38 Burst results for "engineer"

Fresh update on "engineer" discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

00:32 min | 34 min ago

Fresh update on "engineer" discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Those Communities, their mayors are not paid. So you start there they're not. They're not doing this to make any money. They're mayors all have actual professional backgrounds, Tom Ramsey great example engineer engineer with a very, very well respected firm in town clots engineering. I know this guys when I was on City Council Wayne clots was longtime head of that organization. Tom Ramsey was their top engineer. So, let's take place like Spring Valley. At ten and say Campbell. When you look at how those communities are run the values in those communities are through the roof. Because they zone to memorial high school sit at one of the thugs schools. And they're well run. They don't run social programs they don't run illegal alien You know counseling programs the they don't run drug welfare programs they actually provide for good drainage. Good streets good fire good police, clean water imagine that. A city actually running itself well, anyway. Ramsey. That guy was an engineer for all these years is running to succeed Steve Radic. Now, it's not a net pickup radically conservative Republican. But it is holding on to that seat so that in two years when we have the opportunity to take back the county judge seat if the Republican Party can get off, it's ass in. Harris County. If if we can win that seat, we can go back to a three two majority. and. At least stamp out some of this..

Tom Ramsey Engineer Harris County Republican Party Spring Valley Steve Radic Memorial High School County Judge Wayne Campbell
How B-787 Captain Shreenand Sadhale got his start in aviation

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

05:59 min | 12 hrs ago

How B-787 Captain Shreenand Sadhale got his start in aviation

"So tells you got your start in aviation. Well I grew up in India. And you know in India as you. Envision isn't as accessible as it is Let's say in the US. So there's no there was actually no generally vision avenue I grew up in the eighties. But we used to live. Right on the final four and the one four. And this is the time when jets. Loud. and. Quite a spectacle come into. And even though they were not too many a couple of jets. Rushed to the window to see them. It was always an exciting part of. Growing up. Watching these airplanes I had no family who was involved in aviation, but my dad used to travel a lot. And going. To the airport to receive and. That was quite. It was quite excited and. Attracted me to, but I guess it was. was. Okay. So how old were you when you took your first flying lesson that? Point. Twenty twenty-six, what happened was I always wanted to be a pilot. I. My vision was in twenty grigny anymore. So the was out of the picture. and. The fact that I couldn't fly fighters anymore meant my interest sort of windows into. Automobiles and motorcycles. Which is why I ended up being automobile engineer. But I was interested in working at a desk so I started writing or magazines. And I started off, my first job was actually. As a motoring journalist. And I was having a great time driving getting invited on test drive and bribing all sorts of. was sort of. started to come back a little bit and I guess I was looking up. As to how I could still become a pilot. that point in time Singapore Airlines as luck would have it. This compute bureau luck as Singapore Airlines came up with an ad in the newspaper for their credit. And the deal was that debate for your flying. The Youtube underplay. And you had to work with them for seven years. And when I read it I, it felt like the sort of thing that only happens to somebody else. I don't. So so they are going to pay they're going to pick up the TAB and there's only a seven year commitment. That's a good deal. It has been I mean have done it for. So I. But I didn't really expect that I would get through. So i. sent him application then as like whatever they would call. I give the interviews. And the other funny story about the interview. You had to down what Ellen you wanted to go to India group. So there was a choice between Singapore Airlines passenger line. Silkair, which is the regional airline. And as I got. And I wrote a Kabul has my first choice. And they were quite stunned because in the first interview, they asked me. You show you I go because you have to make off. Because I I will because I make great coffee. and. I really do want to fly the seven four seven. And in the second interview again. Asked me. Don't. I said. I know people were was in buffalo so I have absolutely no. No. No did you say the way to ministry? Did you say this because you thought it would be an easier way to get hired or do you really want to fly boxes instead of people? I just wanted to fly the seven I. I didn't really okay what? What it was filled with. A really really wanted to fly December seven and you add it was being phased out by the time. I would have gone online right? So the only way to get the flight would be to cite S I will. Okay. So they hired you right. Did I mean as? I say it's one of the best mistakes made released. Get in as through the cracks and Between was done in two parts. You had to do the ground school I in single. and. After that, you did the initial part of the ocean licensed in. Australia. Oh. Okay. Now all the the ground school and everything I. Assume there were people from all different countries was all the training conducted in English. Yes. It was and there was a little bit of lying on one fifty two in Singapore. Essentially just to see if you could. You know you had the hand eye coordination and that sort of thing. Aviv. Singapore study was essentially just to clear your eighty peel. So that's how they did was they made sure you could read the Terry. And once you got your DP, which was the frozen beal. Scientists, which was in Australia. Okay and how many hours did you get in Australia? So we the one seven do and the barren, and that was about fifty dollars. But here's the interesting part the for the guy who went on the white bodies. They made them fly. Lear jet for twenty hours. In the Brisbane and a this used to happen when I was in the program opted after that. That is one program that I could really signed up. And more years of my life. To plan because. It. It is quite a yeah and quite fantastic experiences when to fly away forty five meaning.

Singapore Airlines Australia India Silkair Ground School United States Singapore Youtube Brisbane Engineer Kabul Ellen India Group Aviv Terry
Fresh "engineer" from Joe DeCamara and Jon Ritchie

Joe DeCamara and Jon Ritchie

00:37 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "engineer" from Joe DeCamara and Jon Ritchie

"All your fall activities with a deal like this. Why have any other Italian beef in your freezer? Pick up Papa Charlie's this week it Fairplay foods. Papa Charlie's Italian beef number one in the Chicago market. Well, the birds are on the road to victory. You're on the roads built by the members and contractors of local 8 25 operating engineers and elect the engineers, labor employer cooperative advocates for them by road or rail. You can't get to the game without elect. Hi. Everyone is Rodney Anderson with supreme lending Every single day. I have multiple people call my office that had been working on a refinance with another lender for 60, 90 or even 120 days. It's timeto fire that lender and pick up the phone and call us at 1 800 express our goals to close our refinances in 20 days or less, and we're doing it every single day. Supreme lending is unequal housing lender and in the last 21 to 90 mellow 196730 49, 75 President Park Boulevard Suite 800. Plano, Texas 75093. Texas has somehow mortgage banker registration, residential mortgage. Loan originator way might not have won last week, but we were the only team in the NFC East not to lose 40. Niners Sunday night Football.

Papa Charlie Rodney Anderson Texas NFC Plano Chicago President Trump Football
Proud Boys celebrate Trump’s ‘stand by’ remark about them at the debate.

Mark Mason

04:37 min | 22 hrs ago

Proud Boys celebrate Trump’s ‘stand by’ remark about them at the debate.

"Meddles in our streams. enough Clorox Clorox However, wipes wipes if you available available folks need to relax about that, there there isn't isn't our enough enough disinfectant disinfectant utilities I've been spray spray working with available available both Salem anywhere. anywhere. and he went To To wipe wipe well his other foot the the from stench stench the Forest Service. USGS. from last They're very night's effective debate. there. On top of this, I was and there a debate last night our on water. water utilities are actually quite effective at removing those W medals. W E The night. things they're going That was to struggle embarrassing. with are going to be the That was ash ah, minutes and some of in the living history carbon of We've never seen and anything the character like it. of that carbon If well you missed will it, create and I challenges got a lot of e mail from for people them saying they and didn't watch costs it last for them, night. They didn't but want to get consumers the won't in get terms involved of their water in what they thought supply. would be a Malay. And it I don't was. think there's ah, We a have major condensed health risk. it into 23. This's the things you Seconds do at Oregon State for University, you 23 which seconds by And this can I think are to this our can benefit pretty much here in Oregon summarize. and were Uh, much the appreciative entire debate of so the time you don't you're spending have to with sit us here, Dr through Kevin hold Bladen, 90 who minutes, was the associate Plus, professor just Forest enjoy engineering this. resource All right. If it And management department impacts, at according Oregon to zip State it University. the question We is learned just a lot just a few short so left minutes. I hope Vote we can call on you again now here. Doctor impact appreciate always it. Absolutely in gentlemen. The jury happy exhibit to do it. a Hey, I'm Charlie Sanders Leaders or Senator, and I'm bald and I'm Brian I'm Husky, zippy Longstocking and I am also ball. You are indeed also bald. packed Those interest is true. When a It's problem good comes because along, we're the host The you new much podcast ball better talk from the big money Players dip. Network It and I would heart radio. you say And because we're bald, it is? Is that right on that's it? That's the whole thing I mean, the show in is Portland about perception, prominently featured. insecurity, Oh, my goodness. vanity, just So like proud. Human Chris stuff. Wallace I couldn't aren't get radio Oregon, is number right? one for podcast. Oregon, But don't take our word for it. Portland, Find Oregon. ball talk But on the I heart radio it app was or wherever you it was listen his to hold podcasts, Trump the real Proud estate boy's market in thing Portland is hot. So Where does it matter where? who you used Chris, to Paul sell? said. Will you denounce It does white if supremacy? you want And top then dollar, and Joe that's Biden why through you and need we'll to probably, call Nick Shivers you at know, Keller denounced Williams. them. Nick's award Here's how it winning went down. online Add marketing to the platform violence and and a connections number of these cities with the top as we 100 saw in Kenosha. agents in the U. S And as allows we've seen your in home Portland to be seen locally, regionally and nationally, giving today, you I maximum would say exposure almost everything and creating I an see auction is like from effect the left if you wing. need to Not Sell your from home the right. and Oregon So what in do you southwest want to, you Washington. know? Call 503847 Willing to do anything. I 93 want Todo 100 or visit What sir? Nick shivers Do dot it say? com there Do pounding you want to call on him? the door. What They're do you calling want to call on him? the phone. Give me a name. Give It's me the collectors. a problem. It's those Right? Like credit cards. You ran proud up trying to start son. Right? your business. Probably Now. You found out that stand a D b A back hurts and the stand family by. and brings But the pain I'll tell home. you what, Do you remember I'll tell you. hearing What these commercials Somebody's on radio got to do for something over 40 about years, Antifa Ray Reynolds and has the helped left customers Because this get is not millions a right in credit. It's problem no wonder is why that they call this is him the a godfather levy I of credit. directed. Reynolds This is will get left your score above 7 20. right, Do Savannah, you need $50,000? Miss. Just stand back and Offered credit stand by using by. corporate credit. You can finance That's of what business, they say buy real estate inside and stock the under a corporation, television studio taking advantage is of they're numerous about to go tax on here. write Stand offs on back. Ly available Stand to a by. corporation. All right, Now you could meet Reynolds let's on his daily go. webinar at 11 a.m. to Wow. P. M. Monday through I mean, Friday, what a fail or call an epic 800 fail for right 90 there. 41 42 Two. He could Find put it out away. more about his secrets He to could success have put it away. and helping If you said fix you know what and improve all white your credit. supremacists Go to Ray's webinar dot com You know, Stand at 11 AM out. Get or 2 out p.m. of here. I Monday don't through know if Friday he and check out if he, his free, uh, very informative if he misspoke webinar himself or call today, 800 for 90 today 41 the president 40. is saying, Now it's worth. I don't Time even know and who the you'll learn proud a boys lot. are. That's Ray's webinar dot com or call 804 90 41 40. So Everyone's back at home Senator and you're loving Tim Scott, the Knights of Netflix the after racing for the black best senator seed, from South But are Carolina you playing musical chairs? You and sit went down to the to relax, president's shifting aide down today a seat for your kid. Then your spouse comes in in. response And you to all Chris Wallace's scoot over another seat. You need a custom, Chris, But lazy he wanted boy to say sectional, where everyone thank has you their misspoke place. Choose corrected how many because seats you need I and guess who he gets didn't to recline? you should Plus, correct it's it. perfectly sized your room. If he doesn't The whole I fam guess he didn't Damn misspeak. ily will be cool. Let me check She is his Khun Twitter B. feed And here. right now save Have you got up anything to 25% their liberal might know. off, Lazy Meanwhile, boy. Oh, Gavin boy. McInnis, Now it who means was so much more. the founder Hey, guys, of listen problems, up. I one have of the some founders exciting of news. published Multnomah they were Medical watching Clinic this has a new on and a live breakthrough treatment video for stream. e D. That does not require And any they were medication. sitting around You listening heard right. to the president's No pills, speech. no shots, And guys. when the proud If boys you're struggling were mentioned, with boy, the D they and also sick they of the sat pills up called in their chair Multnomah Medical and Clinic, they start get the initial they start medical talking assessment to each exam other. It's and all blood caught flow on tape. ultrasound. Listen, Totally right, free. That's a $300 stand value. back Call and Multnomah stand Medical by. Clinic now, But 503505. I'll tell you what, I'll tell you. What Somebody's 1441 got to do something fix your about CD today, Antifa and Call 5035057441 the left. Certainly. or Really visit online. sit here. What Multnomah do you want to medical call him? Go dot ahead. com Tell me, he said Thes the problem. Okay, Air. Strange pad boys times to stand down and stand It's back. been a crash But we have course somewhere in about how to make do you say, with less. probably stand down stand And if you're by a the small General business command. owner, you've probably had to make He's some the general innovative I changes control. The to manage problem expenses. is Donald. But that energy Do not stand trust down. of Oregon Do not stand way back. have Well, been helping small business owners find ways to increase so they're efficiency they're all and charged reduce costs up now. Hey, you for years. know, they got mentioned they've gone It's what quote we do every mainstream. day, and we can I have help been making you, too. T shirts and they're Yeah, they're Find out making how teachers. They at have a new energy patch trust to wear dot on org's their slash arm. for business. But the president ever heard of him. This news has a service of radio Cab

Oregon Antifa Ray Reynolds Chris Wallace President Trump Portland Multnomah Stand Medical Senator Clorox Multnomah Nick Shivers Oregon State For University Multnomah Medical And Clinic Usgs. Forest Service Salem Vote Forest Kevin Professor
Fresh update on "engineer" discussed on Angelo Cataldi and the Morning Team

Angelo Cataldi and the Morning Team

00:49 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "engineer" discussed on Angelo Cataldi and the Morning Team

"Was excited about Monday night's first ever meeting of two league MVP at age 25 under Patrick Mahomes in Lamar Jackson. Seven of the 32 teams have starting quarterbacks who are 35 older. Here's how I rank. He's grizzled grey beards, beginning with Number seven, Miami's Ryan Fitzpatrick. He's now with his eighth team in 16 years in these Philip Rivers is starting with the second team after 16 seasons with his original club, number five, Drew Brees has struggled for sure, but should improve when his injured superstar receiver Michael Thomas, returns that Ryan has been Playing lights out. If on Lee, his defense and special teams could hold a double digit lead number three Ben Roethlisberger, back from elbow surgery has the Steelers out to their first three. No started decades. Tom Brady is finally getting a sea legs with the Bucks. Plus, they have a great defense and number one is Aaron Rodgers. Packers offense is making it look way too easy and Erin's off to a great start. Former science Well, the birds are on the road to victory. You're on the roads built by the members and contractors of local 8 25 operating engineers and elect the engineers, labor employer cooperative advocates for them by road or rail. You can't get to the game without Elek. Hiring could be challenging, but ZIP recruiter makes it fast and easy. We talked to Monica Starks, who needed to hire for her company GS Group as the owner of a construction company. Finding the right people is a very difficult pants. So I use.

Ryan Fitzpatrick Lamar Jackson Bucks Ben Roethlisberger Drew Brees Monica Starks Tom Brady Aaron Rodgers Gs Group Patrick Mahomes Packers Philip Rivers Steelers Miami LEE Erin Michael Thomas
Great Moments in Communication!

The Past and the Curious

06:23 min | 2 d ago

Great Moments in Communication!

"Sure is easy today. A quick pair of thumbs can easily send a text to a friend email someone around the globe or place a call to order a pizza. Each time you do any of these things information is being transmitted from one place to another faster than you can say Trans Atlantic cable. Trends stop already there you can stop. But if you have learned anything from this show, you should know that it wasn't always this easy. A device called the Telegraph. Was the first big development in getting information from one point to another. It changed things dramatically because it was the first time information didn't have to be physically carried a letter on horseback a note on a boat, even a message in a bottle. These were a few of the only ways to tell someone in another place something anything. Imagine how different life was and imagine how revolutionary it must have been when an electric pulse could finally travel through a wire and deliver a message to that person much more quickly. British scientists, William Cook, and Charles. Manson created the First Commercial Telegraph. That wasn't all they dabbled in. We'd stint also invented a new kind of Concertina squeezy Reed instrument sort of like an accordion, as well as the stereo scope Victorian Parlor device that looked like a funny pair of binoculars and created three dimensional images out of. Pictures printed onto changeable cards. If you've ever used a view master toy, it was kind of like that. Anyway, their version of the Telegraph used multiple wires to carry electric pulses, which would move needles on the receiving end. These needles would point to the letters on a dial. This would slowly spell out the words of a message letter by letter in one sense, their version was nice because it required. No special. Code or a special understanding from the operator you just had to know how to read but installing the multiple wires was expensive, inconsistent and difficult. So soon, Samuel Morse's single wire telegraph became the international favorite because the message was on a single wire. It could only send one letter at a time and it didn't actually use letters but something to represent letters a required people to use a code known as Morse Code. Operators had to learn a new alphabet of short dots or debts and long dashes or does of the code to get each letter which they would translate. It wasn't immediate telegraphs took time to send and receive as the letter by letter codes had to travel along the wire, but it was still faster than trains, horses or running really really fast almost as soon as Morse's telegraph debuted in the eighteen forties someone was. Like Hey, we should put one of these in the ocean and send messages to Europe at the time to send a letter from New York to London usually took twelve days of sea travel that's not even factoring in the time on land, the letter would need to be carried. So communication took a long time Samuel Morse believed in his creation wanted it to make a difference. So he said great idea. Let me help. Turns out running a wire across the Atlantic. Ocean was a lot harder than you might think. Or. Maybe your a reasonable person and you realized immediately that this was a super difficult thing to do. It was especially. So in the eighteen hundreds either way there was a guy who with Sammy Morris help was going to see that it happened no matter what got in the way. Name was Cyrus field and he got rich in the paper business. It wasn't under Mifflin that he founded but another real and frightening paper company that sold newsprint to the Penny Press tabloid newspapers of New England. The company did so well that he retired at the age of thirty four as one of New York's richest men. With plenty of life. was he dedicated the remainder to the transatlantic cable a wire to stretch across the ocean settled on the bottom deep below the water? This marvel to be would carry electric signals and deliver international messages in Samuel Morse's special code both America and England loved the idea and pledged support and some money he sold stock in his New Telegraph Company to help raise funds but mostly he put up his own sweet sweet paper making money to get the project off the ground or I guess underwater. We'll spare you the super technical details mostly because we are kids, podcasters and not electrical engineers but telegraphic cable had to be over twenty six hundred miles long to stretch from Europe to North America, and every one of the twenty six hundred miles of cable had to be insulated and protected from the rocky bottom corrosion from the salty seawater and any marine life that may cause trouble. So it was coated in latex then tarred hemp and lastly wrapped in heavy iron braids is took months for giant teams to make. In eighteen fifty seven nearly two decades after Morse's Telegraph debut two ships sailed out from the coast of Ireland and started to unspoiled the gigantic telegraph cable to the bottom of the ocean the mood aboard the British ship HMS Agamemnon and the American ship USS Niagara was probably bubbling from excitement. Those aboard watched the first of the cable disappear into the mysterious ocean, they must have known they stood on the threshold of a new frontier ready to connect two continents as never before with the power of one seemingly magical. The VIBRATO. The line you mean the cable we have to stretch across the ocean for the next few months it's only the first day. Broken just flopping around at the bottom of the ocean. Okay. So after just a few miles had been unschooled, the would-be transatlantic cable snapped undeterred. The brave crews used grappling hooks to find the lost

Samuel Morse New York Europe New Telegraph Company Atlantic Sammy Morris New England Cyrus Field Manson William Cook Hms Agamemnon Mifflin Penny Press Charles North America England America Ireland London
NASA astronaut to cast her ballot from 200 miles above Earth

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 d ago

NASA astronaut to cast her ballot from 200 miles above Earth

"Voting in person voting. And then there's voting in space. NASA has it all worked out for the one US astronaut aboard the international space station, the agency says. The Harris County clerk's office in Texas uploads a secure ballot to the Johnson Space Center. Mission Control astronauts in this case, Flight engineer Kate Rubens uses specific credentials, accesses her ballot and cast her vote, which is delivered back. The county Clerks office by email. It's nothing new for Reuben. She cast her vote from space in 2016 as well.

Johnson Space Center United States Kate Rubens Harris County Reuben Mission Control Engineer Texas
Delivering Maximum Impact in the Public Sector

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

06:47 min | 3 d ago

Delivering Maximum Impact in the Public Sector

"Born and raised in California. I served in the military after graduating high school for ten years. And after completing successfully completing my arm service tenure. I became a civilian again and unfortunately. the. That I held as an armed servicemember did not transfer cleanly into the civilian world. So whereas I was the network manager in the military. I kind of add to start all over when I became a civilian. So digits that. Began working on the desktop and couple of years later moved into. The engineer ranks. After mastering NAN began working with small teams as a supervisor. Fast forward to three years after that got my first manager role it's been just an uphill climb since then on say about seven years ago was when I first entered into the executive ranks. And that was as light goal from a to be at the top of a particular foul. And so your position today, can you describe that for us and tell us what's your day to day like? Well, I can day to day is. Very, challenging We Dallas County is the eighth largest county in the United States. We have a thirty nine different departments and agencies that comprise the county, and so as you would imagine, there's a good deal of diversity and so in one day I might be you know working with public works the next day I might be working with the judiciary. The next day I made me working with Members of the court. It's just a great deal of diversity and I like that. But my team specifically. We have responsibility for the county cybersecurity program and really what that entails three different teams. The first of which is we call in threaten vulnerability management. and. We also have another arm. Architecture and engineering, and then we also supply for the hundred fifty or so folks that make up it services audit and compliance so that we can make certain that were firing on all cylinders with respect to our compliance mandates. Can you give us an idea of the scale of your team? How many folks do you have working under you? We have total. In, source and outsource of ten men and women. That make up the team. We've been asked to source streamlining keep things relatively small. and. So we have a number of partnerships. With outside entities that help us to complete the portfolio. For the security services. program. Can you describe for us how that works I mean how do you balance that I would hazard to say as a relatively small team for the size of the organization that you're protecting, and being able to work with outside vendors. Yeah I tend to agree day it is a fairly tall order. And a part of that call for us to take a look at everything that we had in existence. and then looking at how well, we did in the areas that require improvement what tools might we keep and what tools should we replace? And as we sort of went through that exercise with the backdrop being we're going to be small have to be Nimble. Not Do we have to keep the lights on world cross functionally, but we also have to do programs and other projects How can we do all of that remain nimble and so what we came up with wasn't hey I m L. model whereby we would replace just about everything with those types of tools. So that. Overtime and with clean data entering into those systems, we could train those two only stop work for those analysts for those engineers architects. When it was absolutely necessary, and so that's been I guess in eighteen to twenty month journey and I will not tell you that we have arrived but we're much better off in our day to day. Then we were when I first joined almost two years ago. I mean do you have any insights to share in terms of what that journey has been like for for other people who may be considering a similar approach things that they should be mindful of you know Dave I, I have an opportunity because there are so many cities within my counties and because we're making an Dallas county a model for other entities of our size and larger I get a chance to top twelve law practitioners local to the two hundred, fifty four counties set up a Texas as well as those that are outside. Of Our state and one of the biggest challenges that I see facing practitioners. Is that they don't really know where to start. So so you know the the person before them maybe they were doing their best the person before them maybe they add compliance focus. But with respect to growing the program, what I find most often is that. They have not adopted a security framework and conducted. A gap assessment against that, and then prioritize those documents those findings to give them a solid roadmap going forward. That's probably number one without question and it is on a day to day basis as I work with other practitioners very first thing that I subscribe that they should take a look at.

Dallas County California Supervisor United States Engineer Executive Dave Texas
Why a private section of the border wall is allegedly failing

Dr. Lee Yardley

05:12 min | 3 d ago

Why a private section of the border wall is allegedly failing

"By Iraq war veteran Bryan Cole Fatchett, triple amputee. They wanted to raise a billion dollars to quote build Trump's wall. The targeted mission Texas in the Rio Grande Valley, one of the busiest illegal border crossing areas in the country, all on the border. We're here building. You gotta help out. They had started producing the video's promoting this project and they were on the property. They started clearing the property before anyone really knew what was going on The company Clearing the riverbank to build the private wall was Fisher Sand and Gravel. Tommy Fisher, the company's CEO, had been trying and failing to land a lucrative border wall contract from the government. Since 2017. When the Trump administration began soliciting Wall design concepts. Fisher was one of the companies to put up a prototype. Officials of the Department of Homeland Security said it had design flaws. A second bid was also rejected. Frustrated Tommy Fisher took another approach. We really believe with our patent pending system, we could bring sexy. Back to construction. He became a fixture on Fox News, the president's favorite network at the time, people time sounding less like a contractor and more like a contestant on a reality show pandering to an audience of one, You know, hopefully the president will see this as well. And he's a guy who says he can cut through bureaucracy two weeks after that appearance on Fox In April of 2019. I don't know if you heard about this contractor that said he could build the whole wall for a lot cheaper than anybody else. Yes, I have. We're dealing with him. Actually, Fisher Comes from North Dakota. Recommended strongly by a great new senator. As you know, Kevin Cramer, by May of 2019 Tommy Fisher had the president's attention but still couldn't land a contract to build the government's wall. The Army Corps of Engineers, which oversees border wall construction, pointed to the company's lack of experience building border walls to prove they could fissure teamed up with we build the wall. First in New Mexico and later here on the banks of the Rio Grande admission. On the banks of any rivers difficult. But building on the raging Rio Grande is especially challenging, made more complicated because the U. S Mexico border but straight down the middle of it. So any plans to build on it must be approved by the International boundary and Water Commission for I, B. W C. Sand and gravel didn't get that approval before they started. Bulldozes. What steps did they skip? All of them. What should they have done? They should have gone to the I B W c to the A and presented their plan an actual plan. What about this idea that you know this is private money being used on private land and a landowner could do whatever he wants. They absolutely can do whatever they want on their property. As long as it doesn't affect other people's property. And you think the wall infringes on other clearly does. The way the bollards were built is gonna cause clogging of that wall, So those followed the trash or debris could get stuck in there and then the waters. It's a giant break, just like a rake in your yard. It's going to catch all that debris and redirect that water. Penna filed a lawsuit on behalf of a neighboring wildlife refuge called the National Butterfly Center, which feared the wall would cause flooding to its property. U. S government also suit on behalf of the I. B. W C. Good walls make good neighbours. But this wall did not. We've got rogue priest running around anti Trump anti Won't we build the walls? Bryan Cole fragile, launched attacks against anyone who opposed their wall. Falsely saying the national Butterfly Centre was the site of a rampant sex trade and that the Army Corps of Engineers was part of the deep state even took game and Father Royce Nights a local priest to oppose the Trump wall. Accusing him of promoting child trafficking. Also not true. We build the wall people came after you personally and that's something I didn't even know who they were. They're coming after the local priest. Yeah, I guess you're not from around here comes from around here. We can. Even Mom and Dad can disagree about things without being mean and nasty. Last December, Brian Colfax bragged in an interview that we build the wall had a direct line to the White House. We have Crispo back and Steve Bannon A lot of people that are tied in with the Trump administration, so we're able to back channel things to the Trump Administration and let them know what we're doing, But what they were doing was falling apart. A recent engineering inspection after summer storms revealed deep gashes under the foundation of the wall. That's Mariana Trevino, right, who runs the Butterfly center line underneath it. This was a normal seasonal rainfall and what happened to the wall the foundation washed out from under enormous sections of it, His attorney said after this, that this is just a normal part of new construction if you walked out of your new house And had a 30 FT hole under your home foundation. Would you consider that normal? There's the end of the hall right

Tommy Fisher Trump Administration Trump Wall Army Corps Of Engineers President Trump Fisher Sand Rio Grande Valley Rio Grande Bryan Cole Fatchett Donald Trump Texas Iraq Fox News New Mexico Kevin Cramer Department Of Homeland Securit Bryan Cole Mariana Trevino
Amazon Luna cloud gaming service launches with support for iOS

Daily Tech News Show

02:25 min | 5 d ago

Amazon Luna cloud gaming service launches with support for iOS

"At the top of show that Amazon got around with Apple App Store with apples help. Let us explain we mentioned yesterday that Amazon launched a game streaming system called Luna and we have a few more details about how that works on. IOS as we told you yesterday. It comes through the browser Luna will be a progressive web app or pwa we've told you about those before it means you can install an icon off Luna on your home screen on iOS run it separately from the rest of your browser. You're not going to see your other tabs or anything. It'll act like its own app, and technically it could even work offline. But since I bought it online game streaming service, that's not really a feature that applies here. It can act pretty much like an app, but without being subject to Apple's App Store rules because it's really just a very robust website that you're saying. Going to your home screen in Apple's recent streaming game guidelines. Apple actually wrote quote. Of course, there is always the open internet and web browser apps to reach all users outside of the App Store. They pointed at that and they said you could just do that if you wanted to an Amazon said, okay, I guess we want to Luna head of engineering and Technology George sip elitists who works for Amazon package said that Amazon worked with Apple's Safari team to make sure quote some of the things that weren't there are there and that allowed us to do kind of get where we are today. So they not only cooperated with Apple Apple Safari team apparently like added some functionality for them with their Progressive web apps you'd think Apple was like try to force them into the App Store know they didn't Amazon also says they're working with apple on a game app and we'll ship one when quote we can come up with a good experience. So Amazon saying like those new guidelines about the native apps didn't really work with us yet, but we're still working we're talking dog. Apple we're not suing them like epic has The Verge is Sean Hollister. Also wonders when Google and video Microsoft might follow suit Google runs stadia in Chrome already Nvidia GeForce need webrtc version for the Chromebook and a Sean points out. Yes. There are issues to web apps like controller support questions lack of all the optimizations you can do on a native app. And of course cos if you're running a progressive web app, it has to run on webkit. You don't get a choice of browser, but Amazon was able to make it work by working with Apple.

Apple Amazon Luna Sean Hollister Google Head Of Engineering Nvidia Microsoft
Huang's Law, the New Moore's Law?

Techmeme Ride Home

02:18 min | 5 d ago

Huang's Law, the New Moore's Law?

"It got all lost in the scramble of other news but remember invidia bought arm and that's a pretty big deal. So to pieces about that, I let me introduce you to. Some, people see as the new Moore's law and it might explain why Invidia is doing what it's doing quoting Chris Mims in the Wall Street Journal who I believe has actually coined the term quote as chipmakers have reached the limits of atomic scale circuitry and the physics of electrons Moore's law has slowed and some say it's over but a different law potentially, no less consequential computing's next half century has arisen. I call it wings law after INVIDIA Chief Executive and Co founder Jensen Wang it describes how the silicon chips that power artificial intelligence more than double in performance. Every two years while the increase can be attributed to both hardware and software it. Steady progress makes it a unique enabler of everything from autonomous cars, trucks, and ships to the face voice and recognition in our personal gadgets between November twenty twelve and may performance of nvidia chips increased three hundred and seventeen times for an important class of a calculation says Bill Daley chief scientists and Senior Vice President of research at Nvidia on average in other words, the performance of these chips more than doubled every year a rate of progress that makes Moore's law pale in comparison and quote. And then also from the Journal, a portrait of Jensen Wang and his founding and stewardship of Invidia as the company has. Just exploded in all sorts of ways. In videos market value has soared to three hundred and nineteen point, eight billion dollars surpassing Intel's valuation of two hundred and fourteen point five, billion dollars even though INVIDIA had ten point nine, two, billion in annual sales in its latest fiscal year compared with seventy one, point nine, seven, billion for Intel. Videos bet on some of the hottest fields, INTECH video gaming and artificial intelligence have fueled investor enthusiasm. While Intel has stumbled with some of its most advanced chips, it's all a long way from nineteen ninety-three when Mr Huang. Dreamed up in video on his thirtieth birthday at a Denny's in San Jose California with two like minded engineers they bet on a future where consumers demanded better computer graphics, which would require specialized high performance hardware that wasn't available at the time and

Invidia Intel Moore Jensen Wang Wall Street Journal Nvidia San Jose California Chris Mims Bill Daley Chief Executive Mr Huang Senior Vice President Chipmakers Co Founder
Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

Side Hustle Pro

06:51 min | 5 d ago

Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

"So welcome to the guest chair Jerry. Thank you for having me I'm so happy to have you here as I mentioned I was in the juice bar on h street the other day, and I was like this is so yummy. This is amazing I'd love to know more about your story. So first and foremost what was your career path before becoming the owner of turning natural juice bars. So prior to juicing, I was an air nautical engineer I worked for a major company which is probably the main companies in the Department of Defence Specialty was F twenty, two fighter jets. So Bess, literally my background I didn't WanNA been engineer at first I wanted to go to fashion but we had a career fair in highschool they separated all the boys of jobs that they believe men become in they separated the girls with like nursing and teaching and I didn't know you know to be feminist then I just wanted to go with the boys and so went with boys and this guy from NASA's Guy Actually said women do not become engineered. Yet I was so offended I went home and that's home. My Mama say what I only WanNa do fashion anymore I wanNA become an engineer and she's like. Bass drastic. So I just kind of looked into what types of engineering I would potentially enjoy in to be truthfully honest none of them were remotely interesting. I just knew that airplanes was probably the most interesting to me and I ended up majoring in Tennessee State University. So you were on that path and what did you envision your life looking like before this whole entrepreneurship thing happened. My first internship with with Nasser in our member calling my mom during that year that summer I was like. Do this every single day for like sixty five years. There's no way. This could be life, and so I knew that I was going to work for a while I. Just knew that couldn't be that person that worked until retirement indigenous. No hope to petty pitch whatever they decided I I earn so. Actually, GonNa. Probably be engineer for a while. Then I had no idea. So, walk us through what was the motivation behind starting turning natural. While two thousand, one by MOM was diagnosed with Stage two breast cancer and even though Stage two is roads of we early at that time cancelled as like a death sentence, everyone was so afraid of being diagnosed in, you know all the people that we had known to be diagnosed like my aunt who was diagnosed with stage four she passed away shortly after being diagnosed in. So our live drastically changed a mom went from a meat eater to vegetarian to Vegan and. Nine and a half years she was cancer free. Very healthy life in we found out in two thousand ten that cancer I came back. When it came back, it was much more aggressive. It's spread to her bones and then it went to her liver was in like two weeks of out that it came back my mom transition and so you'll never really hear me say my mom died I think super aggressive word. In it helps me cope to say she transition because I believe is energy. Redo that guy we just exist in another space and so shortly after my mom passed a believe that very next summer I quit my job and has started going to grief counseling When my mom transition, they give you this pamphlet that tells you what morning is GonNa look like in one minute you're GONNA be happy. One Minute you're going to be said and you're going to be depressed. That you're going to be angry. and. I was just angry I was angry for a very, very hard time. A MOM's a super spiritual woman. I was very angry with guy. Stop believing in any and everything in ages I'm already an introvert. So I literally practice. introverts space like no one could get in my space in. A really good friend of my recommended grief counseling which even made me angrier. Like I don't want to go to counselling I don't want another person to tell me to be absent from the bodies to be present with guy like that didn't make sense to me and I didn't want someone else to say I'm sorry for your loss because I really don't know how to respond to that. I don't WanNa say thank you that you're sorry for my law. So I was just in a very angry space in a started going to counseling. It was difficult because everyone that I had talked to a new mom. So I never had to explain my mother in the way that I had to explain to this counselor. and. She told me that morning isn't linear. You're not going to feel one way today, and then the next day is the next phase in pampering. You're gonNA fill multiple things on multiple days. And that was probably the single best advice that I could have gotten after my mom transition. So I'm sitting at my desk at my job at the time when I'm still in engineer and I hear my mother's voice and she said, why are you still here now in my mind I'm like I read about this this is the point where my mind I'm going crazy because if I turn around my mom is standing here I am not Right anymore. and. So I stopped what I was doing and I turned around I. Heard it again of course, she was there but I knew that Mitt like you don't WanNa do this anymore you not fulfil. You're just doing it because you're good at it. and. So I went to my boss's office and. told him as saying, Hey, you know I can't do this anymore. And you know at the time I was doing about equipment. The workload that I had was equivalent to two or three people job title. And so he said, don't worry. We're interviewing people were going to get you some help You don't understand I don't want to do this job at all anymore So I quit.

Engineer Jerry Nasa Bess Department Of Defence Specialt Tennessee State University Nasser Mitt
Next generation nuclear is a step closer to market

Climate Cast

03:38 min | 6 d ago

Next generation nuclear is a step closer to market

"The way we produce electric power is changing Minnesota generated twenty five percent of our electricity from renewables like wind and solar in two, thousand, nineteen and nationally coal electric power has been cut in half in the last decade and many utilities planned to go much further but going completely carbon-free is going to be tricky. Extracting alternatives such as natural gas still emits carbon and many states are looking to retire old nuclear power plants. So engineers are developing a new kind of nuclear last month. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission gave its first ever design approval to accompany working on the technology. That company is new scale power and here to talk about it is co founder Jose Reyes previously, he was the head of the Department of nuclear. Engineering at state. University Jose. Welcome to climate cast. Well, thank you so much for inviting him. Excited to share with you our technology why developed smaller nuclear reactors there are many parts of the world that don't have the grid to support a thousand megawatt electric nuclear power plant or they don't have the capital to invest in such large projects a so it really developed it so that it could reach a wide market and so we're looking at small module reactors. Each of our module of only produces sixty megawatts electric So not power or a forty, five, thousand homes in the US. Now I budget, we designed the plant that would house up to twelve of these modules, but we also have configurations of packs or six packs. So it's it's very flexible in in terms of where we could deploy these designs, Jose? What would these reactor buildings look like? Well, it looked like an industrial building as opposed to the LARCH containment domes that you associate with nuclear power. Each reactor is factory fabricated our containment vessels only about fifteen feet in diameter about seventy feet long So it's a very different configuration. What's the climate benefit of these smaller nuclear power systems? A company called energy, environmental economics each three. They performed a study for Washington state that showed that the least cost path to achieving percents clean energy out by twenty forty five was to include small module reactors. Assault new schedule meets with twenty nine utilities. Every six months utilize from Canada in the US many of them have coal fire plants which needs to retire, but we design our plant so that we can repurpose those coal fire plants and we can also retrain many of their workers to work at a do scale plant. So a twelve module loose gambling. Would avoid over six million tons of CO, two emissions per year, and so that's the equivalent of taking one point three, million cars off the road each year. Are they safe? Yes these are extremely safe reactors. This is a very unique design in that under any a worst case conditions of the reactors will shut themselves down without any operator action without any AC or DC power and Alamein cooled for an unlimited period time without the need to add water. So how soon can we realistically get to reliable carbon-free energy production? Are Design courses now approved and so that means that customers can start looking at how to a reference are designed in their integrated resource plans, and so that's very important. First step sob think we can make a very big impact in helping states, beat their clean-energy holes Jose us with new scale power. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. Thanks so much for having.

Jose Reyes Us Nuclear Regulatory Commissi United States Department Of Nuclear Jose Minnesota Alamein Cooled Co Founder Assault Canada Washington
Internet: Old TV caused village broadband outages for 18 months

Kottke Ride Home

02:15 min | 6 d ago

Internet: Old TV caused village broadband outages for 18 months

"It sounds like the plot of a SCIFI novel. In fact, it's literally part of the plot of a sci-fi novel. I read last month Hank Greens a beautifully foolish endeavor every morning for eighteen months the broadband Internet went out in a small village in Wales. Engineers ran a cable replacement program, but it didn't work every morning at seven am on the dut the Internet would go out for the entire village. The engineers were stumped into the used a monitoring device called a spectrum analyzer and walked around the village looking for electrical noise. Engineer Michael Jones said quotes at seven. Am like clockwork. It happened our device picked up a large burst of electrical interference in the village end quote. But it was not alien tech, it was instead a secondhand television set that an anonymous householder was turning on every morning at seven am and which omitted enough true `interference specifically a single high level impulse noise or nine to affect the broadband signal and knockout the Internet in the whole village. The TV owner has said that they were mortified and has agreed not to turn the TV on ever again. Quoting BBC Suzanne Rutherford Open reached chief engineers lead for Wales said anything with electrical components from outdoor lights to microwaves can potentially have an impact on broadband connections. We just advise the public to make sure that they're electrical appliances are properly certified and meet current British standards she said and quotes. which is good to know except most people probably wouldn't be aware that their device is causing any sort of problem i. mean it took them eighteen months to work this out I don't think that your average Joe would necessarily ever think that technology like outdated TV could affect modern tech like broadband but of course, it can and I do think it's interesting to see the interplay of older and newer technology and almost reminds me of how devices that run on electricite go haywire at hogwarts because all of the magic interferes with them, which was definitely based on a real scientific theory and not a convenient explanation as to why the characters didn't watch TV or use computers.

Wales Hank Greens Suzanne Rutherford Michael Jones Engineer BBC JOE
What it Means to be "AI Ready" - with Matthew Mattina

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

04:52 min | Last week

What it Means to be "AI Ready" - with Matthew Mattina

"This is Daniel Magellan. You're listening to the and podcast. We speak this week on the topic of. Readiness. What is it look like to truly be ready as an enterprise if you're a consultant, you're selling into enterprises and you want to build a success wave. This client stands in what might need to be worked on or if you are an AI champion within an enterprise, you want to get an understanding of where do we stand how ready are we should be an awfully helpful episode our guest. This Week is Matthew Martina who's the head of The machine learning research lab, A. R. M. A. R. Ramsey multibillion dollar semiconductor and software development company wholly owned by Softbank Softbank One of the biggest venture funds in the world based out in. Japan, and Matthew speaks to us about his criteria and his way of thinking through with Ai Readiness looks like in an enterprise again, if you WANNA a checklist to list of features away to assess take view on your own company or that of your clients. I think at this episode should be awfully helpful. If you're just getting started with deploying a, we have a free guide called beginning with Ai. It's special guy for non technical professional. So if you do not have a technical background, but you still want to understand what is it realistically look like to deploy artificial intelligence were the key factors to understand for a adoption. If you're not the person writing code, you're more focused on the business strategy side. Of things then you'll WANNA download that free pdf brief it's an e. m. e. R. J. dot com slash B e g, and then the number one. So bg like beginning and then the number one that's RJ DOT COM slash bg one that pdf should give you some extra details to layer on top of some of the insights that Matthew provides for us here today. So further ado this is Matthew mcconaughey with arm on the and business podcast So I'll kind of dive in first here on this topic of Ai Readiness and ask you about what you consider to be sort of the core components, the core aspects of Iranian s within the enterprise obviously a lot of moving parts here what comes to mind for you? Yeah. That's a good question I think. One of the core questions is one that I think people sometimes miss with respect to a I is. Now there's the problem that you're trying to solve. Of course, understanding that from the get go is key in pretty much any scientific or engineering discipline, but then with Ai. Knowing how your machine learning or a model actually going to be deployed. So what is that model gonNA run on in the field as it can run on a some kind of a big server in a cloud data center somewhere with no terabytes of memory and an of GPS and processors, or is that model ultimately going to be deployed on some kind of you know very constrained embedded device say you know in a in a o not censor or mobile phone or a car and everything in between? So think what we sometimes see is that a model will be developed by a data scientist or or. application will be developed without a good understanding deployment and where that gets prickly as you've developed this model, it uses you know. Fifty gigabytes of memory and then Lo and behold actually want to deploy it on a constrained device that has you know two hundred and fifty six kilobytes of memory, and now you need to do some surgery. Got It. So readiness here you're talking about you know not only involving the model, but involving sort of what are we going to run it on DC? This is potentially part of the four thought process for companies obviously, not everybody's GonNa have devices. Out in the field, people have security cameras, La- run things on mobile phones you know in in cars or maybe heavy industry the have it on a boat somewhere maybe other folks are just GonNa have stuff up in the cloud but for you, it sounds like maybe that thought process should happen as we're coming up with ideas not sort of after we've developed a great model idea that those have to be married to hardware sort of at the brainstorm phases kind of what you're getting at. That's exactly right as part of the upfront? Planning. Stage of enterprise preparing for a readiness. Yes. Some consideration for. What devices is this actually gonna run on and what are the key characteristics of those devices and and the interesting about it is that like I said, you can build models you know and build ai applications that you know recognize faces and use lots and lots of memory or they can have models at recognize faces and use very little memory. And making that trade off and understanding that that trade off will need to be made between accuracy and memory upfront will save people pain down

Matthew Matthew Martina Matthew Mcconaughey Daniel Magellan Japan Softbank Softbank DC Consultant LO E. M. E. R. Scientist A. R. M. A. R. Ramsey LA
Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

02:22 min | Last week

Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

"It's been a record shattering year for heat in the American West and this weekend is going to be hot too. If it seems like heat drought and wildfires are all piling together it's not your imagination scientists say climate change makes them more likely to happen at the same time. As NPR's Laura Summer reports. It takes a lot for heat to make headlines in Tucson. Arizona as Stephanie Small, House realize listening to the radio recently a couple days ago he said well, no warning for today it's only be one hundred six. Apparently. We're not over a hundred ten everybody should join the weather but this year is getting people's attention. Small House says she's president of the Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, and she also runs a cattle ranch outside of Tucson in the twenty years that I've been here on the ranch. This is probably just the second time that I remember a summer that's dry on top of the heat the entire Colorado River, which is key for Arizona's water supply has been in a twenty year drought. Is there tension in the Vermont Community Right? Now ranchy community absolutely is their stress absolutely these rare events. Are simply becoming more common says, Mogi Sunday professor of Civil Engineering Boise State University in a study in the journal Science advances he says that trend is clear over the past few decades basically routes or getting more intense and hot years or getting more hud, and the cycle between them is intensifying droughts and heat waves feed each other. He says when the soil is dry more of the sun's energy heats up the air then it's hotter making more water evaporate causing more drought. It's climate change driven cycle via have to move past that traditional thinking of heat waves and droughts and fires separately. Because they would work together they. They are the reason that we are seeing so many disasters, happening disasters like the extreme. Across the West this year, what is happening in California is a preview of what we'll see every. We need to act. Now we do not have any more minute I'm not talking about the years we do not have any more minutes to cut our emissions because in a hotter climate he says disasters are teaming up lauren summer NPR news.

Stephanie Small Arizona Tucson NPR Mogi Laura Summer Small House Arizona Farm Bureau Federation Colorado River Civil Engineering Boise State Vermont California Professor
Chipping Away at a Monolith with Tori Huang

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:44 min | Last week

Chipping Away at a Monolith with Tori Huang

"Tori I'd like to dig into what your role is at Gusto. So I'm a software engineer on the partners engineering team. My teams basically responsible for building out the experience for accountants on Gusto. So what Gusto specializes in small business, we have this entire platform for accountants that allows them to manage multiple clients and it's it's a pretty awesome platform. We provide a lot of tools to help accounts give personalized advice to their clients. They receive revenue share for clients, neighboring Augusta, and actually just worked on a project that recommends some of our accounting partners to small businesses. So now we're bringing accountants new clients. Just generally, I'm very passionate about the product I think it's were being able to build something and immediately be helpful to so many people especially small business. So essentially, my job is building Gusto for accountants, and I really have a typical product engineering job. So the reason that I brought you into the show is that I came across the excellent article that you wrote under the Gusto engineering blog called chipping away at a monolith. So, there was a period of time where developers were really sheepish about having a monolith however boldly, at the beginning of your article, you stated that Gusto had a monolith problem but it was a good thing. So can you explain why? Yet I would love to. So really you can only have a monolith problem to the extent that Gusto does after years of building your software's first of all, that means you've already been around for a while and in the startup world that is a big success right off the bat. I wasn't around in Gusta those early years when they were known as payroll but from my experience working with start ups right out of the boot Camp I can tell you that you're not worried about creating a monolith I mean you should be focused on launching your product a doing it quickly getting yourself out there finding as many users as possible and beating the competition. So while you might might be trying to build things a scalable way, it's it's really impossible to see to from that short distance where patterns are going to appear in your code base. So I would argue that most of the work you do early on in the life of a company to prevent the creation of a monolith is kind of pointless because you don't really know where the patterns are yet they haven't appeared. By the time you have a monolith problem like I said you've been around for a while so you can start to see these patterns Hopefully by that time, you're in a position where you're mature enough as a company that you have the space to spend some time on tech and addressing those patterns in Europe. So the tr of that is you can't really see these patterns, these domain patterns until you've had enough time to build out your software and that means you're already had some success. Survive long enough to write that much gone. That's a really positive way of looking at it. So from your personal experience windy. No, it's time to build a service outside of a monolith. I think that there are two things that really indicate you should start looking at breaking down your monolith. The first of all is that you're going to see these patterns emerging in your code. You're going to see where these domains should be and where your boundaries should lie. The second thing would be more of a business consideration a that spending time breaking down your monolith spending time separating out your software is going to bring you more benefits than actually focusing on building those new features. So again, early on in a company's life, it might make more sense to spend a lot of time building up this new features because you want to get your product out there quickly. But once you are able to see these patterns that's when you've earned the right to work on this model is problem.

Gusto Gusto Engineering Software Engineer Tori Europe Augusta Gusta
Is Stainless Steel Really Stainless?

BrainStuff

06:25 min | Last week

Is Stainless Steel Really Stainless?

"Bathroom, sinks and kitchen appliances to New York's Chrysler building, and the Saint Louis. Gateway. Arch. The world sometimes seems like it's covered in stainless steel. And why not the material is not only sturdy and versatile, but also stainless as the name implies, but is it really impossible to stain stainless steel? Stainless steel is a family of materials that gets its handle from corrosion and oxidation resistant properties that protect it from rust and unsightly botches. Generally, these steals our mixture of iron end at least ten point, five percent chromium sometimes rounded to eleven percent by engineers. When exposed to oxygen and moisture a for instance, when a stainless steel pan is nick door dinged chromium is an element that produces thin oxide film, the coats the product. This self repairing feature of stainless steel ensures the object will always look smooth and shiny. Various European American metallurgists claim to have invented. This wonders material. A We do know that Croup ironworks in Germany created an acid resistant steel as early as nineteen eight, it was used for the hell of a yacht. To other German researchers discovered the relationship between chromium content and corrosion resistance that metal containing at least ten point five percent chromium had a greater resistance to corrosion. Meanwhile American. elwood Haynes patented one type of stainless steel precursor in nine eleven and English researcher. Harry brearley developed a similar material around the same time. After a four year dustup in which hanes successfully opposed brearley's attempt to patent his version of the steel, the to pooled resources to market their wares as the American stainless steel. Company. These and other stainless bells found their way into cutlery airplane parts, Gulf clubs, and Adams almost immediately. But not all stainless steel is created equal. There are four main types of stainless steel classified by structure and composition. The most common variety is static sixty, five percent of the stainless steel produced. All's in this category. A static steals can be found in products ranging from cutlery and cookware to automotive trim and industrial applications. Immaterial pains at least sixteen percent chromium no more than zero point one, five percent carbon and usually includes nickel or manganese for added their ability. Meanwhile. For riddick stainless steels contain up to twenty seven percent chromium often as well as aluminum or titanium, but if little or no nickel. means that while these materials are highly resistant to Croatian, they're less durable than their austin cousins. For riddick steals are more affordable than Austin attic varieties and are commonly used in Mufflers, exhaust, systems kitchen counters, and sinks. Then we have Martin's stainless steels which are less corrosion resistant than the first two types, but are noted for their extreme strength and durability. Of the material contains twelve fourteen percent chromium along with small amounts of Molybdenum and carbon. These steals also contain little to no nickel less than two percent. Martin's stainless steels are magnetic and are often used in products where this feature's useful like a kitchen back splash to which spice rack or other metal object can be attached without using fasteners. A finally duplex stainless steels combined the benefits of Austin night and fair right to provide enhanced decay resistance and beefed up strength and durability. metallurgists typically look to create a mix that's half Austin and half foretich. The result is material that features more chromium and less nickel than his found in Pure Austin at steals about twenty to twenty, five percent chromium and five percent nickel as well as a high level of Molybdenum. These deals are primarily used in chemical plants and piping applications. You may have noticed our use of the term resistant when referring to these stainless steels capacity for avoiding blemishes. So is the material just stain resistant or completely stain proof? And despite the hardy protection that it affords users, stainless steel is more stain less and stainless in other words while the material is highly resistant to discoloration blemishes and other imperfections, it's not completely impenetrable. Just look at the Gateway Arch, which is starting to show its age with breast and K after five decades of welcoming tourists to saint. Louis. The protective layer of film covering a stainless steel object can break down over time leading to corrosion and pitting. In addition compounds like chloride, hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide often caused the film to stress and crack. The level of rest resistance provided by a particular steel depends largely on the materials used to create it the more chromium, the more corrosion protection. The sturdier stainless steels also feature at least eight percent nickel, which provides further defense against tarnish. Some products are tagged with numbers indicating their proportions of chromium and nickel. For instance, eighteen over ten flatware is sold at a premium because it has eighteen percent chromium and ten percent nickel content providing greater protection against corrosion than ordinary flatware. For household users it's important to understand that many metals advertised a stainless steel are actually stainless steel played it. The plate is corrosion resistant, but is susceptible to damage if cut or scratched deep enough to reach the. Material because the plates can also wear off over time, buyers should clarify whether a particular product is made completely of stainless steel or simply plated. Whether played it or not. You're stainless steel appliances and other products need to be cleaned. Most of the time good old fashioned soap and water will do the trick for tougher stains. Professionals recommend variety of household remedies. A couple of dabs of olive oil or window cleaner can remove most of those pesky fingerprints and smudges while white or cider vinegar will restore shine. A don't use steel wool pads or harsh cleaning powders as they'll scratched surface. If you need to remove burnt on food from stainless steel pan, let it soak in warm water and then clean it with baking soda and Gentle Nylon or plant based scouring pad.

Austin Harry Brearley Blemishes Molybdenum Martin New York Chrysler Croup Gateway Arch Saint Louis Elwood Haynes Riddick Adams Researcher Hanes American. Germany Louis
Give Up Control, On Purpose

Developer Tea

06:24 min | Last week

Give Up Control, On Purpose

"One of the misconceptions that I had about this show when I started this podcast five years ago. was that every episode needed to be better than the last? And this was a misperception misconduct option of what this audience needs out of this podcast for a couple of reasons. The first reason is very simple. How do you decide? between two episodes, which one is the best. The easy answer might actually be substitution question. Which, episode, has more listens. Or? Perhaps the heuristic were this substitution that we make is which episode has the best feedback. Which episode is mentioned in reviews the most or which episode has the most chatter on twitter. All of these are just proxies to quality. And there's no specific way to determine. What episodes are? Unequivocally. Better than others. Of course, that's not to say that all episodes are then therefore equal to each other their episodes that I feel. Much more proud of over time but the perception, the confusion that I had was that my pride or my feeling of. Investment or my feeling of quality my perception of quality of the episodes were going to match up with everyone else's. My perception was that I needed to increase control and investment in every episode. But the truth was that I needed to like go of control. And invest less in the episodes not because I didn't WANNA put more of my energy and time. Into caring for the episodes but rather. that. If I tried to be a perfectionist about these episodes, then we wouldn't be able to publish this show on as regular basis. And the interesting factor here. Is that some of the episodes where I felt. Rushed or even. Like the idea for the episode, the premise of the episode wasn't very good. Some of those episodes I actually received very good feedback. You could argue based on those heuristic we talked about at the beginning. But some of those were my best episodes. So, why am I telling you all of this? How does it matter to your career as a software engineer? First of all I do want to mention the fact that this isn't true across the board. Not, every podcast is optimized for delivering two or three episodes a week like this one is. But I wanNA talk about a specific measure. That most suffering engineers will relate to especially as your career moves forward. And that is control. In. One of many things that we often have a confusion about. Perception that could be flipped on its head and many of us would. Benefit from that flipping. Our natural perception most of us at least. That as we gain more control things will improve. As as we have more influence. As. We have more say over whatever is happening. As. We have more information and more power. Things will improve. Our ability to our lives in a positive. Or our ability to affect other people's lives in a positive direction will increase as we gain more control. But time and time. Again, this shows to not be true. And, probably, for a few reasons, one of the first reasons that comes to mind is the fact that most control his actually an illusion. We aren't increasing our own agency most of the time. Instead, we are borrowing agency from someone else or something else. Or we're allowing ourselves to believe that we have more control than we actually have. Now how does this play out well? As an example, you may eventually become a manager in your career and you might find yourself excited to dive into the statistics of your team's performance. An as you open up those statistics for discussion and as you drive the team towards improving those statistics, it may feel very rewarding to see those numbers change. But there's so many problems that tend to happen when we manage purely by the numbers, this is only one example of how control can be an illusion. In this example, managing by the numbers creates very clear. Problems with those numbers if you have incentives to make a given number move in a particular direction. Then it's very likely that you're trading something else off or. You may unknowingly be creating a false measure, some kind of gamified measure. and. So this idea that we're controlling things more that were able to take those numbers and move them in the right direction by imposing our powerful position, for example. On other people that that is somehow a controlling measure. It turns out to move us in the other direction. We get a picture of things that isn't clear. And this isn't a new problem. This isn't a problem that has come up since. We started measuring things measuring performance with data. This isn't new it's not a modern problem. In fact, many philosophers talk about the idea that control is in some ways. The source of suffering for many people.

Twitter Software Engineer
How Arsha Jones Started An ECommerce Empire with Less Than $100

Side Hustle Pro

06:17 min | Last week

How Arsha Jones Started An ECommerce Empire with Less Than $100

"Guys welcome back to the show. This is Michaela and I am so excited to introduce you to today's guest. Today's guest in the hot seat is our show Jones and our show. Hey, our show. Thanks for coming on the show you guys are. One of the people who I've learned the most from this year. Yes. I'm a part of your facebook group as you know. So is a serial entrepreneur and master of many trades. As we speak she's currently operating and managing capital CITCO keeping us all fly through the tease in the trap brand building Iowa's APPs for APPs by the pound all while running the designed blog and facebook group rant bill. So so on this episode, you'll learn how arshile created her first online business with less than a hundred dollars and is now an ECOMMERCE extraordinaire. The welcome to the show our show. Tell us. Tell us more about who you are and what you're currently working on. So. My name name, the journals like you said just. As hard to kind of Embrace that term entrepreneur. You know I put it in bio because it's the easiest. Thing that people can understand without you. Know me having to explain any further but I just you know part of me just doesn't feel like one I'm just a more of a creative. Think of these great ideas and I say how are bring this to light you know so I don't think of me. Oh. I want to create all these businesses I think while that'd be a great product that I could sell, and then it usually turns into something else So each thing that I've started historic off one thing and kind of morphed into something bigger you know. But definitely on my plane is just to be a creative lead who has the ability to see ideas before they're made and know that they be profitable and be fine. You know 'cause this for me it's like. The money is you know but I enjoy the process of it. It's fun to me. To see these things come to live come to life rather and so So that's GONNA. Margot here is you know entrepreneurship is kind of the side It's kind of the five part that happens along with being creative but I just a maker at heart maker. If, I didn't have this I probably be a crafter or. Someone at home like gluing things to get. Definitely have. Creative. Brain and five and like. You know you remind me of the quote unquote the phrase bias for action like you see that on a lot of people's by like. Like I love meeting people who really epitomized that because when you think of an idea, you're like Oh let me let me so I had this. Thought those product together. But before we get into the business as a little bit where are you from like how? Up Bridges Lewis's creative Well, Wa was born raised in Washington DC and I currently live in Maryland but it was partly because of my parents so. You know like most parents you know their idea of they were coming raised with the idea that she would come trade and I'm going to get a government job or something more steady. You know engineer doctor lawyer or something like that But my father kind of wanted us to go into a different direction in. So he kinda pushed us into the arts. Okay. So from a age I would say like eight or nine I always had eager to draw actively or play an instrument actively So. I played the cello. for about eight years amongst other instruments but kind of my heart was in art. So I kind of chose that as a thing I wanted to do. So I did art all through high school until school and then graduated went to these you in Richmond and gut graduated with a BFA. What I didn't realize was that I, didn't really have a plan for my life. And it wasn't like that in college I was like wait. So I'm supposed to like pain control like has wanNA. Make money. Like never even dawned on me that I'd like need a job I love. And so this is around the time that. kind of the DOT com boom had happened. So I learned fairly easily how to design websites and so that kind of kind of figuring out the creative side always had was able to keep a job based on the web design skills that I saw graduated with a BFA. Like I said. With his huge creative background but my but but my day job was web design So that kind of got me into building websites, understanding design understanding how the Web, works, understanding marketing. Social, media and and all that fun stuff and that led me into blogging. Okay. So then because I would get, I would feel questions about the blogging, hosting in how to set up a website and so I put blog. Okay. I'll put a blog. And I'll get all these affiliate links and click. Well. You know I figured out the system and I was making like a passive income about a thousand dollars a month and I was like, wow okay. If I had this thousand dollars a month bright IF I sell a product than I probably can like take another thousand dollars. and. So And for launched, I ended up launching capital. because. Capital city, we sell a wing sauce called capital city Mumbo sauce, and both of is in A. Wing sauce that we originally created is this assaults that you can get here in Washington, DC, metropolitan area

Facebook Washington Bridges Lewis Michaela Jones Engineer Doctor Lawyer Margot A. Wing Iowa Maryland Richmond WA DC
Kevin Magee of Microsoft Canada on where the cybersecurity industry may be headed

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

01:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Kevin Magee of Microsoft Canada on where the cybersecurity industry may be headed

"Where do you think we're headed when when you look towards the horizon? In terms of thinking of the continued professionalization of cybersecurity. Becomes more and more essential, less exotic a part of every business. What do you think the future holds for us well I hope we don't ever lose the art and make it into a complete science would be my number one comment on that it's it's not like other industries and we try and graft our thought processes and how we define our industry on. Other. Industries, we call you know people in technology architects or engineers. Maybe we need our own vocabulary to describe what we do, I and I. Think we need to You've really step back in see where we want to take our industry and those of us that have been in while and have been around have had the benefit of lots of great mentors and lots. Of folks that helped us up the ladder and it's incumbent on us to really do that for the next generation, help them up the ladder and a lot of times they feel like they can't reach out to someone with a big title like mine or whatnot. One of the greatest joys of my day is spending some time with a student or someone who is passionate. About our industry in in helping, guide them or introducing some a new book that they should read or not to them to enable them on their career and I. think There's a lot of folks like me out there that would love to have those discussions. Have those have those interactions and pay it forward because someone helped them get to where they are as well.

"engineer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:48 min | Last month

"engineer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"There's two more things that I want you to let go of to leave behind. . On your pathway to becoming a software engineer. . And realistically you're going to be on pathway indefinitely and that kind of inspires the next two things. . The first one is the belief that there is a perfect tech stack waiting to be discovered. . This is an easy thing to believe because there are people who have bought in very deeply. . To, , given tech stack in that stack works really well for them and perhaps when they write a blog post or they do a podcast, , they go and speak at a conference. . They talk about that stack as if it's kind of a one-size-fits-all solution or as if it's the pinnacle of computer, science? , ? But the truth is that there is no one perfect tech stack. . How can this be? ? When we're told this over and over, , and over that, , we're supposed to be refining our tools and. . Building new ones and abstracting on top of those and getting better and better. . The truth is that your tech stack is only part of the equation in you are a huge factor in that equation. . Think about it for a second you are part of the tech stack. . The tech stack doesn't build itself and it doesn't exist as some kind of autonomous entity right you are working with the tech stack. . And if it doesn't you or if it doesn't fit the thing that you're trying to do. . And it doesn't matter what? ? About it at a conference or on. . Hacker News. . So you're not going to find the perfect tech stack and that should also feel liberating. . It's a little bit disappointing because it'd be nice if we all agreed and we just went in one direction and we could find a tool that just works for everyone magical but that's not going to happen and that can be liberating because we can let go of that constant pursuit and be okay we can choose. . Tools that we like we can choose tools that are safe or we can accept the fact that the job that we have or working with a tool that <hes> <hes> maybe has some downfalls right? ? It has some weak spots that doesn't necessarily mean the end of the world it certainly doesn't mean that your engineering organization doesn't see the light. . Once, , you are able to accept the fact that there's not a perfect tech stack. . Then you can work towards making the one that you have more valuable. . Now have one final thing that I. . Want you to let go of in this really is an underpinning theme of this podcast entirely, , and that is that coding is not the job. . Let go of the illusion that coding is the job. . And understand that there is so much more to being a software engineer than just writing code and to illustrate this point, , I want you to do a kind of mental exercise <hes>. . This is just a thought experiment imagine that you have your job today. . You have your job today but. . That we've somehow removed the responsibility of writing code from your. . Plate. . You no longer have to write the code. . You still have to go through the same thought processes that you had before you still have to think through all the same scenarios. . You have to understand the people that you work with. . You still have to work with the same <hes>. . You know stakeholders, , etc. . How would your job look different? ? What would change about your job? ? It's important to understand that there are people who are hired just to be coders, , but this is a fragile job. . It's a job that could easily be replaced. . And if you're just now starting out in your career, , especially, , if you have many years <hes> theoretically in front of you in your career then focusing on just coding is not kind of the pinnacle of what you'll do in your career. . It certainly will be a part of it. . But <hes> imagine that your coding is only one tool in a very wide array of tools that we already just mentioned. . Right imagine taking that tool away what is left in your skillset focus on developing those things as much and perhaps even more than you're coding skills because they're going to. . Pay You back in spades, , not just in money, but , certainly in relationships and. . Personal fulfilment. .

engineer
"engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

14:30 min | 4 months ago

"engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"Welcome to another episode of the Front End. Happy our podcast in this episode. We're joined by a two NETFLIX's engineers Chevron and Michael to talk with us about ecosystem engineering at Net flicks. Trevan and Michael. Can you give us a brief introduction of who you are what you do and what your favorite happy our beverages? My name is Michael James. I've been at Netflix's for nine years. This is actually my team that flicks the current team. I'm on is called device reliability. And so what we're tasked to do is any TV or set-top box like a Roku or cable box that you might have in your house if something should go wrong on it like you can't log in words crashing where there's lots of playback errors or there's a lot of startup errors. Anything like that Kua. We is bad you get lots of buffering. It's our teams job to detect that remotely figure out what broke who broke it and get them to fix it so half the time. It's netflix breaking stuff. Because Netflix's changing all the time in the cloud and pushing new things the UI is changing doing experiments and the other half of the time. It's either the internet or it's the what we call partners the Roku the Samsung's the comcast of the world. They've made some change. We have to ask them what they changed and hopefully get them to fix it. So that's what that's what we do and I do in a an awesome and then what's your favorite happy hour beverage Right now I am drinking Don Julio Hole too so good choice. That is a great choice. I had to choose something very good to put me into mood to being a talking sort of frame. It should help. We have found that that actually helps. Just loosen you just enough so far. It's working so my name is charlene owner. I'm being at Netflix's for about four years now right now. This is my second team. I'm on partner infrastructure and what our team does is. We have a box called the the reference automation environment and this provides a lot of services and an entry point for all partners to run their metrics sweets on so all the partners that need certification to have netflix on their boxes. Whether it be. Mvp BOXES CD vices. They use the ray to actually a make sure they get run. They get results back There are a lot of services that do you know. Dns marking that talking puty and do all sorts of cool stuff We also provide a lot of services internally do teams across partner ecosystem and yeah so prior to that. I was at Bahrain's nearing so. Why used to work with partners awesome. I love that you both have been on two different teams to. Yeah that's awesome gem. You and I've been on the same team the entire time we've been at. Let's run a good team or we don't believe that that may be it. Yeah exactly well. Let's give introduction of today's Panelists Jeb. Young Senior Engineer Net flicks. I've only been here for For years so maybe Michael you can give me some tips on making another four. And I'm Ryan Burgess. I may suffer engineering manager at Netflix. And I've been here for just over five years in each episode of the Front End Happier. Podcast we'd like to choose a keyword. If it's mentioned at all in the episode we will all take a drink. What did we decide? Today's keyword is quality. I don't remember say quality I figure I heard Quality Docu automatically 'cause they kind of go hand in hand so that makes sense all right. Well let's jump in both Iran and Michael. You gave a little bit of descriptions early in your intros. But I'm really curious. How do you describe? What IS ECOSYSTEM? Engineering NF flakes. So I've my previous role. I was a manager also and interest netflix's have to do a lot of recruiting and I'd have to answer this question a lot. Like what do you do? And what is this an unusually posted by saying you ever go into a store costco someplace and you see the. Tv's for sale and on the box they have netflix on them. Netflix's already pre install on it or if you could buy a Roku already got netflix on their more comcast box you may or may not get it but if it does get loaded somehow. Netflix's getting on all these devices. How does that happen? What happens is there's a team at net flicks that makes the Netflix's player code and we package it up once a year and we call it the de k a software developers kit for the player and we might give it a name but every year we give it out to these partners in these partners are like Samsung L. G. Roku comcast of the world and they have to take it and make it work on their system. And so if you look at all the TV's out there and all the set top boxes you can see that you know they're different chipsets. There's different hardware. They probably have different compilers and compilers settings. They've God's maybe their own libraries that they have to do they have a different os on their TV. Every device out there. Basically a custom made device. And so how do you get those Netflix's player which looks pretty much the same once you start the APP whether it's on a Roku or a Samsung Smart TV or a cable set top box? How is it ended up at experiences? Pretty much universal. I would say in how that happens is there are other teams that work with these partners to make sure that AAA compiles and be that. It's good that doesn't crash We have a suite of tasks and Trevan helps with that that area. The part and my previous manager job was in area too. We don't let net Netflix. Go out or be sold or pre installed on and device unless we know that device is going to have good quality with it. I said it cheers. Cheers cheers cheers and how that happens. Is these partners. Have to run a whole bunch of tests and pass these tests and there's a a Cloud-based tests service that Netflix's made where they can take their device whether they're working in China or whether they're working in Japan or Korea or the US or anywhere in the world they plug it into Internet. They log into this cloud service and they can run tests and we can see these tests if they pass fail and so on so forth and was passed all these tests then it goes out into the field and people can buy them what people have them in their homes or they sign up for cable service and they get this box and they start net flakes. And if it's working great we can see the metrics remotely from here 'cause all these boxes and TV's are sending this logs all the time and if there's a problem we should be able to detect that and try to get it fixed so long story. Short Netflix's works with a whole bunch of other companies to get these apps working and what's out there are jobs not done. We have to make sure that it keeps working. And so that's where he may be a deluded to like. Qe which maybe you could explain. What the Kiwi Patrick. Is that your your teams looking at sure. So Kua we. Quality of experience cheers. Cheers kind of set. You up for that one. They are metrics that deal with how the APP appears to the user. So this would be. Things like is video smooth. Does it look like high. Bit Rate. So it looks like very high quality not just st but also hd for K. buffering a lot. Which hopefully it's not a re buffer is when you're watching in the middle of playback and there's this kind of spinner that appears on the screen where it's trying to load and it's ten percent twenty percent. Seventy five percent. Ninety nine percent starts playing again. It's probably because there's some interference on the network or there's a bug in the buffering on the device we want to keep all that buffering to a minimum so that when you start watching it smooth. There's no interruptions but it's not just limited to that if you have trouble starting the APP or if you're in the middle of the APP crashes or there's like network fluctuations where it goes high quality low quality too much on. These are all things that could be addressed usually on the device side and try to minimize those as much as possible wherever possible. Even things outside of the network that users network or the service provider's network lately. Yeah that's another one. I forgot about that one. The time it takes for you to press the button versus how long it takes to start the actual playback. Hopefully it's around four or five seconds but on some devices we see. It's as long as twenty seconds thirty seconds. That's something that could be fixed on a device. Hopefully I think that's always been something that I've actually been amazed at is just Michael. You paint the picture of the ecosystem of all the different TV devices. But when I think about it too is the Netflix. App is being built for something like a roku stick. It's a lower powered device. And then you have something lake the playstation four or Xbox at you can also play on. It has a lot bigger assessor. I think is really interesting. How you there's large ecosystem of devices that we are supporting and so I can imagine that becomes a lot more challenging in your world to to support all those different variables are those devices and especially when you think that every one of those devices basically a custom made device very few devices. Look or act exactly the same from the code perspective and so it's it's a challenge to make sure that when you start Netflix's whether on a fifteen dollars stick if you bought it on sale the way up to four hundred dollars playstation or even a three thousand dollar four K. SMART TV that the Netflix's experience is pretty universal. On all of them. You still log in the same. You still have your same catalog. He still are able to see and navigate through the you. I pretty much the same. It's pretty familiar despite that range and I think that's pretty amazing. What Ryan I think? I WANNA point out that the game consoles do not come under g good point so meaning. Eeg would be the ecosystem engineering nearing group. Yeah they do. Share allotted the same player. Coon the and they do share the same underlying Java script code and the code so a lot of that is the same the main differences. It's not made by partner. There's a dedicated Netflix team. That makes the player for playstation saint for xbox and so there's a problem we can go render those teams which is like one floor above us. Say Did you know that there's a bug and they can fix it. If there's a problem with Samsung we have to go. We usually have a engineer on site a Netflix's employees who specializes with Samsung or works a lot with a certain partner and shrove on when when you you're on that team what was your partner so he's to work with CISCO WITH EASY so if there was a problem in the certain partners device our first up would be to go and see if that partner engineer we call them. The NETFLIX's employ has any insight. If they don't then we have to escalate to the partner of themselves so we have to either send email conference call or do something. Maybe there's someone we know. In country athletes now have offices in Taiwan and Korea and so maybe they can take it over from us. I think there is a certain kind of a chain of command there. Yeah like most people inside e typically go to the park junior and say I know Michael might say I'm seeing when I was to be a partner engineer it would be like hey big played delays on easy box right you know. It seems like they pushed a new form. Where on certain? Nate and the play. Which is the time taken for the title to actually start playing from the time when the user presses it it's gone twenty percent more percent more but then the engineer would actually reach back to the partner or in certain cases we have coalition partner engineering. Their tears so there's apartment engineer who works in the operator level. There's a partner engineer who works at the s O sea level so the associates his system on chip on chip right so people like dot com and ham logic and things like that. So we have certain implementations based on these. Soc's and certain parliamentary partner engineers would actually work exclusively with those associate companies. So then you know we. We consider those scaling projects because they're serving more than one operator. And so you know it'll be a to them and they will talk to the nurse it kind of worries on the problem and the situation. That was one of surprise when I joined. This group is a lot of people. When they hear Netflix's they think if I'm going to be an engineer at Netflix's I'm doing stuff in the cloud or I'm doing stuff on the UI. Maybe I'm doing stuff on the player but they don't realize there's a big team here that is device from where specific that they're actually working with system on chips and they're trying to get Netflix's to work at the hardware level amongst the whole eco-system lack of a better word of device chip said sin everything out there and so a lot of people are kind of surprised at like I did not know that you work with device drivers and C..

NETFLIX partner Michael James Samsung engineer Trevan Ryan Burgess Senior Engineer Net Bahrain costco Korea Don Julio Hole Soc engineering manager Mvp Kiwi Patrick Nate Iran Chevron
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

15:30 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Engineering daily happy to be here. Your book. We're recent book is called big business and and there are many different forms of big business that you explore in your book. I'd like to go through a few different sectors of big business briefly just to get your condensed perspective on each of these industries and give the listeners a little bit of exposure to you're thinking i the banking sector. I think the american banking sector has become come underrated. It's arguably the best financial sector in the world for re allocating capital to growth companies venture capital. Does this but it's not just venture capital private equity. It's our entire banking system. I fully accept the criticism that our financial sector had a great deal to to do with the two thousand and eight crash. That's correct but one thing i tried to do in my book is to give people a balanced perspective of all of the facts and overall right right now the u._s. financial system is not out of control and it's doing many good things for us so i think of my book overall a corrective on the factual side healthcare healthcare u._s. Healthcare system is far too expensive in my view is the sector of our economy where business and business incentives work the worst asia too much consolidation and our hospital sector. We're very bad at cost control and there you have the worst tendencies of impatient american consumers. There's over promising american politicians and pretty greedy. American business people are working together in what is somewhat of a dysfunctional direction so that part part of american business. I'm pretty critical of quote. Unquote big tech big tech means different things to different people but right now we're in a world world where both political parties intellectuals on both sides are calling big tech evil saying it's ruining our democracies <hes> that it's destroying families the actual reality is from a lot of big tech companies. We get wonderful services often for free or very cheaply. The criticisms about destroying democracy are very much overstated or lacking in evidence. I do think there are some problems with big tech. People might waste too much time on their smartphones. There's some evidence say that teenage girls become more depressed because of social media but overall consumer and societal gains from the big tech companies have been very very large and i mean amazon facebook google apple and others big tech is distinctive from other industries reason that it's easy to imagine these big tech companies getting into almost any other business line and it it's much harder to imagine wells wells fargo getting into a business that is not closely related to finance or imagining a pharmaceutical company getting into streaming video something like that. Why is it that big. Tech companies have this quality of being able to move into such a wide range of business lines well. I'm not sure that they do. I think a lot of the big tech companies are not very good at managing labor intensive processes. It's one reason why they've been bad at lobbying and public relations a few years ago. A lot of people ask the question question well. Why isn't facebook selling us all insurance after all it has a pipeline to so many millions of americans but it doesn't seem like that's about to happen so <hes> services that are rapidly scalable and partly or fully solvable by software and by hiring clemson clusters of talented software engineers and other sorts of tech workers the big tech companies are great at so amazon expands into cloud computing for instance but i think what they can do is nonetheless remarkably limited and even amazon which is in some ways the most versatile of the tech companies still far smaller than say walmart is in our modern environment you bring up cloud computing and cloud computing is something that our society has come to rest on like amazon web services went down our society would fall apart in in many ways to to a certain extent similarly to how the fall all of two thousand and eight of the financial institutions had a too big to fail quality where it it started to to fracture the potential for society diety to function properly are there ways in which the ubiquity of these big tech companies gives them a too big to fail quality. That's concerning to you at all well. I think there's a national security issue with a number of tech services including also as related to our power grid but if you ask the question would you rather have this issue two issues tackled by say amazon with a very high levels of talent ability to purchase the best i protection that's available and also they have a pretty close one to one working relationship with say the department of defense or intelligence agencies or or should we split at big tech and f seven smaller companies with less talent fewer resources harder to monitor. I actually would rather prefer to work with the giants. I know we are still vulnerable. We've always been vulnerable in some key ways but nonetheless. I think you know put your money where the talent is essentially when it comes to national security another issue that can emerge from the sprawl of big companies like this was the case with finance companies. He's this is the case with companies like amazon is that when you get this very complex web of incentives you have a widespread potential for fraud frauds if potential for fraud in the amazon marketplace in google and facebook ad marketplaces and we have no way to gauge the amount of fraud. Is that a concern that we need to worry about well if the question is simply. Do we need to worry about it. <hes> yes but if you ask what are among your most reliable and predictable experiences that can as a consumer most of them involve big business you stand a much better chance dealing with walmart or amazon and then say trying to call in a local television repair person who will tell you whether or not your saddest broken and how much it costs to fix it so i view that as net upgrade should we be more vigilant against fraud of course does the internet as a hall help us monitor fraud in many small businesses it does so if you have a local restaurant toronto makes people sick or doesn't sell them the proper products you go to yelp or tripadvisor. It's actually pretty easy to find out about that. These big tech companies they often unhappy mythos about them so google is about growing the world's information and making it more accessible. It's got an inspirational air to it. Facebook doc is about connecting the world to each other. These are ideologies that can appeal to certain people that can appeal to consumers they can appeal to potential employees the company but some of us we can get swept up in the ideology. What's the productivity of this kind of inspirational ideological india logical facet of businesses. Would it be more realistic and sobering if we thought of these companies more like just you boring utility companies please. Do we really want this inspirational element to it. I favor those ideologies for the most part. I've benefited from them greatly. I'm connect could two people around the entire world that helps what i do is a researcher and writer. I'm not saying it's all upside. Clearly it is not you can have certain bad. The ideas spread too quickly. You can have certain kinds of ideological bubbles become too popular <hes> but the extent to which something that was only a vague dream fifteen or twenty many years ago has become an stand she aided in our world and i can really without any kind of effort be in touch with someone in rural africa which i am on a regular basis this multiple times a week and i sent him money tried to help him out. That's the phenomenal development and my ability to learn about other places so you know the printing press every other major communications technology has had some downsides radiohead some downsides but i think the overall ledger on tech communication has been very strongly positive tiv- that individual in africa that you're referring to is that the person that you're sending all the money from your previous book too. That's correct. His name is yellen. He lives in lally bella. He has mobile access to the internet and did even before. I sent him any money his family has you know very hello very low annual income and he spends a lot of spare time on youtube. He loves church history so if you ask them about the fourth century armenian the christian church he knows all about it to me. That's pretty phenomenal that we have this in our world and it was not the case until quite recently and i can send him money and be in touch with him. Yeah tell me more about what kinds of cultural reflections you've had from your interactions with him. I have an understanding of how fragile progress in ethiopia is so the country has grown at around ten percent a year for ten years running which is phenomenal of course but they were starting at such a low level hugh. I have a sense of the political problems with some of the ethnic minorities. I have a better sense of what it's like to live in a town of about twenty thousand people people in the ethiopian highlands. I visited that town twice but still being in regular touch with someone. I learned things it gives me a greater awareness of global problems. It's like what's the economic potential for the town. What can it do. Why can it not do so again if you think of this and then people in africa south asia many other places learning from the technocratic expertise and other locales and improving their own local policies. I think those are just phenomenal gains and they're very much under aided by current discourse. How do you envision that changing because i've had similar experiences just from people who listened to a podcast and they reach out or want to interview somebody eighty in a market in salt lake interview somebody about software in vietnam for example and it's this really magical experience it feels an it's rare when you get on a skype call with somebody in a completely different place and it feels so much more magical and i mean speaking of inspiration compared compared to logging onto twitter in the morning which i also love but there's something to that and i feel like not many people experience it well. The more and more people are experiencing it a podcast for instance or growing. We're doing this podcast at a distance through skype which is owned by microsoft which supports it. That's also big tech so i think also any new technology we get better at using it with sometime. We learn how to curb the excesses and how regulate our own deployment of the technology so i think the benefits of the internet are really just getting underway compared to what is likely to follow over the next century. Your book is explicitly pro business. What are the most valid critiques of big business today. Well i would say my book is pro fact so in big business is at fault. I'm not at all shy in admitting that we discussed briefly the american medical establishment not long ago. I'm pretty critical of that mostly on the side of cost a for profit higher education. We've seen massive fraud there. That was a big business. It's now gotten smaller very quickly for the better her. I think rates have fraud in business. Transactions in general are pretty high but i also think if you look at how individuals behave outside of a business setting they tend to lie i at least as much but i do think you have particular sectors with the incentives and information are bad and for profit higher ed and parts of american healthcare would be examples of that and in those cases big business has not performed very well but that said i think when you look at it sector-by-sector company by company the overall record is much more positive than what you hear say from bernie sanders elizabeth warren or even donald trump loves to go after c._e._o.'s and companies..

amazon fraud facebook google africa walmart giants youtube ethiopia south asia microsoft asia bernie sanders lally bella
"engineer" Discussed on Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

"Something that's really Zionist this time and so it's less about being able to predict it but saying if something like that happens it will be a lot more calamitous than I think historically just because there's less room in terms of the way balance-sheets are structured the way the government has flexibility so that's my mini anxiety and yet one of the things we've talked. 'cause we know each other around. The hall is your maybe this is just to kind of an occupational hazard of being a portfolio manager is to have these anxieties that are kind of verb lean in in different ways this part of what makes you prudence on behalf of well also part of my training right and so if you think about you went through my background I was an engineer is trained as a civil engineer and engineering is a very pessimistic discipline. I mean basically we're in this building and I say okay. What's we're going to make the list of what could go wrong? How bad the win be much the earth shake what could happen if someone not and so you go through this long catalogue of negative outcomes and you sort of designed to say okay? What would I need to do to survive those doublet and build your building right right? That's a really difficult way to function as an investor because you wind up seeing boogeyman around every corner and so a lot of the battle for me personally as an investors tried to blend in some optimism because they have this natural training that drives me towards articulating. Violating all the negative things that are going to happen. I that's interesting. I'm sure we're going to get more into that but staying on the idea of a downturn that's GonNa come eventually. Presumably has the definition of the defensive stock changed or is it still pretty much. What folks have talked about for a long time? It's kind of the usual suspects utilities consumer staples solid dividend payers that kind of thing look a definition of a defensive stock is a stock whose earnings and revenues will hold up fairly Weldon recession. I think the question you're really asking is will the stocks have historically had those attributes the same ones this time around <hes> that I'm a little I'm not so sure about right. I mean some of them. Utilities that feels that businesses Felix changing very much but I think the foods which are traditional you know people have to eat and so in recessions those revenues typically don't go down very much although right now food is in this really transitional period just in terms of how it salt right whether people going to the grocery store where the people eating more food at home whether you're having home delivery services so all those things are are changing the nature of the industry such that there may be a different pressure possibly on the top lines of those companies when you have a recession next time around it may be the same but I'm just always vigilant about companies that are undergoing <hes> a sea change in how the industry actually operates now one thing our listeners should know is that you are viewed..

engineer portfolio manager Felix Weldon
"engineer" Discussed on Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

"Something that's really Zionist this time and so it's less about being able to predict it but saying if something like that happens it will be a lot more calamitous than I think historically just because there's less room in terms of the way balance-sheets are structured the way the government has flexibility so that's my mini anxiety and yet one of the things we've talked. 'cause we know each other around. The hall is your maybe this is just to kind of an occupational hazard of being a portfolio manager is to have these anxieties that are kind of verb lean in in different ways this part of what makes you prudence on behalf of well also part of my training right and so if you think about you went through my background I was an engineer is trained as a civil engineer and engineering is a very pessimistic discipline. I mean basically we're in this building and I say okay. What's we're going to make the list of what could go wrong? How bad the win be much the earth shake what could happen if someone not and so you go through this long catalogue of negative outcomes and you sort of designed to say okay? What would I need to do to survive those doublet and build your building right right? That's a really difficult way to function as an investor because you wind up seeing boogeyman around every corner and so a lot of the battle for me personally as an investors tried to blend in some optimism because they have this natural training that drives me towards articulating. Violating all the negative things that are going to happen. I that's interesting. I'm sure we're going to get more into that but staying on the idea of a downturn that's GonNa come eventually. Presumably has the definition of the defensive stock changed or is it still pretty much. What folks have talked about for a long time? It's kind of the usual suspects utilities consumer staples solid dividend payers that kind of thing look a definition of a defensive stock is a stock whose earnings and revenues will hold up fairly Weldon recession. I think the question you're really asking is will the stocks have historically had those attributes the same ones this time around <hes> that I'm a little I'm not so sure about right. I mean some of them. Utilities that feels that businesses Felix changing very much but I think the foods which are traditional you know people have to eat and so in recessions those revenues typically don't go down very much although right now food is in this really transitional period just in terms of how it salt right whether people going to the grocery store where the people eating more food at home whether you're having home delivery services so all those things are are changing the nature of the industry such that there may be a different pressure possibly on the top lines of those companies when you have a recession next time around it may be the same but I'm just always vigilant about companies that are undergoing <hes> a sea change in how the industry actually operates now one thing our listeners should know is that you are viewed..

engineer portfolio manager Felix Weldon
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily dot com slash Mesa sphere. Tyler county. You're the author of stubborn attachments. Welcome back to software engineering daily. So your previous three books were about the state of the world today. And how we got to where we are. And what might happen in the near future your newer? Book stubborn attachments describes a philosophy that you've been working on for around. Twenty years describes a framework for making decisions in today's world. Describe the philosophy you outline. In stubborn attachments, and how it relates to your previous books stubborn attachments as a book is pro economic growth. It's pro capitalism argues that we do face ethical dilemmas in our world, but the only way we can possibly resolve those is to sustain ably increase the pie for everyone over long time frames. So I think of the book as trying to integrate economics and philosophy and to provide some very basic fundamental answers to the key questions. Facing us, my other books tend to be more. More connected to current affairs or more anecdotes or they have more proper nouns. You could say this is a very abstract book. It's quite short, and I've been working on it very slowly for a long time before we talk about the ideas, laid out. In stubborn attachments. We should give the listeners some motivation. These are mostly software engineers who are listening to this. Why should engineers care about philosophy engineers care about the world surrounding them? So typically initiate is focused on a small task. But obviously engineers are smarter than the population at large and wanted to have a sense of what they're doing fits into a bigger picture. I pretty often actually have engineers right me. And they say like all I wanna more rewarding job. I wanna do something that really helps the world why am I here? And I usually write them back and say, look, you're boosting economic growth, you're contributing to technological progress. The generation of new ideas, odd, see other people who should be worried about the engineers. So indirectly you could think of this as a very pro engineer work and try to put certain kinds of productive activity into a bigger picture. And I think it also can help us think that public policy especially in light of the fact, how software is increasingly guiding the flow of ideas, and it's influencing the thoughts of people the emphasis on philosophy becomes more important because we have to think more deeply about how to shape informational flows rather than how to make a better steel beam, for example. So it becomes more important to think about philosophy software. Engineers are building these tools, but we don't control whether people use them for good or for evil. Do engineers actually have to think more deeply about how their tools are used. Or are. We just thinking about how to make better steel beams. And we're not really responsible if those steel beams are used in weaponry. No, I think we should all think more deeply about how our outputs are used..

Tyler county engineer Twenty years
"engineer" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"engineer" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"Okay. Let's hear let's meet the in the new mass engineer. The name is the engineer the jackal. I think I know who this one is for sure. Very right. That's a factor. Hold nothing. Everybody knows Joe. She knows you got everything. Stuff. Six twenty six. Wow. Offer them. But it seemed like it was a choice. Yeah. You seem like he or she he or she was putting their own spin brickhouse a song, we all know by heart. Okay. Bosch is so upset when we get this much joy performance. I now. When it's not about him when he's not the one getting laughs. Like like, you know, I don't wanna do. But it's always like is this more of like a Bosch bit. Yeah. We could be doing like would fit set. No one chose to be the soggy too. Was his famous single. Oh, engineer engineer, the jackal, so nice to meet you. Tell us about yourself. Okay. Okay. Engineer, the jackal. Hello. The famous song. Could it be Adele? This is not a Dell. Dude, you're getting a into. Are you the dude you're getting a Dell kit engineer, the jackal? I've never heard of that interesting that other huge detail. Never heard of the dude you're getting del guy. Okay. Any other details, and you can be very vague. Okay. Okay. Just not really funny. Jimmy. Okay has hair. Engineer, not Michael Jordan. You know, what we haven't talked about engineer Sam tab. We know. And I and it did occur to me that it could be engineer Sam, I think you would have done more on the I detail than just saying Hello. Interesting. What something I should know about engineer Sam, I engineer Sam used to have a motorcycle. He he was wrecking it constantly. He has sleeve tattoos. He what else? This all sounds like engineer type stuff, Brian Beverly he's friends with them walkie brewers. He loves them. He wants to be the bat boy for the Milwaukee Brewers and he's been on dishing. I don't know. I mean, do we do we make our official guesses now? How does it work? Do we do? Yes, we vote someone to be revealed than we all put in our final gas, and then and then after all of our final gas. They reveal themselves. Okay, now is really the person who went I just get so much credit for like, the joy of the fulfilled. I just can't possibly know the centerpiece is like a hero. This centipede is going to be voted. I would say it's between aquaman and Devon engineer. The jackal. I just want to say it's not it's engineered the awkward man engineer, the aquaman. Okay. So engineer the aquaman. My vote. For who? Are we waiting for who to save or who to unmask I vote to unmask engineer the man, okay? Maintain the more mystery for logger. Yeah. I got. Yeah. I'll do that as well. I'll vote for engineer. The man. Do we do they get get? What do they do? They just take off their masks or do they give a farewell performance? They they take off their masks. And then they give Ferrell performance now that they've been on mass without without the void. Them do their song over I think. Yeah. Yes. Gift out. Okay. So, but okay. So well, okay. Sing your song without your voice disguised their. Start singing just say who you are. No, we'll tell you based on the voice..

engineer Milwaukee Brewers Sam Joe Bosch Dell Brian Beverly Adele Devon Ferrell Michael Jordan Jimmy official
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Awesome thank you ben ben your company needs to build a new app but you don't have the spare engineering resources there are some technical people in your company who have time to build apps but they're not engineers they don't know java script or i o s or android and that's where out systems comes in out systems is a platform for building low code apps as an enterprise grows it needs more and more apps to support different types of customers an internal employees use cases do you need to build an app for inventory management does your bank a simple mobile app for mobile banking transactions do you need an app for visualizing your customer data out systems has everything that you need to build release and update your apps without needing an expert engineer and if you are an engineer you will be massively productive without systems find out how to get started with low code apps today at out systems dot com slash s e daily there are videos showing how to use the out systems development platform and testimonials from enterprises like fico mercedesbenz and safeway and i love to see new people exposed to software engineering that's exactly what out systems does out systems enables you to quickly build web and mobile applications whether you are an engineer or not check out how to build low code apps by going to out systems dot com slash s e daily thank you to out systems for being a new sponsor of software engineering daily and you're building something that's really cool and very much needed in the world so thank you out systems.

engineer
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You started this podcast about data engineering exclusively tell me your roadmap to to starting that why did you get interested enough in data engineering to start podcast entirely about it so i've worked as a systems administrator and as a software engineer and most recently as a quote unquote devops engineer take that as you will and i been interested in the data systems and the systems that are used for processing the data and the complexities around that for a while largely because of my roles of being responsible for those systems whether it's just you know managed managing the databases or as a software engineer being cognizant of the way the the database schema can impact the performance of an application or how that data can be used for other business purposes and there are a large number of podcasts in that are out there that address things like data science and you know maybe focused pacific ly on the hoodoo biko system or business intelligence systems but there wasn't anything that i had found that addresses more broadly the topic of data engineering and the people who are doing that work in seemed like something that was interesting both personally and it seemed like a topic area that didn't that wasn't receiving the attention that it was due and so i similar to when i started podcast out in it i saw gap in the market for broadcasts it was something that i wanted to listen to nobody else was doing it at the time so i decided that you know it was time for me to take up that mantle as well so far i've been happy with that decision and it's been growing slowly but steadily and i've been happy with how things been going that far and also is just an excuse for me to talk to intelligent and interesting people who are working in the space so that i can personally learn more about it.

software engineer engineer
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You started this podcast about data engineering exclusively tell me your roadmap to to starting that why did you get interested enough in data engineering to start podcast entirely about it so i've worked as a systems administrator and as a software engineer and most recently as a quote unquote devops engineer take that as you will and i been interested in the data systems and the systems that are used for processing the data and the complexities around that for a while largely because of my roles of being responsible for those systems whether it's just you know managed managing the databases or as a software engineer being cognizant of the way the the database schema can impact the performance of an application or how that data can be used for other business purposes and there are a large number of podcasts in that are out there that address things like data science and you know maybe focused pacific ly on the hoodoo biko system or business intelligence systems but there wasn't anything that i had found that addresses more broadly the topic of data engineering and the people who are doing that work in seemed like something that was interesting both personally and it seemed like a topic area that didn't that wasn't receiving the attention that it was due and so i similar to when i started podcast out in it i saw gap in the market for broadcasts it was something that i wanted to listen to nobody else was doing it at the time so i decided that you know it was time for me to take up that mantle as well so far i've been happy with that decision and it's been growing slowly but steadily and i've been happy with how things been going that far and also is just an excuse for me to talk to intelligent and interesting people who are working in the space so that i can personally learn more about it.

software engineer engineer
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It works really well for engineers whip providing really great value in helping people build really reliable systems based on what i've learned in the past but it's definitely very different experience because like you said chaos engineering it is very new system people who've been doing this type of work for the loss few years but the hide your chaos engineering wits continuous chaos it's automated you know really you should be injecting failure constantly end actually it shouldn't be causing an issue because you're infrastructures able to handle it it should be actually more rare that the chaos closes in issue in actually pages you and you need to fix something that's a really new area and i think it's exciting that we ought to be the pioneers in space i'm i've really enjoyed working with early customers who have come on bullish that doing really exciting things in space of chaos engineering and yeah like to me wanting to small company it's you know it's really like the startup stall have a very small office is not many of us i spent my first few weeks working remotely from stralia but i just think it's an exciting opportunity and i'm really glad to be on board okay dubuque oh thanks for coming out software engineer dale it's been great talking thank you very much thanks jeff live ramp is one of the fastest growing companies in data connectivity in the bay area and they're looking for senior level talent to join their team live ramp helps the world's largest brands activate their data to improve customer interactions on any channel or device the infrastructure is at a tremendous scale a five hundred billion node identity graph generated from over a thousand data sources running a eightyfive pedal bike bite duke cluster and application servers that

software engineer
"engineer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"Way more things hitting our pub sub we spin up more more pups up that this this break up is actually allowing as some really interesting use cases round that for the ops side for the ops people the one i'm seeing that's very interesting is the built in replication so there's obviously replication that you can do with kaffa with near maker with catholic connect but those are when when you have to force somebody to set something up they'll often either set it up wrong or it will take them or time and so what i really prefer to see is built in replication and that built in replication makes it much easier to do highly visible things and as a direct result the customer usage the customer success there is oh yes we can have an active active and it's going to do the replication for us i saw this when h base rolled out replication before it was really painful they rolled out replication and it was people were were actually talking about how well it worked people were successful win it or they didn't have to worry about did that get replicated did we set that up right it was out of the box good a good customer experience in this kind of what i'm looking for from pulsar so see assia stopping right save became crystal clear to me that the that's data engineering thought machine learning engineer reid sobbing anyone who's managing this he's yeah definitely infrastructure their mead it engineering and an end to kind of go back to your question before about israel time a done deal is is really coming for now we'd iot yet and you had this excellent episode with any language of the you know reinforcement learning is really interesting so much research but we'll kind of to me the crux of that is we wanna move we wanna shift away from predictive analytics were assigning labels correctly hopefully too prescriptive.

reid israel engineer
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"All of dna s but there's not much you can do about that other than have a different dna s provider have multiple routes and then if you don't use a discovery or your discovery is based upon dna name and your services can't talk to each other will that's that's where things meltdown because if that's if that's one of those base building blocks you've used in you you expect it to be reliable and expected to be there and it goes away that the house of cards kinda crumbles and did your company needs to build a new app but you don't have the spare engineering resources there are some technical people in your company who have time to build apps but they're not engineers they don't know java script or iowa asher android and that's where out systems comes in out systems is a platform for building low code apps as enterprise grows it needs more and more apps to support different types of customers and internal employee use cases do you need to build an app for inventory management does your bank need a simple mobile app for mobile banking transactions do you need an app for visualizing your customer data out systems has everything you need to build release and update your apps without needing an expert engineer and if you are an engineer you will be massively productive without systems find out how to get started with low code apps today at out systems dot com slash s e daily there are videos showing how to use the out systems development platform and testimonials from enterprises like fico mercedes benz and safeway and i love to see new people exposed to software engineering that's exactly what out systems does out systems enables you to quickly build web and mobile applications whether you are an engineer or not check out how to build low code apps by going to out systems dot com slash s e daily thank you to out systems for being a new sponsor of software injuring daily and you're building something that's really cool and very much needed in the world the thank you out systems.

engineer iowa safeway
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Ron licht is the author of managing the unmanageable iran welcomed to software engineering daily eight thank you i have a bunch of questions for you about management particularly managing software engineers would you have a ton of experience in and the questions that i wanna start with our mostly related to experiences i have had personally being managed by engineers engineering managers end as well as some experience managing engineers myself and the first question i have is something that is very close to my heart because it it i would say is the number one frustration slash difficulty i had as an engineer and that is the question of boring work so if you're if you're managing engineers and the engineers are doing work that is frankly boring i mean this is a frequent thing that's gonna come up how do you keep engineers engaged when the work that they have to do is boring or otherwise uninteresting to them well i think the first thing you need to think about is what's the what's the contribution that works going to make to the product to the company to the customers to the team into the world one of the one of the fundamental rules that managers have is to connect the dots basically between the worked at any individual programmers doing and the and the contribution to all those places to the to the team to the product to the to the company into the world and in a what it is really helpful to work in a company that's got a company mission that people can get behind but fundamentally and jeff i'm i imagine this is true for you it's certainly true for me most of us got into engineering because we wanted to make a difference in the world and knowing that and eat.

Ron licht engineer iran software engineers jeff
"engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"The advice i give up a lot of younger engineers nowadays because allow the people who go to these coating book camps and they they sort or try to teach you to become what's called a full stack engineer sort sort sort of like a jackofalltrades if you will right but i i think it is very difficult to be a full stack engineer because judge jess a very small part of software engineering is difficult enough and also the context which between working on the uri versus work on the back in verses working on maybe some now working eight issues is is very challenging so i always recommend people to focus on what area and that's what i did and i feel like i i was able to get deeply enough on just a you i designing engineering part and eventually i was able to lead a team on my skills developed in the area cool so ray you start your career often cells and trading you realize i like building things but probably they're still something saudi that that likes finance you start to work in his engine nearing jobs bring a full circle how do you get to where you are a day had your offering finance back into europe into your life sure so so uh the company i was at montage studio eka acquired it got quite by back and company and i knew that i didn't really want to work on back in technology so i i was looking for my neck's opportunity and i was thinking okay since i worked in on the business side of things i worked somewhere in design and also in software engineering so i've done these three pieces the natural intersection of these three pieces is product management.

engineer jess europe
"engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"They can also tell you about their experience there because sometimes from douse i accompany may look really promising but from from the inside there are a number of problems they may want to avoid so so i i wanted to build this network with the software engineer in crowd here so i i went to a hacker thon put up by google and i met a guy there his name is charles and charles turn out to be one in the original four engineers who build the entire i tuned stack for apple backing the '90s after apple bought sun jam so he is a more a older engineer a very senior engineer and he is a very very good technical architect and i i work with him on the heck with on i knew that i wanted to work with him at some point so i stayed in touch with him over almost two years i i keep asking him as head why are you working on like i evolved to work with you on something like let me know what can i do and eventually he went through a startup called montage studio which is a sort of founded by the team of folks who came out of apple when next so he went there and he's like hey i i'm i'm here i'm working on some kusov issue com and that went there and there was my very first software engineering gig that's really cool so can you give people would like tell them exactly how you call the beta that relationship with him like you met him at this event and then like where do they were did it go over the next how long it took you to get this job you have coffee once a month you sent an email of interesting articles how'd you keep their relationship going yeah so i i tried to do both so trough actually lived in texas and he he was doing consulting gigs of the time so he would travel back and forth and i i would just paying him out say okay wearing towel next and i knew that he'd love to go to meet ups too so i was okay okay let's go check out this meet up together and then won't go and then we'll we'll listen to some tech talk which had the bear and they i.

software engineer google apple technical architect texas two years
"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Listening and let's get back to the show lynch ty is the founder of key values led welcomed a software engineer daily hein thanks for having me yeah it's great to have you we're talking today about company values and how that pertains to an engineering team you have built a platform called key values will get into what the platform does but first of all how do you define values as they pertain to engineering teams or that's a good question so unlike company values oncourt ice which are a little bit different the way that i have defined values for my website is these are things that engineers like you or me care about and prioritise when were evaluating different job opportunities so if you want to join the team that you know really as laid on meetings cause you really don't like having meetings that is an important value to you at as an example so there's an important distinction between the value system of a company company in the value system that is implemented by the engineering teams within that company yeah in many cases i think core company values are they're they're really helpful for keeping the company you know unified and cohesive but sometimes it's really unclear how that actually translates to the daytoday operations or practices or behaviors on the engineering team and any engineer can probably say this if they worked at a larger company sometimes those core company values really manifest themselves differently for you know the sale team verses the engineering team so he values really gets that the values for the engineering teen specifically yeah it just helps them kind of look for teams based on those values so the those the values of the individual teams those do tend to be down stream values from the company values i but from from my point of view would you agree with that yes i would say i mean actually i wouldn't say that's all.

founder engineer software engineer