19 Burst results for "enright"

"enright" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:57 min | 2 months ago

"enright" Discussed on WRVA

"Northern Enright go news Radio W R. V eight times 601. It's now confirmed. The UK variant of covert 19 is in the U. S. Colorado's governor, announcing state health officials have discovered the cove in 19 UK variant in Colorado. It was found in a man in his twenties who is in isolation. He has no travel history to the UK. It's believed the variant maybe up to 70% more transmissible but may not be more deadly. In California. Health officials been trying to determine if the variant is in the population. And if that's why California's cases have exploded in recent weeks Like stone ABC News. There was a large scale testing event at the diamond this afternoon with the goal of helping people determine if they have Cove it the Richmond Health District's Lanier Olson says they were hoping people who traveled for Christmas and we're worried about exposure took advantage. We've done a lot of passing across the city and county and you're right. It has been really helpful to have this coordinated effort, both in Richmond and Enrico. On. Do you know continued to see a large turnout, especially now, um, but across that time, definitely like a new increased demand for testing overall, spoke to Richmond's Morning News. The Department of Health's new numbers showed an additional 4100 cases today. Positivity rate of 11.8. We do not know where the driver is. At this point of a truck that went off the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel this morning, the search ended at dark. The truck went off near the Eastern shore just after eight this morning. Just about two years ago, Another truck driver died of hypothermia when his truck went into the water in January of 2019. The accident today was on the North bound side. President elect Joe Biden, offering his plan to speed vaccinations in the country when he takes office and gets Children back to school. NBC's Andy Field says he'll also order.

UK Richmond California Richmond Health District Colorado Joe Biden Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel Northern Enright Department of Health ABC News hypothermia Andy Field NBC Lanier Olson President Enrico
New York AG files lawsuit to dissolve NRA for "fraud and abuse"

Larry Elder

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

New York AG files lawsuit to dissolve NRA for "fraud and abuse"

"Reporting New York State Attorney General Leticia James has filed a lawsuit against the National Rifle Association. Accusing its leaders of using funds for lavish personal trips, contracts for associates and other expenditures. James says it's time to put the NRA out of business for these years of fraud and misconduct. We are seeking. An order. To dissolve the NRA in its entirety. James highlighted misspending and self dealing claims that have roiled the NRA and its longtime leader, Wayne LaPierre, in recent years from hair and make up for his wife to a $17 million post employment contract for himself. In a statement Enright President Caroline Meadows label James of political opportunist who is pursuing a rank vendetta with an attack on its members. Second

Leticia James National Rifle Association Wayne Lapierre Enright Caroline Meadows New York Fraud Attorney President Trump
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:56 min | 9 months ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"And, so you can see how <Speech_Female> controversial <Speech_Female> the key side project <Speech_Female> is been in Toronto. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And, then you just times <Speech_Female> that by hundred <Speech_Female> who <Speech_Female> benefits from these projects, <Speech_Female> who <Speech_Female> is being marginalized <Speech_Female> or excluded from <Speech_Female> these projects? <Speech_Female> And I think a <Speech_Female> lot of people are questioning. <Speech_Female> Do we <Speech_Female> want technology <Speech_Female> companies <Speech_Female> building <Speech_Female> urban environments for <Speech_Female> us, or <Speech_Female> we think <Speech_Female> that the government should <Speech_Female> be doing this <Speech_Female> and overseeing <Speech_Female> it and regulating <Speech_Female> this process. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> I think key <Speech_Female> side, the <Speech_Female> alphabet city project <Speech_Female> in Toronto is really <Speech_Female> good. Example of <Speech_Female> this people are <Speech_Female> suspicious rightfully <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> of technology companies <Speech_Female> role, and <Speech_Female> what they're standing <Speech_Female> to gain and what <Speech_Female> we stand to lose. <Speech_Female> And, also <Speech_Female> wondering <Speech_Female> well is Toronto, <Speech_Female> so broken <Speech_Female> that we <Speech_Female> can't use existing <Speech_Female> mechanisms <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> for urban development, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> does it? <Speech_Male> Disturb <Speech_Male> you that almost <Speech_Male> everything in <Speech_Male> our world <Speech_Male> and in our <Speech_Male> lives <Speech_Male> has become or <Speech_Male> is becoming <SpeakerChange> corporate <Speech_Female> ties. <Speech_Female> Yes <Speech_Female> it does disturb <Speech_Female> me. <hes> <Speech_Female> I think we need to <Speech_Female> be cautious <Speech_Female> and we need to be vigilant. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And I don't think <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> a lot of people <Speech_Female> are paying attention <Speech_Female> I think a lot of people <Speech_Female> think well. <Speech_Female> Government's inefficient <Speech_Female> corporations <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> better at getting things <Speech_Female> done. <Speech_Female> And so they're <Speech_Female> outsourcing <Speech_Female> urban development <Speech_Female> and outsourcing <Speech_Female> all sorts of things, <Speech_Female> assuming that the <Speech_Female> market <Speech_Female> is efficient, <Speech_Female> and we'll sort of sort <Speech_Female> things out, and <Speech_Female> the the end result <Speech_Female> will benefit all of us. <Speech_Female> And this <Speech_Female> is magical thinking <Speech_Female> in my view, we <Speech_Female> need government <Speech_Female> and I think <Speech_Female> these new projects <Speech_Female> underscore the <Speech_Female> role of government <Speech_Female> in protecting <Speech_Female> the environment <Speech_Female> in. <Speech_Female> Controlling <Speech_Female> Development, <Speech_Female> so it's not completely <Speech_Female> out of control <Speech_Female> of controlling <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> foreign investment <Speech_Female> in our cities. <Speech_Female> It's something <Speech_Female> we need to discuss and <Speech_Female> we need to <SpeakerChange> be very <Speech_Male> vigilant about. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> think one <Speech_Male> of the most important things <Speech_Male> in our in the conversation <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> when you said <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> Cities <Speech_Male> can <Speech_Male> be fixable. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They can <Speech_Male> be rehabilitated. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> We don't have <Speech_Female> to go and build a new <Speech_Female> one. <Speech_Female> I think CDs <Speech_Female> are never beyond <Speech_Female> hope. <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> people who say <Speech_Female> that they are <Speech_Female> stand to Prophet. <Speech_Female> So if <Speech_Female> your technology company <Speech_Female> who stands <Speech_Female> to make more money <Speech_Female> from a new <Speech_Female> master plan city, <Speech_Female> then from <Speech_Female> negotiating <Speech_Female> some sort of a smaller <Speech_Female> contract <Speech_Female> with an existing <Speech_Female> city. You would <Speech_Female> definitely advocate <Speech_Female> for that new <Speech_Female> master-plan city. <Speech_Female> So, I think <Speech_Female> we always have to follow <Speech_Female> the money and <Speech_Female> see who benefits <Speech_Female> and who <SpeakerChange> loses <Speech_Male> out from these projects. <Speech_Male> That was <Speech_Male> my conversation with Sarah <Speech_Male> Moser a geography <Speech_Male> professor <Speech_Male> at university <Speech_Male> where she <Speech_Male> runs the new cities <Speech_Male> lab. <Speech_Male> It first <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> aired on the Sunday edition <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> last September. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> that's it for this season <Speech_Music_Male> of the enwright <Speech_Music_Male> files. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you for listening. <Music>

Toronto. Sarah professor
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:49 min | 9 months ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"Edition in May, two thousand sixteen, while cities around the world are trying to undo the urban planning mistakes of the past centuries. There's a new breed of cities trying to avoid the messy aftermath of those mistakes altogether you could call them. Instant cities built from scratch, many of them in deserts, jungles, or other landscapes previously untouched by urban development. Their builders proudly described their creations as the smarter greener cities of the future. They promise a fresh start free from the problems that plague conventional cities, such as congestion, sprawl, crowding and pollution. In these cities, every aspect of daily life has been optimized from sidewalks that melt snow and ice on their own to pneumatic tubes that whisk garbage away from residents homes. But for all their Utopian promise, their critics see something much more distortion looming in this brave new urban world. Sarah. Is a geography professor at McGill University where she runs the new cities lab. Here's our conversation from the Sunday edition last September. Why did you start studying this explosion of new cities? What was that caught your interest? At first I only knew about one new city, and that was the capital of Malaysia. And no one was really talking about new CDs. At that time, so got really excited. Thinking this is the Brasilia our time now. Brasilia's the capital. Brazil was built when nineteen sixty or something yeah, it's a very nineteen sixties relic of nine hundred sixty s era modernist urban planning. And the phenomenon seemed to have died down for a few decades, and then when I discovered, this new capital was being constructed in Malaysia and I started realizing there were more and more new cities. and. We continue to learn about new CDs pretty much every week now. Every week. Is that what you said? Yeah, so for example Morocco is building twenty new cities. Tanzania's building nine new cities. Give me your sense. Some examples of of what they actually look like those a place in in Malaysia forest city. That's right. This is one of the most fascinating projects it started in about twenty thirteen. And it's China's largest property developer creating a new private gated city from scratch in the ocean. It in the ocean on a manufactured island or yeah, this is all artificial land, so they've had to engage in one of the largest land reclamation projects in the world to create a new city for seven hundred thousand residents and I think what's particularly intriguing about this new city is that if geared towards Chinese nationals not towards Malaysians. Other examples. One of my favorites is King Abdullah. City in Saudi Arabia and this is a new city that aims to be the size of Washington DC with a population of two million. And the goal is really to transition. The Saudi economy away from oil and into new sorts of industries. Manufacturing downstream oil industries education high. Tech Shipping Cetera. Tell me politically. How do these new cities compared to conventional cities? We understand. Is There Mayor City Council out our they run. One of the things that's the most interesting aspect of these new cities is that they don't have mayors? They don't have elected city councils. They have CEOS. so completely corporate ties model where regular citizens maybe don't have..

Malaysia Brasilia McGill University Tanzania Saudi Arabia Sarah King Abdullah China professor Brazil Morocco developer Washington
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"You know we have really wide roads. Our cities are very spread out were not particularly dads, and now we have the challenge of having to reverse those wrongs, but you know at the same time I think it's an exciting opportunity. Because most cities have very wide roads, you can reconfigure that and place cycling, infrastructure and wider sidewalks, and so we have something to work with I think it just really depends on the impetus and the political will of the people who are in charge. How did you first come to notice or discover I guess the relationship between urban design and mental health. I did my masters in occupational therapy. At the University of Toronto on therapists distinguish themselves from other healthcare professionals and paying particular attention to the environment, so really trying to understand how someone's environment physical environment or their social environment influences how they feel and function, and so my first job was actually at the Center for addiction and Mental Health in Toronto where I worked on an inpatient schizophrenia unit. and. My job was basically to get people out of the hospital and back in the community to help them transition from an institutional setting to a community setting road and in the process. I started to notice how different environments with the city might have caused stress to the clients out supporting and whereas other areas. They really like felt at ease and and happy, and so that was really when I started to wonder about. How was that the design ever? City or the built environment would affect wellbeing. So in certain areas of a city can exacerbate the feeling of isolation. Depression. And other areas you can be more of a delight for the for the person yeah I? Mean that's what I noticed and that's anecdotal and that's what actually drove me. Start my phd where I use neuroscience to try to measure these things. We ran study a couple of years ago in Vancouver in collaboration with the city of and cover the happy CD consultancy and motives planning where we looked at really simple interventions That were done around Davie village where we looked at how you know. Something like a rainbow, crosswalk. A shrubbery or a community garden, these kind of not cost intensive interventions affected how people experience the city, and we found that there was a significant impact of these things on how people experience that space. In talking about urban design and its relationship with how we feel about things, what do you mean by the first step is empathy I think that a lot of professionals that work within city building which can range from urban planners to transportation engineers to architects. It's essential for them to think about how another person would experience what they've created to me. Empathy fundamentally just means putting yourself in someone else's shoes, which I guess translates well. Well to thinking about how people experience the city by foot, but it seems to me you know at least in in most cities and I've lived in a number of them. The first person experience really isn't taken into account, but rather trying to make more efficient for people who drive through a city, so if someone is not living close to transit or sub, buddy your bus, or whatever or close to a community space that can induce. And exacerbate a sense of isolation and depression..

Depression University of Toronto Toronto Davie village Vancouver
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

15:29 min | 10 months ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"And Sirius Xm with the enwright files. I'm NOLA I. Few Infectious Diseases Inspires much fear and dread as Ebola in twenty fourteen. An Ebola outbreak killed thousands in the west African nations of Liberia. Sierra Leone and Guinea those countries were in turmoil. Their healthcare systems were pushed beyond the breaking point and their economies were in tatters. Fear drove the response and much of the affluent world. Political leaders called for Western countries to shut their borders to west Africa. Something experts said would likely worsen an already dangerous and destabilizing public health crisis in globalized world. One thing that would have kept the world safer from terrifying public health. Crises like Ebola would have been investing in the public healthcare systems in the developing world. Dr James Are. Bensky is one of the world's top experts in global public health. He was the international president of doctors. Without Borders when it won the Nobel Peace Prize in nineteen ninety nine. He is an officer of the order of Canada when I interviewed him in November twenty fourteen. He was a professor of medicine at the Dalla. Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Here is that conversation. How do you contend with the argument driven? Perhaps by fear that Ebola is only an airplane right away from Texas or auto or Winnipeg. We've seen in the last few weeks There is some truth to that But there's also truth to the fact that epidemics have very particular dynamics and it's absolutely vital to understand the dynamic of a particular epidemic and to respond appropriately to achieve containment a control and mitigation of the epidemic. If you don't do that Then the natural course of an epidemic spread and so the reality is that two of the dynamics that are really important. Our fear and panic one must understand the nature of fear understand the nature of panic and respond appropriately and that's not simply fear and panic outside of West Africa. It's also in panic inside West Africa. But how how did Nigeria examined Senegal? They've managed to contain right and even end their their bricks. Yeah so Nigeria. I think is a very good example of what is necessary And what is sorely lacking in much of the developing world and particularly in this particular case and in the three countries. Liberia Sierra Leone and Guinea when the epidemic emerged in Nigeria. It first of all was in two separate. Travelers who were essentially members of the elite class of society. One was a diplomat was a businessman very quickly. The infrastructure of formal and informal of Nigeria was mobilized to first of all identify a problem secondly respond appropriately with containment an isolation and thirdly to engage in what's called an active case finding so they have the infrastructure that well they had an infrastructure and most importantly they had strong leadership capacity and the exercise that leadership they also had expertise so the WHO was already in Nigeria and had been present for a number of years working on polio eradication and on Guinea worm that capacity was in country and was just shifted to deal with the Abo- la outbreak and so those essential principles are the vital elements of a viable Public Health Response. Whether that's local or whether it's global but you said in that explanation that Nigeria specifically had the wherewithal to deal with one read you a quote from one of your colleagues former colleagues. I think in mid says some frontier doctor from Windsor who's been treating Ebola in Liberia and he told Maclean's magazine the following we are overwhelmed. Our resources are stretched to the limit. We need to double our staff right here right now. That doesn't seem to me that you can get any worse. Don't resource. What what it illustrates is the the limits of a charitable response to a major public health crisis as opposed to a government as as opposed to a government and multilateral government response you cannot rely simply on goodwill goodwill is a necessary starting point but it also requires appropriate resources appropriate infrastructure appropriate personnel. And to be clear. I'm not speaking for MS up here server. Msf is a charitable organization with enormous capacity. Enormous skill. Developed in fact the protocols around Containment control mitigation of a bowl. But it's a charity. It's a group of people who freely come together to focus on humanitarian. It is not a state it does not have legal mandate and responsibility to pursue protect promote the public health. And so in the face of an epidemic of this kind of this scale it must be state based responsibility and response that deals with the reality of the epidemic but isn't the real the also that the international community has been relying at initially anyway on NGOs like MSF to deal with the crisis if it is a global threat. Why doesn't that Paradigm Change? Why doesn't read governments in countries and UN? And everybody involved. Well when it shows us is that this is a major governance deficit a black hole if you will in our global governance architecture and system. It's a crisis that can become an opportunity in the sense that if we carefully analyze the causes and conditions of the particular crisis carefully analyzed the deficits that led to the crisis. We can actually begin to imagine And then to construct a proper global public health architecture. You've worked all over Africa. Can you give me a sense? Like a survey sense of what kind of medical infrastructure there are in these countries much of the developing world. I would characterize in terms of health as policy rich in that capacity poor So there's lots of good thinking. There's lots of good analysis. There's lots of good understanding of the nature of both clinical need and of public health Needs now that generalization made there's a great degree of variability across the developing world. So there are certain pockets. For example South Africa has a highly developed clinical and public health system there are deficits of course but relative to other developing world Middle Income Countries South Africa is extremely well developed The same could be said for Ghana for Indonesia for Thailand for example but the low income countries have in fact the lowest capacity for the forty eight low income countries. They spend on average between eleven and fifteen dollars per year per person on health care in Ontario. We spend somewhere between thirty five hundred and forty three hundred per person per year. Now that should tell you everything about what kind of capacity you get for eleven bucks. What we're seeing in west Africa is that that public health infrastructure is simply not there. It's not there insufficient form to deal with this particular issue. And then the failure to recognize the gravity of of the epidemic has led to a kind of a cascade effect throughout the system so that the health systems are on. The verge of collapse or have already collapsed. And so you're seeing now for example massive increases in malaria quite apart from a bowl because people can't get treatment many of the hospitals and clinics are abandoned. Healthcare workers. Aren't going to work. Because they're afraid like everybody else. And there isn't an appropriate support system for them. Basic surgical needs Are Not you know? Cases being met and so on and so on and so on but when you read stories Jim how they they don't have the right kind of gloves or the right kind of masks or things. That are so elementary to us. We throw away. I don't know how thing a situation that could arise unless the world just doesn't give a damn well. I think it's a good question. We come to a point here with this particular epidemic and it really calls into question The very nature of our relationship to others and the degree to which we care or don't care and also calls into stark focus the interdependence within which we exist and the real kind of necessary caring the wise self interest if you will that lies at route to a future viable global public health system can't separate needs over there from Needs over here or needs over there that that become potential threats over over here to Bricusse is a disease that we've human beings have lived with for Millennia every year. There are nine million new cases of tuberculosis around the world and now tuberculosis is completely treatable and infectious disease. One point nine million people still die of TB every year now because as a human society we have failed to actually treat those people with tuberculosis. And because there's such high morbidity and mortality associated with it there's now emergence of multiple drug resistant tuberculosis these emerge because of poorly or partially treated Tiburcio service. And so now. We have a five hundred thousand cases every every year of multiple drug resistant to work. If you get 'em dart as it's called eighty percent of the people who who get MDR TB aren't even detected and don't get treatment of the twenty percent who do get treatment only half will live and treatment itself is extremely difficult. It's like chemotherapy for cancer. And it's a twenty four month period and leaves people with hearing loss with kidney failure with with all sorts of other potential side effects to the treatment. Now that is a direct consequence of failing to treat to Bricusse that the cost of treatment for MD. Rtp is about four thousand dollars for the full treatment course the cost of treatment for regular TB is forty to sixty dollars a couple of weeks ago. We had on the program a doctor working with the Gates Foundation and she works in the area. Ntd neglected tropical diseases and there are thirty or forty of them or something rather than she was explaining them and then she said of course you know. We could cure these diseases for fifty cents a year per person. In many cases we actually have the treatments. We actually have the technologies what was lacking is the health system and the public health system to actually properly identify treat and support people through the course of therapy when a health care system is stretched beyond capacity to deal with crisis. What does that do to our country in terms of the economy? The government's social unrest. Have you seen countries almost brought to their knees because of well in in the early part of the twenty first century there were several African countries wearing their leaders had declared that their nations are on the verge of collapse because of HIV now with a massive international movement to gain access to treatment for HIV that situation for those countries and for many others around the world has radically changed. There's no question that there are highly significant threats to national stability and as being a good example of that And the reverberations of that effect through the public sector through the private sector through the military orders and then potentially beyond borders in my view. It self evident that if if you don't deal with with the bushfire then it's going to spread. It's that simple again. A public health issue like Turkey losses or Bulla is a call to action a call to see the nature of the problem and to deal with it effectively. How you view responding to that call. We still don't yet have in my opinion appropriate. Strong clear political leadership on this epidemic. We still at a point where we're using in my view. A kind of charitable mindset but among nation states which who wants to give or to donate a certain amount of money or send a certain treatment clinic or support a certain region. There isn't a clear political imperative that has been acted upon to appropriately. Engage the measures that are necessary to to contain and control the mitigate the epidemic. Even though there's been a Security Council resolution on this well why don't we have that we have the World Health Organization under its number? Don't we have nation states saying here's what we're doing and we're going to give this amount of money this number of resources we do. We certainly do and we also have the usual practice that follows the grand and glorious declarations. You know that so much is pledged to not quite enough is delivered. We live With a series of post World War Two United Nations Institutions Bretton Woods institutions that have adopted very particular norms of practice in terms of dealing with crisis and those norms are practice are no longer appropriate in situations of this kind one of the provisions of the Charter that was never actually exercised was the creation of a standing force to deal with threats to International Security. And so at this point they're still a kind of a donation mentality among nation states Toward issues of this kind. But what is the ACLU DHS those pathways of getting the resources and material in the money to the People? Who Need it? It's just that there isn't an appropriate pipeline to deal with problems of this kind. It's akin now what we have to instead of a pipeline bringing the the resources there. We have a bunch of people running around feeling buckets running along the road to bring the water to the necessary people who are trying to put out the fire. That's no longer appropriate. We need to build. Those pipelines is the World Health Organization up to the task. Well you know. The World Health Organization does great things. The World Health Organization however like so many multilateral institutions has been functionally limited. Its budget is four billion dollars. A year of that four billion one billion mandatory and is made by contributions by member states..

World Health Organization epidemic Nigeria Liberia west Africa Guinea Lana School of Public Health Sierra Leone Msf Ebola Sirius West Africa tuberculosis Africa Bricusse international president Bensky
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> the room <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> That was Brian Hilda. <Speech_Male> Linda seeing <Speech_Male> even the final active <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I was just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thinking. 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Tends to be a short <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> life that other wagner <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> because it <Speech_Male> is so <Speech_Male> demanding euclid. <Speech_Male> Is it true <Speech_Male> that I think I read somewhere? <Silence> That wagner <Speech_Male> thought <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the singers in <Speech_Male> a secondary <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> saying that the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> orchestra <SpeakerChange> the orchestration <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> was the most important <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about secondary. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Suddenly the the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> realization <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of his consciousness <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> was in the orchestra <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the way in which <Speech_Male> the <SpeakerChange> demands <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> made on singers very <Speech_Male> considerable the image <Speech_Male> that we have. <Speech_Male> Are <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> these superabundance. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Brune Hilda's <Speech_Male> with breastplates <Speech_Male> and goofy hats <Speech_Male> and that kind of <Speech_Male> thing and <Speech_Male> large <Speech_Male> teutonic <Speech_Male> men singing. <Speech_Male> I mean that's all <Speech_Male> kind of as <Speech_Male> I hate. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That went out of the window <Speech_Male> a long time ago. <Speech_Male> I mean there was <Speech_Male> this tradition at the time <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of people standing <Speech_Male> homes on the head. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> not sure it's really <Speech_Male> what he wanted <Speech_Male> on the other hand. I'm <Speech_Male> not sure about these <Speech_Male> concept productions <Speech_Male> where you sit you <Speech_Male> decide that it will be set <Speech_Male> on. Mars and that everything <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> will be <Speech_Male> subjugated to <Speech_Male> that. I think that <Speech_Male> one should take <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> literally <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the fact that Wagner <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> really did <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> play with these <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> myths and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in secret. You're <Speech_Male> dealing with a fairytale <Speech_Male> about dragons <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> and everything else. <Speech_Male> But what's <Speech_Male> behind this? <Speech_Male> But I think one needs <Speech_Male> to know that the forest <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> he at the full <Speech_Male> chromatic point <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> here that before <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Wagner and before the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ring things orchestrated. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We're done <Speech_Male> this way <Speech_Male> and after <Speech_Male> they were done that <Speech_Male> way. Is that <Speech_Male> the kind of change. You're talking <Speech_Male> about yeah. <Speech_Male> I think he realized that if <Speech_Male> you look at where their <Speech_Male> duals when Wagner <Speech_Male> began to write <Speech_Male> and then we're there was <Speech_Male> later now. <Speech_Male> I think he changed the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> way we look at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what he called music. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Drama Opera was <Speech_Male> no longer to be <Speech_Male> seen to be <Speech_Male> as it was much <Speech_Male> more than it is now <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> sort of <Speech_Male> educated in entertainment <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which might also <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> contain <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it musically <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> extraordinary <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> poignancy and <Speech_Male> and drama <Speech_Male> and tragedy <Speech_Male> and beauty <Speech_Male> everything but <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cease to be anything <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but a tremendous <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> journey. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> That was some <Speech_Male> of my interview with <Speech_Male> Richard Bradshaw. The <Speech_Male> late British conductor <Speech_Male> general director <Speech_Male> of the Canadian <Speech_Male> Opera Company. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It was first broadcast <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the Sunday edition <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> April. Two Thousand <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Four. <SpeakerChange>

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"Conscious own whole. Oh Aw Aw Aw Aw do. Ooh.

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"Hop represents a lot of problems for a lot of people but the most problematic part of opera fans and non fans alike might be Ricard Wagner. His Virulent Antisemitism has made many conductors orchestras and audiences reject his music and yet his music endures and fills concert halls to this day in particular wagner is ring cycle still holds its reputation as operas. Everest and magnum opus. Seventeen ethic hours that people travel the world to see. The cycle consists of four operas. That's rheingold developed siegfried and got her de marrone. The stories of the operas are based on a thirteenth century epic poem about Betrayal and Revenge. The plots are so complicated. We can only focus on the main thirty or so characters in two thousand four three years before his untimely death. Richard Bradshaw oversaw. The first Canadian production of the Ring Cycle Bradshaw was a distinguished conductor and the general director of the Canadian Opera Company. I spoke to him about Wagner and the ring cycle but the Sunday edition in April. Two Thousand Four. I started by asking him about Wagner 's antisemitism and whether it's possible to appreciate the music of Rehired Wagner as distinct from a man with hateful beliefs or whether the music itself indelibly bears the taint of his antisemitism. Well I I should say that. I think that you can't defend wagner and Semitic writings or indeed his anti Semitic star Star on any level. No no pulse of and it's appalling and I think as a man. He was pretty obnoxious. The way in which he managed to treat his wives and other people's wives and and the way in which he apparently behaved person in every direction is deeply on appealing on the other hand. I think what you have to realize that any artist creates in response to overwhelming in a compulsion. I think that an artist creates out of the abundance of his own need and Wagner preeminently. So and what he couldn't achieve in his life he ultimately did achieve in his work and in his work. There is integrity only want said there's integral greatness of soul human understanding to spare. I mean when you look at Calcutta for example at one level. You're looking at this extraordinary parallel. If you like of Enron and Parmalat if you want to deal in modern terms because I think the ring is a much bigger thing. It's based on myths because they have universality which the debacle with Enron doesn't but at the same time when Wagner said. That's when you look at vote and he's off. He had extraordinary plans for the world. He had great human faults and failings in the way. He tried to bribe his way to make his plans work. We realized that they didn't work. And we realized that in all our plans were perhaps misguided. Perhaps we deserve to fail. But there's this tremendous vision of what is possible and at the end of the ring when we get to the end of good at Enron. You'll see a world in a sense in ruins a lot of broken ideals. Moral values gone to hell but listen to the music at the end a nobility which says once we can give up material wealth as the center of our needs once we realize what love demands of us. Then we have something much greater than the creation Valhalla. At any cost attorney said to me the other day telling him that I was going to be speaking with you. He said that really without Wagner. We wouldn't have had twentieth century music. In a sense now I think he was being perhaps a bit over the top but but the importance of Wagner. Now what is it well I mean he did? I'm looking at who he who influenced and I'm in Marla Bruckner Pelaez deduc- wouldn't have been written without him. I think he's the most extraordinary influence on composers. He was the first person to really say that the orchestra had to be down there in a pit He had a tremendous influence on what conducting was about in so many ways. He changed our lives what he did there. More than anything else was. Make US face things. Perhaps we didn't want to face a he's been called the father of psycho analysis he was there before Freud. What you're doing in Wagner is taking a tremendous trip into the unconscious and hopefully coming out the other side I was. I was looking at something Ben at eleven once written alum great journalist and Essayist in England Green Dragon right too. He says no other composer goes down into such dock and forbidden. Cousins fog is dangerous. He liberates passions high and low. He breaks open doors that we try all our lives to shut. He takes bandages off. Ancient unhealing woes Goethe Wagner ring. And at the end of the week. You've had the equivalent of a year in the psychiatrist's chair go to Tristan and Zelda thrice and you're lucky to be alive now that's that's strong stuff he said he'd long ago surrendered his subconscious the Wagner and he knew more clergyman seem to get wagner any other night of the opera. He says. I didn't find that strange priests to have passions to wrestle with and wonderful. It is daunting though is how ten hours altogether sixteen sixteen with sixteen hours and it's it's scale is massive as we go to as we approach the ring. What do we have to keep in mind here not to be afraid of it or or certainly I? I'm afraid of it so I didn't see that I can advise you not to be okay. I think that the daunting -ness of sixty hours that you shouldn't be afraid of. I think it exists on several levels. I think you can take child to the ring. I wouldn't take my very young child the ring but I think you can and then you have this wonderful world of fairy tales and it's a great store okay. I think there's another level Where we begin to see that it's actually about as I said L. Enron Parmalat. It's about it's about greed and it's about manipulation and murder and incest and we have all that and then you go to another level and you realize really what we're dealing with our subconscious and we're dealing with. I hope in this production bringing the unconscious the consciousness so that in itself is a great journey. But the most interesting thing. I have no answers to why this is so absolutely none is that it sounds a lot of time yet for me and I think for a lot of a lot of people with Wagner. Times stands still I can conduct a thirty five forty minute act of any OPRI like in the repertoire and find it long with Wagner. I never find it and then rehearsing dot good in the last week. Several Times plans to me after a grueling three hours my goodness. It never feels long really. It's a strange way in which time is suspended in a good performance for me. That's one of the mysteries of Wagner. He needed that much time to do what he's doing. But once one accepts the contract to be part of this dangerous exploration of self and the world. Then you're drawing in a way. Which time does how did he come to write it? What was the what was the idea about? The he was trying to find. The world is about. Why did he use myths? Because I think that they had a certain universality which admitted of infinite interpretation and I think that one of the for me disappointments wagner pre production over recent. Years is that we've got into the wave doing a sort of post industrial revolution ring for example and all the Gods capitalists and all of this. Is You know one of the things we've been trying to do in this. Production is not lose the myths but to take them and present them in a way that allows us subconscious play on them and I hope that what will produce something which has a suitable ambiguity in. What comes out all right now. The re it's based on as you say these myths and this thome what. Just give us a rough plot. Outlandish we're GONNA start with some music from us. Wrangles wrangled stops the music. You'll hear will be the music of the sound of the the rioting in e flat. You have the Rhine Maidens God a ring and by grabbing that ring in the end this was going to pay for the building of Valhalla. Right home of the Gods and cut very very long story short. This all goes wrong. And all sorts of people get involved in the snatch leave Horford then one giant kills his brother to take this over and then we have the strange. I active Barracuda. When we have seen didn't seek Linda who are brother and sister children attend. Who then realized that brother and sister but full madly in love and we have this insisting which actually goes back to a saga to a myth. I mean Wagner. Didn't invent this. Let me have a great confrontation between vote and his wife because she says this cannot happen. Vert answers why. What has this done? And we start to question the whole lore of the world but in the end we realize that the end of it all that all these compacts all these deals all. These infidelities all these attempts to fight with a moral law. All these things where people are seduced by PA where they realized that until you give up being ruled entirely by money the acquisition of wealth at the end of it. All we have as I said earlier. We have sort of a willed which is apparently in ruins the fall of Valhalla but a world which we realize we have learned about ourselves and in darkness music we hit tremendous hope for what can be possible are Melissa. Listen to some music you've run into. This is from a rankled. This is the very beginning. I the sound of the waters if you like. It's the sound of our sub.

Ricard Wagner Wagner preeminently Goethe Wagner Enron Parmalat Valhalla Richard Bradshaw Canadian Opera Company US rheingold Marla Bruckner Pelaez deduc general director Calcutta siegfried murder Freud attorney England Green Dragon Ben thome
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

08:47 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"Thank you that's what was that from. Which was that was FIDELIO. That's the Beethoven. Yes German different languages. You have to meet different way far more lyric when you German is as you could hear more guttural you could feel that. You're especially proud of something. Lucia the dolt well Lucia Regiment dulled in data the regiment. I was proud of because To me it encapsulated. What I did best was standing there and looking Dom And I didn't have to move a lot In the merry widow and act three. Leon major staged like A. You know a football game. You would just moving all the time motion going on but for the Dole. Just had to go there stand there. And when Anna Russell played my mother Fabled and a Russell it was it was show was double cast. Anna Russell played my mother for five of the shows and Stuart Hamilton in drag. He's been on our show played and no offense. The man was very nervous. He almost strangled to death because he was worried about what he had to do. When Anna was in the show the show got fifteen minutes longer and at one point she would say to me son. Where are my cast nets and I was told to say here. Mama here are your cast nets but I didn't WANNA break my string so I just daughter slee smiled and took the cast nets and handed them to her right the last performance was being broadcast by the CBC and they came in and said they were going to pay anyone who had anything that they said during the show. So I of course spoke up and said I have two lines of dialogue breaking my string of that point but worth cold hard cash for me and so for the Saturday performance she goes. Where am I go here? Mama here are your Castaneda. And the the castor going. What he speaks. I then went back into the shadows and playing leopold into Rosenkavalier which was a great role. And and then after that Lotfi who just recently passed away When he took over he sort of saw some kind of mute gift in me and he really allowed me to take some fine rolls the C O C would send out a tour. The how I got to do three hundred days performances was because two three years I went on tour with the ninety six cozy fantomas as assistant stage manager but ninety two I played the other servant and four. I played these services and the larger rule. These are the others. These different was being performed by a man named Phil. Stark and Phil dark was a soloist but still fill stark. Would go on tour. Because he said money doesn't stink so he would go on tour but then believe it or not he would be called to the met so I would become servant and the stage manager will become the other servant so after I finished that they tell the tour of the Barbara Seville. Oh and a gentleman named mckelway. Strana was playing Ambrosio now. Mckelway had another Gig so when the show went to the Royal Alex for two weeks months. Let me play Ambrosio and a saying. Did you call Yawn? I'm tired a good extra really doesn't still. There's there's a book called the art of course acting. You can tell if someone wants to steal from the show and no offense. I could before I started a standup. I could just lay into the background. One of the things we're supposed to do on stage is we have to talk to each other and there was one supernumerary. Extra whatever who knew how to do and what you do. Is You talk? You say Motor Motor Motor mumble. Mumble Murmur is that what you do. It all depends you. One of my favorite moments is that is it was my. I got my sister. My sister was the one really started me when I was seven years old. Used to drag me on stage to do the lady feather bottom joke which I don't have time for an apple to pay her off. I got her into the merry widow has one of the three female extras John Reardon. Who was the star of the marijuana? A wonderful man. I told him it was her birthday. So he crosses the stage when the focus is on stage right and he goes over and he sings happy birthday to her very silently. Yon Rubbish is down stage right taking all the attention so you can do numerous things we we would sometimes talk about things. We discussed what was going on. But you know you you take more attention by doing things physically than you do things audibly. I'm very aware of a term called status or status when I was in England. And that's how you carry yourself with your body so if your body is relaxed and your shoulders are down in. Your head is down and you don't look with your eyes that tells the audience something then if you are erect and you're looking and you're focused you know it's amazing what you learn from body language when you can't say a word what you express and you communicate and you notice that when you talk to people and you say he saying one thing but his body's Tony something else. What is your worst opera experience? The most traumatic experience would be my first time on the Okey centerstage. I'd waited thirteen years to get there and I had a very good as elegant. Gentlemen in Lucia dilemma more now for the Orchestra Dress Rehearsal. You have one hundred people in the audience. You've got the guild watching. Sonya Brazelle is on the microphone and the show goes on nonstop. So she's going you're more light stage right I don't like that hat etc etc as she's looking at it cheeser she's fixing things now. I didn't know a lot about the opera. It was an Italian. I was only one scene but I figured out that. The prince was coming to Lucia's hometown for the wedding and after everybody comes on all the peasants and everybody in we come the wedding party finishing with the Prince and the two Elga Gentlemen so finally we get our Q. And I'm walking along the riser hidden by the set and I turn and were bathed in latest we walk we walk through the Golden Archway and I finally arrived and I'm so proud I'm walking down stage right the lights on me. The trials of the orchestra is in the pit. And you hear over there microphone. Yeah the one on the right. You walk like a penguin. Don't I was shattered? I was almost anticipatory that would be. There's nothing left. I mean I'd finally arrived on the O'Keefe Senator Stage and this is what I heard but I was lucky enough to Have the advice of some sage extras who said keep going. And I didn't know status. I like that. Put a stick up your back elegant gentlemen. What about the other people? The people that have singing roles in any deavere stories any horror story tyrants of the stage. Yeah well you know what it was. Interesting one John John Cox American playing siegfried. We have to carry them out. I wouldn't be really obnoxious. Two men who had cared rid a minute. Wait a minute. What do you mean you had to one siegfried died? We had to carry them out so far yarn. He's dead. We carry him off and he was a little temperamental and not really nice to us and then we had finally party in Ottawa. Because we would take two operas from Toronto Up to the NFC where you can actually hear the opera rose youthful house. And he gave us two hundred dollars to buy everybody drinks at the final party now. He just took a complete reversal. I mean it seemed to me that even though the extras with the lowest of the low it wasn't this soloist as much as the tenors. Who WOULD BE Not the most? Yeah is there one opera? You'd love to do again. I love Tosca because of the Tate. Today on procession end of act. One is the one you'd never do again. I don't think anyone would ever do the prisoners. Play again. It was at opera for children based loosely on the Vietnam War. But nobody knew about it. I played an eight foot tree and I had a giant like plastic fishbowl on my head and at one point I had to go down a slide and I would usually fly off of it and hit my bowl head on the stage. I do not want to do that again. That was some of my interview with. Brian Nasdaq one of Canada's leading operatic mute. It was broadcast I on the Sunday edition in two thousand fourteen..

Lucia Regiment Anna Russell Mama Leon major Mckelway Dole Ambrosio Phil dark John Reardon football Barbara Seville Lotfi England marijuana leopold Sonya Brazelle Stuart Hamilton Royal Alex Stark Toronto
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"A more fearsome reputation for being rarefied forbidding and just plain snobbish than opera but before the twentieth century opera was Popular Entertainment. Music for the masses is just as full of quirks auditees lore colorful personalities visionaries and other worldly talents as any other Jonah and opera comes from the same wellspring as other genres of music passion. The full range of human experience and emotion and the pursuit of truth and beauty a way of expressing what it means to be human without having to explain it no less universal and comprehensible at a visceral level than any other art form this month on the android files conversations with opera insiders about the inner workings of Opera and the people who make and perform it. Opera is not the only vocal form of music and opera is about more than the voice but opera is perhaps the most specialized and demanding of vocal arts in terms of talent technique and raw power. It takes a lot of training and it takes a great coach to make an opera singer reach the upper echelons of his or her art. The late Stuart. Hamilton was Canada's Premier Vocal Coach the Regina native developed special partnerships with Canadian superstar. Sopranos such as Maureen Forrester Elizabeth Benson Guy Isabel Barrack Darian and this woman. Los Marshall.

Maureen Forrester Elizabeth Be Popular Entertainment Jonah Los Marshall Stuart Hamilton Canada
"enright" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"The other is inspiration that always annoys sort of bores me. Where did you get your inspiration? Michael Longley the poets. If I knew I'd go back and get some more Hello and welcome back to the vintage podcast with me. Lena norms this we. We are really honored. Have THE BOOKER. Winning Irish author and right in the studio with us today. Her New Book which is published on the twentieth of February. Is The story of Irish theatre. Legend Katharine Odell as told by her daughter. Nora it tells us that at least stardom in Hollywood highs and lows of the stages of Dublin and London's West End as.

Katharine Odell Michael Longley Irish theatre Nora Dublin London
In the shadow of mothers  Anne Enright

VINTAGE Podcast

10:41 min | 1 year ago

In the shadow of mothers Anne Enright

"Thank you so much for writing such an incredible book. I thought was really interesting. How the book was sent. Just you know it really does pass the test when it comes to two women talking to each other about things and so you also involved in the pen. International Women's Manifesto. Do you did you when you came to thinking about writing this book was. It was a thing where you're like. I want to tell women's stories in interesting ways or was it kind of just like I'm interested in these characters and I mean I've always written about women. It was actually my last book. The Green Road that to pretty central male characters is. It just never occurred me before. I think it was really good. Fun Rushing Man I. Oh Oh yeah. I can see why people might want to do this. But I more or less human beings amend their female. Because that's what I know bests I Yeah I've I've done a man to work on gender in publishing and reviewing and I keep obgyn BG on Alaskan. I'm quite an advocacy. Abbas my political life. It's not really my creative life. Yeah just swimming. Martin a book. That doesn't really figure just stuff that I need to put together. I find the figure of Del. She's an actress. Goes through from the forties rush up to the nineteen hundred s She's Big Irish figure. I actually thought was at least three things for me in terms of telling stories And how we tell stories and also in terms of Arlanda base with what that was I don't know why I put it from the point of view the daughter it seems to be the natural way to go is interested in glamour. And I think that glamour is kind of impart its idealization which children off their mothers very much but also the glamour contains little hint of loss. You know when something is glamorous. It's already nostalgic or it's already receding from you. That was a really good moment for a daughter to have a better mother so she has this big famous mother and of course. She's everything to to daughter as well. So there's those two things went together very well and I loved. It was told from the spectrum because it kind of the fact that she was completely unknowable. In some way and there was this privacy almost even in an intimate relationship. The daughter goes through to the first half of the book is almost like a memory and she tells you exactly where her mother was and what she did and all the rest. I like a lot of members. You're somehow there's a lot of color and detail an interest curiosity but some. I haven't got the key to the person or the key. In this case to want the person ends up doing because The mother the actress the star ends up shooting a a small town producer in the fish. I found it really interesting to the way. Describe the you played at Trinity Day. Do Waving into the book or research around. I wanted to raise it book for years. And I've been looking for good books for for for decades because I just loved the kind of hopefulness of the slight toll. Dryness of the high shambolic backstage is and how what the difference between backstage than going on under the lights is like and I did a digital native a small amount of acting when I was in my early twenties I'm at one stage. I had considered working out as a career but as unemployed as every other actor was and Oakland at the time which is pretty standard Unemployment rate of ninety five percents in the profession. But anyway I decided that it was a bit of a mugs game and I turned to rushing instead deafening fit higher percentage of my team. Maybe you're always employed advising earning anything but you and most people aren't but you're busy that makes sense so you're a professor of fiction. How does that affect the way you right now? Do you think it's changed because you'll teaching as well? Does she feed off students? Does it change the way you think about writing or is it kind of very separate fee? Yeah I teach creative writing a new C. D. I really enjoy it. I love the freshness of the page and the fact that it isn't finished yet the feeling that I am seeing seeing people's work shift with in a noble way when they bring us into an Ma and they start passing durant and they suddenly start seeing. What they're doing. There's all makes sense It's very steep learning curve for people. It's quite anxious anxiety provoking i. It's a big moment for them and I like being there Around US energy. I don't necessarily take anything to my own process as the Americans. You don't necessarily take take anything to to might to the desk from the classroom except Thou sense that this is what you're it's like. This is the air you breathe is high sentences are made where you put your common making all the difference. Hi can hinge a story or a book on on on high. Turn on a dime. I can build it slowly. I mean when you're in a book your inside it doesn't change on book eleven. You're inside you don't quite know what it is and I suppose there's a time when you start to look at. Yeah now I know now I know that is. That's glorious when that happens as we go to really good fun. Did you find the price of this book? I'm any different to the other. Books is kind of book. Very Different Orgy. Feel like you. You have a new well. Every book is the saying in us. I spend an enormous amount of time. Not Getting anywhere and slightly in despair rewriting and rewriting and rewriting. What feels like the wrong paragraph and that was on sometimes for our moms or is always goes on from him so I mean let's be frank and then I realized that have been growing the book that I've been solving other problems off the page. So there is a time for quite. There's a tipping point where you're actually. It's actually moving at takes about nuts about a year in for me and then another year in I get the gasses. I know where I know what the whole thing is going to be now. I'm a really foolish hopeful about. I'M A. I'm a great food at the desk because I don't know where I'm going. I start to book so it's up to mistake. Obviously somehow it works the must be some sense there but of an ending or where. It's going I'M I. I had the the episode that the the the mother choosing the producer in the foot and I must have had an more of motivation and history there as well but I just didn't know what was going along the way and have such an easy life if I could just make up my mind and say okay. This is a book in three parts and it takes place in three days and you know wakes up at five. Am and it ends at twelve midnight on Thursday. And here's what happens and then I just go type type type type but the problem. I think books that are too preplanned that there are. There are bits finished. There'd be dead on the page. You like something that's making itself up as it goes along. Yeah don't be seduced by parameters. Well no yeah I mean. People get all their ducks in a row. You've got a ROLODEX. There's no medicine today. Wouldn't ducks I like that. Tell me a little bit about how you think. Maybe people responding island to your writing as opposed to to anywhere else. Do you see a difference in. This book is so much you know a lot of set an island but it's also features. This character is to say that she was born in England and yes very much sees herself as Irish and being Irish is is almost a performance live aspects of her in some ways. Yes tell me about that. How did you feel about the perception of Irishness? Yeah well it was really interested in in this. Mongrel troy of the actors in the forties. There were actually came back from London. Dublin and the moines trying the countryside's To bringing Shakespeare to the small towns and and and then aren't the wonderful the way they show up at the stage when when Romeo kinks Julius is dead or whatever. I'm there's likely patronizing but they galvanized these small towns. People really remember the mirror very important they were real interesting and different to the texture normal Moore life which doses quite impoverished knitted during the wars. Anyway I love these guys It's been like Shakespeare while at the The they worked in India as well but the so they were kind of colonial remnants in a way but they weren't entirely English or Irish or anything. It was hard to identify. There was a guy called me home. Mclemore who has ended up finding Gate Piers Hilton Edwards and they were the only game in Ireland for for decades. They were a couple of never knew there. Were a couple in here so that was fine. So that's already really interesting. The meal mclemore. Who had apart from anything else Beautiful Beautiful Irish Gaelic. Irish was born in Winston and he made himself up. At what point did he change? I am he came to I. I'd have to look it up again. Became young to Ireland and decided he was going. He was called Mike Williams. I thank our Williams and he turned it into Macklemore and he spoke like that has an Irish theatre voice in which he did wonderful renditions and people didn't find him out. I guess we've got the Internet now. You will be able to so there. Was this gay couple and his sister married on your McMaster. Who's in my book? And they went around. I didn't I didn't. This is all history outside of the book and they went around the country so anything is possible. They might have been straight. You know that might be another kind of Mongol identity that they weren't they were. They were between borders between countries and between identities and they were actors. And that's what they were supposed to be.

Ireland Producer Mike Williams Shakespeare Arlanda United States Trinity Day Abbas Martin Durant London Professor Oakland Frank Dublin Hilton Edwards Mclemore Macklemore England
"enright" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

14:56 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on Ideas

"It's it's really an eighteenth century construct. the Scots and the English historically paces each other take up war with you there. How many times they got right and the English were very old? Nation things are arguably the first really effective nation state. They agreed in a way to sort swap englishness for Britishness because of the empire so the empire was the sort of the bigger projects that for both the Scots the English it was kind of worth burying their their differences. And say well actually you know what if we combine. We can conquer the world which they did however what happens when empire is gone you know the underlying glue that holds this thing together. You know. It's pretty obvious. Now you look back it has been pulling apart really since the turn of the century. I mean you can really day to around the year. Two thousand twenty two big things happen nineteen eighteen ninety eight. You have the good. Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland was Kinda says Northern Ireland can leave the Union Everett wants and the following year. You've establishments Scottish Parliament which takes on more and more our kind of power but also you know it was a real symbol of national identity and the English are saying what about us. Why do you think though? There's so much dysfunction and in transit ginge and so little cooperation or even a hint of compromise. Is Anybody looking out for the good of the country. As the first reason is that of of course brexit is a negative proposition right. So it's it's about saying what you don't want but it has no positive content at all all puts people whilst you want to be in the European Union not and they said not not very marginally but the way that thing was conducted you know it was all on the basis of you can have all the benefits of being in the European Union. None of the costs that was fantasy stuff is was never never going to happen. So brexit itself is not a political program. Right it's actually didn't have very much content. Then the logic would have been that the people who leads the BREXIT campaign would've taken over power. I mean they'd won a kind of peaceful revolution. People like Boris Johnson. and Michael Govan these kind of people what happened then as they they stabbed each other in the back and none of them could actually take power so the only person who who ended up in power is it was theresa may who remember was remainder she mistrusted to remain and as often what happens to the zeal of the converts. She she files. Well how am I going to establish authority You know the Brexit. I wasn't one of them. So Theresa may sat out these. He's just incredibly hard brexit leaving every aspect of the European Union and then captain statistics on this and repeating it over and over again. This is part of the comedy comes in or consulates takes is brexit means. Brags us as if just repeating that formula somehow brings some kind of light to bear on the situation what is it a real referendum. Because it's my memory. Their whole barrel of lies rolled out almost every day in brexit campaign. So I grew up in the Catholic church and we're also told there were two kinds of lies lies of omission and lies of commission less emissions watch. You don't say and of course. What does a huge number things? They didn't say which was they didn't talk about Ireland in talk ars border but they're also is of commission them and they were very active lying. I mean the the famous one was they had this battle which toured the country with the slogan on the side of it saying you know three three hundred and fifty million pounds. A week is going to go from the European Union not paying that anymore. Paganism National Health Service. You know even during the campaign the independence since bridget office in Britain came this just not true. You know it's just making up these figures. I suppose very like what happened with trump. You know that that we always assume somebody's caught that lying that they're going to be ashamed of them. They'll say actually sorry we didn't really mean that. And you know the brazenness just if you just just keep saying it. It doesn't matter that we're lying. We just keep repeating it so so so you had had this promise to ordinary voters that they were going to get a huge improvement in their health service. I the big live course whilst this fantasy thought you were going and to be able to leave a club. Let's like if you're a tennis club right. And as you say I'm really federal paying the annual Jews and I don't like the rules that say I have to wear tennis shoes. I WANNA I WANNA wear my high heels on the court. I'm going to leave the club. I'm not going to pay the Jews anymore but I want to be able to play all the court whenever I wa lots whereby heels. You Know I. It's just fantasy stuff an and so the basic proposition. It was dead on arrival because it wants it made contact with reality it died. What damage though has the whole brexit vote and the subsequent negotiations? What what's the damage to the viability of Britain's political institutions and and to the unity of of the UK? I think the damage is is very profound and very long term. I think it's generational so I think people are looking at the mother of parliaments investments saying really really. Is that what we've come to. They're looking at the fact. That Britain has actually humiliating milius itself. I mean one of the real ironies. The whole thing was this was all about reasserting British greatness front and it's painful to watch you know as an Irish person you're tempted to have some kind of Schadenfreude or for historical by really genuinely don't because it damages everybody. Thomas is all too but I mean to watch resume going supplicants to to no other European countries and being left outside the door while people discuss what they're going to do what extension they're going to give them you know so they. They talk about Britain being humiliated inside the European Union. And they're actually Creates those those very circumstances so I think Britain's reputation on the world stage is deeply damaged. I think it's economic future is body damage But I also think think the Union itself construct of England Wales Scotland Northern Ireland. Very hard to see that it's going to exist in fifteen or twenty years time. I remember Scotland's voted overwhelmingly. Stay in the European Union. Northern Ireland voted stay in the European Union and the other thing is you've got this buried English nationalism. which really he is a lot of what's behind? Brexit who voted for Brexit. It's the Non Metropolitan English. They're the people who wanted breakfast. They're kind of saying. Look we want. We want England to be regarded. Arta does its own community which is absolutely legitimate but then brexit's kind of displaced expression of that it doesn't do anything really to sort of give them an identity just as purely the next thing you wrote in one of your columns that there is a a fear on the part of the Englishman of turning into a new European that has they're always been in the DNA of the British. This anti European or suspicion of your. You know it's always been a very strong drain particularly again. In England I think the smaller nationalities like the Welsh and the Scots and the Northern Irish kind of realize. Well actually we're kind of small nations. We kind of need to be part of Europe and are actually more comfortable with an way but I think the English very long history of distrust of the continentals the way English to find themselves against the Spanish and the French the big Catholic powers and now this is very generational. It's important to say the so one of the great paradoxes of Brexit. As if you were to say which which country in Europe now has the most passionate organized pro European movements England you know you can get a million people out on the streets now marching arching to stop brexit. Six million people signed a petition to parliament. Trying to stop but so so at the younger generation has been kind of forced by all of this into saying we're Europeans. We really do and and see if you talk to anybody who is in their late teens or twenties thirties. You know they think of themselves as European but there's no doubt about the fact that older English people define themselves as anti-european. It's not an accidental Michael that they talk about Dunkirk. All the time you know not image of evacuating basing themselves from Europe. It's a national myth of great importance politics of pain the subtitle pain for whom inflicted by whom this is masochistic. I mean you have to say if stripped down to its essentials itself harm right. This is a huge act of self harm so far far the car worker in Sunderland in the north of England you know who works for the Nissan Plant where Nissan is saying. Look I'm re- we're really sorry. Sorry but we'll have to close the plant if this thing goes ahead because we have just in time integrated systems whereby all the car parts arrive every morning from France. You know we just can't do it if you if you have. Why would somebody like that still say well? I'm GonNa vote for Brexit Anyway. You know there's a sense of Self Arman and this goes back. I think to a huge loss of identity identity on the part of those working class communities but the people who are inflicting. The pain are the ones who are really not going to feel us right so so the people are actually kind of glorying in this in a way leading people in this direction. are at the Barras. Johnson's three smog. They don't suffer at all. You know. There's a phrase that the wonderful historian Timothy Schneider under uses Saito populism and he makes the point that it turns out that people are willing to inflict a lot of pain on themselves. If if they can be convinced that they're inflicting even more pain on people they don't like and this is usually groups immigrants Mexicans Muslims Foreigners whatever it is you you know But also in the English case I think this idea that you know that brexit is is going to heart the establishment and they despised establishments therefore they're willing to take a lot of have pain. Let's talk about one of my favorite subjects and I think yours and that's Ireland. Yes so I remember watching the big debates a a promise. I will watching those big brexit debates in two thousand sixteen and shouting television. They say when. Are you going to talk about our than the peace process. I'm the board particularly right right so I live in Dublin of course in the Republic of Ireland in the South when I was a kid and for most of my life if I wanted to travel north to the rest of the islands I the pass customs barriers then during the troubles from sixty onwards I had an eighteen or nineteen year old kid from the north of England somewhere in full uniform with a machine-gun shingles sticky my face that it south than of course hugely exacerbates political divisions and political tensions. Right so a lot of people think the border is illegitimate the Moore wrote in their faces. The worse it gets right now since the peace process so so for the last twenty years really when I travel north. Now I actually can't remember where the border was. I actually remember the specifics of and I can't tell you how much that's helped you know. You have millions of journeys of course every year people people going back and forth back and forward and the fact that nobody's telling them you're in British territory now. You're an Irish territory. Now you know it just made ordinary life so so much more pleasant than so much more possible for people. The problem at brags of courses then if Britain leaves the European Union. And nothing else happens. You have to reestablish establish a hard border on the island Ireland and Theresa May famously said you know there will be no return to the borders of the past. This is absolutely true. It's not the order pastas actually much worse right because it becomes not just a border. Between Britain and Ireland becomes the border between twenty seven European countries and Britain the only real land border between between these two entities. And if you live on the islands the idea of bringing this thing back at forcing us to confronts US feels like an act of violence it just feels like a sort of recklessness. You know that that because of your nervous breakdown. Our peace process our progress. That we've made is all to be sacrificed Christ for that. I was in public house on. Victoria treated in Belfast..

European Union Brexit Britain England Ireland Theresa May Northern Ireland Europe Scottish Parliament Michael Govan England Wales Scotland Norther Union Everett US Scotland tennis Barras Republic of Ireland National Health Service
"enright" Discussed on One Giant Leap For Geeks

One Giant Leap For Geeks

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"enright" Discussed on One Giant Leap For Geeks

"Like, I am specifically because I'm really curious to see what happens down the road with these people. I mean, I hopefully Kentucky who Enright and all these other people who did he's Expos as about this kind of should follow up and keep up with the story because I'm I'm really fascinated to know what is going to be the fallout from all this in the workers era games have said they plan to do more walkouts in the future. So I'm really curious to see how long this is going to go until something comes to a head. And what the solution will be from all this like it. And the whole thing is really fascinating to me. And for all the people that. Think. Oh, I think I know what all I have the right answers put it like this. You don't need to know. What's right to know? What's wrong? And this is wrong. That that was good. I like those really good. That was good. Well, any any other final thoughts on this before we go? I think you invent kinda took the show on. No, I I've seen I've seen too much in it. I chalk it up to both the being in professional jobs, and I haven't had a professional job quite like that. So yeah, I was I was kinda glad that rain on this because I didn't really have much to contribute. She was like, no I depart. But yeah, I mean, we'll we'll see what happens. I mean. I don't wanna I don't wanna be dead horse with this one. But I'm really curious to see what's going to happen. And what's gonna be fallout from this? Because I got a feeling that there's there's going to be more ways to come. And there's going to be more fallout not necessarily in a good way for the workers. But we'll see. But anyway it for the show. Remember, you can find a center home. One giant leap for peace dot, Lipson dot com. We.

Enright Kentucky
"enright" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"enright" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"SOX app need, orphan third Tyler salad Dino it's short Eric so guarded second Andres Blanco playing first outfield Clint Coulter. In left rhymer, Lear Yano at center d'amico Santana Enright. Jed bandy is catching and Brandon Woodruff the. Six four right hander on the mound Purdue go leads the league with a three thirty. Two batting average even the. Box left side stand straight. Up and down feet close together any takes low ball one Purdue go has nine home runs forty two Rb is he's been held hitless. In his last five. Games Next one is low ball to two and nothing Verdoux go as played in fourteen games this year for the LA dodgers hitting to eighty with a home run. In three Rb is he's rated the top prospect of the organization To pitch fastball in there for a strike Dialed up at ninety four, from Woodruff who started on Sunday against Omaha No decision game sky SOX rolled seventeen to five Fastball inside at ninety five miles an hour And it's now three and one Kyle farmer on-deck would riff in that game through, seventy five pitches in three innings Trying to reduce his Pitches. The number of pitches he throws during the course of an inning strike called. On the outside corner another fastball three and to divert do go Feel straightaway would riff Peers over that black mitt Now into his wind up to, three to pitch low ball four.

Brandon Woodruff SOX Purdue d'amico Santana Enright Lear Yano Andres Blanco Jed bandy Clint Coulter LA dodgers Kyle farmer Eric Omaha Verdoux
"enright" Discussed on Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"enright" Discussed on Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

"Also true believers they give out thank you colts to people who seem which is really low i think of the cones i go to and isn't it will call waiting fewer you know they go the extra mile soon yet i really great who collected this annoys oh skew so she quit random pushing wrenching so disney more of stuff fifty or any other any characters that if you could draw enright for us raining heart i'm not sure all difficult i feel especially with yeah when you mall was high today i didn't really grow up with it that closely souls yet but i kind of feel over exposed to it right now because i like i quite like the landau run they did was last year the before with logo that was quite nice but i'm not sure i'd wanna true for it i really like to revive that was this late eighties early nineties show with the pirates of doll which was i would live someone not me but someone to revive the 'cause it was just so of its time and just radi doll for kids cone tune that i just yeah i think it's to give their stuck getting launch the moment that's just rehashes of something that's already great result i kinda think there ways you could take it would be quite interesting but that's a hard one man i looked dragonair like games wise really drink by shell fire show but yeah.

enright landau disney
"enright" Discussed on Critical Role

Critical Role

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"enright" Discussed on Critical Role

"He pushes open the shimmering door on the inside is this beautiful mansion tall for your with mobile floors pillars that raised the ceiling with gold trim there's a giant portrait in the center of the making stairway now that it has uh both uh scanlon and you on horse on on horseback over a a beautiful land um and there are a number of mystical servants that are so much transparency and us you know spiritual arcane energy inform that to take your take your coats and offer food delicious meals presented for all of you in skin and bones the second most is mostly chicken slum chicken on top of the servants about different ways to prepare food you know don't you grow um ceiling does lead you to your room which is right next to his and covered and yellow rose pedals a beautiful interior the color scheme is marked tailored specifically to your tastes that you've been able to glean from conversations with you over the plans silver's ogongo there's a little many many prayer area for her predecessor enright and is a little stats you've sara a nfu if you pull it a little secret door opens to my when it's a small room at only man could fit is there a locker.

scanlon enright
"enright" Discussed on Z100

Z100

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"enright" Discussed on Z100

"Of revenue hand latah rain ladder evidence all right around the room scurity of any music for this i do that'd be nice to a whole it up i'm eating immigrant muffin eggs yeah the diner reginald's come into now diner verge i wanted it from the diner would you call it a model that's a trademarked a sandwich it looks like i really wanted to take mcmuffin in so i wonder from the diner what was the closest to enact mcmuffin yeah if not exactly that but but it came out okay yes actually pretty good all right all right we vamp in now it's now time for the best invention of all time they did a survey asking a lotta people what they thought in their opinion was the best invention of all time and i'll give you the countdown the top ten on in a moment we start with you danielle best invention of all time didn't say the microwave oven and the reason is i use it more than anything else because with my schedule and craziness it's much easier to use that than this stove a lot of times okay scary best invention of all time the wheel you gotta be thinking was no round this we'd be dead no delay has the wheel has really changed a lot thing was around nece dad moved off of that what what are you straighten eight the best inventions of all time i'm going to have to say the printing press think about it okay yes think about it really change the way we communicate yeah everybody can read now we don't need monks to set up in the enright yeah book race by here you don't need the town crier now what about you froggatt of the best inventions of all time nobody talks about sliced bread but ongoing with electricity i'm gonna be without electorate oh gosh it always is sort of hard to make one better than the other the account down the top ten is going to be impossible i'm going to give you the one i found a line in a few minutes bethany yeah the best inventions of all time so i was going to say fi because it's the united.

reginald enright