33 Burst results for "erasure"

"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

05:07 min | 2 d ago

"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Such as bush Ah bama people that you would think that would be associated with each other. Well this was during the obama administration. That's exactly if there was some kind of a cover up and military up you know didn't go well. Obviously that wanna cover how. I said though the start that this appears to be something. We don't know the world we're leaving with this impression of who's left who's right. Who's the enemy who's not. It's all messed up. Because it appears that the americans might even be working with the chinese in some capacity. What yeah it's it's very because it's the elites. It's obviously not the american people. It's these political elites that don't care i'll hang out and killing anyone just describing wall street and it's exactly what is going on at the moment. Plenty of that loss hike from the. That's how they conduct warfare that are connected you with big tech all agok slick facebook with news propaganda propaganda outlets like cnn It's really on selling. This was happening back in two thousand fourteen. You've seen it happening recently as well aren't can't waste on the political spectrum. There is something very very odd. That's going on. They don't care about you and me. They only care about power and it doesn't matter who they mess with so coming up in our plus extension first of all. I recommend that you pick up the book. The disappearing act the impossible. Case of three seventy incredibly will research Just a book that just keeps you on the edge you see. I didn't even touch on all the minute. Details goes into it and fifty pages just crazy things where daughter is being deleted. Where like there was this one thing that happened. Where apparently there's a system known as nab texts. It's like these telex messages that get sent to all the ships right. This message got sent to All these vessels off the coast of thailand and off the coast of vietnam in the area. Where the ship probably disappeared. One of the Silence that was aborted. Took a photograph of this naff text with his phone so he had it right and it was reporting. It was the seventh of march. Two thousand fourteen so it was. It must have been given the The timeframe thompson times on you must have been adjusted a little bit but it was. Ms three seventy lost Contact passages to three eighty something like that or to thirty eight requested to look for crash but within moments. Apparently this thing gone and yet there was a photograph of it so they didn't get rid of it completely so very very strange. Things have being easily able to remove datta if it was laura if it was gone that quickly. That would suggest that. It wasn't a an attempted hijacking and landing gone wrong..

fifty pages obama seventh of march vietnam thailand facebook thirty eight Two thousand fourteen laura one thing american three seventy One two thousand fourteen three three eighty chinese americans seventy
"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

03:39 min | 2 d ago

"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Serious universe. And we're discussing the disappearing act the impossible case of match three seventy by florence to chang. And as i've said you know she's written a fantastic book. Many years finding witnesses looking for data going through archives digging up information about the truth behind the disappearance of m h three seventy and. It's becoming very clear that already. There is some type of disinformation campaign. That is taking place trying to even dissuade rescue searches from looking in the location. Where it's most likely that the ama three seventy aircraft went down. But as i said earlier on why. Let's have a look at why someone would do this. What's so important about this. And some people have suggested that look. Maybe the reason why this took place is that it was something to do with you know finance now. It's not just finance the plays a role. Here there's also political reasons There's public safety issues. The finance cattle so one of the finance angles was really fascinating. And this was a story that came to to florence when she flew to make contact and this one contact was actually so convinced that he knew what had happened to match three seventy that his wife had threatened to leave him. Because the god had literally talk about being shackled. He had literally turned his house inside out into a massive whiteboard and everything was linked together with red string and he was smoking constantly being completely consumed by the like you. The softening kind of his belief was that the reason why. Ms three seventy had been covered up was purely for financial reasons because the aircraft have been struck by lightning. Then when you hear that you just go we'll so i walked the across struck by lightning. Have a faraday cage effect. No he was saying that. The aircraft to use prior to this had been a little bit more than two years. Prior to this event have been involved in an incident a small accident at an airport where it had part of its wing effected oshii it off and in doing so that repaired the aircraft but in repairing the aircraft it had then removed the faraday effect of this aircraft. Right right so the aircraft. This m h three. Seventy this triple seven boeing aircraft. It was hit by lightening as it crossed from malaysian s. base individuals airspace. This we'd kind of perfect winstons taking place when that happened when it was struck by lightning. That would explain all the things that happened. It would have either killed the captain or incapacitated the captain or fried the brains of the computer and that would give us indications as to why it flew to an extreme altitude white flew back down to a low altitude because the pilot was trying to maintain that and i would be messed up. So it's the finance angle is a disabled. The shares of boeing right. It's not boeing's fall. Be the maintenance crews fall. Knowable the conspiracy is is that boeing knows that the faraday cage effective aircraft is Destroyed when an aircraft is repaired. So that would kill the ship. Every single boeing aircraft. That are being prepared would have been pulled out of the sky massive repairs every single and not just been going on..

florence Seventy more than two years chang match three seventy single one contact one ama three seventy triple malaysian single boeing seven boeing three seventy three m h three seventy
"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

05:55 min | 2 d ago

"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Apollo needs to be able to do anything so florence points out that with a little bit of research he would have been able to to turn off often do this so the the story says that all of a sudden took a u-turn and disappeared off towards the indian ocean and what we know. Is that what it disappeared and obviously didn't lend in beijing. People started frantically looking for there were reports coming out from air traffic controllers that they hadn't seen it that it just simply disappeared days later or even i think it was up to awake leading a company called emma sat had announced that they might have some information regarding where this aircraft was because emma sat technology was on board image. Three seventy and what this was is that even though the transponder was switched off on the aircraft the aircraft continued to every hour ping satellite. That was earned by emma set. Now emma sat says that using this ping data they would be able to work at an arc of where possibly the aircraft had disappeared. Too right now. They claim that this arc had followed an octave flew directly into the indian ocean the southern indian ocean and it had obviously the story was that something had caused the pilot to become incapacitated and then the plane had obviously flown for a certain number of hours until it read a fuel and crashed into the south indian ocean. That's the story that we know and there are also versions like he committed suicide ed or he was drunk. Look of them. One's was and this is information that has been confirmed is there was some obviously with analysis of datta afterwards. They're able to say that. The aircraft traveled up to an extremely high altitude that was beyond the capabilities of a triple seven aircraft. Barn triple seven craft and then flew down extremely low and the theory wall says that he flew up. He was clearly suicidal captain. He had flown up to an altitude. That was You know extremely high where he could depressurize the aircraft and then allowed the oxygen masks dropped down but those oxygen masks the way that generate oxygen is chemical reaction so once that moss drops down i think is only twenty minutes also of oxygen so once that was expelled then people would experience hypoxia and would have died within moments. A bad way to go. It's still horrible but hypoxia isn't necessarily a bad way to go once. Everyone had been incapacitated on the flight. He then flew down to an extremely low altitude to avoid right off so that he could crush the plot the the plane and the thing is is that obviously there have been massive investigations into the pilots history. And who he is and all that we found out about this pilot is that the man seems to be a man of principles. He never expressed any kind of extremism before know that we live in a world of post terrorism and you know people crashing aircraft into buildings and other locations and these things can take place. He had never given any indication that he had that kind of intent on top of that when they recovered a flight simulator from his home. They had found that he had flown to several airbases. That were in that area but that doesn't suggest that he was trying to learn how to avoid right or fly into the southern indian ocean all very very odd when you start picking apart the narrative you start to see that there are things that simply. Don't add.

twenty minutes indian ocean south indian ocean southern indian ocean Apollo emma sat days later Three once florence hypoxia emma triple sat seventy seven
"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

05:45 min | 2 d ago

"erasure" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"This memo here is really what set in motion. The research that followed from a people like a doctor poll piece peaceful that seemed to show the existence of cellular memories right so this is where people will have an organ transplant. And for some reason they'll have memories of the person that had been the dr not not right. it's not so much memories but some traits apiece. Sometimes it's memories but in her example because she was the first Case of this transplant full the state of new england. The the press was involved. The press was very interested so those tv crews down there. There were reporters interviewing her and recovered sufficiently and in one of the first interviews. She did. She was asked by the journalist. You know what. What are you looking forward to getting back to you. Now that you've got your health back and you so you've got this new hard and this new set alongs and she said oh yeah. I just can't wait to do normal things like be able to walk around without losing breath and spend time with my daughter and go shopping by myself. And just i can't wait to get back to normal life and the journalists obviously wanted to in something more than that and he basically said well. What would you like to do. What's the thing you would like to do. The most right now and she kind of looks at the camera and said just want some chicken and beer. Some chicken nuggets said. I want chicken nuggets and as soon as it came out of a mouth. She thought i don't even want. Did i say that. I don't even like via an. Why do i want chicken nuggets. She just didn't know with this feeling. Come from but she said in her mind was just this overpowering desire to drink like a nice called chris. Bia and just sco and smash them chicken nuggets and this was the start of a series of changes in her personality. That seemed to coincide with the transplant. Yeah and it's important to note that because it's not just simple subtle. Changes in food preferences can be things that completely change. Your life will attend out. Transplant was from young man And she notice all sorts of masculine traits. Start to appear. yeah. I remember stories ago of. Where're woman got. I believe it was the heart or the liver of a god that a dot in a motorcycle accident and then after that for whatever reason she took out took up motorcycling. that's all. She wanted to cassia often the off from car accidents accidents. Yeah yeah they get those traits coming through look. I'm really looking forward to that coming up a little bit later on..

new england one first Case first interviews
Poetry, Songs, And Prayers Mark MMIW Event In Springfield

Native America Calling

01:16 min | Last month

Poetry, Songs, And Prayers Mark MMIW Event In Springfield

"Events both in person and virtual were held across the country wednesday to draw awareness to missing and murdered indigenous people wednesday night about fifty people gathered in springfield oregon to honor missing and murdered. Indigenous women kale. Cdc's brian bull has more in the dark. In the bitter wind. Listen to a dream. Members of illuminate theatre in the university of oregon's indigenous women's wellness group. Read poetry under trees adorned with red dresses co organizer amardeep. Clifford explained the symbolism to show a garment. That's empty because the women are missing in many indigenous cultures the only color that the spirits can see as red hoping that they can see the red garments that we put out in their honor. Another organizer laurie. Top honjo said red garments are also visually striking. it's about creating visibility for the erasure of an entire generation of women. Young girls in our brothers have gone missing an honor song. Close the evening as people. Pray for the roughly fifty seven hundred missing and murdered indigenous woman across north america for national native news. I'm brian

Brian Bull Red Dresses Co Amardeep University Of Oregon Springfield CDC Honjo Oregon Clifford Laurie North America Brian
Ellen Birkett Morris Explores the Quiet Power of Womanhood in Lost Girls

Charlotte Readers Podcast

05:58 min | 3 months ago

Ellen Birkett Morris Explores the Quiet Power of Womanhood in Lost Girls

"In today's episode visit with ellen briquet morris author of lost girls short story collection which explores the experiences of women and girls is a confront the challenges and expectations of womanhood. Ginny awful author of whether of speculation last things called this book a dazzling collection stories. The showcases morris as impressive ability had devastating truce was seemingly small moments of. You've lost girls. In the southern review of books said vivid snapshots female struggle march demonstrates the tire women acknowledging one another and themselves in a world where they're continually does managed the woman girls in these stories. Hold the antidote to their own erasure and in turn give it to us on the way can prevent each other from becoming loss girls l. Welcome to the show. Hello good glad to be here. And you're coming to us. All the way from louisville kentucky kentucky well s the magic of remote podcasting right we can. We can stretch. Stretch our podcast around round the catching around the world here. So congratulations on the book. Oh thank you very much. yeah it's A nice collection of stories. I enjoyed reading reading the book and I want to start out with this Quote that. I just read in the opening that these stories how devastating truce was seemingly within seemingly small moments and Did you have that in mind when you started writing these stories or is that a thing that just sort of when you got the oh. Yeah okay. I'll see that now didn't didn't necessarily have it in my. Although i think i recognize it from works of literature that i've read you know i'm a big fan of the work of the writer. Lee martin and lee martin does that. He focuses on ordinary people and ordinary moments. That become waited with. Meaning you know In terms of the way he constructs the story sent so Though it wasn't a goal. I was really pleased to see that. That's how she read it. And this idea of truth surfaces another author of us to lasting truce to reside in the familiar And two other author your said you can step back. And behold the world and make unexpected discoveries As your any stories riding them in different points of view your audience and First person third person But you are the author of these stories. What did you Step back behold into this work when you get through you know. I it story my story there were revelations so in each story. I had a moment when i finished it when i thought oh. Wow that's where we ended up. You know that sort of surprise that you can that can happen in the in the course of the creative process and then you know with the collection itself at bishop. Early developed a collection and had a meal photographer from boston. Traveling through the south and it was all about him in his life and for some reason Folks that were reading it. They liked him okay. They weren't super excited about it. It occurred to me that the women in the stories not him were the most interesting part of the stories and then there was a point in our culture where people were really turning their attention to the experiences of women at through that metoo movement and it occurred to me that i had a whole bundle of stories that really featured women and so i went back toned down the photographer character in some cases elevated some of the other characters and found that when i had was a cohesive collection that simply centered on the experiences of women and girls and that in itself was really a revelation. I had you know. I didn't really know that. I had that many stories. That would hang together in quite that way. But i was really delighted to find that they did and Have felt really confirmed as readers as a whole sort of a collection. That's that's cohesive and and pulled together based on those themes yourself your woman you grown up. You experienced These moments where you are not as interesting and they interfere with what what women are trying to do. Were there any stories in this collection that Maybe were more personal to you than that other. Well you know there are a couple of them that really resonate with me Like miss not being a ballerina as about of kind of lonely little girl. At who's best friend's mother is getting ready to undergo cancer treatment. And you know. I remember being a kid and i remember having a best friend and how central and passionate those relationships can be and And and that idea that if happens to your parents at sort of up engineer world And so i feel. I feel very tenderly towards that one. The other story that that really The that stays with me. And and i wrote it kind of straight as as a sad story but people read it really a satire and ad i read it to groups and they laugh at it is the story religion about the The lonely thirty year old woman. Who goes to she thinks. She's going to a day coupons class and she had step in a breastfeed irs lake meeting. And you know it's a it's a story about really not being seen in. It's a story about being desperately lonely and you know. I just remember points in my when i felt that way and didn't feel a part of a group or one badly to be a part of a group and you know that's really what drives her. Those are her motivators. She wants so badly to be accepted that she fabricates the idea that she has this child. And she pursues this goal of breastfeeding. So again i wrote it straight but people it is funny. It's really not

Ellen Briquet Morris Kentucky Ginny Lee Martin Morris Louisville Boston Cancer
"erasure" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

03:37 min | 3 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

The History (and Erasure) of Black Brewers

Kottke Ride Home

05:29 min | 3 months ago

The History (and Erasure) of Black Brewers

"Despite the overarching image of whiteness. When it comes to beer there is a vast history of black brewing culture. Which like so many things has been largely erased from the history books and cultural consciousness. James bennett the second dove into this for a recent peace in eater. He acknowledges the huge influences of german and irish culture in america but points out. That's not the only source when it comes to beer quoting eater. The ancestors of african americans. They were fermenters. They were really good at making their own liquor and making their own beers and also making wine from fruit says the culinary historian and writer. Michael w twitty one of our african 'isms in fact was producing all of these things and one of the reasons why we did. That was because it was related to our traditional spirituality libation twitty. Ads is the heart of african spiritual worship. He recounts seeing this firsthand on a trip to takhar village in cameroon. They pull out a big ceramic vessel full of their traditional beer. He says and even though a lot of takhar our muslim this is one of the traditional religious practices that they keep alongside islam. What beer-drinking may be nonexistent on friday. Would he notes. You better believe that at social functions to honor youth. Celebrate a marriage or the deceased in the ground. Alcohol is poured out and passed among the elders and quotes alcohol and in many cases. Beer was and is important. Spiritually and culturally to many different communities in africa throughout the ages as european colonizers began enslaving people and forcing them to work on their stolen land. The knowledge and skill sets of many enslaved black people surrounding bruin were exploited quoting again. The prevailing image of enslaved black person is that of someone laboring in the fields were being ordered around the big house but american slavery built in sustained a pretty much every aspect of this american life and that included beer again the west african societies. From which so many bodies were stolen. Were no stranger to the mechanisms of fermentation. We know that. Enslaved africans and african caribbeans were brewing beer or were cultivating hops or other grains. That would have been used in the brewing process. Says theresa mccullough of the smithsonian's national museum of american history. Black brewing skill was no secret. She adds advertisements for enslaved. People who were skilled. Brewers -absolutely wanted posters that identified fugitives as skilled brewers or otherwise involved in the brewing industry. As american as apple pie. Peter hemmings enslaved at monticello was a master brewer and quote but even if their expertise was being used to produce beer many black individuals who were free at the time. Weren't drinking much of it. Part of it was because temperance. Got rolled into the abolitionist movements. Most abolitionists were anti alcohol. Seen it as a toxic influence and a tool of the oppressor now. That's not to say that all temperance advocates were abolitionists. Far from it but most abolitionist were teetotalers. But there is also a practical angle. Bennett explains black. People were wary of being taken advantage of by white people while drunk and also simply didn't have the money or time for drinking while they were figuring out more important matters like getting an education job and securing semblance of safety in a dangerous climate then in the second half of the nineteenth century beer and cider went from being a smaller mostly at home type of operation to a profitable business largely. Thanks to the influence of german immigrants in america and of course now that it was profitable. Black brewers were shut out and being that beer was now more something to be purchased at an establishment like a saloon versus consumed at home. Black people were also often refused service. Then prohibition hits and when it was repealed with many federal regulations in place breweries were fearful of being shut down so they leaned hard into patriotic. Branding the kind of whitewashed stars and stripes apple pie type of america that is definitively white as been it says. Advertising has more to do with what we buy than most of us care to admit and by his accounts that adds up with the consumer trends that we saw throughout the second half of the twentieth century as white flight brought middle and upper middle class white people to the suburbs where they could host parties at home and had a bit of bigger budget a lot of them swapped beer for cocktails and thinking that they could get them back with a beer that had as high as cocktails beer. Companies tried to sell the white suburbanites on malt liquor but the attempt flopped most likely minutes opposes. Because it's something of an acquired taste so then a pivot happened quoting again. How did malt liquor go from garden. Party aspirated two boys in the hood levels of despair. The exact y. Is a matter of law but jane. Nicole jackson beckham diversity ambassador for the brewers association has a pretty good idea. The story i've been able to get is that there was some kind of persistent market research saying that. Urban audiences make more purchasing decisions based on. Abc and that urban audiences tend to buy for volume. She says the decision was made to market malt liquor not as an upscale product but a specifically urban products and to put it in a large vessel boom the forty and quotes

Takhar Michael W Twitty James Bennett Theresa Mccullough Smithsonian's National Museum Twitty Peter Hemmings America Cameroon Monticello Brewers Apple Africa Bennett Nicole Jackson Brewers Association Jane ABC
Explorando el Instante con Camila Ibarra

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:19 min | 4 months ago

Explorando el Instante con Camila Ibarra

"Let me like. Oh my staff human trafficking from alabama's. Yes we need the dmv n. o. J. except for learning list twins getting blisters. What's your heritage dive. Amelia's go was out those took on a separate Have asset one of your grammy gonna separate the Here is more useful elegance thousand years when he was Hoan as soon as i've ever lay story is pay scale. Get super porno instances lemire. They'll is presented scare you key. The is the joe. Go they alimony. You ain't got it's at been announced. Ucla overnight he gonna berto hamblur key. Less prisoners am doesn't the latin america unofficial said which was issue the most and believe that ian in the biens and thumbs. His nose is go acrimonious. You and he therrien russillo or is he in bigalow. Alert secret can make Geeky lucas that sioux city and the mutual is colonie said. Donald visit goes independent amid the to the question. Those is colonie semyon. Though be an exploration they have gannett is no porchet woman which Erasure sybil wrong lays the low sixty s fulfillment you to learn new jersey amusement. As course those the is is is lebron. look at percents. K alita is komo is muslim. Acela columnist mass mental pocket system. Paseo in every way bnb system muzzle celebration municipal expenses. Who program blake. Join me and explore under the semi and see as lucas as como que argument that ms must be an algebra. Neither is komo mail buddy mall. How do i address myself by son does say an low system operas us conspiracy though and thune says boorda hemp illiteracy. They don't have is opening. Meet a man. Oh it means is that they don't send. Peter is on a never known as if communication commission progressive limited colonie cello until Wisconsin than either eating here. We should christiane in three mahyco. In san jose california themselves stella me just Product style out of flick cinemas. Already give a distinct will not take to maintain meet unloading will not precipitating e of manal. Tatham makeable reverential. He our position luciano to limit the the that whole in salsa music. Don't go with people. He recommended real. Sarcoma is a component. This extreme wow it's surprenant that was on the border gate of blood you go. You're news alerts. You have done this. I forgot that you make the. So isn't this young. Little green ghanem into borough bar see less anger and thumbs his eye on them per se is exponential Make the give me. He was bobble premium pastas and which isn't spectacles spectrum. Your level or hemlock jingle mochis amigos de ultra spices. they're latin america hamblur. Mamiya where may i may. I is run swollen on. Wbz which he go. E which are the spaghetti said. It's kissy your rail coma. He supreme you out to the pasta seniors. That different this mandate is in manila's which is quintas ghalib's seon gone lows. Maria's gone alkaloids meet lessees mock exist and where he cook as as can him which simple does better we via name which are the was established. Those particular graphic does doesn't necessarily as much and does this glenda abbas lane. Guess it shut respect though who's just a witness Literal alcohol but still look in the radio. I'm gonna win in the industry in california that Sat on how it is toga. Promise on experience como que a head on commerce you your quake-hit has indicated quicker hip.

Berto Hamblur Russillo Geeky Lucas Colonie Semyon Erasure Sybil Hoan Lemire Boorda Colonie Latin America Amelia Sioux City Alita Manal Tatham Gannett Ucla Alabama Thune IAN
Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

Unreserved

05:50 min | 8 months ago

Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

"You don't have to look very far to find Examples York region Ontario was named after your can the UK Regina is named after Queen Victoria Regina being the Latin for Queen and well British Columbia obviously. For Christina. Gray reclaiming those place names is vital and it's personal. The Simpson and Denny lawyer is one of two researchers behind reclaiming indigenous place names. The policy report was released in October of two thousand nineteen by the Yellow had institute at Ryerson University in Toronto. I've reached her at her home in Prince Rupert BBC. Welcome to unreserved thanks for having me. So you are a CO researcher with Daniel Ruck and you looked into naming practices and the erasure of indigenous place names. What did you find? We really wanted to do a cross section of the history of settler colonial renaming practices from indigenous place names to places that are an English or in French, or there's also note anglicised version as well and none look at what is the practice of reclaiming indigenous place names that is happening in various places are ranging from like the Northwest Territories, Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Manitoba to give. People a different idea of what's going on across these places and territories, and so how do original place names get changed? You know from from the original indigenous words into you know the things that they become how does that happen? Basically what's happening as a result of mostly white people or settlers who were? Changing the names to suit their whims, our desires or values when places were being changed from indigenous place names, saedtler place names like we have to remember the population of Canada at that time was a lot lower than it is now yes. There were indigenous peoples on these lands and territories, but there is also a different perspective by settlers at that time as well, and so they I think they wanted the the places to reflect. What was going on in their life for different ideas that were important to them. I can think that Greek in Vancouver I was looking into the two sisters, which is now called the lions and a lot of people go heikal lions in in Vancouver, and they kind of overlook how sound and you can see them pretty much any point in Vancouver. But before they were called the lions, they recalled the two sisters and it relates to an oral history. Of The squamish nation and it's an oral history that also relates to northerners like myself because the oral history it's it's about making peace offerings between the northern and the southern people's. used to war with each other and so that has much significance to me as a simpson person who used to live in Vancouver the two sisters in Vancouver is definitely one that I've heard about Are there any other striking examples of renamed places that you found y'all like almost makes me want to cry actually there's a place that was called Lake Squat Kit. It's like near Kenmore, but the word squad specifically, Drago Tori term to refer to indigenous women and. Terrible. Stereotypes associated with it as well, and those are based off of how some settlers song about indigenous. and so you can just think about like it's a Grayson, deeply misogynistic but. People like had such a personal connection to the place name of squash it and like didn't want it to be renamed and. But like that I think has such a affect the way that you call places. And think about there are so many missing murdered indigenous woman in Canada and how you referred to that something that. So awfully in calling squad like those have affects real-life affects on people it's not just about placing. And is renaming more. Can it be more than just a symbolic gesture you know on how is renaming more than just a symbolic gesture i? Guess I think we always hope that naming practices or the revitalization of indigenous place names will go beyond just symbolic gestures who also have substantial effects as well and sue. Enrich policy really wanted to also look at like what are some of the mechanisms. In which indigenous people are. Using policy and Law to revitalize indigenous place names and so we looked up land use planning conservation co-management. Events and also modern day treaties and self government agreements in which indigenous peoples are using these different mechanisms available to on to re attribute and revitalize indigenous placing you know this work is being done by indigenous people. So think it's really important to attribute that recognition to them.

Vancouver Lions Simpson Queen Victoria Regina Canada Prince Rupert Bbc Christina Examples York Uk Regina Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Mani Ontario Daniel Ruck British Columbia Toronto Researcher Lake Squat Kit Ryerson University Drago Tori Yellow Had Institute Kenmore
A Critique of Dallas Buyer's Club

Is It Transphobic Podcast

07:16 min | 9 months ago

A Critique of Dallas Buyer's Club

"Let's. Let's Talk About Dallas Buyers Club. I first and foremost all the triggers. Goddamn because everything you thought you knew about this movie you were right and then there's more. There's The the TRANSPHOBIA is there from the characters. It's enacted characters but it's also just that kind of trans-phobia where it's tucked under. Oh, it's actually homophobia but that's because they don't know what to do with someone who presents in a way that is not stereotypical. To one gender or another. and. Yes. So look up triggers for this movie. There are so many that I don't even feel like sitting down and listing them but look them up before you continue to consume this podcast and before you decide to watch that movie. That said, had you either? Have you seen this movie before we went to the podcast first time? For a first time on that radio to. See what I did there. On brand very unbranded. Yeah. It was my first time too. I definitely knew it. As you said, for all the reasons that I knew, and then there were more reasons that I was glad I did until now. Oh Yeah so This movie I have to say because I tried to as much as I'm trashing it as much as I'm like Oh this all this I really wanted to like this movie I went in wanting to like it I remember talking to a friend about this movie because I refused to see it. So I was like, why are people praising jared leto wire people praising his portrayal of Now, I can't remember the name of Rayon why and I actually had to coax it out of a friend because. This was a friend that I respected their opinion on and they basically said they were like, well, you don't actually want to know you wanna be mad and it's like, no I respect your opinion i. am asking you why people care what is it about this helped me and what this friend said to me was that the portrayal of someone who is going through a having aids being HIV positive and then having AIDS, and then dying from another disease which. It, it was the thing that really drew this friend of mine into the character and into the world of this film and as much as. We are going to talk about a lot of the specifics now having watched it. I respect that opinion. Even though I did not get the same thing from this movie. At least from from Rayon and that's really mean I also did not grow up like I grew up as a child during the AIDS crisis I did not know a lot going on but at the same time. The movie in my opinion the movie itself. Didn't do a great job with ray on. But I really dug the way that they dealt with. Woodruff Matthew. mcconaughey character in the first act. Yeah To to. Put My cards on the table for we continue. To very specific misconceptions or like nervous conceptions but two very specific things that we're going to my mind when I started watching the movie. Deborah really softened a lot of it for me, which was one. The last movie that I've seen that was in relation to the AIDS crisis was the film adaptation of Rent. which was the worst movie that's life. I it's just. Sorry And the others conception is that I didn't realize that it was made in twenty thirteen I thought like watching it. It felt like it was like an early two thousands movie in house can be like well. Okay like Even. The Straits don't really get chanced stuff I. It was like a good attempts to try to like bring more color to the table metaphorically speaking. But it's a twenty thirteen. I don't know like. I mean at times article didn't come out yet. It's just it's just weirder and it's also like. That film strikes very early two thousands and I'm not like sinophile so I could be completely dead wrong on this, but it just felt. Like You know way older movie than it actually ended up being. So. And that. Up Sorry and then I guess the third conception. Sorry. The secret third one was that I actually was trying to give him the benefit of the doubt because as soon as I found out that it was like historical like a history piece because runway was a real person. As like, Oh, well then you know if they had to deal with a real life trans person like they're they're dead in the water like you know they're not going to handle that well. But no round is is a real. She was made for the movie. So cool. Great. Love that for us. So. Yeah. I wonder because Silas one of the things that you had mentioned that you had focused on when talking about the movie was a lot more of a real life historical things that were going on and about the real life of what was happening. Can you talk a little bit about that? Yes so Aside, from knowing about, you know sort of the kerfluffle about jared leto playing the part and hearing a little bit about that when the movie came out the other thing that I really had a bee in my bonnet about is the fact that Ron Woodruff was not straight. And he did talk about long clearly had some stuff but. They just. Changed him to be straight and altered his character quite a bit and watching it. It's so clear to me that they were like, how do we make this the straight male hero anti hero type that the straight people will come see the movie for? And so that to me like before, we even get to any issues of transphobia homophobia of that in the Bi phobia that really just made me now it becomes this sort of like. The straight guy in the hero of a crisis that you know certainly straight people and all people belong to this lots of. It was but it was primarily focused on the queer. Community. And sort of start off before you even have a chance to give the film the benefit of the doubt with that erasure just really for me. Through me completely out of it it was I wasn't able to come to the film really with. A kind of the I at that point.

Aids Jared Leto Dallas Buyers Club Woodruff Matthew. Mcconaughey Deborah RAY Ron Woodruff Silas HIV
"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

02:24 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Was Vince clock in and the shelf Malaysia and called in from London while Vince was at home in his studio in. Brooklyn. One absolute joy was bright yet it's hard to convey how much we enjoy doing that in weds for I think are laughter during the interview spoke volumes. Yeah I mean we mentioned in the intro didn't we about growing up in the ATC and these people on top of the POPs weekend we out and Kansas sit down and quiz about their work now is just such a pleasure. It's magical. Net we were all remote there obviously given the current circumstances, but you could still hear the rapport between Vincent on the could near that dynamic between them here I mean, the personalities just works so well together. Yeah you know on stage and on record. Yeah and at one point we sat packed in we just listened Zandi quiz. Vince. He I think he was after our job. In. The corner situation you know the way they work together as change into isn't it? Yeah. It's less than sitting in the same room with an Acoustic Guitar. Now, they're still managing out these rock-solid June's. Grenades as you call them. Yeah. Of Court. No no Kharian. And they really know themselves. Don't they inasmuch is Vince doesn't WanNa hear on the recording vocals and and he doesn't want to what you've been selected. Hi Hats for eight hours. So kind of partnership in that sense. Yeah. The made children the. Some great insights into these lyrical approaches? Well, I thought yeah. Now he uses those kind of nonsense sounds that Komal Tomb is kind of a framework for. The shape of the way for also what they might mean and and also how he can't use his rhythm. Rhythm of of walking can sometimes yield ideas. Couldn't as convinced about his approach to a synthesizes these days as well. You're absolutely wrapped at that point. Tell your in. Hugs having listeners events talk about sense was for him, and now he uses logic can manipulate all traditional look into into these new sounds just amazing. Wasn't it? Yeah and the fact they asked to use all of them at least once and get his money's worth. So. Thanks to on the events that was extremely pleasure. We'll make sure you check out the neon which is available everywhere now, cheese also zoe for here helps up. We'll be back soon with more magic until then take care bye-bye..

Vince clock Komal Tomb Kansas Brooklyn Malaysia Vincent Zandi London
"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

03:31 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"When we <Speech_Male> saw recruiting the pilots <Speech_Male> but then <Speech_Male> particularly when <Speech_Male> they sang <hes> <Speech_Music_Female> Ha Woo. <Speech_Music_Female> Hoo. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> A? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Best play by. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> Will <Speech_Male> we thought we'd end <Speech_Male> on them a little <Speech_Male> respect if we <Speech_Male> may. 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London Shula Bachelor Sano Zach.
"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

05:58 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Here they are. Your my say. Alexiy upon. Change. And the struggle. Comes to. To. See. Jobs they. Are. We taking this kind of a distinct division of labor between the lyrics and the music or is the more overlap there than we might imagine is a little bit of overlap is mostly you know anything's carry the lyrics. interested in recording vocals. And and is interested in what you miss a balanced cable. United site you still sticking with the original sold on look since that you've collected over the years or incorporate a range of stuff now, like soft syncing stuff will the wild now is I'll come up with. Arrangements. Using since right is really fast difficult Lockerbie as heads. You know even ridable can get back just using the computer using the internal sounds with a computer, and then once I'm happy with Al Went. Once that will show me is actually then I'll translate that stuff my analog he'll sketching soft and commit in analog Main Heart, right? Yeah. You still avoid midday well, can't avoid any more thoughts of folks. Now because I'm using the budge right I, donate to use scopes anymore in time. Shifted in all looking why foams right. into the I mean recently will have been doing the law actually is recording, look at look sound and then manipulating logic which interest in. So doing definitely couldn't possibly do in real life in Spain's of slowing down Sam's. Making, about whatever Tricks that just get these different like thought to a different feel to it. So it's not song poses such a manipulated sound are really doing that. I. Mean recently I've been working with and vocals for another projects and. Doing a law that unit? Go Back Woodson cels is really interesting I of that. That's teach recording of the. Recording the look sound. Yeah and then within the digital dial nine, then about it and do also tricks with it. You know so I think the sound is ready interesting enough then I'll interested of. That's the technical term. Didn't touch your sin fins with the sound stay the same or would it drifts well, it kind of drifts I'm very fortunate because if I produced a really cool by sound on A. On. Sunken right whatever socal that set up right and then we'd lights or listen to ranch movies. You know I know the another I've used the pro one since before because of like unspoiled many students. Outsides, none of them just using the pro one over and over again. Going from that to the system seven hundreds of the one hundred. Emma whatever the whatever always think what have you used? This From Basil to rely on, you know Mogi Earth justify revision. Spend. Money on that really really bj. Synthesizer though I really should use it for this read gold, and in this of the loss to free records of trust recuperate every single synthesizer have at least once why on every on every album, you cannot identify every sound that's on there pretty much. You Know Canyon. Live with stuff I'm sure you could identify your on. You know you eliminates over and over and over again you know. The Ping the. And someone who's life. Would you have a stall but nothing I would never off. I would never my own it would be a record for life you know that would be. Calm. Bag for life. Well I mean it wouldn't be as you record without those crystalline talks those presence in abundance throughout this new album I, love how in an entire of love the you introduce a whole new kind of catchy keyboard riff in the last like forty seconds of the song where you know a lot of people might just repeats of the chorus to fade is that important element for maintaining the listeners interest rates the end? In a luxury papers did we volunteer refuge within that? You know who may not think? About? Other. That was some binds like from the seventies of the make a records, and then there would be a scratch on the REPUTA- Liberal. So the thing would never end. Gee. I love that. So we can do that have you can indulge yourself. Single looking for we weren't even so Yeah. I mean, you get the chance to do that. That was one that we did. Someone tweet me about theorems track because already comply one. And then I plucked that my therapy enough still work can accomplish know. Stuck for time correction. And Pitch. Correction. Pigment jazz musician you couldn't do that was now no. That was wrong. At. The end you'll show that's what he was. Tariff. Love the lasy come up with that..

Know Canyon Spain Al Went socal Emma Sam
"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

05:51 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"There's no escaping. Sin Plus Bell Equals Rasiah that's it. It. Must be an interesting process translating things from Qatar. Piano to those since especially, if this sort of. Traditional analog since the amount of phonics or whatever. You know I'm I'm not very natural keeble player and I'm no great guitar player but could talk blind comes much. We could to me. I do like folksy on music really or get you know and also I think because and are both really keen on melody. Easier to to decide okay. Ready Works within the child or he works for piano. When you start getting into the magic of a studio tricks you can do is sometimes I think he can be. You can end up with a great sounding tripe necessarily of Brin some. Yeah. Sometimes I think we have over melodic. We caught it becomes quite floor sums. I. Call It. The Neil Sadaqa Syndrome. Will. mean the opening track hey. Now thinking go to feel and that really sets out you stole does net kind of like the describe does the current single shot satellites That uranium to Kinda remind listeners of those Classic Arabia hallmarks not again i. Really difficult analyzing record use astound because when you do you just do it. To do the day, actually wanted to rotate John Brady GonNa do. But he was one of those track by track fans and I read other people's examples of of this and it was like that we can get what I intended with his trip this to this rankled hair annoy air came about bill this stuff going on picking. Both for us time. Basically you see in the studio you mcabe and you go. Ve. Advocaat let's say then you might go about some all I mean it's about it really. Yeah I just felt like. I just wanted to have some kind of originality of like those bands. I was the Ivan fans of like Eurythmics and stuff like that. I mean not to show young people overseas how songwriting should be done but it's just another way rather than having like these groups of people each writing to bits worth of. Stuff for the song. You know like now it seems like the ultrasound writing's kind of lost a bit. You know I've been Roy music now is A. Little. Bit But community. And when you Roy, so you have to. Think this is qualified to be pretty so confident you go. You know all this. Around need necessarily twelve of able to change in around mandate in on. Unfortunately I record company support since in doing that we're looking for. Those committees really they call. A four to fail nugget. Vested in. And I suppose some songs, kind of points the white, how they should be recorded anyway. So like new horizons on the new album, like couldn't have kind of been done in another way. Almost you know I think that's our. Nearest to Simon and Garfunkel that we're ever GONNA come. Now. We're going to get Matt. Sore reminds me of that I'm leaving on a jet plane not song. But it seems like it only needs that stripped down piano arrangements, put it across railway. That was one of those things also just mucking about one night in the studio one early moving probably. Just messing about Ganor sound out that. Works so I put together this carruth arrangement. And then you know usually then go in and start adding stuff nonstop Bengali as vice on on by know it sounds pretty good as is actually and Andrew Really. Liked it. Actually it's the audience I think you in court with that one. that. was kind of like. All the way through one wasn't it? Yeah of Vincent I can't really work in studio together is fine as far as writing goes like when he's working on sounds. And I'm working on vocals we don't have the patience are the one of us for the the other person it's eight hours for a higher. But I mean when I am listening to it's kind of like in the studio and his working on a sound. Always, I just wonder what's going on in his head like I'm trying to imagine where's the space in his head he's like aiming for why he's like making these sounds and he's like with these sounds, you can never go back. And I'm thinking Oh night was really good like fifteen minutes ago. But he'll. He'll just going on and on until he what as whether he's looking for something whether it sounds whether it's a feeling I'm not sure what it is. We interviewed them Oh md not long back and they talked about the tyranny of choice that they have these days in terms of sounds and mccloskey start and they say, okay, we've got two hundred, Eighty, seven snare drums.

Vincent Qatar Matt Andrew Really Brin Advocaat Classic Arabia John Brady Roy mccloskey Ganor Simon Garfunkel
"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

07:05 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"With the quite marvellous Andy Bell and Vince Clarke Aka Erosion Oh Well jets the new album is trees. Yeah, very buoyant and uplifting as always. Yeah. I mean, we never know when we make an album. How much can you turn out particularly mean we knew we didn't want to make a slow out again. Some of the interviews I've done so far were saying how miserable was. Wilsie gone either you cut a felt like ozone bitch serious. But I didn't realize how down in the dumps we actually for. Some lovely songs on. Great Menzies on. Ballots. But yeah, it just seemed like starting fresh. I. Think it was because we wanted to do it. We were intrigued by the concept behind the titled On. Can you explain the idea behind the force? Wasn't anything really it's just. I love the word I love EON. Love. The idea of the on you know, I think one thing that looks really peaceful. Go on holiday somewhere and you like in the old town and they have like, oh, stone roads and old stone stonewalls like ancient, and then they might have a neon sign on usually bands the on because they don't mix the two but when you do have neon with an old stonewall. Is really amazing this kind of this mix of. Antiquity and Modern Day ish is kind of from the fifties neon by further softer. LAVENDER and blue and pink. Of, covers and the just the idea of these gas trapped insider bendy glass tube like forever and you have to pass. He threw it and you just got the different colors by mixing different classes and I just thought well, some people have thought it's Like a reference to an eighties club, but it's that's not what it is for me. But I can see why they would think that though right just to black dark box undercurrent somewhere. And Been, does it help you from a musical perspective to have some kind of unifying? Of some sort of overarching theme. When you start project, we never really have a concept we stopped making wrestle because we don't know what's going to happen now and get together. It's the right some slack every two years pretty much. So it all the time we spend his catching up and then. We sit down play some music or in this case, tracks for the recalled a name we stall. Working out will the tunes my eight on the lyrics nitty was later? So. Again, we don't know what the. Could open an album about dusty weist. Not Be a big seller. have. I mean, when Vincent meet up like it's funny when we meet each other again because it's kind of like it's like meeting one of your X.'s. Like embarrassingly somewhere, and that's why we have to almost have a heart heart before we start working together because. Because it's really embarrassing otherwise you. Just. For me to pick the my cup and start singing. Shortly to warm up to the whole thing you know. So we're probably listen to the tracks maybe like a couple of times each or something before we do anything, we've vins. Yeah because he's like in order to let yourself, go to cut it into the Mike and try and get really good. chewed it certain. Extent. It is right. It's easy because you really you know when you mean some writing is is a very personal thing you lying Uganda you emotions bear little bit. You know because your conduct meetings helps criticism but we end the United States relationship where we just don't do that I mean. But having said that you know over the two years where all you lose that familiarity thing. And then it takes a little while for civil mop go. Yes. Environment we can. Say What we pretty much. You know we can. We can make mistakes write or he'll wait as where if we'd like just blurted out something like it was really stupid. Is it never been a time where we've been so embarrassed that you kind of like. Just laugh at yourself and leave. Yeah when the time arrives aware coming album will you generally start with a slates over you've accumulated? So's amuse cool lyrical ideas in the interim finish cigarette would I prepare think nineteen or twenty tracks backing tracks, which are very loose conduct backing ideas we've gone rough arrangements and then Andy entrusted will days over was the nice thing is we can jump in China so you know we can say that this best moved this section. So this section to section suddenly becomes a chorus whereas before it was us is very fluid on most of the wrinkles we've done we move it's out on John And then it seemed mostly fluid the trouble move that is my terrible plane meditations. With compete rock do along I think sometimes it's the kind of folksy codes you get trapped inside that sort of melody will I do? Those calls but I mean, that's why I kinda persuaded Vince to write on since just maybe for the past couple of our rooms, right? Because it felt really fresh and are wanted that kind of excitement of of light when you're fifteen year old or sixteen year old, you're going to buy your first final and to me it was like Japan and Eurythmics and pretenders and Those kind of. They were really original as I've always been a fan of Vinci's. So it's quite strange when you working with someone for so long because you kind of get used to their sound. By think this time I was really surprised with Vince, his work because he seemed to kind of like still using those old analog synthesizers but made loads of the riffs sound really fresh. If we like a brand new band but like with an H who's Bent. On the IDEAS NEW OF A. And.

Vince Clarke Andy Bell Wilsie Menzies Uganda Japan Vinci United States Eurythmics Vincent Mike John China
"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

03:07 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Hello, very warm welcome to so DJ here on some writing this assignment, and this is Brian joining us for episode one, hundred and seventy is an Iva novello and Brit Award winning English synth Pop Gio and one of the most prolific and successful UK act of all time between one thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two, thousand, seven, they achieved an astonishing twenty, four consecutive top forty hits. And To date of sold over twenty, five, million albums worldwide, they recently released their eighteenth studio album than they on and anyone who said that can attest thirty five years on from the first meeting their ability to crack the sparkling Hook Laden pop song remains undiminished with the lights. Welcome the wonderful. Andy Bell and Vince Clarke Rasiah to the show. This was such phone interview wasn't it? And a genuine thrill throws both yeah I mean, we've said this before think honestly getting the chance to talk songwriting with these artists we grew up watching weekend week outs on top of the pops will just never ever get old. Absolutely. Loved raise your songs as a kid I still love them. Now me to just masters of irresistible uplift in pop music. Aren't they? They are and it's just impossible to be in a bad mood when you listen to them isn't exactly yeah. I've always enjoyed on stage dynamic to with Andy the effervescent frontman is deadpan demeanor behind the keys. There are a little bit like sparks in that respect on the. Vince Clarke, grew up in Basel Than Essex. He started out lending violin and piano, but was inspired to make electronic music as a teenager by the likes of the Human League former guests. Oh, MD along with Martin Gore and Andy Fletcher. He was a founder Member of Depeche mode pending most of their first album speaking spell after departing the band shortly after the album's release in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty one he formed the short lived but successful Gio Yazoo with Allison. Following which he hatched another Cinta Project the assembly with Eric Radcliffe in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five cents place Denard Melody Maker looking for a Singa which was answered by one and Bell of pizza who happens to be a huge Fan of Vinci's Alia work and they have been working in a shoe shop and singing in a band called the void. When he saw Vince is at auditions and got the job. A regime was born the first few singles and debut album wonderland did reasonable business with the release of their scintillating fourth single sometimes to the Jiro got the recognition they deserved after that hits kept on coming asked hugely successful albums like. The Circus, the innocence, wild, and course the assistant Abbas retains the public consciousness with nine thousand, nine, hundred, Aba Eski pay, and one thousand, nine, hundred dollars I say I say I, say was their fifth consecutive number one album. The following years regime was quite a departure from their signature sound but still yielded several hit singles wins none of maintained consistently high quality outputs ever since with albums like cowboy night bid tomorrow's world and twenty seventeen more pensive and politically minded will be gone. There was even a Christmas album twenty thirteen snow globe outside the band fences collaborated with the likes of Martin wear of having Seventeen Sean Michelle jaw, and pull Hartnell. Of orbital and remixed surcharges to sparks Franz, Ferdinand simple minds, go rock and.

Andy Fletcher Vince Clarke Martin Gore Iva novello Andy Bell Gio Yazoo Vince Clarke Rasiah UK Andy Vince Basel Than Essex Aba Eski Brian Human League Abbas Sean Michelle jaw Eric Radcliffe Jiro
Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:37 min | 10 months ago

Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

"Many. Of the faces that we have seen over the past few weeks leading the black lives matter movement have been those of young black women theatric DVD. Jackson is one of those dynamic women speaking truth to power as a leader, a black youth project one hundred while attending Florida International University. She became active at the height of the murder of Trayvon. Martin was led to founding the local chapter, a dream defenders at her university. Today, we chat with Yatra, how young people are seizing and owning their political power at this moment. I'm really excited to talk to you today I've been such a big fan of B. y. p.. One hundred in really excited that you were able to join us. So thank you. So I I want to talk about the fact that at such a young age you have done so much for the black community and the Black Youth Community you've done organizing as a CO founder or of the Durham Chapter of the Black Youth Project hundred supporting black mamas bail out, which is one of the favourite causes that I donate to and just so much more especially during the racial pandemic that we've been in these past few weeks. What brought you to this work? What made you wake up one day and say, okay as a young person, I have to get involved as a black young person I have to get involved. So I am from Philly or and throughout my years I was in public schools I grew single mom. Single mom household of three girls and. So grew up in inundated southwest philly end of there's many things of my experience that really informs where end today but that's not quite where I was politicized. I was in Grad School. Down in Miami Around Twenty, twelve, twenty thirteen and so I, was living in Florida. At the same time as the murder of Trayvon Martin and all of the marches in the energy that was being built up in that time and I was pretty apolitical leading up to that point and was going to a black sitting union meeting because our school where I know black people. So the black student union because that's where we were and this organization out to folks from dream, defenders averages a state based organization down in Florida Cain ended presentation on the work that they were doing and police brutality and immigration. Reform. School to prison pipeline. We're talking about these different issues in was really activated started to pay attention. To. That as an opportunity to be partners to the apartment organizations actually doing the work that was really where I started really a moment that similar to where now I love your path that you just talked about and I feel it's so important because A lot of young people you know when I talk to them, they just feel that can I just show up? Can I do it in? That's really what you did, and that's what a lot of the people involved with the. One hundred have done and I would love for you to talk a little bit more about the work that you're doing. In particular I'm a fan of the safe. We save campaign, which is something that I also think is a very timely conversation that we need to have in this country. Yes. So she said we save is one hundred national campaign It's our transformative moving campaign to end gender-based violence against like women. Like girls in black gender, non conforming people especially comes. In there is more origin even how we got to deciding orange she sees as national as I national campaign we had this huge visibility of black boys and black men that were being murdered brutalized by the police It was carrying this very long history erasure, black women, black girls, an our stories in the way that we have been brutalized by the police, and so we wiping one hundred among many other organizations really uplifted. Hashtag say her name. As a demand to also remember the stories of black women and black girls be harmed on a regular basis by the police and really pushing a bit of an intervention into the visibility of who stories are being told. And so we help these different events honoring black women and black girls who stories were not being pushed to the front and also talked about the a specific nature of black women in the way that the system harms us that doesn't that doesn't necessarily apply to black men in black police in. So we've been pushing. On, lifting up story of Ricky Boyd Renisha McBride. Happens Melissa Alexander. In just a number of Ions Stanley Jones might hall that list goes on online. Envy making sure that that this was also part of this time. The stories of black women grows they're are always forgotten

Black Youth Community Black Youth Project Trayvon Martin Grad School Murder Florida Florida International Universi Ricky Boyd Renisha Mcbride Jackson Philly Melissa Alexander Stanley Jones Durham Co Founder Miami
"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

05:03 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

"With a real detected then went onto toby. These great stories of backtracking died murderer's victims Alexa the death data. and. So I think I was thinking this is. Would definitely watch this. This is a lot more to the daily the. Character relocated. Nine thousand nine hundred most were, what did he spend weeks and weeks put together to book proposal when you could have just written all this down and said I made it and then you book written. To. Chat function is generally a bit of a multi because you gotta make. Exactly. What's your closing time GSA? Yeah. I had my my Sunday evening disrupted because Russell Crowe launch these at promos for his new film licensed. Quite is kind of like I don't know if you've seen is he's basically Meta promos we say movie promos are all trailers are always saying promising promising not the magic sentenced of folk the new film out going to say. Just, really threatening and and. The speculation easing character from the film he plays a on hinged person in the film. This is taking character in using it as if he's doing the trailer for his own felt, but it has been said that I. Ask Aspirin passing resemblance to Russell Crowe and this comes out When Russell Crowe gets both gladiator. No one ever says this to me when Russell Crowe lets himself go. Independent. And grow your hair looks really CD people like. You have you been in the same room as Russell Ronald? Reagan trailers dropped it was eerie people just like, May. I'm really freaked out it is so soon. So the interesting in its own rights, but a personal kind of. Relevance for me as well. Let's go Russell Crowe Masks for Christmas and went to the. When Russell Crowe Musk was sitting next to million people will be upset when the came in not too much information that. We used the same suffer. A shout out as he tom. Closing time chatter is helped the trades club in Hampton Bridge. Traits couples, votes in Nineteen, twenty four and as we know not since then but since. It's been eight massive live music venue in terms of influence the bandits had on its struggling because no one can come through the doors. So it's launched crowd funder the Crown Fund is crowd, Fund Dot Co dot UK, and if you then tap in Bridge Trades Club, you'll find the page that trying to raise fifty grand that didn't really well at the moment, but even more than that will really really help you get really. Great. Things with this one. So you get limited edition prints the some real art what that you can get there was heavenly bundled. It's already gone in put your name on a in a booth. You can name on a chair. I'm sure that one point you get up on stage and do your own Gig new party at least but you can DJ's wealth quit they So help them if you can such that Crown Fund. bridge traits, cubs, another this other places that are struggling, but it's a good place that we could start there after fifty to forty four grand already. So helpful gets hundred. Yeah but I'm sure actually yeah, more is going to help as we just don't know how long it's GonNa last don't well, my clothes on chatter is inspired robot. In, spyro bought is a angle, the internet which generates inspiring quotes to help you get through your. You'll need it the moment just hit and hit refresh and it gives you a new way thinking about things. Okay. Char childhood is like a dungeon the pitcher kitten. Hick on its coming round. Always, let's everything you examine gets in the way of everything you lose. That sounds like Japanese stationary was has things does yes. From the. Insert says the universe is still going on the pitch. Talking Without County. His good one pinch of woman a mildly problematic native. American. Clothing on the the slogan is don't let no one stop your day from being meaningless special. Command exchange preaches. On this mindfulness made what you can sit on your speakers stop. These things like you. So Spiro boldly go just to help you get through the endless meaningless I'm GONNA go out right? That's the end of the podcast. Thank you so much to Adam in Boston I'm Pete Brown for joining us and being remote big mouth. Thank you. Thanks. Guys come again soon, stay sanitized and safe, and well, thank you listeners from me Andrew an producer Roping Lebron. We'll see you next week..

Russell Crowe Russell Crowe Musk Russell Ronald Hampton Bridge toby Fund Dot Co dot UK Crown Fund cubs Aspirin Bridge Trades Club Pete Brown Boston Spiro Reagan Without County spyro Roping Lebron Adam Crown Fund.
"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

02:01 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Think like the J. Because I recently watch sputnik, which is. Uncertainties Alice, ten minutes. An it's the Soviet alien bicycling but bundle basically pretty transparent. Is set in nineteen ninety-three a in the declining years the USA and it's a story by a send up to go is. A one point says we sent to three km tagline. and. It turns out. One of these calls is called. Alien inside him. which they just got the the you know they take the coastal to a remote installation examination. It's what book what's going wrong potentially exploited. He hasn't. With Terrible results. I just I mean the movie is fantastic but while was watching that I mean not least because his. Books was sanitary was. What never because? The book was. The this is a really great setting a fictional stories and you know in the spirit of Sputnik. For the conchords style box of. Western stories. So you know, is there an appetite at say pheno inspectable ski or some of the? Genre fiction sat in the US about. Trying to find justice in the in the decaying USSR well isn't that sad? That's the same as. wrote the one about he was right in the Nazi Council factuals This is Philip Cares Bernie gotTA novels. Isn't it? Except instead of being in Nazi Germany it's going to be in decaying decaying Soviet Union. There's a lot of knowledge on this. I thought. So partly because one of the people I interviewed for the book was this guy were to the prosecutor's office his name was so e n coffee so they thought. He.

USA Soviet Union Nazi Council Alice prosecutor USSR Philip TA Bernie
"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

09:03 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

"From. I gotta get back. something. Also on. Tearing City. Okay teenager Robin appears in a Wu Tang shirt one of the first scenes in this film and is clearly doubling the dark forces there we find out. She's working in conjunction with New Orleans cop frank, and there are these power pills that seem to be cropping up everywhere and everyone's taking. Adam. What were you expecting from this film? I was given the the at line. It sounded like it was going to be amazing unanswered in order. To, begin with. It totally delivers the I know Dino Twenty minutes. It's really great because because all of the three central characters that the Roman character, the culpas by Jessica Medic Yla Jamie. Foxx. All really ambiguous. Real sense of skill. Is just. Is a real call was he blamed drugs school go? Driving, force joined the killing toll. But then you know if very quickly devolves into such a formulate. Superhero action movie format where somebody we have to find the emotional to A. Y. Is Jamie Fox hunting these people approach, and then you discover that I mean it's not too much of a spoiler site or is it July? Should I say why he is explicit? Just so you could probably get away with this. Okay so but he's looking for his daughter many like. Come on an. It's just like one action sequence offer another until wit into the big boss section of building when it. Comes to take slice and at the end of that I, just a wider. Because it was utterly predictable from minutes thirty five old. But I I would say, had me grit especially the text messages so one person will take the pill I. Know The bus moves tax pizza anything off what am I missed here? New Orleans is very much part of the story line. There are no John's cliches here which I really liked. It set somewhere where that poverty and the fallout Hurricane Katrina are really felt and I thought that was enormous sense to it. What did you think? Yes. They sort. They they sort of gesture towards that is just kept faking tax breaks schooling in will wash cynic. Alison. Now you like Comex, you'd like superheroes enjoy. My my trajectory was if you put much China on a graph next Dems it's pretty much the same but probably just a little bit higher. So I really enjoyed the start I really enjoyed the ambiguity of the the League three lead characters and I found the overall atmosphere. Quite oppressive and depressing which you in a good way because that's kind of. Is Everything a metaphor for covid. Now even film photos happened. And it reminded me. Of the the late to judge dredd film. Good one. Yes. Yes. You're in that kind of dystopia setting in the the oppressiveness of it. And they'd start going off the rails obesity a there was a bit of a it or may also the kind of classic colty eight to Sci Fi. Films like at Terminator Robocop Cope in that way just a big hit to the same time as being. clunky. Dialogue like this eight, your fight it's my city and. and then I think for me. It was enjoyable for a bit longer than the first half hour but then. The last. Half an hour was just every action movie cliche in the Book and the actually starts taking the piss O of itself blowing clint, Eastwood Lines and borrowing from burn means from from twitter basically the from everywhere an it just becomes an until the these kind of interesting. Merlin. Rowley ambiguous characters I just trading wisecracks is they re people's heads off you know it's just see. So I'm glad I won't stay, but it's it could have been a lot better Andrea. Did you enjoy the juxtaposition of this supposed immorality of taking pills when you see someone taking pills on a screen? It's a bad thing with taking pills to become a morally superior superhero. Well I. Thought I was interested in I thought. I. Thought the film ceases to interesting at the moment that forgets that that's what it's about because. Obviously, Superhero, films on now the dominant genre although it remains to be seen if they will survive cove it after the movies take a two year break this already a big question mark over whether things like black widow are really going to. Do the business that they would. If all this happened but I think at the core of it, you've got very interested idea. which is the the idea of addiction to power. The idea of drugs escape the set the document here you can be looking at this as a kind of a cocaine allegory as well. You know get tightrope get superpowers briefly for five minutes, and that was often then was, but it's also you know there's also Of It's about the idealization of power and celebrity. If you're a nobody will is a somebody but I think it's because it's a movie it has to fall into movie tropes, tools they and they asked to. Tidy resolution and I looked listen thought this is a great universe, a great set of. tropes for a decent as episode, not flex, which can explore some of these things and doesn't have to earn it self into a final confrontation with a bathroom wraps everything up and everybody hope for the future of in the final fifteen minutes because that's sort of betrays the premise the premise is this is a morally mixed well, the premise is that this drug is. Is Spreading throughout Nolan's and presumably throughout the rest of the United. States it's not going to be tidied up just by guessing to the end level and finishing the bad and it's such a shame you run into a big wool with this is a movie written on it. It's clever and quite so subtle and quite a quite eloquent an elegant parts that have been. Real. A real old one looks like a million dollars. I like the facts. Actually get yours these. So he said it looks like ten million dollars. I also thought the assessing of was a good one and the ovum laying off of hip hop and the notion of the central character, a rope and played by the brilliantly dominic fish back. Hedrick of escapist. In being a rapper well, isn't that just bliss superpower fantasy a people are indulging. It's such a rich world and yet the IT comes down say. Let Them Go. You wouldn't add all that kind of stuff I. DON'T BE WASTING RAGES BY THE WAY BECAUSE I I've been waiting for ages for some fresh movie native superheroes go because everything's not up. On the the the DC on mobile wells are going very very dry. I know this inside out. I know they're going out stuff and I'm surprised that there have been so few attempts to launch completely original movie properties banks there on the superheroes stuff the with which you know you could you could apply the capabilities of movies to it in a way that. You POPs caught with comics anymore. What did you think chuck? Why is he has a very interesting premise in this is a it's a film about Robin and there her two. DADS. Has To make Jewish between two fathers and is interesting because the dynamic is not one father figure and a goal it's not buddy movie isn't really is it's that meshed into one and it's about her journey and that's really ram. That's why the Clint Eastwood thing that references to him a lot and him as a father figure because she doesn't in the story have a dad that is absent. We don't know why. But the something to do with that, which I thought was really interesting. Extremely unusual. Yet I think what happens is it makes concessions to a young audience towards the end and becomes something that is cliche. It wants to follow Joker Batman Path and go down the darkness but I think because it's trying to appeal to a netflix younger audience all the edges get taken off it I found the rap stuff a bit. Bit. Cultural stereotype or anything. If you're black, you're going to get out together by wrapping. It's not yeah. She should be reading book or you. Is Real. That's a real dream of your kids I know, but we see a lot but people want to be rapid than I felt come on come on is the bad guy in this film is pretty awful. They they reference the real life Henrietta lacks who was a woman who didn't consent to her tissue cells being used on, yet they have been used in have helped science cure diseases, I? Mean it's not. It's quite easy to get so cheap relevance by. Out..

New Orleans Clint Eastwood Robin Jamie Fox Wu Tang Adam China League Hurricane Katrina netflix Jessica Medic Sci Fi frank Foxx twitter cocaine dredd Alison Henrietta
"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

07:37 min | 10 months ago

"erasure" Discussed on Bigmouth

"The? Home to. That image is only just the of the labels of Michael Sir. Yeah. Yeah. This is stoning isn't it? I wasn't aware that lovecraft was a massive racist not I'm I'm not a complete. Kite no less about me seems to be is more of an American. Well, it's it's a you know if you've spent Lafayette like certain people. That time with complicated abstracts, abstruse death metal. Some people may spend a lot of time with two thousand eight as some people may have spent. That's horror novels and Dino. Kunz and all the rest of these things are by law crafts vision of the world, which was that we live. In this guy, we walk this narrow corridor in the wider non euclidian reality, which is four Harrison months now go white. But unfortunately as time goes by realize what he's getting all of their stuff from the town of Ins Mus, which features heavily in his stories where the people are strange and mutated an inbred reading this and enjoying it, and then after a while you start to realize, oh, he's just talk. This is his this is his vision that the Jews it's just an anti Semitic track than at times rather takes the fun out of it. I would rather than not allegorical. It's all. Let me just say. This puts the firm mechanic. Out. Testing it what's the meaning back into? What's what's clever great about it I think is that the excavates the sort of subconscious impulses behind these creations locates them back in wall is you know the original Senate of the United States which is the Presence of slavery in how deeply woke it's it was and is into into American society and it is very much the fusing of allegory here and the still present horror that just makes it is. See. Stuff I really did think that we will be watching it. It's nineteen minutes long and it flew by that first episode I felt I think episode is a feature length one I think everything else is a stretch of again. Definitely this is this is like Zainuddin built for me. Yeah absolutely. Amazing Yet they go so. Massive sums owners eight. Eight eight roiling filthy tentacles up. A couple of. At night wings as well. Yes good stuff, right? Okay. Time for Choon brought influenced by all of our guests Adam Hickinbotham brought in for us as your guest. Andrew I was particularly stung. By you Mulkey me bringing something piping hall for Deicing Cindy to without growing. So this this this time I thought from nineteen seventy four. Off Tonight, it is boxed up. The difference is this this is actually is coming out to get. It's the calvary cross original on his new book set off look stories, which is coming up next. Whether is I love it is a is a once timeless and unmistakably redolent of. The miserable Brennan Early Seventies. And I thought originally might couldn't couldn't be more nineteen, seventy four it was a painting talk. At a company at least forty seven but then I discovered it was originally recorded. Ninety three wasn't released until nineteen, seventy four because they. Know shortage out. That's very seventy S. which I I simply could leave you know radio wicked. Come on vinyl shortage. New. York Times Jerry. Jones. And there is there was a junior, the oil crisis kid. On these documentaries will show you know queues of cars going by miles and miles on a sign saying gas full dollars and had lunch sunglasses complaining never show Richard and Linda Thompson office phone tapping the fake like come on I gotTA records out here. Okay. Now get you thinking. They certainly done. To this time story whether they observed that this might have been a tough story by. So he's like. There is and I quote there is speculation. Companies seizing the oil situations excuse to head their own fat on talking distribution policies and taking fewer gambles artists who had not yet proven Sella's more talent and bless vinyl might be an emphasis for the future many executives. Bullish I'm Hari. It's explanations better than the music, Adam? That's. That's a religion of the listeners can make their own jets whether the too much talent. final. Yeah. was. RECR-. Nice. She said to me. What's you? One. EARN. His shoes. Now, some extremely contrasting pop music magpie drew pub brothers. The Lemon twix finally released that album songs for the general public to been delayed by the Rona since about March or something. What will the panel make of this latest iterating of grandiose steely Dan meets busby Berkeley confections, and how high are the irony is The other end of the emotional out tonal scale. It's octave baselines Savannah it's no guitars. As rasiah released the neal, the eighteenth albums, eight notebooks like is there I broke it doesn't need fixing his middle-age high energy, the White Fullwood to what you whistles, a couple of tracks, the lemon twigs with the wall and derision with hey now, open brackets think I got a feeling close brackets. were. GotTa go. This.

Adam Hickinbotham Michael Sir Ins Mus Senate Lafayette Kunz Dino United States Harrison Choon White Fullwood Zainuddin York busby Berkeley Brennan neal Andrew I Sella
FavyFav on Planeta G!

Latinos Who Lunch

06:55 min | 10 months ago

FavyFav on Planeta G!

"With us today, we have the Amazing Justin Fella Aka five, eighty five. He's Guatemalan American artists from Nevada known for his large scale sculptures that plays with American pop culture and the lat next experienced. He's the host of a couple of podcasts including the art people podcast and one of my favorite podcasts. Latinos who lunch welcomed Fathi. Welcome. Still trying to figure out technology. Technical difficulties. We're like we're right there. Thank you. Thank you for having me. I am in Las Vegas Nevada right now since. Yes in city where people don't believe that wearing masks is a big so. Crystal. Very similarly. You know we we started working at Greenpeace right around the same time and we really didn't see a lot of lat next representation in the environmental movement in these big green organizations and so we thought hey, like maybe we can just do something like that and on your show you talk about sort of the intersection between being Queer Latinas and sort of like this idea of Spangler. Inside this Anglo world out what do you think is the importance of intersection analogy was important to talk about. Oh my gosh. That's one of the. That's one of the big big missions of Lebanon's lunches that. If it's not intersectional it it's really not for for anyone really like if it's not intersect, the revolution is intersectional whom we will never be free basically you know. So from the very beginning, we've been checking ourselves on our privilege as gender males on the show, and because we recognize the all the you know the misogyny within own you know belief systems just based on how we were raised in America and I'm saying America like North South and Central America and so And then something that happened maybe like a year or two intellectuals who lunch was the recognition of the erasure of Central American culture, and also after let me move out. So we actively before people are using the term anti-racists or. Really. Intersection analogy I think I heard that a lot after the the white woman's March that happened a few years ago So but they got fizzy hatsaw haven't seen many at the black lives haven't seen many at the black lives matter protests but so wh-. Anyway, We really we really started paying attention to like oh my gosh we're really like Mexico centric on our show we need to actively be anti-black and talk about colors and talk about the erasure of offer. Let the needle on our show and we recognize that it was our own. You know that was our one of our personal goal was to really openly talk about that and have sometimes uncomfortable conversation. Let I love what you said. We can't have revolution if it's not intersectional because the sort of Traumas and the histories and experiences are compounded with each identity that include you both you know in a way that's like. Boosts Society and helps you in society also not. About yeah. especially with climate change because at the end of the day, we're all going to be affected by climate change but to what degree and how soon it really depends on where you are how much you have, how much you given, how much you're supported in society. It's funny because like recycling and incur the environment it seen this very same in or you know white people saying but it's like no dinos have been trying to take care of the environment for a very long time. We just don't talk about it in the same way you know what I mean. So I mean I also like to pretend that I'm Vegan. Just people mad because you know that's US relegated to just white people. You know I'm so like Oh. Yeah. I. Don't I don't wanna eat cows anymore because it's bad for the environment and that's like the real thing that I'm doing now that we're talking about claim it and how much Linex do people care about it maybe not in the same context that you know white people are recycling or being around this like we have our willows. Teaching on like here's the. Deal or like rub this like urban you're like sore foot and you'll wake up of. The best. Or some other iteration of that Linex people care about the environment and we quote like or reference this study that happened recently at Yale that seventy percent of people in the United States, Horley care about the environment, and so how do you see that or not see that reflected in our culture and how do you see annex values reflected in the conversation around the environment? yeah, I mean there's there's very different schools of thinking within my own family for example, but like my will lead, you know isolated people do it saying this online to we've been saving plastic bags and containers from jump? Right. That's just something that we do in our like is that sour cream in the fridge? That's probably. Some leftover beans or something. You never know you never know I'm so in little ways like that we're very resourceful as Latinos because we have to be, but also it's just part of our culture even in Latin? America. But I am example that pops up to my pops up to my head is recently visited what the my life for the first time as an adult and went back to where my mom is from this little little village called. We let the in Garland which is right in the center of a psychopath in Guatemala and so. HALF OF MY A. Family are farmers and then half of them are. are raise cattle So it's like. That's when I realized like Yo my family is responsible for like the deforestation of Quantum Allah because I'm seeing all this open land my GRANDPA has. but they don't see that way. They're like, no cows our money we're going to raise cows we're GONNA make you know we're gonna them or dairy cow. So then we'll be sold for me and so there's this acres and acres of land that my family owns that is is just it's just grass now when it used to be rich rainforest

America United States Justin Fella Nevada Fathi Central America Las Vegas Nevada Greenpeace Traumas Linex Lebanon Spangler Garland Mexico Guatemala Yale
Black Women Deserve More Credit in Civil Rights Movements

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

03:05 min | 11 months ago

Black Women Deserve More Credit in Civil Rights Movements

"Black women have been the pioneers of so many movements that have changed the world, the Eurasia of black women from the story of these movements is something. We've seen many times throughout American history starting all the way back with the women's suffrage movement. African American women in particular played a significant in sometimes overlooked role at a suffrage movement. There were African American women fighting for suffrage from the beginning you. Know sojourner truth and the time of the civil war I to be Wells Barnett and Mary Church. Terrell, they built a movement that would grow to half a million but they would never find exceptions among mainstream. Selfridge's at that time. Suffrage leaders were actively wooing southern white members to appease the southerners. White suffragettes found it expedient to abandon their black sisters they minimize the presence of black woman in that struggle. Stan seize control of suffrage history, and this multi volume book still dominates the histories and essentially wrote black women out of that. That's right. Black suffragettes were literally written out of the history books by white women in the movements and just look at their faces. It's like they had already seen the future and they were like I'M NOT GONNA get credit for any of this Emma because the truth is certain white feminist heroes worst super-problematic. People, remember them like they were early versions of wonder woman when in reality they were more like the mom from get out. Now, you may not be surprised that these nineteen twenties, Karen's where he gets to accept black women's work but give them credits. But what may surprise you is that black men in the civil rights movement also happy to do a similar thing most women who worked in the movement who were the exit backbone of the civil rights movement were not really known media attention would always be drawn to the men of the movement as they are doing work that Martin, Luther, King's and others but would not necessarily go to women like Ella Baker who was a longtime activist. Who helped to nurture and birth the student movement Diane Nash With the Lead Strategist behind the citizens in Nashville and the freedom writers he played a critical role in organizing the Selma marches. Dorothy height was the Godmother of the civil rights movement. But because she was a woman, she was often off to the side behind the podium behind the scenes she was guiding force at the table when the big six planned the historic march on Washington in nineteen sixty three, the lone woman at a table full of med, yet despite all her efforts height could not convince them that a woman should be allowed to speak at the podium the day of the march come on man this is so messed up. Black Women with the lifeblood of the civil rights movement, and still they got caught blocked by the dudes I. Mean, the Reverend's got half a dozen microphones right there you come break. One of those offer, my girl Dorothy she was a critical part of the group if the vendors were fighting Santa's but they made eye on Manchester from the stands and this just shows you that black women don't just have to deal with racism from the world but oftentimes, they have to deal with the sexism within their own communities and the world at large.

Dorothy Height Selfridge Diane Nash Terrell Wells Barnett Stan Ella Baker Emma Lead Strategist Mary Church Karen Manchester Nashville Washington Dorothy Santa Martin
French Fries: American as Apple Pie?

Doughboys

01:47 min | 1 year ago

French Fries: American as Apple Pie?

"As the nineteen seventeen. Us Entry into World War One whip citizens into a nationalistic fuhrer rebranded. Sauerkraut as liberty cabbage. An attempt to mute the culinary influence of the now hated Germans. This distinctly American act of combining performance jingoism with the absolute least amount of effort would repeat in their early outs as Francis. Opposition to the Iraq. War led the. Us's loudest wrong as citizens to rebrand French fries as freedom fries. But despite these temporary attempts at Euro erasure the continents influence on American cuisine is indelible and vice versa with French fries. Among the most notable examples in the sixteenth century Spanish Explorers Return from the Americas with a new ingredient the potato at first relegated as hogtied by Europeans but in time recognizes the first style kitchen staple French fries among the new dishes. That would come to exist as a result of the transcontinental tuber track though their disputed origin is credited by different sources to France Belgium or Spain brought back to the states in the seventeen. Hundreds French fries exploded in Popularity State side in the twentieth century alongside their common accompaniment. The hamburger and soon home cooks would desire way to approximate addition their kitchens without the Messi sputters of deep that frying in Nineteen Fifty. Two brothers formerly corn. Growers opened a company offering frozen French fried potatoes intended for oven. Reheating with facility. Straddling the border between Oregon and Idaho giving their company. Its name from abbreviating both states day. Sixty years later. The Briggs Brothers Brainchild is the dominant frozen fries brand in the US and the company also credits itself with the creation of variant beloved and cafeterias and Gastro pubs alike. The tater tot only time will tell which future war of opportunity will lead to originally specific foodstuff getting clumsy rename. But whatever you call them. French fries are now as American as Apple Pie. Which itself is European origin.

United States Briggs Brothers Brainchild Nineteen Fifty Iraq Apple Americas Messi Francis France Oregon Spain Idaho Belgium
Rebecca Solnit: Recollections of My Nonexistence

Bookworm

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Rebecca Solnit: Recollections of My Nonexistence

"Of my nonexistence. It's a profound book. It moved me deeply and let me say furthermore that this is the first time we're doing a show under these corona virus situations. I'm in my home. Rebecca's in her home and we're going to talk to one another without being able to see one another a real I for bookworm. Hi Rebecca Hello Michael. What do you mean by my nonexistence? I had the title before I wrote the Book and the book in some ways a reflection on it. It's most of all about all the forms of violence against women. The literal violence that leaves some women. Did some woman silent. Some woman pushed out of full participation in different social arenas but I also wrote about other social groups game in native people etc who face other kinds of erasure and I also wrote about reading as a positive form of non existence where you withdraw from your own life and your own physical being to enter another world and kind of float disembodied in somebody else's imaginings in somebody else's language. Wow let me say that as I was reading the book although I regard myself as I hope sensitive gay man I was made aware of how frightening it is used say at a certain point partially ironically that in your childhood your hobby was not getting raped. To what extent is that true. I-in it's completely true and I was really writing about my adolescence and early adulthood. We've had a really valuable and significant conversation. Last several years thanks to black lives matter and the response to the killing of Trayvon Martin about black parents giving talk to their sons about the dangers. They faced because of their race and gender. Most girls get different forms of the talk. Telling them often in roundabout evasive ways that they can't wear this. They can't do that. They can't aspire to this. They can't move freely. They can't go out at this hour. They shouldn't go to the party. They shouldn't have a drink and that it's entirely on them to prevent men from harming them and that society has no interest in taking responsibility for that but Democrat violence against women. So as young woman I had to constantly think about safety and strategy as I move through the world and every situation walking out in the world public transit meetings classes social situations parties Cetera and it was constant and it took a toll. I remember when I was first in college. This is around. Nineteen seventy the first feminist movements. Were starting in it in phone stickers. That said this exploits women but it wasn't yet clear that we were in a culture that exploits women altogether and that when I started to join gay men's liberation groups. We discovered how much we had grown up being teased being heard being disregarded in the language of the Normative Patriarchal Heterosexual Culture held one. Live in such a culture. You know I think if you add up those who are not male those who are not white. Those are not straight those who are not conventionally able bodied et CETERA. You end up with the majority of facing these forms of non existence. I think that you know it is a burden that people shouldn't have to carry That a lot of kinds of people carry these burdens and I wrote this book partly to try and home in on some of the nuances and complexities around gender. That I didn't feel we're talking about enough but I also wrote this book very much as a first person account of my formative years in San Francisco and gay men were a joy and support and inspiration in those years You know I lived about a neighborhood away. You know a fifteen minute walk from the Castro to see these men who had said we're going to refuse our assignment. We're going to refuse our role because we've decided it's worth paying the price rather than the price of avoiding who. We are and conforming. But I also WanNa talk about another form of non existence that really had an impact. And I think has an impact on young queer people even now on people of color the non-existence of being given reading material stories histories in which people like you don't matter don't exist aren't the protagonists. I grew up reading. Very male centered white centred literary Canon and I should say Christian centered and I feel like there was a non existence that to imagine myself as the protagonist of the great stories. I had to D- imagine myself as a woman and it always felt like I was wavering. Between who I was in my bodily identity and who I was if I wanted to be like Odysseus Sir Lord Jim more so many of the adventurous people in the books that I love when I was growing up the used to as a regular thing on once book reports ask. Who Do you identify with in this book? And since there were no queer characters and no Jewish characters except extremely negative. One says in the case of the sun also rises. I mean hemingway was particular corporate for giving us no one that we could know who would be like us. We would want to grow up into and my parents intern. They were the children of immigrants or immigrants themselves and they were given Ivanhoe to read when they got to school and suddenly they were saying words like pretty young maiden where did that come from. They weren't learning American English in their English classes. That will earning Sir Walter Scott so when I was reading your book. Rebecca this idea of non existence and the ways in which it's pressed upon us move me so deeply that I'll tell you the truth I was breaking into tears every ten or fifteen pages. Wow thank you I will say if I'm not mistaken. Ivanhoe has a beautiful Jewish named Rebecca in it but it is a very anachronistic archaic book. Rebecca Soni is an explorer of the American West and when she became involved with her younger brother in anti-nuclear demonstrations. She was there at the test sites in Nevada. Exploring what it was lied to beyond Shoshoni lands. Yes yes and actually that was such a formative place for me. I like to say the Nevada test site taught me to write because the place was so extraordinarily it demanded. I learned to integrate the different modes. In which is writing journalism criticism and kind of lyrical personal essays but also was a place in which the protagonists were Western. Schone elders Mormon down winters atomic survivors from Japan Lesbian Pagans and anarchists and just really remarkable coming together of a lot of people who already weren't part of the central narrative to exert real power make real alliances about the future of the world against the dominant narrative being told by Cold War America and then nuclear physicists and politicians who were mostly white men and it was an extraordinary movement with many

Rebecca Soni Ivanhoe Nevada Normative Patriarchal Heterose Japan Sir Walter Scott Trayvon Martin San Francisco Shoshoni Intern Castro Lord Jim Hemingway
Hatshepsut: 'The First Great Woman of History'

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Hatshepsut: 'The First Great Woman of History'

"Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia Lamonica. Today's leader was one of the few female fan and each in Egypt and one of its most successful pharaohs overall ruling for over twenty years. She led Egypt through a period of prosperity completed ambitious building projects and increased trade with surrounding lands. She sometimes called the first great woman of history. Let's talk about huts ships. Hatshepsut was born in around fifteen o seven BC to the Eighteenth Dynasty Addiction. King Tut most of the first and his primary wife very little known about her early childhood around the age of twelve hotshot so it was married to her half brother. Tet moves to the second who was a younger son of Hatshepsut's father and his secondary wife cut most of the second had three older brothers authors. So he wasn't originally next in line for the throne but each of his older brothers died before coming of age as the eldest living son of most of the first. I tut most of the second ascent to the throne around fourteen ninety two ABC hardships. It became his primary wife and Queen. She gave birth to a daughter but never had a son to inherit the throne. One took most of the second died around fourteen seventy nine B C e. his eldest son took most of the third was named King Tut. Most of the third was the eldest son of a lower harem queen and was only an infant when he took power as US such hardships. It acted as regent for the baby. This was fairly common arrangement at the time. But by most of the third seventh year in Power Hatshepsut sit herself had been crowned King and was given the full titles and Regalia of Traditional Pharaoh. Technically she co ruled with the young cut most of the third but there was no question about who the primary rule really was. It's unclear exactly how hot chips it gained that level of power and how she convinced. The Egyptian elite beat to accept a female fair. It's generally thought that she spent years promoting loyal officials into major positions of power and they in turn supported her bid for the throne during its reign. Egypt enjoyed appearing to peace with its neighbors. She went on a short successful military campaign in Nubia. Yeah when she first came to power after that. Her government's foreign policy was almost entirely focused on trade scenes on the walls of shops at. Stay here Bihari. Temple show trade expeditions and imports of valuables like gold. Animal Furs Ebony. And spices as part of their duties. Egyptian Pharaohs rose were expected to take on major building projects and restore the buildings of former pharaohs that had gone into disrepair in this regard had chips. It didn't buck the norm. She took on a massive building program that included temple to the God. Amon Ray in thieves a full remodeling of her father's hall and the addition addition of her own shrine at the Great Karnak temple complex and a beautiful temple cut out of rock at Beni Hasan among others hut ships. Greatest building chief of all was the year up a hurry temple. It was meant to serve as a living memorial temple that would continue to be used by her subjects after her death breath for her actual burial spot hardships. It added onto her father's tomb in the Valley of the Kings so she could be buried next to him as Hutch. Upset that older. She gave her co ruler. Tut Most of a third more power and a larger role in state government after Hatshepsut died around fourteen eighteen fifty eight BC Tut. Most of the third ruled alone for more than thirty years. During his rule. He tried hi to remove all traces of shops. Its existence here moved statues of her and Ethan wiped her name off. The official list of Egyptian kings. Modern scholars originally thought that this must have been an act of revenge. But it's now believe that it probably had more to do with cleaning up the line of succession. It's worth noting that other pharaohs did similar things to their predecessors including scrubbing building inscriptions and claiming the buildings as their own because of this campaign of erasure. Racer hardships it became essentially unknown to history until eighteen. Twenty two when the newfound ability to understand hieroglyphics finally allowed archaeologists theologists and scholars to read descriptions at her temple and rediscover this incredible.

Hatshepsut United States King Tut Egypt Great Karnak Temple Complex Jenny Kaplan Eighteenth Dynasty Addiction Kings Beni Hasan Official Nubia Amon Ray Hutch Ethan
"erasure" Discussed on Books & Rhymes: The Podcast

Books & Rhymes: The Podcast

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"erasure" Discussed on Books & Rhymes: The Podcast

"The one that shack in my head. That's one or you can look at the lyrics deeply and it's really about the person who's the object of my affection and that person is so complete the way they are. They don't need to change their behavior. Fine just as they are and as they are is all that. I need to know the wonderful thing which is amazing. How you you'll some choices ties. So wonderfully with the with just the structure of lives of great men here. Is that what he uses. First album is titled whitney houston. Yes and the second of mistitled whitney with me. So she has dropped this. You know the the surname in the second one. She's just i mean who. I am any so wonderful that that is the album that you choose where you've janis that that first decade of her as an artist There were a lot of in her music. That spoke to people outside of a vocal progress. I mean i think when people think of with knee houston they always think about how great she was as interpreting songs. You know but some of the songs that were a biggest hits songs edmund sung by other people. Yes louis love you thirty houghton. That was a dollar budget song for many years ago on. Her interpretation of it made people think differently. The greatest love of all was by george benson. Her interpretation of admit people think differently. And i think there are several songs that she was able to get people to feel them Right and so when people often think about her they think of her talent in terms of a powerful vocals. But i often think of what she made me feel by paying attention to the lyrics. She was not a songwriter but she elevated the work of some bright s to make us think and not. Just feel the melody but think about how you behave or do you wanna do Saving all my love for us. One of a favorite songs of all time practically because it spoke to me in in a in a in a very visceral way. Because i could see myself with lamido with other people that i mentioned in the book in my life who i tried to give everything and i was willing to wait until they finished with their lives. That's true it's a common give me the crumbs and i would be saving my best sells for them and these were things that she interpreted that more than just shaking your ass sway incident. Beat you made you really think as to where are you going with this shit. You know Yeah so how. How irv primarily in the first decade Is quite meaningful to me because i related to a lot of The lyrics to the things that she song and a lot of it were quite powerful and uplifting but this is such recognition of you. Know if you're in this space you need to pick yourself up and get out so instead of saying. Maybe just whitney or the whitney houston album. I would say may be the greatest hits volume one because income passes all of those years and she puts the songs in there that i just On remakes just just like that was one of her songs. That was used in the olympic. You know some of her interpretation of of Strong lyrics need. You feel like you know you could you. Could you could do better. You can have your moment you could shine without the whole world Recognizing it and so i. I loved a lot of her work. Everything i was quite lucky in that. I was living in america at a time when she performed a lot and she was at her best. Now we all know that. What's the end of her career. There are health issues and challenges. But i think that i Up until the part where an immediate aftermath of the buddy god soundtrack she was a consistent live performer and you could see the depth of interpretation of lyrics of songs that she had recorded but also songs that other people had recorded and it was a real joy for me to be able to see her four or five times in concert Before the decline of homes. I like listeners. I've just had a wonderful journey through the music. Yes thank you so much for. Having me on the podcast. It's been wonderful being here The one last thing that. I want to ask everybody to do is just encourage people in your life street. I think that for us as africans people who love africa. It's very important that we stop reading for passing exams only off our own religious journey. We need to invest in writers who are contemporary who telling our own stories Because there's a lot of. I have had the luxury of living in america and america's powerful because of its ability to put out different narratives out there so you don't know only one thing about america. You know a lot about america. And this is what i wish for us. Jerry's and africans in general that we invest in people tried to tell our own stories. So yes. I want people to read lives of great men but allison them to read every other thing. That's coming out book. Saved my life and books will say thank you. Thank you for listening to this. Episode and sung featured in this episode is available in the show. Don't get in touch. By emailing books and ryan jimmy dot com philipson rhymes on instagram and twitter. Don't get to share your thoughts on this episode. Where he's in high stag books and ryan's subscribe to the mailing list out. Books and ryan dot com have a most most most excellent and fantastic week onto next time he can..

america mistitled whitney whitney houston george benson twitter ryan irv houston louis africa Jerry
US Calls Out China's 'Remarkably Awful' Human Rights Abuses

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

US Calls Out China's 'Remarkably Awful' Human Rights Abuses

"It US state secretary of state, Mike Pompeo is called out what he says is China's remarkably awful human rights abuses. He says China, which is in a league of its own when it comes to human rights violations in just two thousand eighteen. China intensified its campaign of defending Muslim minority groups at record levels. And he says today more than one million Muslims are intern at erasure camps to reeducate their religious

Mike Pompeo China State Secretary United States Intern
Stanley, STAN Lee And Writer discussed on John Batchelor

John Batchelor

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Stanley, STAN Lee And Writer discussed on John Batchelor

"Like spider man, and the hulk Thor also the Black Panther ever, nurses covers comics for Gizmodo. He's a comic book writer himself as it happens. Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. I'm going to quote, your tweet this morning back to yourself with a slight paraphrase to make it a FCC compliant. You said this is actually messing me up a lot more than I expected Stanley's writing. And speaking voice has been in my head almost my entire life. That's kind of a thing. He's been out there for a very was out there for a very long time being really influential. Yeah. So much of what we think about when we think about superheroes. And even pop culture comes from Stanley. Here's the thing about about the superheroes. That Stanley came up with for my money that sort of makes him stand out the superheroes. That that came from the minus Stanley and others, we should say, and I'll get to that in a minute. Were the oddballs in the misfits. And yet he made it, okay? To be that. And then we should say marvel and Disney made it okay to make gazillions of dollars off that. Yeah. I think the thing we have to remember when we think about STAN Lee is, you know, he himself was like an outlier right in terms of doing what he did in the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties. He worked at a magazine company, which made comics when he really wants to be like a screenwriter novelist like he had different ambitions for himself. So it's not a stretch. I think to say that Stanley was taking his own sense of being a misfit. And you know, he was a Jewish man in America. Right after World War Two you. I think those are some of the things that probably forms. The idea that went into characters like Spiderman. Fantastic four the X men. Here's a trickier question. Did he have more influence on the comic book industry or later in life and through his derived work in comic books, a bigger influence on the movie industry? So that's an interesting question. I feel like you have to think about when marvel universe that we know started in nineteen sixty one the company was near death DC was dominant with a formula that was viewed as a lot more stayed in save. But when when standing this cO contributors come up with the marina verse nineteen sixty one of those characters if basically forces DC to step up their game and rethink about hiding their cassettes Wiesner characters. So then it became this competition that reinvigorated the whole superheroes genre. And I think then you see that trickling out as annotations become more and more common in TV and movies and stuff. So I think the comic Centric portion of his career is far more because without it happened. So here's. The impolitic question the kind of has to be asked and you refer to this a little bit in your job at that. You wrote of him today. Did he maybe get a disproportionate amount of the credits since he was the guy out there hustling, and and making it work. I mean other people helped him come up with all these guys. Yeah. Stanley was a pitch man. Right. He was the public face of the company for decades. And I think by sheer virtue of that there was an instance of kind of unintended erasure of his other co creators, but I think. The only today with remember that STAN was there and so much of what marvel became was a result of his direct involvement like his his personality, and his energy is all inside of that work ever. Narcisse senior staff rhetoric is motor writes on comic books and has written comic books as well. Evan. Thanks a lot. I appreciate your time. Thanks for having me. Right.

Stanley Stan Lee Writer Gizmodo FCC Disney DC Evan America Senior Staff
Tom Cruise, Steve Stone and WGN discussed on Steve Cochran

Steve Cochran

08:18 min | 3 years ago

Tom Cruise, Steve Stone and WGN discussed on Steve Cochran

"At, ten on, WGN TV Moron entertainment as I recall this It's, not it doesn't feel the same Steve, out here for more on entertainment so we'll just introduce Dina's the. Moron. Quotient a little bit That's. Right to make up for, ever Steve right right Troy come on, Choi in a little bit I can do I can be Moron there's nothing. There's nothing new. But for this Let's talk mission impossible. Fall out the film the reviews they're coming in this is we're talking to Nick to Gilio yesterday about this is the only vehicle for Tom Cruise that. Makes money the the rest of Tom cruises career. At this point they're bomb, after bomb, after bomb they might be good. Movies but. They're they don't, do well too Jack Reacher and others have done, okay but nothing even remotely close, to now these. Six mission impossible, films that he that he's. Done that started back in. The year two thousand which is amazing that he's been doing this character and this franchise for nearly twenty years and there are no signs of slowing down. With this normally you get two or three films. In the franchise and it, begins to, fall apart no signs whatsoever This this film was about as strong and as exciting as. Any of them that have come along the premise. Is almost secondary to, everything that surrounds the premise which is some plutonium goes missing in the hands of, some bad guys they want to set. Off nuclear bombs around. The world to disrupt the world order and it's up to the impossible mission force should, they decide to accept the mission to find the plutonium and stop these, nuclear nuclear explosions that are going. To take place but this is done with with so much excitement it's like a Corey a daredevil choreography with this of one exciting stunt an action scene after the next he's not jumping out. Of a plane he's doing helicopter aerobics we talked about. The scene where he famously shattered his ankle real life, injury with this and he's the, the scene when When you all go to see the movie this weekend there's a scene, which he's running from rooftop-to-rooftop to rooftop to rooftop and jumping from. Rooftop to rooftop and there's. A point at which he instead of jumping from rooftop to rooftop he goes rooftop smashing into the side of the building and. Trailer yeah you look at it and go wow that's amazing, that stunt man really did a great job there is not a stunt. Man that was Tom Cruise and that was not planned he there was a misstep there in that that's the scene where he. Shatters ankle we talked about it yesterday they keeps going he's he's Scoglio keeps going until he told me that he knew that. They could only do this one time he knew. That something was very, wrong that he had broken something but still lifts himself up on the building as, you see in the movie and keeps. Running past the camera. And that's where he collapsed after he was out of the shot but that's that's Tom, Cruise it's one thing after another Let's bring in China why why do. You think that he didn't know that there's a there's a lot, volved with it but why does he want to do all of these elaborate scenes himself and risk himself to, the injuries he's a he's an action junkie I mean that's that's. What I think it is. He finds a tremendously exciting There are some, precautions that they take with harnesses and things I'm sure while he's doing all this building jumping you know. That there, are precautions so he. Doesn't seriously, hurt himself with any of this but. He just absolutely loves it I mean some people would say you know how how can hockey players get out on. The. Ice, and, go through the, physical abuse that they do but. I mean isn't that isn't that part of the adrenaline rush for asking I guess whether it's hockey or anything else where there's, a certain, amount of physical danger involved. Good hey dean during the break. Trae brought up a great question we couldn't think of another star, like Tom Cruise that you'll go see in the theater even. If you're not into the movie you know Tom, Cruise is a draw Justin brought up the rock rock can you give another star that, has power like that these days No That's a legitimate, questioning whether he's reading that movie star, gone where it's gonna, go, see Tom, Cruise Gina's movie. Star he not only is he the evil. Knievel of movies but he's he's a, really, good actor I'm in the scenes that don't, involve stunts, he is so, good at so motion. Empathetic in charismatic in. The roles that he does and this, this particular character, Ethan, hunt in particular There, there's just a draw to him and I think that you know part of the enjoyment of this movie is knowing that he's doing almost all the stunts that you. See there's, a helicopter scene toward the end of the movie it's. Him maneuvering. This helicopter and jumping out of airplanes in fact tell me about jumping out of airplanes last. Night on. The late late show. With James corden instead of a cruise just coming to, talk to him at the desk Tom Cruise may James corden jump out of an airplane with. Them that's great if you're watching the, show entertaining to, take a look at that James corden YouTube channel today it's fantastic we're short on time Michael. Boob Lay's wife gave birth to a baby girl but. And you can find that online but cool significant in, that this, is their third child now. By the wind blew blade family his oldest. Son Noah who's now five years old, style, with a very rare form of cancer two, years ago, so now they've, added to their family Noah by the way doing very. Very well good and apparently in remission He is the cutest. Kid, on the planet. To sure is this, hair he, is amazing. Hair oh there we go All right cool Here we go with. The, hair stuff again we've got the. Dupage county fair that's going on this weekend that you might want. To check out we've got the. Lake County fair that's going on this. Weekend as well taste of Margarita, festival at, navy pier stone's throw from the studio today could see. It from here I'm just saying the morning, show could, be you know all the salty around, the edges today but concerts Kenny Chesney is at Soldier, Field on Saturday, Chris Brown's Hollywood amphitheater in Tinley park. Also on, Saturday We've, got erasure when a little. Blast from the eighties, of Chicago theater Friday tonight and Saturday wiz Khalifa's intently, park at, Ravenna wing Chung. Flock of. Seagulls and naked is I'm pretty. Sure that's why Steve is taken off the last. Few days pre partying mullet wig out at for Ravenna and then of. Course foo fighters at Wrigley field Sunday. And, Monday that's an amazing weekend in. Chicago stuff yeah thanks gene guns have a good weekend every night. Go Dean Richards there you go. That was great great entertained more on. Entertainment see dean at Kenny Chesney, we're going, to go I hope I see him all right out. The heaven Thomas Rhett there it is all, right we'll, take a quick break here get the, news and then coming up Steve Stone we'll talk White, Sox baseball here, on seven twenty WGN stay with us Tonight After the all star break Finally back home on the south Country music times. They them the Toronto Blue Jays On. The pre game at six thirty The flash Twenty, WGN, hey folks Dirks. Bentley here if you see one of, my concerts, you know I'm all about energy, performing, recording traveling being a husband and..

Tom Cruise Steve Stone WGN Kenny Chesney Dean Richards Chicago Hockey James Corden Wrigley Field Nick Toronto Blue Jays Choi Dina Jack Reacher Gilio Ravenna Thomas Rhett Dupage County Corey
Ebola survivors suffer severe mental and neurological problems

Global News Podcast

03:35 min | 3 years ago

Ebola survivors suffer severe mental and neurological problems

"Today many in the west view moscow as an aggressor but here on the parade ground the ceremony and the speeches portray russia as a country on the defensive a nation fending off external enemies most places but not not musco version it but i i get chatting to a retired army officer called veatch love and i asked him who he thinks is the greatest threat to russia nearly as marshall boucher is yeah it's the imperialists catches love tells me oh how old friends including nato they want to steal our riches our resources for themselves thirty two royal ups boys so the suspicion is mutual nato is concerned binding creasing lee assertive russia that's why nato has increased its presence near russia's borders and as distrust grows on both sides the baltic is a potential flashpoint nato members regularly report scrambling jets to intercept russian military aircraft over the baltic sea in one incident two years ago a russian fighter jet came within thirty feet of a us warship conducting exercises there when someone is whining about russian planes flying over american ships in baltic prince just remember that it's baltic and saint petersburg can be seen from the ship and rate f anoxia is a news anchor for the russian tv channel sar grad rush itself is a problem for nato because a strong sober and independent country in the heart of erasure is definitely a problem for the west so what do you believe nato's aim is in relation to your country our destruction of this league you really believe that nato wants to destroy russian it's not matter of believing it's just a matter of saying bluntly and straightforward it's native that's coming to our historical areas of interest and areas of our ju political influence nato insists it seeks dialup with russia not conflict but the alliance's eastward expansion has made moscow uneasy back on the parade ground the national anthem brings celebrations to a close the soldiers standing to attention here believe then mission is purely defensive to protect their country to defend their motherland but that doesn't change the fact that russia is perceived externally as a threat and until that changes tension between moscow and nato is unlikely to eat rosenberg reporting research carried out in sierra leone shows that some survivors of ebola suffer from neurological and psychiatric conditions long after they recover from the initial disease and soy reports it bonus averse who had symptoms of mental illness or never system conditions in sierra leone were identified and observed research us from the university of liverpool and king's college london found that many of those veivers suffered from debilitating migraine type headaches stroke major depression.

Russia Officer Nato United States Moscow Sierra Leone Ebola King Veatch Marshall Boucher LEE Baltic Saint Petersburg Rosenberg University Of Liverpool Thirty Feet Two Years
"erasure" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"erasure" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The coolest suburbs plenty of sunshine tomorrow warm and breezy high of 75 southwest when 10 to 20 miles per hour friday mostly sunny back to around seventy degrees with the north west breeze saturday and sunday both looking awesome mostly sunny high of 73 on saturday mid70s on sunday with a few whispered clouds mixing in i'm wbz tv meteorologist danielle niles wbz newsradio 1030 abundant sunshine sixty seven 1919 the red sox five games to three in the th world series the series known as the black socks he has ninety three four at the first world series nfl game was televised this week 19th thrower became the first black nfl quarterback in modern times this week he might 1950 senator maurice erasure richer became the first nhl score five hundred i'm 1225 on the ring central news line wbz political analyst john taylor with keller at large you do commentary for a living and if you're realistic about it you know that sooner or later preferably later and infrequently you're going to say something stupid with a high likelihood of giving it thrown in your face years later since this is unavoidable i've chosen to just two brace it so without hesitation lemme go on record as saying driverless cars are the worst idea to hit boston since the olympics according to the glow two local companies are currently testing driverless cars down the seaport so let's start there how can you really test the these ability of selfdriving cars in a part of the city with a traffic rarely moved at all plus the seaport feels like a good case study in why it's probably a good idea to have humans driving the cards if you've ever been down there when the bars let out you realize why it might not be a good idea to have the passengers in directing strictly with a computer and what if some fellow makes a break poured out of the courthouse the driverless cars driver won't make a good witness in court the very idea of driverless cars in boston is frankly appalling which is weird because the drivers are so bad but there were reasons why are driving the so bad terrible roads horrible weather vicious pedestrians and so on that aren't likely to be forgiving to selfdriving cars yes i'm afraid this is the worst idea that come to town on since replacing fenway park if i recall they wanted to stick the new one down in the.

danielle niles world series maurice erasure john taylor keller boston fenway park nfl senator nhl political analyst seventy degrees