36 Burst results for "engineer"

Fresh update on "engineer" discussed on Masters Decoded

Masters Decoded

02:29 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "engineer" discussed on Masters Decoded

"The drily smart of people who are working hard. Ooh link their life's mission mendez that number on his side for this And then they then you mean tonight. This he died. That is purpose behind what we're doing and everyone's really matting that purpose. Thank and it's not in nevada on a brian. Did they see their founders on purpose. And they're good mentors and he probably. This is called the nation for us to grow as cuban and that's why that's why they will join that i hope that Yup i i mean for the for the put my voted i make vada declared i mean i someone research that how many of them i i am. I don't accept michael founder I don't remember homini. i'm from my my I had to think could only hired. And i would still like to believe that i will very good organization Because you know everyone has the discipline in common. I look for even if you you know. Played cricket but you've played in a disciplined way for most of your life. It works from the higher. If you if you've sort of than gate a musical instrument anything that you've been passionate and you'll sort of done destroying disciplined. That's only did i as Why by it. I mean obviously you do have thanks and integrity on all of those intrigue find but if you sort discipline in energy and lights I think that's an interesting trait for people to ben teens also is disciplined about a stock. No interesting Just switching gears You i'm sure Your dad is a big role model. That you've mentioned and You know you look up to him and you look at his journey and he always has your back but are there any other professional mentos in life whom you look up to.

Mendez Vada Nevada Michael Ben Teens Cricket
Questions continue on $16B back bay flood plan in NJ

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 5 d ago

Questions continue on $16B back bay flood plan in NJ

"One of the most ambitious and expensive flood control projects in any US state could eventually change the way the Jersey Shore looks and operates during a storm the back bays of the Jersey Shore hit hard by flooding during superstorm sandy but a proposed sixteen billion dollar plan to address flooding is raising concerns the proposal calls for construction of huge gates across the miles of three inlets in New Jersey that could be slam shot when a major storm approaches officials with the US army corps of engineers held an online hearing Monday night they said the plan could prevent one point six billion dollars with the storm damage every year when fully constructed but officials didn't have detailed answers on some concerns including where the water would go during storms and the impact it might have on the environment participants asked what would happen to the water levels near the structures there's no guarantee of funding for the massive project which would run from Neptune in Monmouth County all the way to the state southern tip in Cape May New Jersey I'm Jennifer king

Jersey Shore Us Army Corps Of Engineers New Jersey United States Monmouth County Cape May Jennifer King
In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:32 min | 6 d ago

In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

"In the beginning of your book. You mentioned that the writing began in part out of frustration and frustration specifically fueled by how media covers autism. What frustrated you about that. And what were you hoping to do about it in this book so i feel like the frustration i had about the way we talk about autism was that any conversation about autism began and ended with discussion about vaccines. I should say the completely false idea that vaccines caused autism. There is no evidence whatsoever about it and then there was the other part. Which is that if we want to get. We wind up getting past discussing vaccines. There's just a lot of discussion. about curing. autistic people are curing autism or combating autism or fixing autistic people and almost never. Was there any discussion about well. What is it that autistic people need right now. Even if you believe that there should be a cure which i really articulate that. I don't think that there should be cure that there can be a cure for autism. That's something that's a long way down the road and that doesn't really serve autistic people now and i also was frustrated that i felt like almost every discussion about autism focused mostly on white male adolescent boys and i felt like that was a very incomplete. Discussion about autism was a very incomplete excluded. Plenty of autistic people who. Don't that that categorization right right so it. Just it sounds like there's just a lot of myths that get perpetuated through the media which is all too common right and that this in part this was to dispel some of those that have been so pervasive precisely. I think that one of the things that i wanted to do was again to ball from the title of my book. Change the autism conversation to include as many people as possible. Because i felt that there were. There are a lot of pernicious ideas. About what the idea about whether autistic people can live independently or even even if they can't live independently live and they deserve to live in the community rather than institutions or the idea that autistic people can either not work or only work in a very specific sector of science technology engineering mathematics. And i also thought that there were a lot of misconceptions about whether people can have families or have legitimate relationships or legitimate

Autism
Inside Look at World’s First 3D-Printed Rocket

NBC Nightly News

01:53 min | Last week

Inside Look at World’s First 3D-Printed Rocket

"Now to our series the new space race in our exclusive inside. Look at something that could revolutionize space travel. It's the world's first three d. printed rocket. Here's jacob board. It wants took thousands of american engineers more than a decade to get something into space. Now this company says it's huge three d. printers can make a rocket in two months. Maybe less we have a fourth generation printer if you haven't talked about publicly yet but it's ten times faster printing than this so instead of building a rocket few slides in sixty days. It'll take six days. Not only can the company make the big parts of a rocket like a nosecone but they can also make all the intricate components of the engines to one zero. The first launch plan for twenty twenty. Two relativity rockets is like a lower budget competitor to spacex carrying satellites for nasa the department of defense and a half dozen private companies at about a quarter of competing launch prices. But with one point three billion in funding it doesn't exactly feel low budget clients. I'm assuming are going to pay you enough to somehow make this all work more than enough to justify it. We make twelve million dollars launch from the customers. We signed up. We've signed up more launches than any other company in history before flying. Ellis doesn't just want to make deliveries into orbit though. I want to put a million people in mars. How far out into space do you think a commercial space industry can take it. It's really about the time line. And i think i liked it very much to back when we found founded the new world with christopher columbus. Yes certainly it'll be government. I dislike the new world was and then it'll transform into commercial. Ancient ambitions built on new

Spacex Department Of Defense Nasa Ellis Christopher Columbus
Thousands of Lawful US Residents Left in Afghanistan

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:33 min | Last week

Thousands of Lawful US Residents Left in Afghanistan

"Cards are available and there are thirteen to fourteen million of them in the united states. For any number of reasons you can be the family member of an american citizen. You can be a religious worker. You can be an afghan who worked for the united states anytime for at least a year on the international security assistance mission for a year. You have gotten your green card that way you can mean. International broadcasting can be a member of an international organization. We don't know who those thousands of green card members are but david drucker. It made it to your paper. The washington examiner yesterday. The big story of the lincoln hearing was the green card number thousands of waffle. Us resonance left in afghanistan. Were you surprised by that. No not necessarily. I mean i think the larger issue here or you know the issue here he is. Does the administration know exactly. How many are there. They are is it. Thousands and thousands is it the low thousands The issue is one. We left them there but second do know who they are. David i have to disagree with you after three weeks. Four weeks of hearing about one hundred americans then bahir blankets at well. We have thousands of green card holders. Hey they're americans. They have legal permanent residents here. Like duane said next door neighbors a bread. Who married in american adam. The engineer chief engineer here his mom's canadian. Pr lp are everywhere. I mean they just left him right. And i think that's i think that's the larger issue but i also think it's important that the administration either knows who they left. Were doesn't know who they're left in. Are they being candid. Especially in these hearings earrings with what they know in decisions. They made in one of the things. I would like to see out of the senate today that i didn't really see out of the house yesterday as some really incisive pointed questionings with let's grandstand in so the administration either starts to talk about decisions. Made and what. The situation on the ground is more just simply reveals that it was as haphazard inside as it looked on the outside and they don't really know what's going on but i think it's important for the american public to understand that i definitely important for congress understand that to put the proper amount of pressure on the administration and at least be able to talk about this in a real way.

International Security Assista David Drucker United States Lincoln Afghanistan Washington Duane David Adam Senate Congress
Author Craig Stanfill Sends Stark Warning in New Book 'Terms of Service'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:52 min | Last week

Author Craig Stanfill Sends Stark Warning in New Book 'Terms of Service'

"Stanfield stanfield. Wrote a book called terms of service. He's a computer. Scientist and a software engineer is very knowledgeable about artificial intelligence and he wrote a book called terms of service. It's so important. Though that we listened to his warning about the role that big tech is plain and the role of censorship on the internet facebook. Twitter all this has been co opted by these big tech. Titans and i had a chance to talk to craig's stanfield about his book and about the warning. He has for all of us who go online. Tell us first of all about the book. Because i haven't gotten my hands on it yet. I can't wait to crack it. Open described terms of service for people who want to learn about it. Know about the book is set in a theoretical future. Two hundred fifty years from now. I put it that far in the future to sort of bypass whatever. Our current contemporary issues may be an look at things more abstractly it posits that there are big corporations corporate monopolies that pretty much run the economy and pretty much run the world sort of corporate government and that flows from this notion that these companies can set their terms of service however they want so if you want housing you have to go to the housing company and you have to sign their terms of service. If you want food you have to go to the food company and you have to sign their terms of service that of course you see all your power to these companies now under sure. That's two hundred and fifty years. That sounds like twenty twenty one to me. I get a lot of that and of course. There's a is obviously written in with awareness of what's going on with big tech and this one of the theme is if you think it's bad now it's could get a lot worse than it is getting

Stanfield Stanfield Stanfield Titans Craig Twitter Facebook
Bezosism: The Way Amazon Uses Tech to Squeeze Performance out of Workers

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:06 min | Last week

Bezosism: The Way Amazon Uses Tech to Squeeze Performance out of Workers

"You think your boss is watching you at work. Monitoring your every move well if your manager is a series of cameras sensors and algorithms. Then you're not wrong. And that may also mean you work at an amazon fulfillment center. The company known for the detailed tracking of packages and user. Information is also tracking the movements of workers at its warehouses looking to precisely measure efficiency and increase productivity wall street. Journal's tech columnist christopher mims calls this bazo schism named after amazon founder jeff bezos. He's got an upcoming book about it called arriving today from factory to front door why everything is changed about how and what we buy any joins me now. Hi christopher hay zoey. Thanks for having me so christopher you coined the term bazo schism. What exactly does that mean so. Basis ism is the combination of sensors and software to measure. How well somebody is doing their job. And then use software which has of course logic or an algorithm in it which was defined by an engineer. Somewhere to then tell that worker okay. You're doing a good job or you're not doing a good job or you need to be doing this differently. And so bazo. Schism or management by algorithm or management by software. At the end of the day it is just about creating a set of rules and then handing it to a machine to enforce those roles so the person's boss is software. Okay can you tell us about some of those metrics. That amazon is gathering maybe give an example of how one of them works so the primary metric is just the rate at which somebody is doing something so the amount of time it takes them to complete any of the relevant tasks picking items off the shelf scanning them. Dropping him in a bin is their rate. So it's a very basic metric. It measures the one sort of performance. That bams on really cares about

Christopher Mims Amazon Christopher Hay Zoey Jeff Bezos Journal Christopher
Are Amazon's Algorithm Bosses Coming to Your Workplace Next?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:37 min | Last week

Are Amazon's Algorithm Bosses Coming to Your Workplace Next?

"You think your boss is watching you at work. Monitoring your every move well if your manager is a series of cameras sensors and algorithms. Then you're not wrong. And that may also mean you work at an amazon fulfillment center. The company known for the detailed tracking of packages and user. Information is also tracking the movements of workers at its warehouses looking to precisely measure efficiency and increase productivity wall street. Journal's tech columnist christopher mims calls this bazo schism named after amazon founder jeff bezos. He's got an upcoming book about it called arriving today from factory to front door why everything is changed about how and what we buy any joins me now. Hi christopher hay zoey. Thanks for having me so christopher you coined the term bazo schism. What exactly does that mean so. Basis ism is the combination of sensors and software to measure. How well somebody is doing their job. And then use software which has of course logic or an algorithm in it which was defined by an engineer. Somewhere to then tell that worker okay. You're doing a good job or you're not doing a good job or you need to be doing this differently. And so bazo. Schism or management by algorithm or management by software. At the end of the day it is just about creating a set of rules and then handing it to a machine to enforce those roles so the person's boss is

Christopher Mims Amazon Christopher Hay Zoey Jeff Bezos Journal Christopher
Kristen Stewart Talks About the 'Spooky, Spirtual Feelings' She Sensed While Playing Princess Diana

News O'Clock

02:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Kristen Stewart Talks About the 'Spooky, Spirtual Feelings' She Sensed While Playing Princess Diana

"Kristen. stewart is already receiving tons of praise for her portrayal of princess. Diana and spencer but it sounds like it wasn't an easy role to take on. She told the la times quote. It's scary to tell a story about someone who's not alive anymore and who already felt so invaded. I never wanted to feel like we were invading anything just that we were kind of adding to the multiplicity of a beautiful thing. Kristen also revealed that there were times when she felt she got a sort of quote sign off from diana saying quote. I felt some spooky spiritual feelings making this movie. Even if i was just fantasizing i mean i think this just speaks to the real challenge of telling diana's story which is a story all about like the media and the paparazzi and the entertainment industry like really destroying her. And you can make that movie but you can never separate the fact that you are the media and the entertainment industry making that story. You know. I know yeah. There's definitely layers going on there. I also want to. Because i was confused. I just wanna make sure everyone's on the same page right now just so everyone knows. This is a psychological drama. This is not bio-pic. They see raise a psychological drama. And so i don't know this is things are gonna get heavy. It's made by the same director. Who made jackie is that right. Yeah and that movie if you haven't seen it it's not like a biographical retelling of jackie o's life it's very much like a story about inner demons and struggles yet and i'm pretty sure this one takes over the span of like three days during christmas time or something like that when she's like deciding she wants to end her marriage so it's a very specific and short time in her life so it's going to be very concentrated and i am beyond excited because it's it really. I was nervous when they said kristen stewart was gonna be playing her you immediately. Just think of twilight but listen. She's done her homework. She's done a research. He's got the people to help our and she's there. Oh yeah i mean. This movie was basically like genetically engineered in a lab to win oscars yet. And i'm so fucking

Diana La Times Kristen Spencer Stewart Jackie O Jackie Kristen Stewart Oscars
Congressman Lee Zeldin Comments on Sean Spicer Being Forced to Resign

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Congressman Lee Zeldin Comments on Sean Spicer Being Forced to Resign

"Congressman lee zeldin. Welcome back as ed great to be with you so much discuss great to have you open the second hour of the show. First things i. I don't know if this is tough for you to comment on with your reserve status and everything else. But i'm touched by. This is a member of presidential appointee to the pentagon's national security education board. My body sean. Spicer ghana latter yesterday trying to force him to resign from the board of visitors for the annapolis naval academy west point board members of being threatened by the biden. Administration your reaction to what should be totally apolitical. Bipartisan boards helping to run our military's academies. Well first off. It's important to point out that sean has served in our military has warned the uniform. He is a proud navy. Man with experience at tactical operational and strategic levels He brings all the right ingredients and perspectives. And what's ironic about the announcement. Is that jen. Psaki states that their decisions aren't going to be based off of party registration. Well then why are you getting rid of somebody with that kind of experience like sean has pours his heart into it dedicated. You know he's not doing that for prestige or money or title. He's just doing it to give back the other element of this. That i'm greatly concerned about is this Desire to Socially engineer the military. And i signed up for the army. Rotc when i was eighteen years old in nineteen ninety eight watts served on active duty from two thousand three two thousand seven. I've been in the reserve since two thousand seven. Seven is still today wearing my Hat as a member of congress putting aside my hat as a member of the military but wearing my how my has a member of congress. I am very active in ensuring that. Our military is focused on y on accomplishing one image. One mission above all else and that is protecting our nation our national defense protecting our safety our homeland And they just need to be given every last possible tool that they need to do that.

Congressman Lee Zeldin Ed Great National Security Education Bo Spicer Ghana Annapolis Naval Academy West P Sean Psaki Pentagon Biden Navy JEN Rotc Congress Army
NASA's Orion Spacecraft Accommodates Astronauts of All Sizes

Innovation Now

01:13 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA's Orion Spacecraft Accommodates Astronauts of All Sizes

"Nasr's orion spacecraft is designed to accommodate astronauts of all sizes. Who may need to spend weeks at a time. In the capsule this is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future. The orion spacecraft features advanced technologies that can sustain the crew during long space travel. Here's sarokin diani. A human systems engineer at nasa johnson space center on the ground engineers and astronauts simulate many of the tasks that will be performed in the crew module evaluating how astronauts interact with displays. Controls seat design sleeping at exercise. Accommodations and more the orion crew will be able to command the ical using three multifunction displays space shuttle crews had to use nearly two thousand switches and controls to command. The call astronauts will sleep in sleeping bags hung in several different places in the cabin to maximize space. There are even armholes so they can use their tablets before they go to sleep. All of these details are planned and tested to be sure that the crew can live and work comfortably and efficiently no matter how long they call the capsule

Sarokin Diani Nasa Johnson Space Center Nasr
Shea Dunifon on Outreach to the Younger Generation

Words on Water

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Shea Dunifon on Outreach to the Younger Generation

"Tell us about yourself chez. Where do you work. What's your role. Semi formal title is education coordinator. And i worked for pinellas county utilities out of the south cross by advanced water reclamation facility in st petersburg florida's. Let's a really really really long name. And i do a little bit of everything to be honest when i started here mostly k. Through twelve so kindergarten twelfth grade education. But i also work a lot. What the local technical schools colleges universities basically anyone that has a title water. Which is everybody. That's absolutely right so for our listeners. Could you give us a little more sense of the municipality like how many treatment plans the capacity of the one that you sit out those types of things and whereas pinellas county in florida. So we'll start with where county is. We are just outside of tampa. So we're like little peninsula on the peninsula's i call it so west. Coast of florida kind of west central. If you're looking at a map of florida right on the very coast golfing mexico and pinellas county. Utilities owns and operates. Three facilities. One is drinking water facility. That's up on our north county. And then also in the north county we have our done facility which is wastewater and water reclamation and then down in the south county we have facility. That is it. It is the south cross by events. Water reclamation facility so between done and south across south crossed is a thirty three. Mgd plant so it is also the largest in the entire county not just owned and operated by the county but it is the largest is so that's one thing that makes us really cool. We have a lot of really unique features here facility for instance we have a On so we actually make fertilizer which is something that when we do towards people think is really interesting because they actually get to see kind of what happened to their number two which most people don't think about right but we also have things like our tetra denied filters so that's what makes us advance so we get to point out those kinds of things we also have primary tanks. We have two parallel trains. Emily i know i'm getting into the technical stuff but those are really cool things to point out even to the public and to the engineering community.

Pinellas County Florida North County St Petersburg West Central South County Tampa Mexico Emily
The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:40 min | 2 weeks ago

The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

"So margaret louise night. She was a prolific american inventor of machines and mechanisms for a variety of industrial everyday purposes. Margaret was nicknamed maddie mit. She lived with her widowed mother and older brothers. Charlie and jim in a little house in york maine. she was born in eighteen. Thirty eight by the way so after her father passed away mattie had inherited his toolbox and she liked to think of things that could be made with these tools and she drew them in a little notebook that she labeled my inventions. Mattie demonstrated knack for tools and mentioned from an early age making toys kites sleds and household items in as little girl. She preferred to play with woodworking tools. Instead of dolls saying that quote the only thing she wanted whereas a jack knife gimblett and pieces of wood. She knew she wanted good for her so when she was eleven. Maddie's finley moved to manchester new hampshire to work in the textile mills there and so matty was going to continue going to school only going so far as a complete her elementary school education and she got to know the head engineer there while wandering around the grounds after school waiting for her family to be done with their like fourteen to eighteen hour shifts. Sure textile mills. Yeah including like her twelve year old brother and fourteen so at age twelve. She started working the mill herself and aloom ow function and injured a worker So it turns out that one of the leading causes of serious injuries at the mill that she had observed was the propensity of the steel-tipped flying shuttles so those were manipulated by workers to unite the left in the warp threads in their weaves. I'm so these shuttles would come free of their looms and they would like shoot off the machines high-velocity even at like the slightest employee error. So like there were people dying from this. There are people like you know basically like you're getting almost shot. Yeah basically tipped metal thing like flying off a machine you know so it was really dangerous and so matty what she did. She created a guard. That would stop the shuttle from coming off of the machine if it malfunctioned. So like the exact details of this device have kind of been lost to history but mentions of it came out throughout published stories of her work and her Mentions articles that will get into so again because this was the mid nineteenth century. And why would anybody document what they actually did anyway. So workman who installed these types of guards all the looms and all the males in manchester. So this sounds like a big deal. She clearly didn't make any money for sure. You know maybe save some lives so after she turned eighteen. Mattie left manchester for better opportunities She worked in several different factories on new england along with other short-term technical jobs too so that she could keep

Margaret Louise Maddie Mit York Maine Gimblett Matty Mattie Margaret Finley Maddie Charlie Manchester JIM New Hampshire Workman New England
Taliban Say They Took Panjshir, Last Holdout Afghan Province

Up First

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Taliban Say They Took Panjshir, Last Holdout Afghan Province

"The taliban say they've taken control of a province north of kabul the last holdout of anti-taliban forces in afghanistan. It's the pan valley a resistance group. There denies those claims and that is just some of the news out of afghanistan today at the same time at least four planes were chartered to evacuate hundreds of people from afghanistan but had been unable to take off for days joining us now. Susannah george. She is the afghanistan and pakistan bureau chief for the washington post. She is in kabul susannah. Thanks for being with us this morning. Let's start with that news. Out of the panjshir province This is a storied province long-held stronghold of resistance to the taliban. Just explain what it means that this province has now fallen to to the telephone. Yeah well this is a very significant development and instruct says. You say it's because this was one of the few places. The dotan never managed to control back in the nineteen nineties when the group had control most of the country and so clearing this valley now it really clearly displays how much more of a formative fighting force the taliban is. Today than it was twenty years ago. They have much more training. They've been fighting against one of the most Powerful militaries in the world for the last two decades and they're also much better equipped force and this is largely thanks to desertions and surrender deals with afghan government forces in the lead up to the fall of kabul so now the taliban controls the entirety of the country we are waiting for them to announce the official formation of their government and meanwhile there are still so many afghans who were trying to get out you have been reporting that kabul airport is now open again for domestic travel What does that mean susannah. What does that look like. It's still a bit of a mess couple airport. I'm the only reason that some domestic flights have resumed is because of this temporary radio. Communication has been set up by country engineers between pilots and air traffic controllers. But there's no other navigation system set up at the airport. They all damaged during the chaos of the evacuation which means that all pilots when they're taking off and landing. They need to do it by sight. And this means that any commercial airline who wants to come in and out of kabul airport is just not going to be able to for insurance reasons and because of international aviation guidelines

Taliban Afghanistan Pan Valley Susannah George Kabul Susannah Kabul Dotan Afghan Government The Washington Post Kabul Airport Pakistan Susannah
Technical SEO Skills You Actually Need With Ahrefs Product Advisor Patrick Stox

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

02:43 min | 3 weeks ago

Technical SEO Skills You Actually Need With Ahrefs Product Advisor Patrick Stox

"And talk about you know a little bit of the more complex topics. Seo some of the technical stuff talked a lot about core web vitals this year. There's a lot that's changing with how to make sure your site is performance an up to google standards. There is a little discrepancy about what actually matters when it comes to technical. Seo talked to me what you think are the technical seo skills that you actually need Man that is a little bit of a loaded question. I'm less hardcore than than a lot of seo's on this. I think you need whatever's goes. You need to work on the systems that you're working on. I'm a big proponent of like learn as you go. And i'm not gonna tell someone like i wanna learn techno gaza what you gotta go learn python javascript. Imbaba because you don't like if you're not working on that stuff if it's not interesting to you you don't wanna learn it. You really don't have to so. I think that there's a debate here of you know what's the prerequisite to go be a tactical. Seo de need to have engineering skills. Do you need to have the ability to understand and manipulate data. You know when you're prioritizing the two of them the analysis part as opposed to sort of the technical know-how which one do you think is more important for us ios analysis in general good analysts. Pretty much always make good. Seo's the matter their role in seo. Someone can look at the data. Look at the issues than just figure out. You know what is going on so when you're thinking about what makes a great analyst in seo. What are some of the skills required there when generally what do you think is the right tool. Set that they should be using. I don't think there's a right answer to that. You know people have different experiences. They've seen different things. They use different tools. I've seen people do amazing things in excel. I've seen people do amazing things in python is. It's all about trying to figure out an easier way to get to the the right data. That's gonna answer the questions. Basically so when you think about the skill set not necessarily the tool kit whether you're using python or do the analysis whether using excel business intelligence tools in what's the mindset in the skill. Set that great. Seo analyst has curiosity is going to be number one. I think they just want to a lot of the best technical. Seo's i know they're just pretty much infinitely curious they're like why does this work this way what's going on. Why is it this working And then they go look good basically all the data all the different systems and just trying to come up with an answer to explain it. What i'm hearing

Seo De SEO Gaza Google
Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

Bay Curious

02:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

"Been talking about how most of our water comes from a system of dams and reservoirs set up to capture the states precipitation so one logical solution here is more dams right. Not so fast says jay lund a professor of civil and environmental engineering at uc davis story. I tell people is if you were the first engineer in california and you were going to build the first reservoir where would you put it. You had put it the cheapest place that gives you the most water. Where would you put the reservoir the next best place. We've done this fifteen hundred times. What do we have left. Expensive places that don't give you much water. He says with fifteen hundred dams in the state all the good damn spots are taken heck. Even a lot of the bad spots are taken but that doesn't mean that there aren't smart things we can do with our reservoirs as david romero takes it from here with four big ideas so the first big idea has to do with managing those fifteen hundred reservoirs differently. I learned how lake mendocino along the russian river. That's where i met. Nick mala savage in the middle of the mostly dry lake bed. He helps manage the lake for the us army corps of engineers in two thousand nineteen. The water was about forty feet over our heads. He says lake mendocino could go dry by the end of the summer mar lake levels here at lake. Mendocino are the lowest they've ever been for this time in the year even though this lake is nearly dry it's on the leading edge of science around reservoir management in the past. Water was let out of the reservoir whether or not storms were in the forecast. They wanted to make room for more water. They expected would come but because of climate change. Those storms are becoming less frequent malice. Savage is helping pilot a new approach at lake. Mendocino conserve wait until a major rainstorm is coming and then let water out of the reservoir. It's called forecast informed reservoir operations. We can sit on this water. We can continue to watch the forecast and then you see that big boomer of a storm conham then you can make the decision. Hey the sun's still shining. We need to put water into the river. Generate that airspace for the next storm. And we're good

Lake Mendocino Jay Lund David Romero Nick Mala Us Army Corps Of Engineers Uc Davis Summer Mar Lake Mendocino Russian River California Savage SUN
NASA's Newest Mars Rover Snags 1st Rock Sample for Return

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

NASA's Newest Mars Rover Snags 1st Rock Sample for Return

"NASA says its newest Mars rover has successfully collected a sample of rock there was excitement at NASA with the chief engineer for the perseverance rover tweeting out I've never been more happy to see a hole in a rock after confirming that the rover had drilled out perfect core sample last month the effort failed when a rock sample crumbled before it could be lifted into a storage tube perseverance arrived in February with hopes that the rover can collect rocks that might hold evidence of ancient life which would be sent to earth in about a decade NASA is planning to launch more spacecraft to retrieve those rock samples I'm Jackie Quinn

Nasa Jackie Quinn
Bill Gates on the Important Choices He Made in His Tenure at Microsoft

Venture Stories

02:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Bill Gates on the Important Choices He Made in His Tenure at Microsoft

"As the founder and operating ceo for twenty five years of one of the most prolific invaluable startups. I wanted to start with your perspective on the important choices that you made during your tenure microsoft and how you view those choices as they've related to the long-term growth story at the company well microsoft was very lucky in that we're not a capital intensive business. You know it was financed by money. I made in high school. And i did the school gasoline and there was all sorts of things you can do and make money fairly easily in those days. 'cause i'm people who knew how to do. Software things was was very small. We did take an investment. We sold five percent of the company and by the way from twenty million to win a million dollars from venture firm dave mark carts venture them just because we wanted to have him actually. It was more senior people but it ended up being him. Advise us about various choices we had to make and those early days we were because we knew that software was this magical thing and it was enabled because the chip was magical and weirdly. People didn't understand that. Moore's law essentially said that computing power would be infinite and so the best way to think about it was to say okay. Software would be the limiting factor towards any sort of digitally assisted activity and we thought of ourselves as a software company. We ended up competing with companies that were single product companies. so like. I wonder if anybody's here's ever heard like ashton tape or has anybody ever heard ashton. Okay good was a great article where i gave a hardcore speech about our database in it. Said gate says ashton-tate never existed. But i did actually say that. I said that they might cease to exist at some point anyway very competitive. There was a spreadsheet called one-two-three a word processor called wordperfect so these were single product companies and in terms of really building your engineering tools. You're international distribution sales consulting. How you work with corporate tells forced you thought of yourself as a software company and a platform company was very different than saying okay. I have one two three. Which was a lotus spreadsheet products. So we didn't feel for ambition but then the intensity of executing on it was super super

Dave Mark Carts Microsoft Ashton Moore Tate
Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

"Hurricane ida crumpled a major transmission tower. That survived katrina sixteen years ago building infrastructure. That strong enough is hard when the target keeps moving because storms are getting stronger energy consultant alison silverstein says utilities and their regulators can take planning cues from murphy's law. We need to assume that everything possible that could go wrong is going to go wrong. Simultaneously and murphy is always gonna win. President biden's climate plan includes a much bigger role for electricity electric cars. For example cutting carbon footprint says easier with electricity from emission free sources like wind solar and nuclear. But even those have to stand up to extreme weather putting wires underground may seem obvious but engineering professor destiny. Knock at carnegie mellon university says that won't always work in hurricane country where you might have under grounded. The lines to protect them from wind putting them underground makes them more susceptible to flooding knock. Says it's never just one thing that's going to keep the lights. On energy experts. We interviewed agree on a few basic ideas though. They say the grid should be more decentralized so the whole thing doesn't shut down at once. More generation out in communities such as solar power would accomplish that but new orleans utility energy has resisted calls for just that to the frustration of local activists at mit engineering professors. Or up. a mean says not all the fixes are technical. He says power companies also need to become more agile and do more when responding to storms the fact that some utilities are not able to sort of respond immediately is also another kind of failure which is perhaps as drastic as the infrastructure. Failures is assuming outages will happen. Amin says utilities should focus more on dispatching generators even before a storm to make sure important facilities and vulnerable populations get electricity restored as soon as possible. All this cost money that usually ends up in utility bills. Congress is working on major funding through infrastructure bills. That could address some of these issues. There also focused on president. Biden's climate goals including zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five.

Hurricane Ida Alison Silverstein President Biden Murphy Katrina Carnegie Mellon University Hurricane MIT New Orleans Amin Congress Biden
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

06:39 min | Last month

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Welcome to the social desk engineer. Got or podcast. The security awareness series episode. One hundred and fifty two by the way. Just saying that number is a little fear-inspiring that we're at one hundred and fifty two episodes. I'm chris had nagy to ceo and founder of social engineer. Social dash engineer dot org as well as the innocent lies foundation. they've been hosting this. For all one hundred fifty two episodes and at my child is my trustee i was gonna say psychic not really a sidekick like i worked for him ryan mcdougall ryan. How are you today. thanks for joining me. I'm doing great chris. Yeah i'm ryan mcdougall on the chief operating officer social engineer llc. I'm also the lead open source. Intelligence trainer for se com having taught both black hat and derby con when that was the thing as well as private classes I've been in the information technology field from us. Twenty four years with the last nine being focused on adversary simulation and security. Thanks for having me. And he's only twenty six so he started saying it just makes me feel great. Yeah that's my goal so this episode is sponsored by social dust. Engineer dot com. We are a trusted information. Security company specializing in fully managed voice fishing or visiting an email phishing programs as well security assessments. I'm sure you can't even like turn the news on without thinking or hearing about ransomware another attack has occurred another breach or all worried about your information your employees what can we possibly due to safeguard against fishing and fishing. That's exactly what we specialize in. We actually delve into the science behind. Why these things work and then help companies figure out educational processes and programs to defend against them so You can find out more information on our services on social dash engineer dot com and you can check out whole new website there an addition that you know that we run a slack channel If you don't know the down. I think this is the direction i'm pointing right down. There in the show notes is the link for the slack channel. We have almost a thousand people in now. Everyday talking about things like fishing fishing pretexting. We've had six people find jobs through the slack. Channel all different types of discussions about psychology non verbals. It's just a full of everything to do with from the physiological and psychological parts of social engineering. So you can join us in there. Also if you're not watching this on youtube but you're listening to an on one of our platforms like itunes or spotify or one of the other many platforms. Then you should give a big shout out to clutch. 'cause the opening closing all the music is thanks to those guys and if you don't know who they are shame on you seriously shamed by now. Go over to produce rock dot com They're actually about to start at thirty Not a thirty year tour tore in in. Well whatever just go check it out pro desk rocks dot com best band on the planet. Obviously they're better than me. 'cause i don't even know how to speak and last but not least Check out the innocent lives foundation dot org my amazing team over there. Imf is working really hard to unmask anonymous online child predators We've just helped with our over our three hundred case this year Since we started for four years but this year we just had our three hundred case and we work very closely with law enforcement to make sure that the people who are trafficking and hurting children are brought to justice. You can check out the work were doing and how you can help at innocent lives foundation dot org now. Let's get to our show. I'm real excited about this one. Is you know this particular series of our podcast is focusing on on the security awareness side of how we can keep our population safe and who better than our guests which is bernie acre Burn as a chief information officer for a whole city. Bryan texas now. Just get this. What he's what he has to have charge of here. All technology and communication systems for fire. Police public works the electric utility as well as all the general or support organizations that are part of all of those different entities He's also currently appointed member of the texas cyber security council. And he's been in this for forty one years which is amazing since he's only forty two years old and Including twenty years in the us air force in twenty one years an electric utility industry in municipal government. I don't know about this burning. This bio makes it sound like you should be a hundred and fifty years old and there's no way you are but i can't thank you enough for joining us on the show today. Thank you i thank. You appreciate you asking. Yes it's actually exciting for us because This one you know one of the goals for us in this in this show is to really figure out how we can apply at someone with your level of experience. All the things you've done through your career when we look out today and we see just everything is getting breached. everything is getting hit by ransomware. And the very things that you are protecting in your daily life are the things that people want to attack. So let's just talk. Let's go back in time. A little bit in your transition from the air force to where you were working for a municipality and now into where you are now how did that transition take place. Well in two thousand. I started looking for my next career when i grew up. Retired from the military and Randomly is totally random. I found that out wanted a hundred. I freaked out at henry stops me and the It it was an opinion. Perfect fit into the net on our was as well. I got hired the electric utility here. wanted to try something out on the military cow three four years and so after seven years i decided to try something else and so we moved our cooperative. My boss Here in he. And i work together to lick utility wanted me to come back and merge everything into one and too early The the entire technology processes the heared zero so Been back here eight years now and we st- interesting conversation to really share because it's very pertinent buses on our talking that before two thousand one. We both started here. The city ryan two thousand one and neither one of us thought about cybersecurity..

innocent lies foundation ryan mcdougall ryan ryan mcdougall social engineer llc chris nagy bernie acre Burn Bryan texas texas cyber security council Imf youtube air force us
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

02:38 min | Last month

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"That's one that i <Speech_Male> always <Speech_Male> go back to. <Speech_Male> And then there's another <Speech_Male> one called breakthrough <Speech_Male> advertising <Speech_Male> By <Speech_Male> jean schwartz. Which <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> breaks down <Speech_Male> this whole aspect <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> how advertising <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> evolved <Speech_Male> and how <Speech_Male> in the early stages <Speech_Male> we were able <Speech_Male> to just sort of put up a <Speech_Male> fifty percent off sign <Speech_Male> and everything <Speech_Male> was totally fine <Speech_Male> and now we <Speech_Male> have to be so much <Speech_Male> more thoughtful <Speech_Male> about how we <Speech_Male> sell <Speech_Male> It's a fascinating <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> fascinating. <Speech_Male> Read <Speech_Male> both of those. <Speech_Male> I haven't read. So i <Speech_Male> love getting book recommendations. <Speech_Male> That aren't <Speech_Male> on my list yet because <Speech_Male> they have more <Speech_Male> content and <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> i mean the one <Speech_Male> about the brain sounds awesome. <Speech_Male> I'm big into that but <Speech_Male> that one about advertising <Speech_Male> is interesting to <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> Recently we've been <Speech_Male> having a lot of discussions <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> marketing here <Speech_Male> in my company <Speech_Male> because competition <Speech_Male> has picked up. <Speech_Male> And you're like okay. <Speech_Male> How do you separate yourself. <Speech_Male> You know when <Speech_Male> the average <Speech_Male> guy or gal <Speech_Male> doesn't even know <Speech_Male> what social engineering <Speech_Male> services are. <Speech_Male> How do you make yourself <Speech_Male> different from everybody else. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> that sounds like a really <Speech_Male> interesting <Speech_Male> topic <SpeakerChange> for anyone. <Silence> Yeah about that <Speech_Male> yeah. There's <Speech_Male> a lot of great stuff in <Speech_Male> there that that <Speech_Male> will help you <Speech_Male> think through that particular <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that particular idea <Speech_Male> not. I'm a very <Speech_Male> firm believer it. <Speech_Male> There is no competition <Speech_Male> there's only specialization <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> people just started our <Speech_Male> gravity towards us <Speech_Male> because of how <Speech_Male> deeply we specialize <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and how <Speech_Male> much we sort of craft <Speech_Male> Craft <Speech_Male> that message <Speech_Male> so there's a lot <Speech_Male> of really good <Speech_Male> stuff in that book <Speech_Male> that helps <Speech_Male> you think through those <Speech_Male> things for your free <Speech_Male> market <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> love it. <Speech_Male> Oh man i can't <Speech_Male> thank you enough michael <Speech_Male> joining today. <Speech_Male> This was fascinating. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> love the acronym <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> took a lot <Speech_Male> of notes while you were talking. <Speech_Male> So we're going to put <Speech_Male> those on the show notes. <Speech_Male> And i <Speech_Male> can't <SpeakerChange> thank you enough <Speech_Male> for coming by. <Speech_Male> Yes thank you <Speech_Male> so much for having <SpeakerChange> me. This is an <Speech_Male> absolute blast. <Speech_Male> Yeah it <Speech_Male> was for me to thank <Speech_Male> you and <Speech_Male> Next <Speech_Male> time on the human element <Speech_Male> series will be joined <Speech_Male> by. Dr courtney <Speech_Male> warren <Speech_Male> so that <Speech_Male> will be next month <Speech_Male> Feel <Speech_Male> free to check out. <Speech_Male> Social dash engineer <Speech_Male> dot org for <Speech_Male> all information about <Speech_Male> social engineering. Social <Speech_Male> dash engineer dot <Speech_Male> com and the innocent <Speech_Male> lives foundation <Speech_Male> dot org <Speech_Male> and we'll have all <Speech_Male> the websites that michael <Speech_Male> mentioned that <Speech_Male> you can follow him on <Speech_Male> a and as <Speech_Male> well as his facebook <Speech_Male> and linked in profiles <Speech_Male> and twitter <Speech_Male> profiles all on the <Speech_Male> show notes <Speech_Male> so hop on down <Speech_Male> there if you want to get any of <Speech_Male> those links and direct <Speech_Male> links so the books that <Speech_Male> he recommended to <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> if nothing else <Speech_Male> will see you <Speech_Male> next month on the show <Speech_Male> thanks <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> z.

jean schwartz Dr courtney michael facebook twitter
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

03:50 min | Last month

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"So i am obsessed with piranha and i can see elements of how all of your other films basically came from your your vision for piranha. And i'd love to do an interview with you to talk about that. What happens. I mean that right. I mean that's such an eclectic point out too that you know a assuming it's true If if i were james and i were to read that i'd be like oh. This guy actually knows me. Yep like he actually knows me and he wants to talk about something that other people are not like every almost talk about avatar. Nobody's asking me that question. Exactly exactly and intrigues me. Yeah and the point that you just made which is so so important is true right because that's the mistake as he too. Many people make like there are people who will reach out to me and they know that i like comic books right but they will just sort of like do like the biggest like surface type of thing and try to talk to me about dc. And win i am clearly. If you read anything. I write a marvel person and that type of thing. Where it's you take that little extra time to do the research and then you reach out with your individual curiosity right like your your curiosity. The thing that your curious about that really does actually light. You up you're far more likely to have a response because people can see that you really get it. You've taken the time to understand this. And i think the mistake that i see a lot of people make within this. Is they read something somewhere right where it says. Oh well talk about something that they you know that they like and then they just come off sounding. Like you know a total poser. And you're just like okay. Fine either your opposed or you're a stalker. Yeah either either. You know it's like how was that stake. You had last night that either okay. I this this is fascinating. So what's the so the tiny the as one of the most interesting ones because the e. Is this ask. That is so different than any other ask. And i and i would argue that. This ask is one of the most important one of the most powerful for any any career. Like if you are trying to jump forward if you're trying to make any kind of successful leap this ask is the one. And the reason why is because it is actually focused inward as opposed to outward so the extraordinary ask is the ask you ask yourself of what you think is impossible. Where basically you confront all of your assumptions that you have stacked up around the social interactions that you yourself are allowed to have and what tends to happen. Most of the time is we will read something or see something or hear somebody doing an interview like this and we will almost always say that was so interesting. I really liked that person. I would love to reach out to them but they're probably so busy. Probably got so many things going on that..

james
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

05:38 min | 2 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"So you have to have a rule set right because i think some people listening to this need to hear the have a line that you won't cross you have a method that you use like is your method to go in and just scare the living daylights out of the out of the senior level. So that way they comply at a fear. What is it that you're trying to accomplish with this with this task We don't we don't go stove. Aligns chris no. We're very ethical. Only on we've got a key 'cause that's values in place so we don't want that i frightened people. We certainly don't go down that road but we use social engineering into expos the risks to their business and also when we do it personal for them so we will not personal program. We offer that we asked them to sign up to it. They give commission. We don't do anything without commission And then we demonstrate what we could find the oh since and then we start to plan the attacks on that but we make very personal real to say this could happen but the good news is and it's always going to be good news. The good news is we can help a not usually gets the attention of the seniors but also a believe you know you've got to have vision white so with us being oversea and all the security awareness for the company and that's massive in the company and sent him on the hottest things for any company in the moments. You've gotta be able to give the business vision. Where are you trying to go what you're trying to achieve. What's in it for them. And also noticed chris with human behavior. It's not quick is no quick fix. Yeah it's very complicated. So they've got a gots. Allow the mustard seed to grow in essence and trust. It's too quick to to to hit people stick which is not going to win hearts and minds i. this messaging is honest..

chris
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

04:43 min | 3 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"I wanted to write and there. It is so i think it's just my natural curiosity and And i know you want to get your your hands on these notebooks eventually. Never just listen. I just say it could happen. I think i've a i two questions for you. The first is what's the difference between the excellence and perfection. Yeah a great question max. Because you know it's interesting. We think that human seek perfection. And that's actually wrong human seek the the penultimate thing that human siegen and and that's one of the items that's covered in. The book is that we seek psychological comfort. And in all its manifestations be it enjoying a good book coffee over tea. A tranquil environment the perfect music or our preferences what what are my preferences at any given time and if in we don't want we don't necessarily need perfection. You know for a young child when when the mother's not there the teddy bear will do when the teddy bears out there. The blanket will do and and if you you know and if you understand the human brain you realize oh yeah yeah there can be surrogates. And those surrogates that create psychological comfort are powerful. So you know why is it that you can go. You can have two gas stations in two different corners and one has a higher price than the other one but people will go to that one million because it has more lighting in its because it creates psychological comfort and there are innumerable examples of that this this fact that the gold standard in a now and forever is simply this. Whoever provides the most psychological comfort is going to be the soonest winner because when everybody has the same information when everybody has the same. They're offering the same things like seat belts and stuff like that. Then you have. Somebody like volvo who came out and said seatbelts not good enough. We're gonna put airbags in there and the minute that started while let's put three by air by and now it's like ninety seven seven eight nine airbags. Yeah and you say what is that. For psychological comfort people will pay for it. people will gravitate towards it and people will embrace it and the minute you realize that whether you're a sales person or whatever that's that's what really humans really what human seek not perfection. So excellence is about expedience. Then it's it's my experience of the journey. I'm on so would you see so. For instance we have sam design for cars. So when you're in a car you hear certain things depended on the brand that sephardim of excellence of the designer. Who has done. I want to get a cadillac rather than up name another by car. Yeah well now. We're talking about preferences and that that that that whoever meets our matches our preference so if if i if i like a certain ride if i have if i like a certain sent..

two questions volvo first ninety seven seven one million one two different corners two gas stations three one of items eight nine airbags sam design innumerable
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

04:28 min | 5 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"I'm meeting the tencent news. I just finished co girls which happens to be relevant topic. How long kiki to finish it. Bitcoin average on average fiction usually takes me now few hours on fiction. You can take a little bit longer. A few hours just cowardly. Just sean like a peaches and a few hours few hour so much better. I another chapter done is once i start. I have to finish right so probably takes you the same amount of time. It's just over several days. Where i have to do it when he that doesn't make us feel bad. Pretty simple yeah. Our listeners are gonna want to reach out and talk talk to you. Just find out about you. What's the best way for them to get a hold of you. My lab's website is secure lab dot com. I have a profile page on the purdue site safin also which through that oswal perfect. I know this is going to be of interest to people. We are company. Gets all the time like if i wanted to go to college. Where can i go to learn about social absolutely. Oh this all the time. I can't tell you how many emails a week we get from. Young men and women asking for advice and well through the pretty center titled base so that the center. Is we do all those sort of non academic education so one of the things that we use officer courses one of. Them's a three course in social engineering. So they can take through social care meetings. They're not going to get that. You know intensive mercedes periods maybe flavor of it. No if they want to do it either. I can't wait for this one to get released on everyone to hear it. You have been not only just a blast and fun but you fascinating an interesting. I hope we can stay in touch and talk more because you really are just this. This is awesome. So thank you so much for coming on the show. It's been so nice to meet you. His do use your bucks as reference material to make a secret actually gonna hate ready for this and everyone listening you did. I'm about to say something awesome about you. Okay so this is going to help you either. In june of this year maxi's book is being released and it's all about attacker mindset ice. I will say. And i will. 'cause i was thinking about it when you were talking. So this is Maxi's expertise in the company and she's writing a book with wiley right now and it's gonna be awesome all about how to get in that attacker mindset while applying the code of ethics that we hadn't a social engineer so look for it in june. But we'll get you to. You're on my list right now but you don't think half an hour read it so you'll get quick. It will be done. it takes me days days. Good back makes me feel the air that you're teaching. The next generation of us thinks. Like i truly mean not. That's a we often focus was the only one. Do not take me. There aren't maybe less than a handful of courses out there in social jerry. But i think it's going to be a growing. I hope so. I agree so of it and we just need people like you taking it seriously. Thank you so much for everything i appreciate. It has always. You could follow maxine on twitter. Maxi reynolds you can follow myself at human hacker or company at assoc- engineer inc. This has been episode one hundred and forty three of the human element series of social engineer. Podcast next month of gun. Hans every are element series. We are going to be here with author of the like switch jack shafer. I cannot wait for that one looking forward to that guy being on.

Maxi reynolds june twitter june of this year half an hour wiley Maxi maxi one Hans maxine assoc- engineer inc. three course few switch jack shafer hours forty three episode hundred handful
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

06:35 min | 5 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"So your words that you spread around the internet and your donations help us now with all of that out of the way. Let's get to the exciting for today. Maxine i or joined by dr eating becky and she is an assistant professor of computer and information technology at purdue university but she also is a director of cybersecurity behaviour lab and the associate director of the produce ivor security education training network and resources which is ridiculous because that's like three full-time jobs when i love about her ready guys not only is she a director of all of that and dr but she focuses all of her research on cyber secure behavior social engineering and an infosec cybersecurity education policy in workforce development. I can't say enough. How excited i am to have you here to join us in the podcast today. Well thank you so much for having me. I'm a huge fan of your podcast. Make suggests strongly that so. I'm really curious first of all just like the career. How did you decide. Like what point were you like. This is where. I'm going to go with my life now. That was a little bit of a wendy road. I actually started out in engineering. I'm smitty. I went to smith college. Which for those of you. Who are familiar with smith. It is a small liberal arts. All women's college and engineering was the only be s offered on campus. So is doing a but we had a very solid grounding in the balart. So i spend a lotta time taking history anthropology and so on. I'm so interested in the history of science and the apology of science and spent a lotta time doing that. Work and in engineering us focusing on hydrology. But i kept coming back to these questions of why we do engineering the way we do. I would conduct science the way that we do and how we got. Where are i think. Partly because i grew up in third world development of my parents worked in all development. My father in agriculture. My mother was in health. And so you know. I was part of that community. You know in the eighties and nineties. Where expatriots really dedicated to improving. The world really believed what they were doing. Really believe they're going to change things and so that was always you know what i was going to do growing up and so you know i was thinking about these questions and engineering in terms of how do we get people to better engineers. So that's focused in hydrology when it came time for grad school as both. My parents have higher degrees in sort of expected expected of all about so. I applied to a bunch of hydrology programs right so do engineering. Water engineering interested in water. I love dance with my thing but there was this one program adviser at the time. Her name is donna. Riley funnily enough. She's actually now the head of generic education program at purdue at the time she was a professor at smith and she was my adviser and she mentioned to me that this brand new pro grab a year old had just started up at purdue university in engineering education. And they were looking at. How do you make better engineers. How can prove education of our engineers so that they're better prepared and they're doing all this interesting research unto you. Know how people learn engineering people do gene. Era in all its different forums. This was the time olin college. The olin engineering program had just been founded. That was sort of a engineering laboratory. They're trying thing they're all these schools trying different things in genetics. So i was really interested in that. I got into a bunch of different programs. Like sort of straight hydrology fancy school and execute this engineering at the patient programmer. For gonna try it. So i came to do and so's doing my phd education. And i was also in ecological sciences an engineering program which is really interesting because you take courses in something like ten or eleven field so economics political science and philosophy and mechanical engineering and traffics and natural science. All these different things. And so i got the exposure all sorts of things and i ended up having an adviser who was a developmental social psychologists. So that is where. I ended up writing my chiesa set right so it was based sort of in social psychology so as during the social psychology work. I was thinking about wicked problems of doing this. All this policy work right. And so i went to do my post doc. It was actually a policy. Stop and we're talking about various forms of science policy and that ended up in cybersecurity looking at cybersecurity policy and start talking about subsequent dictation. And i was like oh. I have a background in stem education. His engineering education is a huge part of our. And so you know started working on some cybersecurity education questions. And i was like. Oh my god this makes sense of all the different things i've done along the way. Somehow they all come together road though as venture different feels seriously wow-wow so when though in that path like after you got into this did you say i'm gonna look at social engineering as one of my areas that i want to understand when i actually got hired as cybersecurity professor. Okay so. I was teaching a class. In cyber security policy while information technology policy a large obscurity but not exclusive security Was doing -cation and so i started thinking we've tried to build our graduate classes along the lines of our research wherever possible and social engineering nate sadness so i learned a lot of guilt that is amazing at something that maximum. I have been talking about a lot lately. Because this is the largest vector that we see in all attacks going on right now and we need more people educating the next generation on it because we all got it kind of by experience growing up in this industry. But you can't do that anymore so we need people educators to take that start teaching the next generation how to use this in their everyday life.

dr eating becky olin college smith college Maxine Riley donna today one ten both one program smith a year old eleven field three full-time jobs first third my areas eighties produce
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

03:21 min | 5 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Welcome to the social engineering podcast. The human element series episode one hundred and forty. Three i am. Chris had nagy founder and ceo of social engineer and founder of social engineer dot org and the innocent lives foundation and been hosting this podcast since i was a wee lad thousand nine..

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Love it. See that about suit. Matt back own.

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Welcome to the social dash engineer dot org.

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

05:23 min | 7 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"What happens if you raise it up at a higher level is that you'll get the individual that takes an interest in you takes an interest and becomes vested unconditionally in your success. And so that's when you can really see that someone you know is really at that higher level i mean i probably partnered with two or three folks this past year and you guys one of them. You know that regardless of anything that comes up especially when people become proactive with they see something because they know your than no things. You're interested in and they become proactive in reaching out for you and giving you an opportunity to do something information on something growth. Whatever it is and one does not only no expectation reciprocity but there's benefit to them necessarily you know so there's different levels. So highest level person is non judgmental vested with no expectation. Reciprocity in wants to be a resource for your success and how you seek them out. You offer yourself up as a resource for. There's i i mean the greatest line. I discovered this past year and i use it very proactively all time anytime. I do a podcast anytime. I do anything i say. Hey thank you so much for your time and effort at the end of this. Please take a look at my website. Take a look my content. If you think. I can be a resource for you in any way. Please let me know and be happy to be. Don't ask maxi's question from a different angle. Because i love the question. But i wanna come at it now not as a person seeking mentoring as a potential mentor. So i get these requests nonstop on lincoln through email people saying i'd love to be in the social engineering field. Could you help me. I don't know where to start. Could you take me on the path and it was. When and if i said well okay but max different story right so we could talk about maxine a minute maxi was one but like you said there was.

two one three folks this past year maxine past year lincoln maxi
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

01:38 min | 7 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Welcome to the social engineer or podcast. The security awareness series episode one forty. I'm chris nagy founder. And ceo of social engineer llc social engineer dot org the innocent lives foundation..

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

01:44 min | 8 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Welcome to the social engineer. Dot org podcast number one hundred thirty nine. The human element series. Hello and welcome to the social engineer. Podcast i'm chris. Had nagy founder and ceo of social engineer llc and social engineer dot org and the innocent lives foundation. And i've been hosting this podcast since i was a wee little nothing now. That's not true thousand. Nine so i'm not. I'm not that young. I'm joined by my awesome now. No longer sick co host maxi reynolds. I'm actually i am same. I'm the technical team. Lead at social engineer and the resident attacker maintain expert on. I am no longer sick beginning wonderful. We missed you. Didn't see you for a couple of weeks and then you came back and you took another week off and it was saturday. I wasn't even sick though before we get to our guests. Let me just talk about our sponsor which is none other than social dash engineer. Llc our company. That makes you and i worked for where premier information security consulting and training company. We've been around since two thousand and three. We specialize in the art and science of social engineering..

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

05:38 min | 8 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Yes with conditions. Yes they could happen. If i wasn't italian hated my life. So there's a condition that's funny but yeah so i think some can you or no. Is it too hard. Trying to think of a defanged example. Yeah i don't wanna put you on that situation so give me another lesson because that one. I think we can kind of all. I think we can mentally picture how we would apply that. And i'm honestly gonna this has got to be one of the main show notes. Here this is one of the main takeaways. Love is going to be. The title of this podcast. Yes with conditions a love it out so i think thinking about more red team center kind of lessons learned when i came to capitol group. There was no blue team. You know the blue team was like nothing so i kind of started helping. Be the backup for that right. And so what i would say is you know. Don't go rush and create a red team before you have an established blue team right because what you. Therefore you're there to help progress. The blue team your hair there to kind of help validates that investment of people process technology in all that security investments. So don't just rush and get a bread team if they're not ready if the orcs not ready so you not just punch uses in the face. Newsom help them. Yeah yeah yeah. I think you know especially in this field. In the red team failed. Ego plays a big part of it and the personality and the type of person that you are in regard to that you go is what's gonna make or break your program. You know folks that. Feel like their successes. Victory is a failure right. So i wouldn't basically celebrate your accomplishments because that means you're not doing your job is a red team or to make the organization better. Yeah and people think that it's a failure to get caught as a red teamer. And i think it's the opposite. I think it's validation. I think it shows you've done a good job in helping partner with you know the blue team to make sure that you do get caught and anything else is kind of a failure on your part now granted you got to be successful and you gotta throw some fancy stuff out there and that's just part of the evolution of a red team as well. You got to find the vulnerabilities biting you got also teach them how to fix those vulnerabilities. Yeah and i think that's where there's a lot of teamers kind of get nervous about showing their cards right. You know you kind of keep them close to chest but you know. I think we've seen some very real practical examples of where consulting teams of stashed away. Zero days I don't know what could possibly go wrong when those zero days are leaked. So you know definitely. The mantra red team is to do no harm in my opinion. And if you're doing something and you really think about it and it's like wow..

one of the main takeaways one of the main show notes zero days red team Zero days Newsom italian
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Content and the objective and what images and what were the stories we were riding and all those kinds of things and when i realized through the biology and science training that i've done in research is that that saying is not as important as you and your audience the why in the component is far more important than what the contours overall. Because we're to biological creatures. You know connecting to each other without going into the science behind that the easy way to explain it is everyone's head an experience with i've been at a wedding or a funeral or thanksgiving or something like that where somebody's got up. They don't have a plan speech. They haven't written anything down and they get up. They speak from there And we all get goosebumps and we laugh and we cry. And we go on this journey with this improv moment and it's just so successful and it moves us greatly but nobody planned anything. There wasn't any content. They wasn't even an overall objective. What happened was somebody was real fintech and connected with the audience from a biologic perspective. Does it make sense. Yeah and when you use that last experience at ties it in because we've all had that i mean i was just thinking about my twenty fifth anniversary. A bunch of friends. We all went italy and we vacation together. We holiday together on sounds like so much fun. I love italy. It was amazing. You know before cova time when we can actually travel and enjoy cultures and things like that and one of my buddies got up and just gave this impromptu speech at brought the whole room into tears. And when you said that. I started thinking about that because it wasn't planned and that motivated me to stand up and say something and none of this was pre thought it wasn't written down. It wasn't a you know here's my slide deck. It was just like going to stand up and speak from the heart. But i've also had the opposite. Experience like where you had someone stand up impromptu and it didn't have that effect and you could. I think when you said that what made me think is yeah those people that connect to you emotionally those people that touch the part of you that emotional part. Those are the ones that you remember those times speeches. And you're like wow that was amazing even though it was unplanned. That's how we remember. And that's how we make our decisions as you know. The limbic brain gets stimulated by whatever seems comes through you. Sight sound touch taste goes into the base of spine and goes up into the limbic. Brian and the limbic brain has reaction to it and then the neo cortex gets kicked in and sue. What do i want to do with this reaction so those kind of things are incredibly important for people to understand. And i know there's probably some people listening to be going. Yes but you know you have to create your content images an is important. But it's the same material that i was talking about food important component and one of the other things that i came up through the process of writing the first training module which dawned on me because i was telling a story about something that i did when i was younger is i came up with driving the car. It's part of the u..

Brian italy twenty fifth anniversary first training module one buddies
"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

The Social-Engineer Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on The Social-Engineer Podcast

"Find amazing is so this is episode one hundred and thirty two so we only do one of these podcasts per month at one hundred and thirty two episodes where you are eleven th year anniversary. I'm awesome yeah and in eleven years. I've interviewed more people not in my community. So not hackers right from a sense that i have interviewed those from my community. And what's always amazed me. How much application. There is to other people's fields at expertise and research to what it is that we do like everything you just said fits social engineering as a security infrastructure. Perfectly knowing how to tell a story will help you with pretexting knowing how to tell a story will help you with training knowing how to tell effective stories. We'll help you with report writing. All of these things are essential to being professional social engineer. Just aggravates me. Well you know the way. I look at it and i think i've said this to you before. Is if your audience or your colleagues or whoever it is you're communicating with as a human being and they have a brain within these techniques work on everybody that's not not everybody has a functioning brain. Biologically the way we're set up with the limbic system and the neo cortex and all that kind of stuff. That's why things like story. And what's social engineering community. Do and what. The entertainment industry dies in the marketing. World does and all that kind of stuff..

eleven years eleven th year one hundred and thirty two epi episode one hundred and thirty one of these podcasts