju they're going to raise tariffs on american products so the president say will that he's going to raise raise rates on european goods aiming this is a trade war the president saying he's going to start a trade war while he say murre where to we're going to avoid a trade war the way he will void a trade war is you get a bunch of other countries together and say we're all going to do this together so that you can bring people to negotiating table and negotiate what the president is due in eight i'm going to raise tariffs in the united states it every other country on the planet as saying we're going to respond by hurting american business economics 101 you know people on the left and people on the.

president european union united states america
"european union" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"european union" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Destroy us on of overstatement others meaningless rented this it won't be she's about this is gonna absolutely nothing to do with the fact that legal money this has everything to do with is the political direction that the european union they're trying to send the message particularly to those southern member states sort of stuff the real economic hardship as a result of the age at european union economic policies that if you dare try to leave this is asian or try to change it we will punish it will frankly we stood alone against uh i was like this before in slightly different circumstances of course but i don't think the british people like being bullied and when we all being put it we can always all that means but hopefully but i hope you'll not comparing the eu with nazi germany no no i i buy may in very different circumstances i do think though the government is getting yourself into a terrible meskhet uh i don't think he's been handled robot this government actual and i'm not saying that any coffee would be in a perfect position to deal with this but to a consent to not negotiating trade until we've come up with divorce settlement accident victims predict when it it's not a divorce but it's a punishment billets executive orders limbo yeah issue is soninlaw's snowflakes now we're not snowflakes the toll but it is upon the bench as the country's they dmz resulted in to to what they say is i think the other angle to remember here as well is the fact that the european union actually can be losing one of its biggest conferences the eu budget and what she's gonna get as much money as possible out of us before we leave because if you look at spending commitment excuse me over the coming years uh they're going to have to somehow make up the shortfall was a result of ali they can say that kind squeezes scruffy panic we've got now like when you get a bad insurance date on your car or something and there but you leave all of a sudden you find the.

european union eu ali germany executive
"european union" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"european union" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from slack where work happens all over the world no more losing time context switching more than nine hundred apps seamlessly integrate with slack so that's less time jumping between tools and more time getting things done more at slack dot com the tensions between the european union and poland are applying out right now in a fight over trees and bison brussels isn't happy with warsaw's populist government pawns leaders have tried to limit judicial independence and this week they rejected an order from the eu's highest court to stop logging a protected forest and pierce rice are hiding nelson has the story the air is rife with miskitos here in the of a wage of forests which spans three hundred fifty thousand acres in poland and belarus the rich canopy is home to many endangered species including the european bison polish journalist the naturalist adam virenque says the forest survival depends not only on the live trees towering overhead but on the many dead ones underfoot the look of birth here you see mrs lynne lethal spruce growing goumba on the buddy of that spruce this very often the heavens fireup shows me more he flew luke under the bar moore's who the beat goes a little spiders ever a with a with a resume can on this is how it's worse wet way good if the of he's a forest to coral reef because in coral reef it a lot of life it's base also on there.

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"european union" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"european union" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with two our appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinity dot com slash service the parent company of google is in hot water in europe what's news from the wall street journal top story without the noise i'm john word on the news desk in washington for the wall street journal google is facing a record antitrust fine by the european union let's head to brussels now where wall street journal reporter natalia drozdiak is standing by she's covering the story so natalia what is happening here give us some details the european union antitrust regulators are expected to find out at some point in the coming weeks the google has abused its dominant and with its uh search five favoring its own comparison shopping service and at the same time demoting rivals in its search results and the expectation is that it would the the regulators would set the fine um uh to record levels so that means it would go it would topped their previous record of an abuse of dominant fine which they head uh levied against intel in two thousand nine and that was at about one point one billion euros or about one point two billion dollars and the ideas to kind of set it at such a deterrent level that no other company even thinks about doing something similar uh it's also possible that the find could go you know significantly above that they could double or even triple the maximum that they could find google is ten percent of its global turnover so that would be around.

wsj comcast windows google wall street journal washington european union brussels intel europe reporter natalia drozdiak two billion dollars ten percent