25 Burst results for "esquire magazine"

Author 'Rodham' imagines a different `Hillary'

Weekend Edition Sunday

07:03 min | 10 months ago

Author 'Rodham' imagines a different `Hillary'

"A young Hillary Rodham madly in love with the man she met at Yale Law School abandons her own path and heads to Arkansas slowly she starts to uncover bill Clinton's many infidelities and makes a choice what would have happened if Hillary Rodham had never married Bill Clinton a new novel by Curtis Sittenfeld imagines it just that and she joins me now to talk about it hello hello your book starts out in a familiar way but then your book takes a very different attacks from the historical timeline what what happens so in real life Bill Clinton proposed to Hillary Rodham twice and she said no both times and then he proposed a third time and she said yes and in my version she says no the third time two and she goes her own way then she initially becomes a law professor and Chicago at northwestern and then she kind of goes on from there and the book follows her over the next forty years I want to ask you before we go much further in this you know so much has been said about Hillary Clinton why did you want to write speculative fiction about her doesn't everyone is in a totally natural impulse and possibly so actually it's funny because I agree with you that so much has been written about Hillary and it was sort of in reaction to that that I think I wrote this book so in the lead up to the two thousand sixteen election I was invited to write essays about Hillary and I would decline because I felt like every possible thing there was to say about Hillary had been said she had been analyzed from every angle and then an editor at esquire magazine invited me to write a short story from Hillary's perspective and I accepted and writing that story was this kind of strange exercise where I realize that the question was not what to the American people think of Hillary Clinton but what does Hillary Clinton think of the American people and it turned out that that I had four hundred pages worth of thought to say on that so it was actually trying to sort of slipped the narrative and and instead of making her the one who's scrutinize lake giving her voice which of course is totally fictionalized voice likes she did not write this book I wrote this book and so she says no to Bill Clinton she becomes as you mention a law professor she then becomes a politician was it inevitable that she'd become a politician how did you come up with this path for her I think that in real life if she had not married Bill Clinton I'm not sure she would have led the life that I created for her in the novel and I think with a novel like this you know that the reader is bringing some opinions or expectations and I as the writer I'm kind of toying with those expectations and sometimes for filling them and sometimes defying them and I felt like it was the most interesting version and to have her enter politics but you know have no pulp click association with Bill Clinton yes except to quite a few meetings along the way I want to ask you about writing Bill Clinton the character because like the real life Bill Clinton your fictionalized bill also has a swirl of sexual misconduct allegations around him and he's also accused of sexual assault so one of the reasons that I love fiction is that I feel like getting knowledge is that people are very complex and that the same person can have very appealing qualities and very troubling qualities and I think that the plan is like the embodiment of that where I would never pretend that I can't understand his his appeal I would never you know sort of say that I can look at him with admiration and you know without feeling any sense of sort of discomfort and so and I think that a novel allows for knowledge in that like this is in an essay that's trying to either celebrate him or take him down they're both the very intertwined in our consciousness are you trying to suggest that we might consider them differently if we had to think of them as individuals yes so actually I think that one of the reasons I wrote this book is that around the time even after the two thousand and sixteen election I had this realization that school children who knew Hillary was running for president often literally didn't know that Bill Clinton existed and that kind of blew my mind where I thought you know what is what if adults saw Hillary as completely separate from dell the way that kids do and you think that that would change fundamentally the way that she's you yes I do I think I mean I'm not I'm not saying that it would sort of solve all the problems of sexism but I think it would make her have an identity much more like that of Elizabeth Warren or any clothes are I wonder if it isn't insulting to suggest that a man held Hillary Clinton back maybe this story and their story is one of a hugely successful partnership that is arguably one of the most successful in American political history it's totally possible that you're right like I'm not even sure it's either or I think it may be though Clinton held her back in some ways and probably helped her and others and the same for I think maybe she held him back in some ways or maybe didn't always do things that were in is personal or professional best interest and then in other ways she was hugely helpful like I don't I don't think it's an either or it's sort of situation for for either of them did your opinion of either bill or Hillary Clinton change after giving them the fictional treatment you know being intimately involved in sort of creating this alternate narrative for them so I was already an admirer of Hilary before I began working on the book if anything I definitely have more admiration for her in terms of toughness her perseverance her hard work there's also there's all these stories I think they are sort of in the public but they don't get that much attention about what a loyal thoughtful friend she is like often over many decades or you know like she's she's very funny which is not really part of her public image so I am fully pro

Hillary Rodham Yale Law School Arkansas Bill Clinton
Wisconsin Supreme Court strikes down Wisconsin's stay-at-home order that closed businesses to limit spread of coronavirus

Jim Bohannon

10:24 min | 10 months ago

Wisconsin Supreme Court strikes down Wisconsin's stay-at-home order that closed businesses to limit spread of coronavirus

"A piece of audio from a state Supreme Court justice this was from esquire magazine in discussing the governor's order to stay at home the assistant Attorney General Colin Ross appeared to be rethinking his career choice Bradley the Supreme Court justice went full on Glenn Beck never go full on Glenn back this is what the press called full on Glenn back listen to this judge my question for you is where in the constitution to the people of Wisconsin confer a sorority on the singles on elected cabinet secretary to compel almost six million people to stay at home and close their businesses and face imprisonment if they don't comply with no input from the legislature without the consent of the people isn't it the very definition of tyranny for one person to order people to be imprisoned for going to work among other ordinarily lawful activities where does the constitution say that's permissible council one of the bravest guys and the guy who appointed her to the Supreme Court successful governor economic education healthcare reformer Scott Walker joins us now governor how are you Sir Eglin even better today because of the Supreme Court yesterday sure okay so the Supreme Court yesterday in Wisconsin struck down the stay at home order what does that mean well there was no stay so it means technically anyone anywhere in the state of Wisconsin could be opened the one caveat to that is welcome to the home rule states so there are still the ability of local jurisdiction so a handful of communities city Milwaukee city of R. we're seeing a Dane county or state capitals at all very Liberal Democrat areas there governor should be there mayors and or account executives issued similar orders to what the governor's administration will done but for everybody else it means technically any retail establishment or whatever's open last night around the state there are other places out there although and I heard the tail end of year your last segment in the end the governor I've said for weeks the government can get out of the way but ultimately the market will determine when businesses reopen when employees feel safe to come back in when the when customers ultimately come back as well but it the first step is getting the government out of the way so Z. the get the new governor the guy who I think replaced you it had issued the stay at home order he said yesterday last night on CNN this puts our state in the chaos now we have no plan no protections for the people when you have more people in a small space I don't care if it's bars restaurants or the home you're going to be able to spread the virus today thanks to the Republican legislators convinced for Supreme Court justices not to look at the law but look at their political careers I guess it's a bad day for Wisconsin because now it's the wild west commented when it's it's like it's like they've suspended common sense not only in his statement but not others across the country we see this over and over again we've been operating for nearly two months now with the threat of this coronavirus in every time anyone goes in a grocery store every time someone goes into a pharmacy every time someone goes to the hardware store every time someone shows up in a in a manufacturing plant that is deemed essential by the government they've been able to do that overwhelmingly across the country safely so to me it just defies common sense that now certainly since the so called nonessential businesses can open finally because those justices actually upheld the law they did exactly opposite what he said they actually upheld the law now does that mean the people who've been operating safe we're certainly going to go crazy and and not use the same watching the done before of course not you know here here's here's the thing first of all I think you guys had the election when every but when nobody knew what was gonna happen and with that it shows that no there was no spread to from you guys holding L. holding the election which quite honestly at the time I would have found surprising but there was no problem for holding the election yeah I guess the the governor didn't learn his lesson from that one and when did we go from a let's not overwhelm the system let's not overwhelm hospitals and doctors and the nurses let's flatten the curve to nobody's going out until everybody is safe yeah it it's it's the flat occur versus now we have to find a cure before anyone can set foot out there the logic I went back and looked two months ago yesterday I wrote a piece on Facebook about how we need to be rational we needed to follow the guidelines we probably shouldn't have Dick's sporting events or concerts for awhile so we could figure this out but that we could do these things without shutting down the economy we just had to use our common sense we had to be purposeful interactions to make sure we're safe the same is true today over two months we flatten the curve but do you still have government officials whose immediately seem like they're hiding under their beds open a guide somehow this will just go away it's not going away it's not going to change anytime soon and if we don't win this year register Connie devastate but think of all the people across America who missed out on doctor's visits in clinics and other checkups who missed out on early detection I mean this is literally a life threatening issue even when it comes to re opening the economy so governor do you really believe that these people are hiding under their beds or is there something else involved I mean there is we have to balance things and that is what a leader does he gets advice from the FAO cheese and they save Valjean just tell me about the health effects and then somebody else has to advise is didn't tell me just about the economic effects and then I have to make choices as a leader on what we do we are now looking at a group of people in Washington and it seems to be falling on party lines that they for some reason we just don't want to open the economy and no one is talking about the deadly effects of America going down the drain or going into a deep depression not only the affects financially but the effects of health and welfare all over the globe millions could die because we go down it even amazing the group that are not aligned with that don't normally reference but even a United Nations report recently just this week showed that grave concerns about massive I mean we're talking crippling poverty around the world because of the economic effects here in their point was that this will actually have a much larger devastating impact on the Taliban casualties because of malnutrition because of the depression because of suicide because of all sorts of issues I think it's a combination of summer parade and some have an agenda when I look at Nancy Pelosi's and we could talk all day about her ridiculous three trillion dollar bill that's out there but one of the things I think's been ignored about what you did put out this week is they've got a provision that would extend the federal unemployment enhanced benefits till January one that tells me Democrats believe our whole some have an agenda that they want the economy not to open until after the start of the year which conveniently happens to be after the presidential election I I got to say if you're an American not a Republican not a Democrat now to conserve not a liberal but Americans that should scare the crap idea we should be doing something about it so do you think that the American people are I mean I think that my father used to say there is no such thing as bad it doesn't it nothing is bad it's depends on how you react to it that will make it a bad thing in your life for good thing you can go to prison for robbing a bank that's not bad that is something that you could use now to reforge yourself and and become better the corona virus I think has helped a lot of people get perspective on their life it is showing us that we need family and shows us that you know this arguing back and forth with the politics is really the Washington doesn't have the power we have the power we could use this to wake up on the bill of rights etcetera etcetera or we will allow it to destroy us do you think the American people are waking up on both sides of the aisle and saying wait a minute wait a minute these essential bill of rights liberties are really important I I do have some more slowly than others but but I do think they're waking up yesterday's ruling in the Wisconsin Supreme Court was a good step in the right direction because as I said after the ruling came out you know though okay holding the rule of law is important even in an emergency it's an important event and I'm optimistic it as frustrated as I am as as challenging as times are I think about American particular country that started out in defeating the greatest military power at the time who overcame a civil war that would have torn apart just to any other country in the world you ever came to me two world wars took on nine eleven were Americans and were country based on freedom and as long as we cherish those freedoms and liberties even in times like this I have no doubt we can overcome anything the part of that means of free will and the ability to engage in free enterprise that's something that I think it's fundamentally a part of who we are it's what king Solomon talked about finding joy in your labor I often say nobody signed by my high school yearbook saying good luck becoming it depend on the government we all no matter who we can where we come from what we look like we all in our hearts we want to work we want to find join our labor we need to get the government on lease and get it out of the way so that we can go back to work and and restore

Esquire Magazine Colin Ross Bradley Glenn Beck Supreme Court Assistant Attorney General
Macaulay Culkin: Michael Jackson 'Never Did Anything' to Me

The KDKA Radio Morning News with Larry Richert and John Shumway

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Macaulay Culkin: Michael Jackson 'Never Did Anything' to Me

"In a new interview star of home alone macaulay Culkin long since grown up is now defending Michael Jackson right now is a good time to speak up he never did anything to me those words coming from macaulay Culkin in a new interview with esquire magazine where he talks about his long friendship with Michael Jackson the actors but a lot of time with Jackson when he was a child I have no reason to hold anything back but now thirty nine year old says Culkin also testified in two thousand five of the pop star's trial that he was never sexually assaulted something others have accused Jackson of the even after his death leaving never landed two part documentary featuring a pair of men who allege Jackson sexually abused them was released

Michael Jackson Culkin Esquire Magazine
Junior Johnson, "The Last American Hero," dies at 88

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Junior Johnson, "The Last American Hero," dies at 88

"Robert Glenn junior Johnson was just eight years old when he started driving in the mountains of North Carolina as a young man he built a reputation as a moonshiner who could out run the law in the nineteen fifties and sixties he another bootleggers became the backbone of stock car racing in the south Johnson won fifty races and in nineteen sixty five author Tom Wolfe in a piece for esquire magazine label Johnson the last American hero in nineteen sixty six he left the track to become a team owner Johnson was instrumental in transforming NASCAR into a multi billion dollar sport by convincing RJ Reynolds to sponsor the Winston Cup which she won six times as a team owner junior Johnson died Friday at eighty eight I'm Tim acquire

North Carolina Tom Wolfe Nascar Rj Reynolds Robert Glenn Junior Johnson Esquire Magazine Billion Dollar Eight Years
Billy Dee Williams Of 'Star Wars' Describes Himself As Gender Fluid

Assets and Aging w Bob Scrivano

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Billy Dee Williams Of 'Star Wars' Describes Himself As Gender Fluid

"Shooting in an interview with esquire magazine actor Billy Dee Williams is coming out as gender fluid the eighty two year old said that he sees himself as feminine as well as masculine Williams is our pricing his role as Lando in the rise of sky Walker the final film in the main cannon of the Star Wars

Billy Dee Williams Lando Sky Walker Eighty Two Year
Man Behind the Camera

Bon Appetit Foodcast

11:40 min | 1 year ago

Man Behind the Camera

"All right so this is your second time with the pot getting our concern Osama veteran okay known at the table. No crunchy snacks crunchy snacks. No no shaking of the coffee ice loud. There are months where like weeks will go by. We're I'm like how am I literally. Don't know where your I will not have seen you for two weeks. Yeah that is basically the story of my life. Sometimes I don't even know where I am. I'll wake up hotel. Mike Oh yeah no. I'm in Appleton Wisconsin. Oh No oh now I'm in San Antonio Texas. Yeah I mean we talk about a few issues in your job in general but in our travel issue that came on May so you you shot almost the entire feature will yeah does may two thousand nineteen you were in Beirut with Andy Burgundy tracked and then you I'm just flip through the pages then you were in Taipei with Suli and also burgundy and Andy any wanted to tag on everything so that was a big photo portfolio of yours your shot in Allison Rome in spring break menu story that was just in New York yeah that was here in the building the buildings that was as basic recipe story and then you shot photos for our red sauce America package which brought you. Where did you go for this one? Oh man that was a lot. I think that was six cities L. A. L. A. Philly New Orleans. Oh my God. Where did I go? I mean you literally can't remember yeah I it was like four to five cities. I guess my first question is I think a lot of fans of yours. WanNa know like how do you end up as a staff dog for at a food magazine like whenever someone asked me about this is I'm the worst possible personnel asked because it's purely luck and circumstance stance and my only goal and still the only like hey just don't get fired and spend closing up on your six and I still get asked to come back every day and there were definitely moments early on we're Alex pollick grocer artificial photo department critic Blake. I'M GONNA kill Lau a huge mistake so you start off as an intern turn years ago yeah. That's my freshman year of college. I just wanted to do something with my life and not just go home for the summer to California and you know Oh bummer and my parents house so I wanted to find an internship and I've always had a fascination with the magazine world apply too much internships. Nobody got got back to me in like a week. Before summer started. I saw a posting for esquire magazine to be a fashion closet intern. Oh and I was like that sounds cool. That sounds way out of my reach. I am hugely under qualified for that but I'M GONNA shoot my shot and Michael Steph. who was the fashion assistant at the time got back to me? He's like when can you come in based on what oh it. Did you have background. It was the most underqualified letter ever. It was basically hey. Here's my resume. I was a lifeguard in high school. I was a high school tutor and I intern at the State House in Massachusetts in politics nothing related to magazines but I really love menswear and here's like my favorite menswear blogs and here's my favorite brands brand's. I like fashion. I can work hard and he got back to me. Can I just say that. I am a lot of times when I talked to young people who are just out of college in their writing you you know letters to inquire about a job and they read like they're written by a law firm. I'm always like learning be yourself. Be passionate sort of expose yourself so to speak but that's what's GonNa grab some somebody's attention one hundred. I think the way I showed her. The letter wasn't like the formerly hi my name's dogs home. Hey My name's Alex. I'm really excited about this. I know him not meant for this Gig but I will do whatever it takes gap and so forth and they took a chance on me and that kind of was my segue into the New York City magazine publishing world and it turns out having square on your resume. Just opens opens up a lot of doors but it was great. It was just my eighteen years old. I didn't get paid but I got to see how magazines work I've got to be on fashion shoots Justin Timberlake Lake and Ryan Gosling and wow poll like hold fourteen thousand dollar jackets and look it Nick Sullivan whose whose the editor in chief at the time Grainger David David David grange just like talk shop and like this is amazing. This is legendary and that made me really WANNA stick with it yeah very recall okay so internship at esquire. How then does that lead you to be a so after that? I was convinced that I wanted to stay in publishing. Look fashion. menswear ended up at Nylon guys Juku for a little bit complex four pins so I was very very much in that circuit as an intern just doing minimal intern work but after a couple of years I was just like this is not really what's my angle here. I don't WANNA be stylus. I don't WanNa be a fashion writer. The idea of being a photographer and fashion was just you know. I didn't even sit down. That's not going to happen so after this is my third yes approaching my third year of college. I A Internet a bunch of or apply uh-huh bunch of other internships again. Nobody got back to me. Despite actually this I'm being off and having a lot of magazines in Monroe oster I applied to like yeah a a couple of mags won't be noted but they're they're. They're okay. They just get back. I mean I saw a posting for bone apetite photo internship and I was like I know nothing nothing about food. I like pictures. I took photo classes in high school and college. So how active a photographer were you at this point. It's like I'm not active. I don't know I took a lot of fissures in high school. I had my own flicker account. I you were you were you were definitely interested. We're sitting at least and I took pictures of the school paper and stuff like that. I I was a you know an avid hobbyist as major so do you did you come in an interview like what God you the job ultimately so I went in again. It's always like a last minute. Call in showed up from Boston and I met with Jake. Ramoser are former photo assistant and he he gave me a talk. Hey so turn yeah. It looks like you've worked a lot of magazines. you have zero photo experience and you have zero food experience so you're pretty underqualified but honestly the only person here that's interviewed. That's worked at large publications so we're GonNa go with you. So that was basically it was it was Bazeley. Hey you're you've worked at reputable places so we'll hire yeah. I do think that's interesting interesting career wise like over the years. I've worked at James Beard Foundation in Time Out New York and the food's severe than G. Q. Got more fashion thing that came back to food. I was a sports writer in college like it is you can move around and I think one thing that editors employers look for is that you do have experience in in a particular field and that you know how to get stuff done that you know under you understand what the industry requires but within that sort of industry you can shoot food. You can shoot you know people. You can do all these things. You don't have to be in one lane. One hundred percent I think at the time I was taking some classes and I was also I was studying NPR print journalism at the time and I remember talking about that with Jake and he was like Oh. This is a plus because you kind of understand writing thing and photography on some level so we'll run with this so he didn't internship summer internship a year or so later. We ended up hiring you as a foot assistant no so I did this summer internship and I was like this is way better than working fashion. Everyone's so much nicer yeah yeah. It was a great time and I was like in order for me to WANNA stay in this world I can see I need to shift from fashion to food media so then I went back to Boston awesome for my senior year and as as I left Alex pollock the photodetectors times like hey we love your great. Just reach out when you're when you're graduating we can like. Maybe you keep you keep you happy. Come back so I would always send emails and I say hey just graduated like three months three or four months. I would love to come talk about a photo editor assistant role. Did you in the interim year. Were you working on shooting things. Decrease your portfolio to share with Alex to say hey I just want. I've been shooting a lot. Take a look at my stuff. Yes so thankfully because of my time I she went over to Boston magazine for my senior of college and I ended up being digital intern which basically means I was just doing every anything and everything for the website correct the king yeah yeah I remember being so proud and like twenty years old on my I've got years of intern experience. I haven't been paid for any of them but you we know I've seen some stuff like that really was my my pride enjoy worked a lot of places and they harden managed digital intern and they also gave me bill do photo take pictures and do have my own bylines socially once a lot of times when you get your foot in the door somewhere are the the brand or the magazine wherever they need people to do stuff go. You can go okay but we'll trust you. There's something trustworthy about you. Then people are all right. Go give this a shot. You'd have a DVD will keep doing it. I must really thankful that it was a web internship versus print because obviously no one's GonNa give any Interna print byline whereas it's much lower risk to teachers hey make something for lab and if it's really good we'll Polish and if not we won't publish in no one will ever or care about low budget so it was just gave me a lot more freedom and they knew that I worked at the food magazine before okay so you know how to take pictures of food. You were photo intern turn. I'm like yeah I guess I mean I. I saw Marcus Nelson. Do you like an overhead shot of something by a window so I can do that. How hard can it be yeah so I mean I I? I did it and they would. It was really cool. I mean they sent me there. Okay so we'll just have you do restaurants so they would send me like once a week in shoot for four restaurants a week and just shoot it for their website so who was giving you guidance about photos style at that point what kind of shots they wanted from the restaurants. It's nobody else really. They just assumed you knew what you were doing. The funny thing is I applied to Boston magazine to be a photo inter. I WANNA continue that path that track of being working for requirements it's but they they didn't want but then the digital department got back to me. I didn't really have communication with the magazine so it was just kind of me and our digital editor who just send me. I was like Oh this. Let's get this close enough to bone advocate and some overhead shots off light and like keep doing this and I would just bike around Boston Jason and go to a bunch of restaurants that are digital restaurant editor Chris Hughes covered and yeah it was it was really good training. It's really good training. I looking back it was really great just being able to go in and practice and shoot restaurants for relatively low risk and have that be an internship set eh great base so then I shot all these restaurants and as shooting what's in all this stuff to Alex pollick. I'm like hey portfolio.

Intern Boston Boston Magazine Food Magazine Mike Oh Alex Editor Esquire Magazine San Antonio Texas Writer Andy Burgundy Jake Osama Appleton Wisconsin New York California New York City Magazine Alex Pollick Beirut James Beard Foundation
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Hundred years in the life of a family. He now writes for hole and corner as well as wired and Esquire magazine's which possibly going to merge into s quiet soon with an intelligent ties. Hello, richard. Welcome back to back north. How you doing? Hello. Hello. I'm very well. Thank you have you noticed. The giant wall of face magazine covers down at King's Cross. I have seen the giant will face covers on Instagram or social media. And people saw sent me and said, do, you know, why this is there, and I don't really know? I it was quite strange. You ought to pop down like seeing your life flash. Before you in a kind of gigantic in literally in the form of wall. Yes, I've got into your life flashing before even the phone all. Yes, I will go and have a look I find what you involved in stuff like that. The memories aren't always that even. So when you look covers the people remember fondly, if they will, you know, what I remember about that is the deployment actually wasn't going to happen. And we had to pull the printing back. So, you know. That was just me. I don't know. But, but yeah, we've got to look at what is remarkable the way the the faces kind of retain this kind of cultural touchstone thing the way lots of magazines, even the faces kind of it's now a set text for central Saint Martins design type kids just seems to be like that. Yeah. Which is quite sobering. Thought when you think about what the the some of the stuff that you write you wrote the time. But yeah. Nice to see some. I'm not doing think outside of my involvement in it. I mean. On something like that. You just get to publish writing that you think is great. And it gives me genuine has your joy to think of some of the pieces that we published having still continuing the hour. Our mutual fund govern hills is right into the thought twenty year olds Mike still exposed to that makes me feel warm inside. So that that's great now you'll from near wet longer yoga from you from literally from most. Most of my life in wet long. Have you been to see the wet Wang slack art exhibition by Francis, Richard at the Babacan I've heard about this. But no, I have not been to say, I I'm very familiar with wet long slog telling us is what it is. Because it'll be baffled slack is in the area. A slack is a name for valley and. Slack was the of a quarry where in the late sixties one of the most important archaeological finds about the age ever in the history of archaeology took place and. My brother used to know the Corey man who found the stuff Wade, Lena, there's a book who knows? I said I said, what do you know, what happened I found existing? They literally took a dig into a chalk cliff face and pulled away a chariot on amazing thing to found me said. Yeah, he just went to the boss and said that this money in this familiar Fellini back in. Actually out with seventy two we end up with Steptoe, so this exhibition it takes the name of what looks like it's it's it's very face. Actually, isn't it because you've been loved it. I thought it was really good. It is as if all these things have been on earth road. They're about to go in. You're not quite sure the straight of civilization at some point not colored grotesque Aires of of various parts of from from consumerism, it terrier design and pasta, rain, all kinds of stuff hats, very funny hats, but also I was looking at the method, and it's it's from this resin that you couldn't get in Brazil, and she's one of the few people that she can handle it. You have to have two heats up very hot eighty degrees. Then you put an enormous cold bath. Isn't that the boss must have been enormous and she says trying to weld it? And there are these beautiful things that age. Mythic gods on strange four legged creatures. I'm just imagine have grappling with that. And wet water. Wet rang say, yeah, it's good go and see it. We don't we never do on the show. Course, the best Yorkshire place name of all the booze and Wham. And there's also a great fry up Dale jingling pot, and he'll the famous, well, there's a place near where we live called swing which is swing list, but they actually called swig..

Slack Steptoe Esquire magazine face magazine Mike Instagram Saint Martins Yorkshire Wang Brazil Corey Wade Francis Richard Lena eighty degrees Hundred years twenty year
Bryan Singer Preemptively Denies Accusations About Him in Upcoming Esquire Article

The Drive Home with Jillian Barberie and John Phillips

01:05 min | 2 years ago

Bryan Singer Preemptively Denies Accusations About Him in Upcoming Esquire Article

"Director Bryan singer is getting out in front of an Esquire magazine article about him that he believes will be published in time for bohemian rhapsody is going to be released on November second is he doing Hemu up the movie about God. Freddie mercury. Yeah. Singer says the upcoming magazine story will rehash false accusations in bogus lawsuits. A person close to singer told the wrap that while they have not seen the Esquire article. The magazine did reach out for comment, they declined the person told us they were not given quotes from the piece though, the questions were clear enough to see where the article was going believes that max Potter is the reporter writing the piece which singers camp expects will be in the November issue of Esquire magazine, which it hit the newsstands this week in December singer was accused of sexual assault by Cesar Sanchez Guzman. And in April twenty fourteen Michael Egan claimed in a lawsuit that he was. Raped by singer. I don't believe either one of these accusations resulted in any type of criminal prosecution or conviction know

Bryan Singer Esquire Magazine Freddie Mercury Cesar Sanchez Guzman Michael Egan Max Potter Director Hemu Assault Reporter
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"The white guy was raising his hands Steve Delicious Hey Oh my, gosh man as ice, cream All right, salute to Esquire magazine They posted a headline. That says manny's ice. Cream existing it might be brilliant then they put hear us out after you tell me you think manny's ice cream is brilliant Esquire there's nothing. More. To, hear out are in, okay now Esquire first paragraph says. We now exist on the same, physical plane is manny's ice cream and it's either ingenious. On the. End of all mankind I'm gonna take Armageddon, is. Upon. Us for five hundred Alex okay the worst thing about this is that, it looks like vanilla ice cream so, somebody could make you. A bowl you'll know any better you take a taste and immediately you get poisoned all of a sudden you wanna listen to Taylor swift and call the police on black, people for doing. In. My feelings challenging the park okay manny's ice cream is what you give. Your kids. When they not behaving all right my little two year old to eat all our food because he's so focused on. Desert and she loves ice cream soda rule. Is you don't finish. Your dinner. You don't get dessert all right bring some. Mayonnaise ice cream in the, house you don't finish your dinner then you get in this nuclear weapon in a bowl. For, dessert called manny's ice cream now manny's. Is a. Combination of lemon juice Vinegar with egg yolks none of. Those things will taste good together frozen in. A bowl all right. Baskin Robbins. Please don't make this your thirty third flavor. Let me just look at. It walk imagine walking in the bathroom Robinson UC butter pecan chocolate chip cookie dough rocky. Roden, cookies and cream manny's flavored ice cream These kids. Doing their, own thing right manny's ice cream has me. Thinking it is quote I read. About. Inventions once in that quotas. Invention has to make sense in the world. It finishes, in not the. World it started it This don't make sense to us now but he's. Gonna make sense in the world. For the whiteness Okay, collecting all the 0 stones right now to put in Putin's He goes snap his fingers and everybody would Melanie. Disappear. And it's going gonna be a world full of Taylor swift And. Mayonnaise ice, cream and it, will all be cows okay please give gentlemen and ice the ice cream Paula the biggest Who's gonna try. It everybody on fear factor that could. Be. The next fear? Factor challenge you wanna try a, bold man.

manny Taylor swift Esquire magazine Steve Delicious Baskin Robbins Alex Roden Putin Melanie 0 stones two year
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"The header esquire magazine those are my credits yet and i won't change them that's what that means now we're doing a little bit different today normally we we're pretty upfront about who the subject of the podcast is but there's a lot of background to get to before we can really properly introduce this guy okay so i'm kind of curious as to when you figure out who we're talking about and i also wanted to be a little bit of a surprise for the audience so okay if you're good i'm just going to get into it okay i mean i'm kind of like a amateur private investigator so might get real off the bat and i wanna ruin your flow or anything but let's let's try all right let's let's see how this goes on o'clock maybe this will be my my migrate disaster but i think it'll be fun yeah all right so today right now he doesn't eighteen britain is a tiny adorable nation filled with wizards and conspicuously broad definition of the word pudding it's easy i'm going to guess baltimore no no no i'm just i'm just getting it that it's easy for us to forget today considering how docile the british people are that for a while they ruled the entire world the british empire was the largest empire in human history the mongol empire at its height held about twenty four million kilometers area sixteen percent of the world's population the british empire was over thirty five million kilometers area and ruled nearly a quarter of the planet's trust me i do not forget the yeah and they i think what's most shocking to me when i read about this is that they controlled that huge chunk of the planet with probably the smallest army than any empires ever had you know the roman empire too tight was about seven hundred and fifty thousand regular soldiers the british empire at its height before the world war started was about one hundred twenty thousand british soldiers than ever spent more than about two and a half percent of their gdp on defense wow which is a regular soldiers relax super serum like captain america's so you have predicted that where this is going now these soldiers regular soldiers they're volunteers which is different from most most militaries in this period or not volunteer permanent standing military so the british are a little bit different but they're just normal you know soldiers they have machine guns which certainly helps with the whole colonizing thing or they have machine guns for a chunk of this but you know it does beg the question we've only got one hundred twenty thousand guys from most of the british empire they don't have have machine guns how do you hold a quarter of the planet in bondage for two hundred years the whole army that's a little larger than the modern coastguard in the united states nukes is that up the correct no no i mean you you get the locals to oppress themselves oh yeah how's my second yeah so michael codner who's the head of military science for the royal united services institute described the british empire's military essentially quote the royal navy and a system of indigenous constabularies overseen by small professional british army now i found that quote in the bbc article from back in two thousand eleven the article also quoted a military historian named dr hugh davies who noted that all of british and beal was controlled by just thirty thousand british troops supervising hundreds of thousands of local indian soldiers or sepoys he was quoted as saying the empire had to pay for itself and it had to be profitable and if you put too much into building up the army the empire is no longer a profitable enterprise he sounds like a rap mogul about sentence him in his department has a build it so in his defense i don't think he's justifying imperialism ending he's just explain this was.

esquire magazine thirty five million kilometers twenty four million kilometers two hundred years sixteen percent
"esquire magazine" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on KPCC

"The frame i'm your host john horn the pulitzer prizes were announced today and rapper kendrick lamar became the first winner of the musical ward who is not a classical or jazz artist lamar a native of competent one for his album titled dam which was released a year ago the pulitzer board said the album is a quote virtuosic song collection unquote that captures quote modern african american life all fourteen tracks on the mars album have one word titles including pride lust fear and god those songs titles and the album's release on good friday last year reflect the mars exploration of redemption and reconciliation irvine weather's be explored the album's religious symbolism in an essay that he wrote for esquire magazine and i spoke with him last year when the album was released we began with the first track from lamar's album called blood you so i wanna ask you about the religious symbolism that you spotted in the song why since i wanna play a little bit from the song field next.

john horn kendrick lamar pulitzer board esquire magazine irvine
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Church quickly grew in popularity by using the country's growing racial tension and income inequality to persuade minorities mostly african americans to join with the growth in resources jones was able to enact his social ideals attempting to turn the people's temple into a socialist haven for the disenfranchised they owned and operated a soup kitchen elderly care homes multiple foster homes and complex for the developmentally disabled by the late fifties jones had found his calling leading his congregation with an antagonistic challenging rhetoric pushing them into being a socialist collective that he deemed quote religious communalism to him this meant members giving up their possessions to the church in exchange for the temple taking care of them in reality this meant that the temple borrowed a lot of money from its followers including welfare and social security the temples growing power also meant an inflation of jones personal power his rhetorical skill gave him immensely over his congregation to the point that he started to regard himself as a christ like figure who was solely responsible for keeping members in complete commitment to the temples communist goals this inflated sense of self led to the first instances of jones using his influence for sexual advances on members of the temple both male and female but jones communist teachings quickly hit a wall in the conservative midwest he needed more members and more money if he was going to accomplish his goals so at the outset of the sixties jones decided to move the church to the promised land for any member of the progressive counterculture california in nineteen sixty one jones claim to have had a premonition that you kaga would be destroyed in a nuclear attack and indiana would be hit with the fallout a january nineteen sixty two esquire magazine article name bello.

jones california indiana esquire magazine
Jordan Peele to produce Lorena Bobbitt docuseries for Amazon

Len Berman

01:09 min | 3 years ago

Jordan Peele to produce Lorena Bobbitt docuseries for Amazon

"Be a movie about a john wayne bobbitt and lorraine remember she took the knife and wack does and it's going to be made into an amazon series by the oscar winning a writer and producer of get out jordan peele his name is really really talented talented guy and they're going to take the saga of bobbitt and her knife and john wayne bobbitt small member and turn it into an even smaller member now into an amazon series so the headlines lorena bobbitt queen of the wild frontier remember that daily news headline was kindest cut when they found lorena bobbitt guilty and she went over and pour john wayne so that's a movie i'm not interested in i say hey i want to mention an actor i really like a lot jon hamm he's terrific he's giving him interview to esquire magazine he talks about his stint in rehab and breaking up jennifer westfelt trying to make a comeback he's a good guy like him so check out that esquire interview john had on him coming up next he's a legend dee snider of twisted sister lead singer will join us when we return plus your next chance to.

Oscar Writer Lorena Bobbitt John Wayne Dee Snider Lorraine Amazon Producer Esquire Magazine Jennifer Westfelt
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Tell you this i am concerned about what will happen to young women meaning they're going to be i think if we don't handle this correctly giving some type of fared due process to individuals then women are going to be actually hurt by this aggressively weaponized movement now anyone in mistreats a woman in the workplace or a man in that regard should be swiftly punished and and you all know that i of course i believe that but this is not really what's going on here is not about punishing rob porter it's not about contemporary nes complaints filed an of the did did this for any i mean look and some of these women might have filed police reports but i think in this case there was a effort made to get a restraining order because he punched a glass friend him friend of mine an italian a certain italian family said that's that's every sunday at our health obviously that's as an exaggeration but let come on i mean now john kelly is a horrible man demanded devoted an entire life of military service lost a son in service and if we're going to judge people on their on their moral character on every level and boy we gotta be got everybody's let's let's let's go if if everyone has to be perfect now in order to survive this new to movement then whose whose left his armor is fairly tarnished at this point he's created now and you read it down i think quite admirably he's created a white house that's not dysfunctional its anti functional so i think both on a on a human level and on a you know what you're supposed to be doing in his day job john kelly has been a failure john kelly is who is that he's trong at charlie pierce he's a writer for esquire magazine that is that still publishing esquire how many years did he give to public service not yet what did he nominate your who's your he in iraq yeah oh my god these people it's time we see how this echo chamber this echo chamber of irrelevance isn't echo chamber of irrelevance all of these people should have to also tell the truth about.

rob porter john kelly writer esquire magazine iraq
"esquire magazine" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on WCTC

"Get a restraining order because he punched a glass me friend of friend of mine an italian a certain italian families said that's that's every sunday at our health obviously that's as an exaggeration but but come on i mean now john kelly is a horrible man the man who devoted an entire life of military service lost a son in service and if we're going to judge people on their on their moral character on every level and boy we gotta be got everybody's let's let's let's go if if everyone has to be perfect now in order to survive this new mi2 movement then whose whose left his armories fairly tarnished at this point he's created now and you read it down i could quite admirably he's created a white house that's not dysfunctional it's anti functional so i think both on a on a human level and on a you know what he's supposed to be doing in his day job john kelly is beneficial you john kelly who is that he got charlie pierce he's a writer for esquire magazine i am of that is that still publishing esquire how many years did he give to public survey at night yeah what an he'd come at a year hungary anurag yeah oh my god these people it's time we see how this echo chamber this echo chamber of irrelevance is that echo chamber of irrelevance all of these people should have to also tell the truth about their own their own predilections in their own you let's open up everybody's files really sweetheart you'll get your you're gonna judge john kelly's moral character a lot of these these juror a half of these journalists have their own me to charges against them half of these journalists have their own problems hit on young girls in the office try me oh sweetie you on a job here oca come over here said on that is nee.

john kelly charlie pierce esquire magazine
"esquire magazine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Good old beautiful mind soldiers role rollover a truck arraignment sooner a mobster your holy writ remember you're so it was a fire trump tower new york city on the on the roof out there yesterday it was electrical far as good as nobody heard the twitter troll at democrats in the of twitter yesterday were rooting for the for the fire and this is some of these tweets burn baby burn there's no one burned down to the ground they want people in that tower unrelated to the trump administration or or anything with politics human beings trump tower burn baby burn the president is not there to bed democrats voting for the legislative marvels captain america exploded on president trump over the weekend allude attack referencing the movie humans said if he'd over eight million fans of dr chris evans got a taste sunday of the trump reduce rage and fury he detailed march of 2017 and esquire magazine interview the disney more real studios star likened mr trump and his senior policy adviser stephen miller to a trained of men whose miles zone do each other's rectums i like to see that drowned beginning of think the movie human centipede was more pressure that it was given credit foreign foreshadowing putin trump and stephen miller nice then there is yale psychiatrist from says president trump's mental health is so bad it could wipe out the entire human race this woman's a big bad doctored bandied lee so this is not hyperbole this is the reality what an alcohol human race is at risk thank to this this kombi professor at yale angry farleft woman has been caught offering twenty thousand dollars for an assassination hit on president trump andrea hudson tweeted that out uh offering twenty granddaddy body that would please bright anyone who is willing to assassinate real donald trump on shore the secret service as governor the laugh another door calling on her green day fought man village armstrong exploiter on instagram this week tolling offended go to hell and stop listening to my f and records after that attempted to defend president trump so let's green day billy joel armstrong just days after christmas tcu matched up against stanford in the valero alamo bowl elaborate halftime israeli which when grabbing people's attention apparently bent tried to trash trump and one of burger on the field of the performance was named texas too big to fail and of course the ban on as.

stanford valero alamo tcu billy joel armstrong andrea hudson yale putin disney esquire magazine america texas twitter christmas donald trump professor lee trump stephen miller mr trump dr chris evans president twenty thousand dollars
"esquire magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

"I'm sam cedar right now daca charlie peers from esquire magazine about roy moore's republican party so charlie uh we were talking about a ruined more in the insanity it's going on in in alabama and uh you know before we get into this stuff about the consumer financial protection bureau in the assault on uh on doddfrank which was we've seen quite a bit of this week uh prior weeks as well but the lot of his came to the head this week when rob corddry were resigned to presumably to run for governor in ohio we'll see about that but this this seen in alabama just for a moment there there's there's like a quality of the insanity that's going on there that feels like you've dumped the right wing you know it's sort of like everything that we've seen in this conservative movement over the years building up as you sort of jumped into this race in and it just losing out like you mentioned the dock seeing of washington post reporters the accusing of washington post reporters for reporting on roy more the the the robocall that where some posed egged very jewish sounding wash in post reporter who is going to pay seventy five hundred dollars to anybody who would come out and criticize roy more and of course we're going to print it but we won't fact jacket don't worry about that we want say i thought the robocall sent somebody else yeah he had a very strange accent no i mean this is i mean we i mean we all said that after the election of donald trump and after watching the campaign that the monsters finally of the lab right you know all the forces that drove the conservative movement that.

roy moore assault rob corddry ohio alabama reporter donald trump esquire magazine washington post seventy five hundred dollars
"esquire magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Is uh dorbyl it is a door i don't even know what they're worried about this wall is never going to happen ever never never ever never never been budgeted for over it i mean i don't even know how long the big money to build the wall has been in the budget long before donald trump even became a thing before barack obama became a or barack obama became a thing and the wall still i don't know it's been awhile since mid down to the border i demand run on the border in a long time sir but there was no wall number and there's not going to be a wall because neither party wants to the wall nobody wants to world was a waste of money cards with friends picture gary whatever you against humanity we're all we're nisa and this is we fell for it to be how we're doing is promoting them now everyone's going to go by cards installed this is what marketing is a fun game i don't know what the says i'm not going to buy their cards against humanity with humanity i'm going to protest by videotaping myself smashing my jange that's what i'm going to do i think that is definitely the most productive way to hit but with situation which by the way it sounds dirty but it's not smash machinga chelsea have from esquire magazine watch a from esquire they have this great story that i'm just in luck with this week on fleet ass esquire still has a magazine as weren't is a magazine who still while i don't know if they print but i'm named they are certainly online they have an online presence okha.

barack obama esquire magazine donald trump gary
"esquire magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Read them it's not cool but the bottom line roy moore right now you'll let me backup in esquire magazine there's was a column for the longest time it was called the indefensible position i still love the read that color because it somebody would 100 percent indus indefensible and then defend it was almost for the sake of just argument i'll grant driving defended their chain smoking and it was it was it was it wasn't really a gulf but it was the indefensible position and many would say roy more is the indefensible position trump starting to bind us which is is pissing me off because what ever rugby in 1973 why did it was 73 we was sturdy 19th cited that that every election involved why all of a sudden now as it's coming up toward uh were the of the the actual were general election for the senate seat that formerly belonged to jeff sessions why isn't happening now and keep in mind uh with what i'm about to will advocate here that the same people that saw her on this out there that have reported this that have brought this forward this information is horrible information for the gave you donald trump and really bush which he it happens i didn't happen but wasn't that time just discu incidentally that just showed up donna manically all of us all you know this person's come four weddings org that's when i think this this might take on this mitch mcconnell spent thirty five million dollars.

roy moore esquire magazine roy mitch mcconnell rugby senate jeff donald trump bush thirty five million dollars 100 percent
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Expert paul will not he is an author former hedge fund manager he knows the maths which is something that we don't say on this side of the pond but i always enjoyed that for the alaji let's talk about the wilma business model so you run the website you have a print magazine yeah you have a paul and dominic recruitment the book which we all know is books of giant moneymakers what is your business model as quant expert well the the pulling dominates doesn't exist anymore but the also there was the we talk about the world's largest torn website it's also probably the world's most expensive magazine i've been told undone with us too it's the magazine cost if us six hundred dollars for for six issues i don't think that's terribly expensive and affiliates legs i looked it up it's not actually this and if you look at some of the like the medical journals us stuff is are thousands of and in fact there was a big article not too long ago about what used to be academic research now sales for thousands of dollars and there's two companies that have sucked up all these formally free publication and that was a quote from esquire magazine so i just like to desist repeat that it's a very useful in marketing that the was until recently well the still is he certificate in quantitative finance yup that's that his is the world's largest high level quantification even with the company called seven says the sikh you f was was founded with chemical sevencity learning nine two thousand three was it but who sold up to fish about three or four yelled really so so but what is the business called the business model will my whole business model all my life has hasbeen do something which is fun and then and then i accidentally all i this to turn things into into businesses it sounded agreed saying it's an enthusiasm sink is endlessly i've got some hobby i'd like to make it public the hazards it becomes more long lasting and sustainable if there's a a revenue stream behind the i don't think he would like that none of just sort of is something in my dna that says for example a stumps does led the you clearly a.

fund manager paul esquire magazine dominic six hundred dollars
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Us true it's the magazine costs it if us six hundred dollars for for six issues i don't think that sarah believes that's a ventilator leg i looked it up it's not actually this and if you look at some of the like the medical journals us these are thousands of and in fact there was a big article not too long ago about what used to be academic research now sales for thousands of dollars and there's chu companies that have sucked up all these formally free publication and that was a quote from esquire magazine so i just like to to test repeat that it's all very useful in marketing the that the was until recently well the still is the certificate in quantitative finance yup that's that his is the world's largest high level contact eucation even with the company called seven says the sikh you f was was founded with chemical sevencity learning the nine two thousand three was improving but who sold up to fish about three or four yellow really so so but what is the business called the business model will my hope is is muddle all my life has been do something which is fun and then and then i accidentally all all i i was his urged to turn things into into businesses its own it is an agreed saying it's an enthusiasm sink lewis i i've got some hobby i'd like to make it public the hazards it becomes more long lasting and sustainable if there is a a revenue stream behind the i don't think he would like that which is sort of is something in my dna that says for example i i stumps does led the you clearly a few years ago i just know sometime my life there will be a time when i'm on the stage and people paying money to listen to me play the flooding going to feel the so trade you should hedge that that no no i am pretty good okay i'm getting them getting no it's not it has to do with your skill set it has to.

sarah esquire magazine six hundred dollars
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Told to let us too it's the magazine cost if a six hundred dollars for for six issues i don't think that's terribly expensive and affiliates leg i looked it up he's not actually this and if you will hit some of the like the medical journals us that these are thousands of and in fact there was a big article not so long ago about what used to be academic research now sales for thousands of dollars and there's two companies that have sucked up all these formally free publication and that was a quote from esquire magazine so i just like repeat that it's up very usefully marketing that was until recently well the stealthy certificate in quantitative finance yep that's that his is the world's largest high level quantification even with the company called sevencity the sikh you f was was founded with chemical sevencity learning the nine two thousand three was it but he was sold up to fish about three or four years so so but what is the business hold the business model will my whole business model all my life has hasbeen do something which is fun and then and then i accidentally all i i was six to ten things into into businesses its own it is only agreed thing it's an enthusiasm sink illness i i've got some hobby i'd like to make it public the becomes more long lasting and sustainable if there is a a revenue stream behind the i don't think he would like that notes is sort of is something in my dna that says for example i ask themselves learn the you clearly a few years ago i just know sometime my life there will be a time when i'm on the state and people paying money to listen to me play the flint would it take the other side trade you should hedge that back i know million pretty good i'm getting them getting no it's not it has to do with your skill set it has to do with the demand clear live ukelele provide surprised i would be surprised it is the instrument all the schools a taking of mutilated because it's i'm on the other side of the trade what did you leonard school trump bone and vienna i wanted to the trauma but they later the trump because at least the piano there's a distinct for each note the trombone as a.

esquire magazine six hundred dollars four years
"esquire magazine" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Qantas expert although the pond dominance doesn't exist anymore but the i also there was the and we talk about the world's largest con website it's also pounded the world's most expensive magazine i've been told i don't want us to what's the magazine cost it it's on six hundred dollars for for six issues i don't think that's terribly expensive nfl italy i looked it up it's not actually this and if you look at some of the like the medical journals and stuff these are thousands of and in fact there was a big article not so long ago about what used to be academic research now sells for thousands of dollars and there's two companies that have sucked up all these formally free publication and that that that was a quote from esquire magazine so i just like to desist repeat that it's not very usefully marketing them the was until recently well the still is the certificate in quantitative finance yep that's that his is the world's largest high level quantification even with the comey called sevencity this sikh you f was was founded with chemical sevencity learning the nine two thousand three was it but who sold up to fish about three or four yellow really so so but what is the business of all the business model will my whole business model all my life hasbeen do something which is fun and then and then i accidentally all i i also this urged to turn things into into businesses it's on it is only agreed saying it's an enthusiasm think emas i i've got some hobby i'd like to make it public becomes more long lasting and sustainable if there is a a revenue stream behind the i don't think of it like that no just sort of is something in might dna that says for example i i stumps does lend the you clearly a few union i just.

esquire magazine Qantas six hundred dollars
"esquire magazine" Discussed on X96

X96

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on X96

"The fans ballot that will be tallied along with the other ballots chosen by that nine hundred artists than the rest this is the meters you've heard the meters and yet he voted in dc this was called this leash blood nineteen sixty nine recalling the meters let's see other banned deferred to as the original meters the differentiate between the funky meters this is there a from sixty nine am was fertilizer heard this in the movie he had gone to eliminate movie at some point cloudy look she ceremony will be held april fourteen th in cleave lands via hammond b three organ yeah the distinctive sir the handling be three now uh a lot of people are nominated year after year and you don't make it bon jovi no they've been nominated before yeah they've been on it so the first time is the first time on the list for nine of those in duct these but a lot of people on at the most and not only on this is a up in its bond joey we are against poncho noneuro gene that you know the nine hundred voters who have not put him in show me were bon jovi touched you bill it you have it against something against punch and that's immediately where you would go with that as well why why would you mind if he touched me i don't clean we do have a bad memory involving bontcho media sweden what we had it was when we were top forty station had a contrast we had bon jovi tickets to give and it was back when we were a morning show if you know what i mean and how we said once the most outrageous thing you would do to jobe takers riding in one guy brought down of a blue portable swimming pool kids cool put put poop in it yeah or whereas will leave it was mercer kauai drought man it was manure and rolled around rolled around mind jovi jovis i gotta and that got picked up by was at esquire magazine in their road the dubious achievement of dubious achievement awards and.

dc esquire magazine bon jovi sweden
"esquire magazine" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"esquire magazine" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Of course the swimmer was uh turned out to be an unhappy experience for her uh uh we can come back but jumping ahead to uh the postproduction period uh as you know uh the film was taken out of the peiris hands uh uh shortly after uh the shoots and uh when i visited fracking they eleanor uh was uh during that time uh she told me that she had written an article about the experience and she was going to call it the shallow and uh i think it was going to be for esquire magazine in the event she had this up not uh uh having that published uh and i can somebody in the preelection later told me uh when i pumped into them uh that uh burt lancaster had called her and dissuaded her from uh publish she basically said that it wouldn't to really uh do were any good for future work uh uh careerwise uh maybe if that was the reason or not i don't know but she didn't ended up having it published um uh uh was fascinated to see some notes uh uh that she had made for it that's in that a documentary on the bluray uh now that uh the dust settled than it's uh history is no longer a question of anybody's career ethic he might be very interesting to have that whole essay published a with the notes uh but that's the film historian at me all this hoping that things will come to light and be preserved you mentioned briefly when it came out um the you went to go see it uh what was sort of your feeling when you saw the final film.

esquire magazine burt lancaster