21 Burst results for "eric lander"

New Science Chief Wants Next Pandemic Vaccine Ready in 100 Days

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

New Science Chief Wants Next Pandemic Vaccine Ready in 100 Days

"And have a beer. Stephen Portnoy. CBS News, The new White House science advisor, says he wants to have a vaccine ready to fight the next pitch. Endemic in just about 100 days after recognizing a potential viral outbreak in his first interview after being sworn in today, Eric Lander painting a rosy near future, where a renewed American emphasis on science not only better prepares the world for the next pandemic with plug in and play vaccines, but also changes how medicine fights disease and treats patients. Herbs, climate change and further

Stephen Portnoy Eric Lander Cbs News White House
Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

"Elect says science will always be at the forefront of his administration. And so he is elevating the post of science advisor to Cabinet level. Eric Lander, a pioneer and mapping the human genome is in line to direct the Office of Science and Technology Policy and service Science Advisor. Biden's also retaining Dr Francis Collins is director of the National Institutes of Health. And he's naming two prominent female scientists to co chair the President's Council of Advisers on Science and Technology. Caltex Frances Arnold, who won the 2018 Nobel Prize in chemistry. And M I. T vice President for research Maria Zuber. Biden says the team will ensure everything his administration does is grounded in science, fax and the truth.

Eric Lander Office Of Science And Technolo Dr Francis Collins President's Council Of Adviser Biden Cabinet Caltex Frances Arnold National Institutes Of Health Maria Zuber
Biden says his advisers will lead with 'science and truth'

AP 24 Hour News

01:14 min | 8 months ago

Biden says his advisers will lead with 'science and truth'

"Biden himself continues to build out his administration today. Introducing his science team have always said that Biden Harris administration will also gonna lead and we're gonna leave with science and truth. We believe in both. He's elevating the position of science advisor to Cabinet level and that will be filled by Eric Lander, a pioneer mapping the human genome. Vice president elect Kamila Harris says the incoming administration will listen to the scientists. The science behind climate change is not a hoax, the science behind The virus is not partisan. The same laws apply. Same evidence holds true. Regardless of whether or not you accept them. Biden is also filling out his State Department team with a group of former career diplomats and veterans of the Obama administration experience, he says, will restore America's global and moral leadership. Finally, the latest coronavirus data from Johns Hopkins University shows three US leads the world with 23.6 million confirmed cases since the pandemic began. Nearly 394,000 Americans have died. That's out of a global total of more than two million

Biden Harris Eric Lander Biden Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Obama Administration Cabinet State Department Johns Hopkins University United States
Biden: Science will be at `forefront' of his administration

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 8 months ago

Biden: Science will be at `forefront' of his administration

"President elect Joe Biden says signs will always be at the forefront of his administration so he's elevating the post of science adviser to cabinet level Eric lander a pioneer in mapping the human genome is in line to direct the office of science and technology policy and service science adviser he would be the first to life scientists to hold the job Biden's also retaining Dr Francis Collins is director of the national institutes of health and he's naming two prominent female scientists to co chair the president's council of advisors on science and technology Caltex Francis Arnold who won the two thousand eighteen Nobel Prize in chemistry and M. I. T. vice president for research Maria's stupor Biden says the team will ensure everything his administration does is grounded in science facts and the truth Ben Thomas Washington

President Elect Joe Biden Eric Lander Office Of Science And Technolo Dr Francis Collins Council Of Advisors On Science Biden Cabinet Francis Arnold National Institutes Of Health M. I. T. Maria Ben Thomas Washington
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"So something that would be super inappropriate where we live isn't necessarily what super inappropriate here and you can't tell the people that are experiencing. It that it is inappropriate and they just don't realize it or something like there's something a little arrogant about that. Right? Like if someone saying Oh. Yeah. We joke about sex all the time at work and I don't give a shit who am I to say well, no, you have to give a shit and you're wrong and you should you should suffer from that. That's a weird declaration to make a little bit right. anyways it was just it was clear I found it to be a very clear difference. Yeah agreed it's different. We're all in our bubbles. That's Really are bubbles anyway Eric went through this little above what happened with him but he did crisper to remove this HIV gene and it was just don necessary and he went to jail and he's a rogue scientist a mad scientists. Do you think when he gets released a move to an island and become like a Dr Evil type double seven villain I hope we could use a couple more villains. And he could create like superstrong humans that are impervious HIV. Gonorrhea this guy must have suffered for some STD's I gotTA. I WANNA live in a world without these? Change in the world one gene at a time on gene any time was that all the facts that is, Oh, well I miss you I. Miss You. I'm having so much fun but I also miss you and I. Think you would be having fun here too. There's lots of steak eaten yesterday I love steak. Yeah and I, love a donut yeah. How many donors did you eat? Just tell us that twenty eight between the two of us. So each had fourteen full-size. Full days coated in. Cinnamon. We got half dozen, the first, half dozen, the second stop, a couple dozen, the third stop but still only eight and a half dozen, and then on the fourth stop, they were even better than we were expecting. We thought we were only have another half dozen but when we ended up eating for there, and then when we got home we we split one right before bed at one am. Yeah you guys are really really Vero. That's the only variety we have left. I Love You love you love you. To God is he look good look at that? Monica I know it's crazy. Screen grab of yourself right now please. Show me what a what a shot. Show. I. Miss Her baby so much will you give her a kiss? You know what I'll be honest I went into my house, the other day and I was scared to look. Out Why I'm afraid. She's GONNA get hair. That's. Scary. Oh Man alrighty I love you have you..

scientist Vero Monica Eric
"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So something that would be super inappropriate where we live isn't necessarily what super inappropriate here and you can't tell the people that are experiencing. It that it is inappropriate and they just don't realize it or something like there's something a little arrogant about that. Right? Like if someone saying, Oh yeah. We joke about sex all the time at work and I don't give a shit who am I to say well, no, you have to give a shit and you're wrong and you should you should suffer from that. That's a weird declaration to make a little bit right. anyways it was just it was clear. I found it to be a very clear difference. Yeah agreed it's different. We're all in our bubbles. That's. Really. Are Bubbles Anyway Eric went through this little above what happened with him but he did crisper to remove this HIV gene and it was just don necessary and he went to jail and he's a rogue scientist a mad scientists. Do you think when he gets released a move to an island and become like a Dr Evil type double seven villain I hope we could use a couple more villains. and. He could create like superstrong humans that are impervious HIV Gonorrhea, this guy must have suffered for some STD's I gotTA. I WANNA. Live in a world without these. Change. In the world one gene at a time on gene, any time was that all the facts that is oh, well I. Miss You I. Miss You. I'm having so much fun but I also miss you and I think you would be having fun here too. There's lots of steak eaten yesterday I love steak. Yeah and I love a donut yeah. How many donors did you eat? Just tell us that. Eight between the two of us. So each had fourteen full-size. Full days coated in cinnamon. We got half dozen, the first, half dozen, the second stop, a couple dozen, the third stop, but still only eight and a half dozen, and then on the fourth stop, they were even better than we were expecting. We thought we were only have another half dozen but when we ended up eating for there, and then when we got home we we split one right before bed at one am. Yeah you guys are really really barrel. That's the only virility we have left. I. Love You. Love you love you. To God is he look good look at that Monica I know it's crazy. Screen. Grab of yourself right now please. Show me what a what a shot. Show? I. Miss Her baby so much. Will you give her a kiss? You know what I'll be honest I went into my house, the other day and I was scared to look. Out Why I'm afraid she's GONNA get hair. That's. Scary. Oh Man. alrighty. I love you have you..

scientist Monica Eric
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I'm not fully myself. We're all getting led. Down a fucking rabbit hole by an algorithm that predicts what we would like and they're right there there right and then they take you somewhere and they're smarter than you like the way they were talking about how? The way the algorithm is making connections a human brain can't do. It's like actually smarter than a human brain. So there are things happening that you can't even figure out why you'd want to see that. But you do they said, they built this neural network basically, it's mostly about youtube or at least what I've heard so far I don't watch it. Don't it you do but I'm not stupid enough to think. It's only happening on Youtube. It's it's happening on everything about I look at. Yeah. It's much smarter than you can predict what you're going to find interest in and then based on. If you enjoyed that they're going to predict and then they're just gonNa lead you somewhere and by the way, I think most people think about this is something that only happens on the right and has on the left to Oh yeah. It's all happening to everybody. Yes. Well, that is a big part of the the first few episodes I. Guess I don't WanNa give it away but it's definitely happening on both sides in it's the exact same thing. Minimally, we can say that it the the first few episodes revolve around this guy who was kind enough to let them access five years of his youtube watching history, and they can just chart day by day how he got radicalized in. This was a smart guy who was gonna Major in environmental, science and. was. Into punk rock and this and that, and then he ends up a place he could never imagine he would ended up and then by some luck broke out of it and started realizing what had happened to him and going on different channels. But now he's just down different channels and he admits he's down different channels and it's all Kuka Sam. Thank. Yeah. But it is also funny because it all boils down to this need for community all of the whole thing and I hate to say it goes back to Joan Harari it's like you know he identifies a lack of community is being underpinning of addiction join on and on and you know it's kind of underpinning this thing. And Yeah we need to be in a group and we'll be in generally what group invites us and accepts us or that we see ourselves in. Yeah. Yeah it's scary. Repeat his name it's Johann. Hari. Johann. Hari sorry. Johan what did I say Johann? Johann Harari I think oh Jesus. Here on Y'all salads we're trying to eat healthy and we're getting a lot of Greek salads and I want them to add what I've been calling guiral meet. And gyro Meat I've been saying it's in its euro at one maybe maybe zero it is. But Aaron and I were talking about they don't even blink when you say whatever you WANNA call it. They're so used to hearing people mangle that word of course. Yeah. Okay, you said you learn in psychology that people with schizophrenia have a particular genetic marker and that a stressful event during a period from around age seven thirty could trigger the schizophrenia he rejected that and I know I learned that. He said he wasn't sure if that was true scientists have not.

Johann Harari Aaron youtube schizophrenia Joan Harari Hari Johan
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Of snow. He did. US Okay well, let's get into some Eric facts. He was so interesting fascinating when I was listening back. I felt like I was back in school. You know we love school. Yeah. He did have a way of like it's like he's teaching us like one on one something. Yeah. There was no talking over anyone's head right? He he didn't get esoteric. He had a really great way of keeping it in Layman's terms. I. Love Him I. Love Him Too. I'm in love with him. I'm in love with them. Do you think? Oh my gosh one thing real quick. When we were at lake. Arrowhead. Eric told us that a T. REX skull holte row. I'm sorry. It was held a t rex skeleton in its entirety had sold at Christie's auction for thirty one, million dollars thirty, one million and the the projections were that it was gonna like. Fetch eight million. So it was way over the project. She's thirty one meal and it was not till Leonardo DiCaprio unfortunately no but but one thing I pointed out is it seems like a Lotta money. But then when you think that the these Ferrari GTO's of sold at the concourse dollar gone for fifty nine, million, you compare a Ferrari do a t. rex full skeleton it seems like a bargain to me it shared does I would really like one and starting to get obsessed with it. I am too. Don't need the whole skeleton because then you need a room that's like twenty five feet tall but the skull, the cranium. Yeah but the reason it's good to have the full skeleton is when you're having sex in the mouth. Very. High up dangerous. Yeah. That's a little danger. Can I make a recommendation? We you start with making love and the ribcage because that's only in probably not eight nine feet off the ground layup. Yes. Because you're going to need to learn I know you've got great balance from your background killing but. None of your cheers involved quotas. So you don't know how good your you know what? I'm saying you're bail. Got Close. Catching by the P. Yes. Sure as you know. As you invented. But. You're right. I'll work my way up. I have got progressively more fearful of heights the older I get. So I will be a little scared maybe of a little net under the ribcage and the mandible case you do fall out tipo fallen to like a little What do they call those people Fi Flyer? Ease a trapeze net. You'll trapeze the fun and then I bet you could auction off your sex trapeze net for. Couple thousand bucks to recoup some of that thirty mile, Oh my God, what a plan you could probably rent it out to you know in you know in Japan Tokyo, they have these they're called love hotels and they're like these themed hotels that people can go and almost exclusively just have sachs like a Bra..

Eric Leonardo DiCaprio Christie GTO lake Japan Tokyo sachs
"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So you put a backpack on this bacteria that makes it eat oil, and then people did file a patent on this and it actually went to the Supreme Court as to whether or not patents could be made on organisms in a famous case, call trucker, Bardy v diamonds, and the Supreme Court held that you could issue patents, and this led to amazing set of patents in biotechnology that helped form the foundation of the field, but also led to a problem. People started Patenting Human Dna just naturally occurring human DNA. The DNA fray breast cancer gene, and saying not just I have a method for sequencing your breast cancer gene. But I'm the only person who could sequence your breast cancer gene because I have a patent on your breast cancer gene. This got a bunch of people pretty upset because it meant you couldn't get a second opinion they could charge whatever they wanted, and anyway the breast cancer gene is a product of nature not a product of humans. And they said, well, we broke it apart from the chromosome. So we get credit for it and it eventually went to the Supreme Court and in my extracurricular activities I sometimes right amicus briefs to the Supreme Court, of course you. Know. So. It'd be embarrassing if you didn't. I like constitutional law wars. You know I met my wife and a constitutional law class and I have always followed law very closely since and I decided that on on some topics the Supreme Court doesn't really get serious friends of the court briefs from scientists. Yeah. So I wrote them one on this question of could you patent genes? And value make long story short I took a position and then working in the president's council. Advisers Science. The Solicitor General took the same position and the Supreme Court unanimously adopted that position Oh. The short answer is court said that even though you can patent artificial things, you can't patent natural DNA and nobody can own your DNA and I was so thrilled by that decision glad to have played a little bit of a role in writing a brief on it. Oh my gosh. How crazy I ask a question I feel like is completely unrelated to him and. Yeah that's that's pretty wild I did not come up in my research of you I, just. Yeah Yeah. That's that's great. Sure podcast we talk about the amicus brief on Gerrymandering Oh, very interesting but a for another podcast for another bike cast Dr Eric Lander you're so fascinating I'm so happy that you've taken this crazy twisty unexplainable don't try to make sense of it turn in life and that you're where you're at and we really appreciate your time and we just hope we get speak with you again in. Great Luck with your podcast you guys are great. Thanks for having.

Supreme Court Dr Eric Lander Bardy president
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"What is interesting is it's now being used for some human clinical trials in cancer to be able to engineer immune cells. As part of that Immuno Oncology we're talking about, yeah. It's beginning to be used in some clinical trials for genetic diseases there still early, but we're going to see that happening and people are approaching it slowly and carefully, but it's going to. Become a mode I don't think it'll become the you know the cure for all diseases, but it's going to go into the tool box or new therapies and so exciting. Now, this one's more of a I guess it's mildly spiritual question and I am I'm an atheist just where I'm coming from the transition from inorganic material to organic material. Am I wrong in that? That's still a humongous mystery. Yeah. Do. We know how we go from rock and lava in water to organic is that still a mystery? To that one is not so much of a mystery I think they've had a pretty good idea for a long time that inorganic things when you put them in certain circumstances can form organic compounds. So heat up, you do things you can get building block organic molecules, but that's a long way from life. I think the thing you might WanNa be asking is how do you go from molecules whether their inorganic or quote organic, which is just a name for a certain subset of molecules. How do you go from that to living organisms? Nobody's managed to pull that off in the laboratory yet but you know some young generation may come along and say oh? Yeah. You know that's our challenge, but I might be. A little while there are lots of people with ideas on how it happens. But you know we want evidence is it of interest to modern scientists or is it largely something that just like whatever I don't know? Let's go forward? No, no, no, it's. It's amazing interest. I have friends here in town who devote their labs to how is it that organic molecules could somehow come together and make living cells and Some of the parts aren't so hard. There's certain kinds of phospholipids, molecules that naturally form sell like boundaries. So membranes of cells they happen spontaneously. All right checkmark what about the stuff in the cell what about the other stuff you know folks are trying to take that apart when I, say we don't know what happens. I don't mean we don't have ideas. We don't have experiments we don't have people speculating and testing is just we don't have the. Goods yet to tell you exactly how that happened. Yeah, and that's why we keep having young scientists coming along. Yeah. Oh my I have one last question, and that is I want to say that I think the history was when Exxon Mobil..

Immuno Oncology Exxon Mobil engineer cancer
"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Yeah. You could identify and then you could go in there and you could virtually cut out that mutation and then the body would no longer create sickled cells is that an example of how it? Could work. That is an example of how it could work which really would like to do is is actually not just cut it but repair it and it turns out you could also send new instructions to be used as a template to fix it up. This is the part of crisper that seems impossible to me. So the cutting out the whole thing's. True, but the particular part that seems absolutely impossible as I understand cutting something out. But then my understanding is you can actually just inject this new protein into the cell or something into the cell and your own DNA will fill in that whole. You just cut out and now incorporated into itself and start replicating throughout your body. Yeah. So it seems amazing to you that your body has the ability to take a piece of broken DNA and repair it. Yeah. But it turns out your body is got broken fragments of the time sunlight. Other things you have evolved your ancestors. For hundreds of millions. In fact, billions of years organisms have had to deal with the problem of repairing broken DNA and turns that they have systems to do it. Almost nothing we're talking about was conceived for the first time by human scientists we largely sit at the feet of bacteria and learn from them although for choosen advertise your bacteria don't have feet. We weren't we you know we learned from bacteria. Okay. So then immediately imagination can fill in the blanks of all these different things you could conceivably think of. An replace. Now if I remember correctly, not only can it do that but you can also implant a bit of crisper that will then for the future going on fix all future future jeans isn't that a part of Crisper is that it can it can be a permanent chain for the rest of the genealogical tree of that individual. Okay. So now now it's an important distinction you're making here you're spot on. Okay. So we got change we can ask where do you WanNa make change suppose you inherited a dominant form of blindness maybe we want to inject the virus that will cut the gene for the protein that's causing that blindness. We inject that into your I. It would get into the is sells the retinal cells and it would cut that gene. That wouldn't get passed on to your kids visits just in your eye, right? Same would be true if we wanted to make change to liver disease. Familial hypercholesterolemia or a muscle disease or you name it none of that gets passed on the only things that get passed on or in the cells we call the germ line sperm and eggs..

Crisper Familial hypercholesterolemia liver disease
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"You can either try to change that DNA or you could try to change the proteins that attached to it and make more. Oh, no no. This is good. You're bringing this up. Okay. Because for the last twenty, five years I've taught introductory biology at mit I haven't taken it yourself which I love having never take us so boring I never taken it but I have this moral obligation to slightly slightly and fixed that explanation..

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"So could you walk us through some of the exciting applications that this? has led to. Oh. Yeah. Well, there's figure at a gene that plays an important role in a certain cancer. Yeah. Pick a cancer. Some gene is mutated in it find out by looking at a lot of cancer patients and seeing that their tumor contains genetic changes that gene but their regular cells don't information at work for you and then you say, Oh, maybe we should make a drug that inhibits the protein. Encoded by gene right or that activates it or something like that. Well, you know in the ancient days of the Twentieth Century Most Cancer Drugs were just poisons right they're trying to kill that sal and not your other cells right? Exactly. Whereas now what happens is people try to in a really molecular way inhibit this specific protein ideally one that's mutated only in the cancer cells So you get drugs that. Have Pretty minor side effects, I I never WANNA say no side effects but pretty minor side effects pretty safe. They're not offering injections, their pills that you can take, and there's more than thousand clinical trials for cancer drugs that come out of understanding, which genes which proteins and people around the world are doing that. Now, 'cause we kind of have a look up table for lots of cancers and I don't want to. Underestimate. It's very hard work, but it's a lot harder feeling around in the dark when you don't know what you're doing. Yeah. Same at other extremes, heart disease. This is one of the early successes that predates the genome project but a lot of people take medicines to lower their cholesterol that really came from figure out a particular gene in a particular rare genetic disease, and then at the other extreme, you take something like schizophrenia. Yeah. The longest time people had no clue what the biology was well, can I add one? Remember learning this in psychology twenty five years ago is that it's a genetic trait and that a stressful event in your life, you have a window right between like I dunno seventeen in thirty or twenty seven where some traumatic event can turn on that gene in the when they've identified people who have hereditarily that maybe they try to protect them in that window the that in of itself to me was one of the most mysterious interesting concepts is that all been disproven or is that? Different understanding of nowadays or. Well. I. Don't quite know what Jeanette is or what you were told Monica is going to be cutting all that out KNBR. But people can carry it right but not express it fina typically. Oh well. But that's true for lots of things right there are a lot of people who inherited gene for breast cancer not all of them will actually develop breast cancer. So that's the thing about a lot of these diseases is they're not deterministic..

cancer breast cancer sal Jeanette Monica
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"FBI was an now we're able to synthesize all this information for the first time ever, and now every state talks to each other. That's kind of what's happened in your lifetime in science. Yeah. Well, it's certainly what's happened with basic scientific information. We have these databases for sharing all this information about the DNA and the genetic variations and the cells and the other things that's amazing and is a great ethic of it. I gotTa say, it doesn't really happen in medicine so well, because the electronic medical records are almost deliberately written in different systems that don't talk to each other because. Maybe the folks who right the systems aren't. So nuts about the idea that you could transfer things between systems because you could hold your customer as captive. Yeah. So so is a little bit of a sore point that some of his have that there's no excuse for the fact that you can't get your medical record from five or seven different institutions easily integrated or the many many people who want a share, their medical records for science have such a hard time doing it. Yeah. I agree. It's like I should be given a thumbnail drive and every time or a thumbnail injured thumb drive I added. Yeah thumb drive and that I every time I go to a doctor I don't have to download them on every single twist and turn of my life that I've surely will forget on one day and remember on another day we ought to be able to do that. We're seeing this right now in the Independent. That, you know it's really hard. Somebody comes in they want to get a test heady connect to their insurer. How do you do this and the idea that we gotta protect People's privacy got to protect their information, but I think most people want to be able to share medical information to advance science yes, and it's it often is frustrating we have a project right now that's you know with cancer patients. It's called count me in to allow patients to partner with researchers to share their information, and we know the people with cancer desperately want to share their information. So I, want to agree with you. There's so much information that's being shared. You GotTa Watch out for the points on your. License tax. There's information being shared scientifically true. But we still got a ways to go to make sure that our medical data systems live up to what patients think they do for them, right? Yes. Because that's the last kind of boundary and synthesizing all this great information as you say like so I'm always fascinated with epidemiological studies that are done in Scandinavia where we're having a debate in this country for three years about whether this vaccine causes autism and it's exactly that it's a debate who knows you over there and they they literally put a command into the computer and in five seconds they go. No we had this group that had it in this group that didn't there's no. And then it's over many countries have this abilities. The Scandinavians are world leaders. The Estonians turn out to be remarkably good at this. But what they have is trust your. Trust. Yeah we can't forget that the science takes place in a bigger social context, and if you have the trust, it's going to be hard implement these things. Yeah. What we thought we've seen that with Cova you know I don't think there's a clear illustration of that when you're really getting down to it, I think you're dealing with people's just genuine distrust with authorities some people some people not were seen it lived out. In real time. Now, the broad institute I WANNA keep this momentum going I want I want to be able to collaborate..

cancer FBI Cova Scandinavia partner
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"We can figure out which genetic variations are associated with You were talking about these six genes for heart disease. Well, we figure out by just finding some genetic variations are more frequent in these people with heart disease, right and actually it's up past six. Now it's three hundred house Oh. Yeah. I'm three hundred for schizophrenia. We now understand that all of these traits height weight. Psychiatric Diseases Diabetes, they're all influenced by lots of genetic variation when people talk about the gene for something. Yeah. It's a real over-simplification what's really going on, but there's some process in your body and it can be tweaked in a lot of different ways. So when we find all these things, the next big question is, how do they fit together in some pathway? and. So once all that was once the genes were found, the next generation comes along and says, oh. Very good elders you found the jeans but you haven't told us how they fit together. Yeah and so they start doing things like we got to read out the genetic code of every cell type in the body not the DNA that's the same in every cell which genes are turned on and off like how the program is read out in every cell in your body. That's still ongoing. There's this international Human Cell Atlas. Put I think I can put it in Layman's terms. But yeah, there's this great curiosity that if I take my hair follicle, my whole DNA exists within this hair follicle yet clearly, the hair follicle is much different than my femur than my than my ear that I eyeball. So why does my hair the shape in consistency? It is in my toenail is what it is yet they're working off the exact same ingredient list house, the body know how to make a nail versus a femur versus hair and you same question about your laptop. Your Laptop has the same program when you booted up but you could be watching a movie running a spreadsheet you could be. Doing some drawing, you could be buying something on Ebay. Yeah. All those things happen despite the same code sitting on your laptop, and that's because laptop can run different programs. Yeah. So can the cells in your body when that's a hair follicle or a bone seller blood cell they're running different programs. So right now people are just trying to find out what all the patterns of stuff that's turned on and off every cell in your body because even though it same code, it runs different programs at different times in is it too generic to think?.

Ebay
"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"We can figure out which genetic variations are associated with You were talking about these six genes for heart disease. Well, we figure out by just finding some genetic variations are more frequent in these people with heart disease, right and actually it's up past six. Now it's three hundred house only on three hundred for schizophrenia. We now understand that all of these traits height weight. Psychiatric Diseases, diabetes, they're all influenced by lots of genetic variation when people talk about the gene for something. Yeah. It's a real over-simplification what's really going on, but there's some process in your body and it can be tweaked in a lot of different ways. So when we find all these things, the next big question is, how do they fit together in some pathway? And so once all that was once the genes were found, the next generation comes along and says Oh very good elders. You found the genes but you haven't told us how they fit together. Yeah and so they start doing things like we got to read out the genetic code of every cell type in the body not the DNA. That's the same in every cell which genes are turned on and off like how the program is read out in every cell in your body. That's still ongoing. There's this International Human Cell Atlas I just wanted put. I think I can put it in layman's terms but. Yeah, there's this great curiosity that if I take my hair follicle, my whole DNA exists within this hair follicle yet clearly, the hair follicle is much different than my femur than my than my ear that I eyeball. So why does my hair the shape in consistency? It is in my toenail is what it is yet they're working off the exact same ingredient list house, the body know how to make a nail versus a femur versus hair and you same question about your laptop. Your Laptop has the same program when you booted up but you could be watching a movie running a spreadsheet you could be. Doing some drawing, you could be buying something on Ebay. Yeah. All those things happen despite the same code sitting on your laptop, and that's because laptop can run different programs. Yeah. So can the cells in your body when that's a hair follicle or a bone seller blood cell they're running different programs. So right now people are just trying to find out what all the patterns of stuff that's turned on and off every cell in your body because even though it same code, it runs different programs at different times in is it too generic to think?.

Psychiatric Diseases Ebay
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Silver medal, there's all this new stuff about how people who win silver often have big bouts of depression that the people. Who Win bronze are happy and that Gold's happy but silver for some reason comes with some baggage Oh God no just the opposite. Oh good. This was nineteen seventy four. I was on the stuyvesant high school math team. You know that was a big deal stuyvesant high school didn't have big athletic teams but we had a great math team and so you know I've been on it since I was a freshman I ended up being the captain of the math team my senior year, which was like way. Cool. But it was my junior year is the first year the United States participated in the International Mathematical Olympiad which was a Soviet bloc competition that the US had never been in before and In the middle of the Cold War I gotta say the United, States was very worried about sending a team to East Germany to compete with the Russians the and the Hungarians were very good mathematicians and they were afraid we were going to embarrass the country a hollow. To this camp to prepare for the Olympics that was held in New Jersey, and then we flew over to east. Germany went through checkpoint, Charlie. We didn't have diplomatic relations with Germany at the time which made it even more exciting and we went down to city airport in Germany, for the competition and I'll just digress and say we hit it off amazingly well with the Russians because there were the other superpower. It was East Germany and they knew that they own the joint and they couldn't get in trouble. So. We go up on top of buildings with them and throw water balloons down into traffic because the Russians told us you know no way. Can you get in trouble where here and so? To a great. And, we ended up finishing second to the Russians and ahead of the Hungarians who are the legendary mathematicians of Europe. So we didn't embarrass the United States good and we came home. So I think the important lesson here is the expectations were very low..

East Germany stuyvesant high school United States Gold Europe New Jersey International Mathematical Oly Olympics Charlie
"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Silver medal, there's all this new stuff about how people who win silver often have big bouts of depression that the people. Who Win bronze are happy and that Gold's happy. But silver for some reason comes with some baggage. Oh God no just the opposite, oh. Good. This was nineteen seventy four I was on the stuyvesant high school math team. You know that was a big deal stuyvesant high school didn't have big athletic teams but we had a great math team and so you know I've been on it since I was a freshman I, ended up being the captain of the math team my senior year, which was like way. Cool. But it was my junior year is the first year the United States participated in the International Mathematical Olympiad which was a Soviet bloc competition that the US had never been in before and In the middle of the cold, War I? GotTa say the United States was very worried about sending a team to East Germany to compete with the Russians in the and the Hungarians were very good mathematicians and they were afraid we were going to embarrass the country a hollow. Went through this camp to prepare for the Olympics that was held in New Jersey, and then we flew over to East Germany went through checkpoint Charlie. We didn't have diplomatic relations with Germany at the time which made it even more exciting, and we went down to city airport in Germany for the competition and I'll just digress and say we hit it off amazingly well with the Russians because there were the other superpower. It was East Germany and they knew that they own the joint and they couldn't get in trouble. So. We go up on top of buildings with them and throw water balloons down into traffic because the Russians told us you know no way. Can you get in trouble where here and so? To a great. And we ended up finishing second to the Russians and ahead of the Hungarians who are the legendary mathematicians of Europe. So we didn't embarrass the United States good and we came home. So I think the important lesson here is the expectations were very low..

East Germany stuyvesant high school United States Gold Europe International Mathematical Oly New Jersey Olympics
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome to our program. Well great to be here sort of. Kind of. You know I got just right out of the gates I gotTa say, I have to learn about people in a rapid manner often for the program and your story is one of the most complex I've ever had to take on and try to synthesize into some kind of linear story. Well, if you do it, let me know. It was actually more complex to try to live it make sensitive. So. You boy, you had this great quote. I read that said you live your life forward thinking yet you retrospectively make sense of your life so neither perspectives are maybe objective. Right? So it's Kinda like you just add it all up at the end and then try to find the through line. Well, that's the thing you have to treat. All biography is suspicious because people try to make some through line as. If you're living in that direction knowing where you were going. You know it's not like that no or that you had set a course for yourself at eighteen, and now here we are God knows not in my case. Okay. So I'm going to try to rapidly go through this kaleidoscopic life of yours so that we can get to the stuff that's on the frontier but first and foremost your kid from. Brooklyn actually you growing up in Brooklyn was interesting. Yeah. Especially at the time that you grew up and you're also you were being raised by a single mother from eleven years old on, which is its own unique experience. So yeah, what was broken back then it was lively and filthy and and exciting. Well, Brooklyn, was the Brooklyn of today what it wasn't was trendy. There was nothing trendy about Brooklyn and. I was growing up in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties. Actually my dad had been in the hospital since I was five he had multiple sclerosis and he died when I was eleven. So I was raised entirely by my mom me and my brother and you know we did have a lot of money back then and so she came up with everything free or cheap you could do.

Brooklyn
"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome. Welcome. Welcome to armchair expert I'm Dan Shepard. I'm joined virtually or rather I'm joining her virtually miniature mouse she has an emmy nomination. To just see you through the screen. I don't like it. I can't smell you. That's good because I haven't showered in a couple of days. Sure I understand today we have a really exciting guests and I would say one of the reasons exciting that I shit the bed on this one about three or four times I'd say in that I thought I understood how certain aspects of cellular reproduction happened I was incorrect but he encouraged me to keep going ahead. So if you like seeing me eat shit, this is the episode I. Don't think we've ever had somebody with a more interesting trajectory into being a world leader in their field Eric. Lander is currently the president and founding director of the broad institute at MIT and Harvard. He's a geneticists, molecular biologists and a mathematician, and he has played a pioneering role in all aspects of the reading understanding in biomedical application of the Human Genome. He was a principal leader of the Human Genome Project and lander is a professor of biology at mit an professor of systems biology at Harvard Medical School. He's won a bunch of. Honors and awards the Macarthur Fellowship the breakthrough prize in life sciences, the Albany Prize in medicine and biological research. But most importantly this guy was just a brilliant mathematician that decided I. Don't want to study math rest of my life and he landed in the most incredible place wasn't he fascinating Monica he was and he's also listening back I mean I thought at the time but I forgot he's so vibrant and fun like you can feel his passion for the subject and just kind of life in general incredibly playful I wouldn't doubt. It if the students teaches refer to him as professor playful and if not I hope they do going forward shed. Yes. So please enjoy professor playful lander we are supported by Bob's red mill. Now, Monica yesterday we were at the site or was Scotty Erin and the Blue Sky just brought up the fact that he's now addicted to the BOB's red mill gluten free oatmeal needs it every single morning and I hit him with the tip that maybe he should start adding a little scoop of almond butter too and that blew his mind. And then I got into the bars because now I'm completely addicted to the Bob's red mill bars I am wild about the peanut butter and banana oats bar. That's my jam. That's the perfect start to my day. You know. So when I don't get to have Bob's oatmeal in the morning, which I do prefer that's the perfect start to my day. I don't get hungry until I don't know four pm it's so great. It's gluten free, but you're pay no price for it.

Bob professor Lander Dan Shepard emmy Monica Harvard Medical School Scotty Erin Albany Prize Macarthur Fellowship MIT Eric Harvard principal Blue Sky founding director president
"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"eric lander" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome. Welcome welcome to Armchair expert I'm Dan Sheppard. I'm joined virtually or rather I'm joining her virtually miniature mouse. She has an emmy nomination. To just see you through the screen, I don't like it. I can't smell you. That's good because I haven't showered in a couple of days. Sure. I understand today we have a really exciting guests and I would say one of the reasons exciting that I shit the bed on this one about three or four times. I'd say in that I thought I understood how certain aspects of cellular reproduction happened. I was incorrect but he encouraged me to keep going ahead. So if you like seeing me eat shit, this is the episode I. Don't think we've ever had somebody with a more interesting trajectory into being a world leader in their field. Eric. Lander is currently the president and founding director of the broad institute at MIT and Harvard. He's a geneticists, molecular biologists and a mathematician, and he has played a pioneering role in all aspects of the reading understanding in biomedical application of the Human Genome. He was a principal leader of the Human Genome Project and lander is a professor of biology at mit an professor of systems biology at Harvard Medical School. He's won a bunch of. Honors and awards the Macarthur Fellowship the breakthrough prize in life sciences, the Albany Prize in medicine and biological research. But most importantly, this guy was just a brilliant mathematician that decided I don't want to study math rest of my life and he landed in the most incredible place. Wasn't he fascinating? Monica he was and he's also listening back I. Mean I thought at the time but I forgot he's so vibrant and fun like you can feel his passion for the subject and just kind of life in general incredibly playful I wouldn't doubt. It if the students teaches refer to him as professor playful and if not I hope they do going forward shed. Yes. So please enjoy professor playful lander we are supported by Bob's red mill. Now, Monica yesterday we were at the site or was Scotty Erin and the Blue Sky just brought up the fact that he's now addicted to the BOB's red mill gluten free oatmeal needs it every single morning and I hit him with the tip that maybe he should start adding a little scoop of almond butter too and that blew his mind. And then I got into the bars because now I'm completely addicted to the Bob's red mill bars I am wild about the peanut butter and banana oats bar. That's my jam. That's the perfect start to my day when I to have Bob's oatmeal in the morning which I do prefer that's the perfect start to my day..

Bob professor Dan Sheppard Lander emmy Monica Scotty Erin Harvard Medical School Albany Prize Macarthur Fellowship MIT Eric Blue Sky Harvard principal founding director president