17 Burst results for "elvis mitchell"

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 11 months ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"Say her dad is proud she was on a student she was on the dean's list and I don't know she works so hard what else can a father do you try to make this day special for her next Gabrielle Pearce plans to enlist in the army national guard and go on to a career in epidemiology this is NPR news you're listening to morning edition right here on KCRW as some states around the U. S. ease restrictions and more businesses reopen many workers at restaurants hair salons and other businesses that involve close contact with customers are scared for their health others say they can't work because their kids schools are still closed coming up we'll hear about some of the options workers have then later today at one thirty here on KCRW show Elvis Mitchell today in the treatment of hashtag.

Gabrielle Pearce KCRW Elvis Mitchell NPR
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"What is the treatment from my house I'm Elvis Mitchell there is a terrific film a few years back calls seven face to one of my favorite ones the movie is fate is for the lazy it's weather could apply to the new film by the writer director Alice who the half of it house was well thanks so much for being here thank you so much it's really my pleasure but I love that line fate is for the lazy I think it's just a very Chinese line I I think it's so funny to me what people think is funny because there are times and I think something is hilarious and clearly nobody else agrees with me but then out of no where something that I think makes perfect sense like probably the biggest laugh line and saving face is when the grandmothers points to her granddaughter's Bruton is like I had a pair of just like that just the thing for war and everyone burst out laughing and I thought it was like a completely reasonable thing to say that's completely what my grandmother would have said so it's always sort of delightful to find out what the world finds humorous and one's life I suppose well I think that's one of the things that unites these two phones for me is that I think you're really adept at shifting points of view so we as soon as somebody speaks we know who when what they are and I wonder because I guess you wouldn't actually thought about being a novelist and if one of the things that attracted you to screenwriting is that you found you had an affinity for characters express themselves that let us know who they were as people almost immediately yeah I I think one of the other things I really discovered is that I tend to write from a very personal place and you know being a Chinese lesbian are Chinese American lesbian and growing up in a very sort of strict Chinese family one of the things in my experience is that it's not what you say but what you don't say that matters no one in my family says things like I love you like that is the kind of thing you might say to love her but like parents and children don't say those things we do things for each other and I think I became really clear to me that when I was thinking about writing a novel attempting to write the server interiority of a character would on some level mean the either I would need an unreliable narrator or I would probably have to write it from an omniscient point of view because I just didn't think any of my characters for that self actualized mainly because I'm not that self actualized or certainly not then and what I think film does that's kind of great is that you can thank you for talking with the shifting points of view and they're certainly moments in a scene one clearly saying this is this character's point of view but then what I really love this when that character is alone or they think they're alone there's a moment when I can show what's actually happening on their face like whether they're aware of it or not right and and I think that that kind of intimacy is something that I think the film can provide the I'm not sure any other medium does quite as well no I'm I'm glad you brought that up because I think one of the things that really resonates is the way characters sort of physical deportment changes when the when the by themselves are thinking about you that you lied to both the films how the physically they're they're different people when they're by themselves I wonder if that's just a common human thing I mean it's funny because we're in this pandemic in our own all these meetings and which means that Wallace for me I'm suddenly confronted with an image of myself when I'm in a meeting which in real life I'm sitting amongst people I'm not I don't the camera myself to see myself but it's like a kind of a terrifying experience or perhaps worse is a better word when I see my face and I'm like that's what I look like one thing I like my meeting face and maybe that is just something inherent in like you know I don't know I guess we all have a public self in a private self and as I get older I I think for me the dream is to try and bring those two things as close as possible but I think my characters tend to be people who those two things are quite far apart and and it's and that kind of a struggle between those two things is kind of where they live yeah it's funny talking about that because I feel like who to talk about the half of it the way Ellie reacts and people are seeing her she almost is trying to will herself into not being seen except when she's in really intimate situations which is really close to people like with her teacher or with the triangle that becomes part of the movie then she realizes she's being regarded the way that she's not and and and I guess we should talk about that because that kind of hiding in plain sight aspect or not being seen the way they want to be seen is really only appearance I guess is really kind of key to the way you you structure your pieces in your characters is not yes I am really glad you noticed that I I wonder if it's just because of the way I grew up and the way I sort of view of my role in the world which now that I'm older I suspect a lot of people feel similarly like I I guess I'd say it's for example high school right like high school is a profoundly lonely experience for me now as an adult I finally discovered that it turns out that it's pretty much a profoundly lonely experience for everyone but when you're in high school you don't know that you think you are like the loneliest the lonely and that everybody else has figured it out right and so I I think there's this way with movies like who's the main character is actually a really interesting question I think one of the things that maybe you know my work does is I I kind of this very commercial hooks but I tend to show characters especially the main character tends to be someone who almost is never the main character maybe there are like a side character maybe they're an extra or maybe they're not even in the movie right and I and I think that's somewhat significant because I think that I would say for both my main characters but the way they're living their lives they don't think they're the main character in their life like neither of them would think yes this is a story of how I eventually get this thing about I want to because for them that just seems like not even something that's available to them and so there's a certain joy and I wonder if it's even like a secret wish myself right like when you're growing up I at least didn't really think that the world was a place where I would end up being a main character in it like I I think my greatest hope is that we would just survive as an immigrant family and that things would be fine in that maybe will rise up the economic ladder and that we have comfortable lives and nothing terrible happens to us like that was pretty much the dream I certainly would not have thought like if you ask me in high school there's zero chance I would've thought yes someday I was going to direct a movie you might as well tell me aliens were coming from space to get all of us like that would feel equally probable and so knowing that makes me kind of feel like well maybe unconsciously I'm setting these characters who don't think that there's a chance of really being you know that that the main character but by the end of the movie they are like they are pretty much in almost every frame of the film and at the end this is their story and that there's something kind of revel a Tory for themselves and that and maybe we cheer them on because I think for most people I don't think my experience is unique I bet most people would identify with me and not truly believing that they could be the main character in their story and so you you want that so much for this character and then maybe it gives you some hope that you could have it for yourself it's a treatment we're talking self actualization with my guess ours will whose new film for Netflix is the half of it and it's funny as you were talking about that I was thinking that their characters in in both these pieces your protagonist for example people who are regarded or people pay attention to what people really know them it's funny because I was thinking about this in the choice of the movies that the hell he's watching and and half of it Casablanca there's almost a relationship a kind of a Claude rains Bogart elation ship in both these films missing with a dance where she goes to the beginning of saving face and she's talking to a friend and then those who wish it with her teacher I mean this kind of idea that you know they're these two or two cynical people who really see what's going on around them and then the people in those orbits who think of themselves as being stars will be in the center of attention and you you populate your worlds with both those kinds of people the people who don't think missiles being in the center of their own worlds and the people who think they are the center of everybody's world yeah I've never you know I have not not thought about it that way but you're absolutely right and I wonder you know because in terms of the characters that feel like they're the center of everybody's world what's interesting is like I'm going to assume like for example saving face that are for example it might be that in terms of for will like her mom seems to be taking on that role is that kind of what you might be alluding to yeah absolutely that and and put these because these people sort of don't know when to get off the stage and you literally and the half of it there is a a stage show going on and and people who sort of comport themselves if they're the center of it of the known world and and then the third people the protagonists find the kind of attractive and repellent at the same time I see yeah no I I I love that that that you brought that up I mean what's interesting is that in the first case when I was thinking maybe you meant the mother what I think is interesting is that from the main character like from will's point of view mob takes up so much the error in the room but if we switch POV is and this was totally the mother story I don't think that mother sticks that she's the main character in her story either in fact so much of that is that she also feels like her life is over she's just like kind of a side character trying to you know live her life for her daughter and her parents right but then you switch to end the half of it a character like trig of who is like the big man on campus and she was like she said doesn't seem to like everybody loves trick his everything happens from in his life what I find fascinating about a character like that it's his arc is literally by the end of the movie for the very first time in his life something didn't go exactly the way he thought it was and he has to think about that which we heard way I think it's kind of a weirdly happy arc for him because maybe it'll push them but it is sort of like a fascinating you know like if I get a and maybe because there's just I mean I I admit none of my close friends are like this but every now and then I'll meet someone who just seems like you know they tend to be young like but did that just everything seems like they just assume that you know this is their world not rest of us are just living in it and there's something sort of charming and that that kind of it's both charming and irritating and so it's kind of fun and this film to have that character have a little bit of comeuppance what is it yeah and as we talk about the show because thing about early on and and and saving face will will goes to the dance and basically has to get rid of this guy who thinks he's going to be her her is her savior her white knight and then and I like the way that you do with these kinds of characters who are so shaped by pop culture and and the special these literally these of these men these guys I mean to say who think that they're in these these superheroes yeah I I think and it's sort of funny because I would say that generally and my movies I really don't have any villains you know but I do have characters that they're usually not the main characters but I do have these characters that you know maybe the growing of it more like a half but I often find them sort of hilarious and they often end up being the characters of the audience finds you know as amongst the funniest right and I sort of love that because I.

Elvis Mitchell director writer Alice
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"To the treatment I'm Elvis Mitchell I always have to have people return to the show my guest mark Harris was last year with this terrific book pictures at a revolution is new book I'm only right in front of me with one the best jackets I've seen on a folk never is five came back if we look at the way the five directors George Stevens William Wyler Frank Capra John Houston John Ford went over and shot documentaries during World War two and what they went through chewing muscles with allies like when they came back first will mark thanks so much for coming back thanks for having me Ellis and tell this book check you must be thrilled about this because I am really thrilled about it it was a a pretty steep challenge because we wanted to get my name on it the title the subtitles and all five of the directors and then we had to find a picture that conveyed some sense of World War two and filming and kind of overall aesthetic that felt nineteen forties without some kind of slipping over into kitschy Rosie the riveter stuff so the designers of penguin did a lot of iterations of that and I couldn't be happier with what they came up with one of the things that you do so well in the end it really starts for me I guess and push the revolutions that that incredible ambition that could only bring you to show business that also makes you unfit to be anyplace else in the world is it still provides in somewhere to buy these five directors is now I think so I and and yeah that is something that ties it's my first book that these guys I write about really you can't imagine them in the quote unquote normal professions because it in at least three of the cases Ford Houston and capture their personalities and John John Houston and Frank Capra right I mean their personalities are so outsides and strange and their passions are so noisy and their ways of interacting with other human beings are so idiosyncratic and often difficult and Italy yeah I mean well Ford certainly was capable of both tremendous compassion and an outright meanness I mean he would often target someone on his sats offense just single out for special kind of humiliation and it's strange because board saw himself as someone who could manage down really beautifully but managed up terribly which is always a kind of self flattering thing to say that you know your people love you but you know you'll you'll always defend them against the horrible bosses but if Ford was quirky and sometimes his managing badly went down as well as up when he was at I think the the most fast thing kind of narcissus the kind who attended he did he wasn't in the they've chewed on handkerchief wore beautiful clothes but in fact as you mentioned here won all the awards the one position his his his his midway documentary for an award while pretending he didn't right I mean one thing I loved about telling the story is that it yeah they all did something unquestionably impressive and even in many cases her robe which is just drop everything and go to war and not just briefly or cosmetically but seriously in the thick of it for three or four years to see these guys all left the two since crew Johnson who was just starting the others are at the peaks of their careers in some ways and they all jump right into this yeah I mean there was really not a single one of them you know Ford was the first to go he went three months before Pearl Harbor actually he's with using the classic guy who didn't want to go home anything rather than go all right exactly and Stevens was the last in the last out and he only really the last topic figuratively in the way George Stevens never got out of it you know in in some ways it's it's he he grew I I would say you know his run of movies in the nineteen fifties Shane giant place in the sun made him kind of the dean of American directors by the end of the fifties so his career certainly wasn't shattered by the war the way for instance Capra's was but emotionally I think he was pretty blunt about the fact that he he never shut off what he saw in Dhaka the you're talking about are all about the walking wounded and then before this book I've never seen anybody crystallize in that way before that each of these protagonists is of a young man who is damaged in some fundamental way and can't shake it and brooms allies everybody's run affected in some way another like veterans returning home for the war that's a really interesting point because you know at that theme in Stevens is absolutely true but they're not war movies really I mean he he he touches back in it and the diary of Anne Frank in nineteen fifty nine but you know a place in the sun is an adaptation of an American tragedy Shane is a western although Stevens called it his war movie and and felt that it was his most direct as you want and what the sound of gunfire in the movie to sound like the the sound of guns in the war war too he was it's the loudest movie of that era yeah in terms of the ammunition I mean this the guns the last one bullet blasts and I mean giant I think fits fits that very well you know and one of the most moving moments in giant I think I'm getting this right is is this moment when when the coffin of a young soldier returns to town it on on the railroad tracks and it's it's not a main character it's it's a minor character but Stevens I think more than any of these directors really knew how to make one death kind of ripple and resonate throughout the drama of an entire movie he does it in shame to in the in the incredible funeral scene in chains I'm not along you can see this with my gas bar Kerr says new book is five came back and again getting back to this thing that you even as a as a as a cultural critic and then there was so many people just writing about popular culture entertainment just see the sort of repeat what others say you really drawn towards making the argument and making the case that others have not thank you I mean I I'm I try to to to listen hard to what's out there and it's for me not at all Mike my goal is not to zig where others zag I mean I don't want to be a sort of professional contrarian but I do like looking really hard at at stuff whether it's a kind of deep stuff like the the archives of these five directors or just a single decision like like the Best Picture expansion of the Oscars and and really trying to figure out a lot of my writing is me trying to figure out for myself what something means or or or why it doesn't sit well with me but also you're you're you're writing some she was about and in this way V. injustice and the kind of sort of slight step that often take place in the hands of institutions in here I was thinking about you know in let there be light the John Hughes's traffic documentary how he starts with these African Americans and and and you mentioned the how that started early from his career and then just how that is sort of just supposed to somebody like Frank Capra who really wants to be a man of the people but it is a racist and be good and and then the self hating person as well and just these these complications and and how they play out in these careers makes you is as much of an Alice is it as a reporter you know this book was my first dive into pure history I'm the first book I got to interview about a hundred people and I really felt like I was able to keep one foot firmly planted in journalism which is is what I really do there there really was almost no one still alive who was kind of adult and in a position of power I was writing about a period of time seventy five years ago so this was pure history and it it made me feel a huge obligation to try to be as accurate as I could and trying to create these guys as characters was anyone that you were up to a particular fan of before you start the book I I knew going in that I was really going to love writing about Wyler and Stevens who are two directors I feel maybe don't get enough credit if it's possible I'll let you have a real affinity for I really do I I really do and and you know while or some sort of the first the first of the directors that the tourists sort of sniffed at and in the nineteen sixties and late fifties even a kind of turned their noses up at I think that was an injustice that it in some ways we're still working to rectify it seems silly to say that a director got twelve Oscar nominations is under rated but if if such a thing is possible I think sometimes because because Stevens's career didn't end well with you know the only game in town and before that with greatest story ever told it became too easy to overlook his virtues which I think are extraordinary and I also think he's an extraordinary person I mean you know to me Stevenson while over the most admirable as men of the guys I was writing about in this book so and the least concerned with image of of of the of the five to talk about absolutely you know they they were ambitious and and everybody I wrote about had a healthy ego but they were really there to do the right thing the more complicated journey for me in the book was trying to get to know Ford and Capper and Houston all of whom at various times I found myself hating and by the end of working on the book which was about four years of research I really felt that I had finally gotten to understand them and sort of take them all in all you know the that you you learn to sort of forgive them their flaws while still pointing out that they were actual serious deep flaws because I find it I think it's interesting I'm not sure you reconcile your feelings about Ford just because the the thing that there's almost never said about him that you really get into here is that he was in fact again the worst kind of nurse is the one who pretends he's not you know I'm the most fascinating to me because so many people from P. about television many of people who've written about four always talk about his they they attend B. Meiring of his cruelty well I think sometimes I I've I've said and I'm not really joking when I say this the the sixth character in this book is alcohol and and never more so than with Ford I mean you're talking about no use as well as yeah Houston absolutely but with Ford I mean he was a black out drunk who would you know a blue liberate himself between productions he didn't drink while he was making movies but as soon as it was over he would go on these benders that could last for days or even weeks but bush said John Wayne's house as a way of turning up turning his mind off right you know it's to the point where sometimes he would be sick you would be hospitalized he would.

Elvis Mitchell mark Harris
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"Welcome to the treatment I'm Elvis Mitchell I get to say that for the second time in my life I'm speaking to Eric idle the last time researchers with a terrific show you may have heard of Spamalot the show the as you mentioned in his new book always look on the bright side of life came to the very last second to win the big Tony awards yes absolutely the best musically and two thousand and five and when I wouldn't move working on the movie there's gonna be a movie Sicko interest you more because I know you're much watches in movies and books and things like that a great I read a book once that was enough yes we're doing the movie congratulations all my gosh but who's going to direct the movie the Casey Nicholaw okay who was the choreographer originally and also right dress book of Malmo on Aladdin mean girls or you know he's a Broadway brilliance genius and that he's going to be a wonderful job since we're here for this terrific book I guess one of things I thought about reading the book is your upbringing is not that dissimilar to the John Bourne movie hope and glory was it you you only will such things through movies to ensure I don't think I'll remember that no no I had would you member if yes a good victory yes Lindsay Anderson's if I heard what it was it was it was like that he was very but I think a lot of English boys have that from my generation you know there were all these boarding schools and they trying to be public schools and the lesser ones like mine were always you know be chairman for what will be the site yes part of the educational thing rip off yes and somehow people when they will be in the school then got into it in the paper I could have it with me just me I I don't think I'd want to pay anybody to be beat well apparently there there's quite a business in that but thank goodness you got it for free or else I didn't pay for it another way but one of things is the so great about the book and and and you will talk about this before but the impact of the goon show on a whole generation of people not just you but your close friend George Harrison yeah I mean that I mean it can't be understated the impact the goon show had on a generation of a British youth is Canada and it's a it's interesting person we didn't have television so the goon show was the number one radio show and it's much more surreal so I think it didn't fit with a few items we don't have television to which twelve or thirteen all our early years he's these radio and radio is much more keen to writing you can much more surreal you can imagine things all the time so it they do a scene with the Thames is on fire well you can call shoot that's it's too literal but if you can imagine in your mind so I think it was very important to us that's and that show cool beyond the fringe which was with Peter cook and Dudley moral Jonathan Miller I'm Alan Bennett's and that changed my life because I didn't know you're allowed to laugh prime ministers of the queen and the monkey on the army in the church and they just ripped into everything and it's like nineteen sixty one and it's the it's like the time in England of the CSR of the angry young man John Osborne's look back in anger all of those times and they were the comedy equivalents and it was it was it was very angry but it was comedy so you just laughed but there there was all of that of that period and and the B. under French guys will almost of your generation and and bringing the educational background that you had to anarchy where is with the goon show it was almost working class view of anarchy wasn't it will the goon show comes out of the army yes general in the ministry shows that answer one of the entertainment section so they will be in and that's the world I come from and they go into a store working strip called labs in surviving comics you know that route whereas beyond the fringe is Oxbridge is auctioned and Cambridge yes which is our roots yes but you know they were and beyond the fringe she wishes is is hadn't brought search use from the oven a festival so that was literally my way into but there is there the thing that they all have in common is this incredible use of word play yes I think that's right well the grocery all rather a very educated exception cherry Gilliam is the American he makes up for it you know to me though he was a doctor dentist yes you just up the road yes yes and and I I think it's interesting too though that that idea of of not that idea but conceptually that language is a playground just get if we look at with the way they're going to impacted beyond the French and the Beatles and the pythons with that idea of of words being really a passageway to almost anywhere it certainly did because they loved the reason they took George monsoon was because he had recorded Peter Sellers he had done it was one of the songs they had outlook sharks was ringing sellers and he did these one of these is like a hard day's night it has to be a hot days Max and I have been looking back at all he did the whole aw as I was like all the VA and it was it was a number one hit in England that hard days night comes a show car I'm always on the way and and I was like yes yes was was was I'm very much of sex bye bye words in the oversized the literature I think this is not a came so it's not really surprising but I think that's why some plays with ideas like for example I we have a philosopher song when nobody's read the philosophers we just the list of names we summarize Proust but now he's ready to produce you know we just know it's too long to summarize in thirty seconds it's a so we play with absurd ideas my guess who's pretending that reading proces an absurd notion is Eric idle whose new book of course is always on the bright side of life I guess I'm keeping this up because I'm I'm I find myself taking with the idea that words really gave flight to you in almost every iteration of your career that is it's it's this thing that that the U. imaginations park even as a kid by what words could do and then the book gives us a real sense of that I think that's right and I think it's possibly because there was no television so like my my wife's generation she grows up with television is an estimate Chicago to bed without television being on a Chicana washing of the bats image animations just a part of a everyday experience for us for me that's not true we didn't have that so that the I think the imagination works through the word diet readings from me was always the biggest Cape at boarding school you do you can just lose yourself in another world in a book and that's and if you're crammed into a boarding school with hundreds of other boys and there's no privacy at toll then a book is a great way to escape and so that still be my escape and I find that that that is the thing that for me basically once the career for you is that is that passion for words and for language in the power of language I mean it is something that I think the pythons basically get short shrift the idea over the way that the word play was years I think so for example one of my favorite sketches written by pleasing Chapman's cold the argument clinic and I think that's just because Tom stuff off I think it's like a Tom Stoppard play in four minutes you know no no you didn't you so it made it not give you just it just goes on it's just so perfect and so we think we wrote sort of different types of scratching each of us wrote different kinds of sketch Jones kind of sketches were always about of being very aggressive man being tormented by somebody else what tormenting somebody else I got very much into what would play in writing sketches and I would do the man is back in Thailand anagrams for example Taapsee ship plate aside cytology ahead because you have to be all Jordan apart New York taxis there next to Corey it's like and then I think we I. play with ideas like you know a man who is alternatives in the roots and then polite somebody you know which is which is also kind of schizophrenia kind of form of of schedule I think my sketches will very much were driven yes yes but that that but for me the wrestling with ideas is so key to who you are as a writer I mean this idea of having I of of of the concepts that battle each other and then sort of contradict each other is something that you really are wedded to or you love that and have from an early age almost I think that's true I think I don't I think it happens subconsciously I know you're all going to make this my seeing this is it I think Rev writing reveals to you all and this show if you look at my writing then you should look to the skies in very obsessed with a list of names she likes funny things she likes ideas if he has a philosophers football match is going to be the Germans rushes the Greeks you know that that conceptualized as visualized so I I do like to illustrate ponds for example I noticed him that we had show jumping on these horses roll jumping over the sound of music contemporary it is like so I left the house and I think that's my kind of writing and so in my book I tried to make it funny I die deliberately I wanted it to be both true and not to skip over them things that happen in life people pass away but I also wanted to be funny about that it was very important to me that it's funny but to start off with a sort of biography I mean you even you are now saying that it's going to be funny and danced and flipped the idea of an autobiography on Ted yes I mean I I didn't sell the book I wrote it first really yeah I thought I'm going to go away on place in France and I go to that and I I'm gonna try and work on it and she won't happen is what you you know what can you remember what sort of things what's going to be theme an officer several rewrites I found my theme was actually my generation because we are unlikely unknown and unusual and generation because we came out of World War two no okay but you go from that to then going chronologically I mean that that that I'm very obsessed by shape all right Sir yes I'm obsessed by shape and rewriting both of which I learned from being here in the nineties rewriting movies and working in the film industry all that time was very useful for him out I'm able to shape and and Mike Nichols told me at a million things about writing in shape to so I do have sex with that and I do like to have theme I'm Mike Nichols who do the single preaching the moral the end of the play even this pilot you have to play preach the moral and those still sings were fascinating to me I learned such a lot from him but I'm I'm just wondering if there was a post war enthusiasm about there really was in the status quo to shatter because the world was so much in flux you are as you say in creating a world but I I do go back to this idea of what education and rebelling against the institutions I mean there was this kind of rebellion they came from all these different schools Pete rock and roll be it comedy there was this philosophical the overturning of of of what is it existed before it was a renaissance stays there was literally a renaissance yeah there's people from all college invented rock and roll they were all about college all the Beatles two stones they will all college Kinks every deal and so they did that but they did of sixteen we went on and went to university and so we didn't get out till about twenty four or twenty we started our careers later but was still part of that generation so they would come chasing doctors and the holy grail made by Pink Floyd Led Zeppelin genesis you.

Elvis Mitchell Eric Tony
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"It's N. P. R. news you're listening to morning edition here on KCRW spring break is just around the corner and summer vacation isn't far away and with all the uncertainty surrounding the new coronavirus a lot of people are questioning their travel plans and looking at travel insurance coming up we'll hear about what it covers and what it doesn't then later today at one thirty here on KCRW I'm Elvis Mitchell next time on the treatment writer director Dee Rees on passing and half away in a Joan Didion adaptation the first conversation about the whole film was just that I was I thought she's too nice you know and so I was like I just don't want to be sweet you know and so we can talk about this transformation in which to be game and so were the little ones like inverted her you know and still being very kind of fair skinned and dark here V. like sunburns unless I hear constantly flush yeah just completely transformed and even like weight gains like would you be down two games I wanted only to feel substantial like every woman you know she's report she's not eating great food she's like you know not caring for herself and she was game so in general like I didn't want to be like the completely noble journalist I want to be like the fly kind of journalist who's a little messy that should be respected director of the last thing he wanted on the treatment today at one thirty PM on KCRW already some challenges this morning if you're trying to make your way into the San Gabriel Valley starting out in the San demus area westbound to ten connecting the southbound fifty seven getting reports of a crash involving a motorcyclist who is gone down emergency crews are on the way there to try and help them out.

Dee Rees San Gabriel Valley N. P. R. KCRW Elvis Mitchell writer director Joan Didion San demus
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"Later today at two thirty here on KCRW I'm Elvis Mitchell today in the treatment composer Danny Elfman on the fact that he still gets nervous when he turns in a film score playing it for the director the first time is the most sweaty palmed experience of my life that I could imagine you don't have any issues you don't score you go this is it I know I had a nail this one this is this is going to be doing this because now because I'm a feel that the director will go now now it just doesn't work for me and I have to let it go so early on no matter what I think of a piece of music I can't get attached to it yet because if I do I'm screwed because it just happens in films were you have to totally change direction that's Danny Elfman on the treatment today at two thirty PM on KCRW well no major trouble spots out on the freeway so far this morning that is the very good news body if you're trying to make its way out the South Bay into Carson Long Beach she could be seeing some brake lights already the problem south on for all five at Wellington a crash that's been taking up a couple of the right lanes there you were slow coming away from the one ten harbor freeway meanwhile EA in Norwalk sometime five imperial highway CHP should be on the scene shortly if they are already to deal with the hit rom the victim big rig driver over to the right shoulder their heads up eve you make your way through Granada hills east on one eighteen at Balboa some kind of metal debris in the car pool lane can want to keep it over towards the right and some are still dealing with this earlier situation some confusion whether it's on the north or south from five to ten but tell truck trying to clear a stalled car could be partly cloudy today highs in the sixties to the mid seventies right now at LAX it's fifty.

Elvis Mitchell Danny Elfman director South Bay Carson Long Beach Wellington Norwalk Granada hills
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:13 min | 1 year ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"Welcome to the treatment of Elvis Mitchell my guests know about mark Israeli directors may movies I think I'll always being kind of bill comes from on they're all coming of age stories in the way would you agree with that yeah as you say it yes yes by the way before because they are there is some point either an adult or child is view has to mature yeah I took I suppose it is about how we use the looking at them as a whole it is sort of how we continue to have to come of age yeah I thought about that too because we just talking before we got going but we hear talk when those two movie story they're all about a body blow kind of a trauma that a child has to deal with and really has a re orient himself after this thing happens yeah and I mean in that in that in that in marriage story as well the there is something and vandalizing about the divorce process to it's like to be the way the legal system kind of takes over your life the way lawyers kind of start speaking for you almost like you know they they the way we see in the movie Nicola Charlie kind of almost are said stripped of their their voices they're in their thirty theirs and their authority their cell phone there is something and vandalizing about that and you know what on one level you have two people who were who are parents who are trying to be the best parents to their kid and and and and and parent be parents during and a man credibly emotional disruptive process and then at the same time or kind of being turned into children get over it in a sense turned into children themselves and that happens in this movie when they meet with lawyers for the first time in the lower than the cold meets with couldn't be more maternal offering T. I'll get you some these cookies to take home with you letting her talk and and and the Cole has a breakdown and and when Charlie goes to see a lawyer it's very did almost like he's the with a divorce data what what's going on here what was going on it's it's very different but they're both these parental figures right would you could say we Charlie situation would both ray ray's character really is character Jay is sort of maybe a more like for like authoritarian father and then you have Alan Alda's character bird who is kind of like the gentle father but you're right at that they both kind of take on maternal and paternal rolls it least initially for these characters how countries that was because right down to the way these offices are are are lighted and and all three of these cases there there's nothing what windows and and and this oppressive like of fluorescent light which really goes in the seat to his lawyer he first talked to read the read the other day when he was yelling all it's a much more inviting it's almost like a therapist's office with yeah well I thought you know that there is also this sort of notion of home throughout the movie I mean of of of of we literally start in their home you know the opening montage is kind of daily life in in in and out of the home and also in in their homes as the theater exactly and then there are we have their work home and the sort of a and and family notions of family the surrogate family of the theater and and then and then we have the Nicole's childhood home which you know is it was home to her as a child in here now she's an adult sort of back with her own child in the bed that she grew up with being woken up by her mother that's kind of in the home that home is now no longer the home that it was it's a takes on a different meaning and role and and then as you say if we we we kind of go into this this with all these once once the sort of legal process begins we going to all these offices and we're dealing with with transitional spaces that are often created to kind of look like their personality but really have none you know it's like this sort of inoffensive way of of presenting the world and and I I didn't I didn't feel there's a kind of menace it ends in some of that did you know that did do something Robbie Ryan shot the movie with me and I talked about in the way we would frame things and we we would always make sure to get a kind of low angle wide of every one of these rooms because there was something kind of I felt sort of in its in its lack of personality there were some there was kind of a sense of of of of menace you know and but as you point out nor a fan Charles office played by Laura turned his prisoner and is presented as a kind of homey version of one of these places and parts bits is is is a kind of you know maybe charming and it's sort of ad hoc you know we see him fixing his lunch you know while he's it's that there is this sort of again yeah like you know home fake home then later of course Charlie is trying to create a home in F. transitional home and by buying plants and he's like sex decorating it with his you know his designer and in a rugs and you know so that that that all of those sort of themes were kind of baked into the story but it's interesting to talk with this just because home and what home means the characters is is a the really the bedrock of every movie or may I think that's probably true this this notion of of of what we kind of hold on to you know what what thank you say the body blows or the what the world offers us what we take with us what we leave behind those struggles you know who who you know how do we in our negotiate this life with you know family member of the family were born into and then family we acquire friends you know how do how do these relationships as we change and or don't change it out in the case of some some of my characters refused to change the case of green burger you know how you know how do we negotiate the sort of changing world around us and and you're right it it does bring up this notion of home and and and and any merit story that that is constantly changing and shifting like where home is is a New York LA is is it it out this at the theater is at the TV station as a it said the rental in Los Angeles is at her mom's house you know I mean all these sort of different I guess different places kind of present themselves I guess this thing too because there's an opening where both the cone Charlie offering up their positive takes on their on their partners and and she talks about how Charlie really build a home from self is more of a New Yorker though he came Indiana a look behind clearly a lot of family wreckage he's turned New York by sheer force of will into a home right I was interested in him and and by people I know and characters for characters I've studied even artists who come to New York how they in some ways it's like this like make a break for them they have to it outs like if if if they didn't succeed they would be eaten up by the city or they would just go back home or something and you know and the ones who do make it somehow really do they feel like they've always been there in a way they'd like made the city more that they're more they're city then you know I I I I came from Brooklyn I sort of had a thing of feeling like an insider and an outsider because I both grew up in New York in a sense but I Brooklyn at that time felt like a very is very different place different San Francisco in fact absolutely I felt and and and I really relate to friends of mine who grew up in different cities you know Greta grew up in Sacramento and so on New York is the sort of beacon of like culture and life in your place you would hope to go to Wes Anderson grew up in Houston saw New York that way the experience New York two movies the New Yorker I I kind of had a something similar even though I could go into Manhattan I still felt very far away from it in Brooklyn it did you know in some ways affected you could see it Manhattan then I guess I say New York I'm really talk about Manhattan you know it it was like Saturday night fever like I felt like I I hope some day to make the trip across the bridge I guess this thing too because for somebody lecture last semester for Charlie who's a midwestern kid who's become this kind of fond of the avant theater in New York I mean he's also kind of a thing would be if someone like Andre Gregory in fact and is not that right right well yeah I mean the end he's I I think that that sort of part of the was one of the traumas for him and that sort of in the movie and in the break up is you know we see how he's both as you were saying made New York very much is home but also Nicole's family very much is home and he sort of threatened both of those are threatened in addition to do with this relationship his you know his Russia but this son is you know in terms of to the degree custody is being debated he is not that all of these sort of in a ways of by data find yourself foot are are kind of at risk for him in this movie I just of thinking it one of the I think one of my favorite things you ever done is the scene speaking of home when he goes to visit to California for the first time after the break up and he's having with those of a normal conversation with her sister played by weaver as becomes is kind of traumatic shell game and have that happen in a kitchen in this place that feels like a second home to him right and the fact there's this kind of jealousy the both the does have that their mom is still kept their relationship with their all their exes so the for for a place that is home to him to have his home idea home stripped away from home talk about writing the six is really something is really great thank you yeah with that yeah that that was and and that a lot of the sort of blocking of that scene from his point of.

Elvis Mitchell
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"More sports gambling during big events. Like March madness, you'll find out what that could mean to the gambling industry and college sports coming up in about ten minutes. Then later today at two o'clock here on KCRW. I'm Elvis Mitchell today in the treatment, Gloria bell director, Sebastian Lelio on making a movie about a character. Who's usually a smaller factor in the story. You know, Gloria bellies is a story of an everyday woman. You know, it's not a superhero rain is not, you know, the president is not the Queen is. You know, we could be here, and we should be here. Bro was should be. But I hope that the spectator feel, you know, invited to to the party in the sense that that when we see those scenes in those table scenes dinner, those dinners those conversations in bed, we should feel that we've been there, you know. And that's what the film spirit solve out to ETA Vate that normality into into seeming to fiction that Sebastian Lillio director of Gloria bell on the treatment today at two pm on KCRW. While the.

Gloria bell Sebastian Lelio director Sebastian Lillio Elvis Mitchell Bro president ten minutes
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on Here & Now

"And so you get a real insight into his comedy where it comes from. And how he's written this line between them a more conventional live and the more unconventional life of being a comedic actor. Now critics have come down hard on him for his Asian jokes in portrayals. Right. Exactly. And he even talks about it during the stand up special where. Particularly the character that he played in the hangover. Sometimes it's empowering, but I do think that sometimes he kind of crosses into stereotypes. And he doesn't really knowledge it in the stand up special. He's trying to be funny. But there may be times when people are watching this, and they may feel a little conflicted about some of the jokes that he's town. Okay. Another one you wanted to highlight for us today involves Elvis Mitchell. There's a new series by epochs called Elvis goes there at features Elvis Mitchell longtime film critic he's been on public radio as well. You've like in this to Anthony bourdain 's old show why? Well, it's interesting, and I think Elvis has has said this in interviews. He gets together with filmmakers in kind of talks about their art in environments that evoke things that made him influence their art. So so there's an episode where he it's mostly focused on Black Panther director. Ryan kugler. And so they spent time in Oakland, you know, which is quite an inspiration for a lot of elements in black. Panther. We meet young people who are dressed like Black Panther characters. And see how these images that Ryan is making it his movies are influencing even young African American children to think differently about their heritage and about their heroes. And what I really like about it is that Elvis takes the time because he's he's a film critic with a lot of knowledge he connects Ryan Kugler is work to other African American filmmakers, like boots Riley who did sort of bother you or a DVD eggs who people know from Hamilton. And he's also working on a project, and then even reaches back and connects them to well known African American filmmakers like Gordon parks and the learning tree in a classic film that he did. And so people get a sense that there's a breath tab to black filmmaking that goes beyond the names that everybody knows Spike Lee to see this heritage that people like Ryan Kugler picking up, and that filmmakers who are working in the or now are connecting to then. Wade. That you might not expect. Well, here's part of what aired on Monday. This is Mitchell and Kugler I think of you more political filmmaker there anything else. As you said. I mean, I'll never think of myself. So it's not just what you are just trying to myself. That's true to me. And I think that the best pieces of Arkan function in different ways. So Eric it sounds like this show has your recommendation. Yeah. It does you know, because it's a way of sort of telling you about why filmmakers doing what he's doing in a way, that's kind of different taking you to different places and encouraging you to kind of see the history that somebody in in what he does it's on a platform epochs that a lot of people might not know. So I'm hoping people will search round in their cable dial and find epics and check it out. It's funny with all the hundreds of channels that are on cable. It always seems like the one show that you wanna watch is on the one channel that you actually have to pay extra. And it's only going to get worse. There are more and more of these streaming services coming and every one of them is trying to find distinctive programming that will set them apart, and that will make people want to pay that extra five six ten fifteen bucks and epochs is one of them. They just started a streaming service..

Elvis Mitchell Ryan kugler Anthony bourdain Eric Gordon parks Spike Lee Elvis Oakland Wade director Riley Hamilton
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on /Film Daily

"So last week. I went to an evening with Ludwick goeransson and goeransson is the film composer, you might know his work. He did the scores for TV shows like community and happy endings and new girl and recently did the scores for venom and Black Panther. And Black Panther was sort of. The focus of this particular vent. There was a it was held at the what's the name this place the Annenberg Wallace Annenberg center for the performing arts in Beverly Hills. So it's like a really nice theater venue and Elvis Mitchell from film, independent did like Acuna with the composer. And it was a night that would it was basically like a mixture of a behind the scenes like a feature etes from Black Panther and clips from the movie and stuff that were shown on the screen, and like live performances that he composed in played on the stage in front of us. And he had a lot of his collaborators who worked on creating the score for Black Panther from Africa. He brought them to this event. And they were doing, you know, like a drum performances and stuff like that. There was one thing that was in in particular really stood out to me they had a couple of talking drum which is a an instrument that I've never heard of. But it's like a specific type of drum where you can manipulate the pitch of the drum sound as. You hit it, and it it's sort of like in this African culture, it's sort of like a creates letters, and they were saying that an and words, and they were saying that the certain type of talking drum noise that they would create an what does drum that they did on stage bunch of times during this thing. They actually used it in the movie, and it was like if you were to transcribe it into a word. It would be the word to Challah which is the the lead character in Black Panther. And they played this song. This little note. I guess thousands of times throughout the movie like when he was on camera and stuff, and so there's like a ton of things like that that I learned about how seriously he went and how deep he went into the research aspect of creating the score for Black Panther that just adds all these different layers to the movie that you wouldn't really notice as a traditional viewer. But knowing about it, it just sort of in riches, the experience even more goeransson is also famous for work. With childish Gambino on a bunch of his albums. He's been nominated or maybe even one of you. I think he's he's been nominated for three Grammys over the years. But he's produced a ton of Gambino's albums, and he also produced the song read bone. He broke co wrote that song with him. And at the very end of the night, he Elvis Mitchell to host asked goeransson to perform that song for the audience. And then they surprised everybody by bringing childish Gambino out, and they performed a new version of red bone, which is the song that was in get out. It was like a huge radio hit a couple years ago and Ludwig orange. His wife is a violinist, and she sort of did this new string heavy arrangement for that song. And every obviously as soon as camping okay came out the crowd like lost their shit. And so yeah, it was just really cool. They just about one song. And that was in. That was like the, you know, the capper of the evening, but it was very cool. And it was. Other thing put on by film, independent which I I've talked about before they're a great organization. And if you are in Los Angeles out highly recommend looking into them a film, independent dot org..

Ludwick goeransson Gambino Annenberg Wallace Annenberg ce Elvis Mitchell Beverly Hills Africa Acuna Los Angeles Ludwig orange
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"The. Welcome to the treatment. I'm Elvis Mitchell that probably up any actress who can say they've worked with see Herbert Ross one of Richard Benjamin. Woody Allen a couple of times and Daria are Gento and Luca Guadagnino. In fact, the idea like the film actress who can say, she's basically worked with filmmakers whose films that she's done with them, including Brian depalma had been about things not being what they seem. And she's now the host of a podcast about things not being with him. Call the Necker by guess, of course, it's Jessica Harper. She's in the original and the remake first of all thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having me Alvis, this is through thrilling to be. But again, this idea of things not being what they seem really hit me listening to the first three episodes of your podcast because one actually we have something in common with both large families. And we both have a twin. I have a twin sister. Oh, really? I didn't know that's great. And you your family life. You talk about is. This sounds like an ideal. You know, these well educated parents. I'm you raised in. Suburb of father had very glamorous profession who just come out of World War Two as a decorated hero. I mean, it sounds like an incredible life you peel back. Those covers in the in the show. Don't you? Yeah. Well, I think it's like a lot of families things often look pretty good and bouncing along on the surface. And in this case, even idyllic and in suburban Chicago, it was it was a beautiful beautiful suburb is where I came of age and most families seem to be fairly affluent, at least and everything seemed to be pretty good. Now, the end of his postwar America, the Eisenhower era when America used to be great. Well, thank you. Sorry. I missed that part of the greatness. What was so interesting is hearing your mom talk about this. Yeah. Because she's got such a great perspective. Yeah. Talking about how basically as a as a stay at home. Mom, her life was in value to make that. But at the same time she loved being at home with children. Yeah. I mean, that's almost like a feminist perspective on John Cheever in some ways. An exactly there's a this is for for people who don't know the podcast. It tells the story of my childhood, and I was able to capture the voice of my ninety six year old mother who who has say does have an incredible perspective on being a housewife and a fifties. And how she felt that was so undervalued because of course, now when she's commenting on her past life. She's been infused with feminism that we all have, and she she was a pretty rebellious tough woman. She she talks about she says that there wasn't information about what to expect when you're expecting all those kinds of things. There's no business. She just she's she reflect. She's almost like looking with fascination on her life. Exactly. And she had you know, she overall. She did have a terrific life. So she doesn't really have any major complaints on. She does. Yes. She does have kind of a a perspective on these on the at the time, you know, when she was a mother, and she had postpartum depression, and there are all kinds of conditions like that, shall we say that that weren't recognized at the time, including my father having PTSD after the war. We mentioned where you go into the memorial. In DC how you saw him. React finally. Yeah. To that. Right. Well, my mother my mother really finally told me this when I interviewed her for the podcast, which I never she'd never really put the term PTSD to what was bothering my father, which as far as we knew as young children was just these unpredictable rages and anger that made our child has obviously quite difficult. But you know, when I interviewed her she said, no, you know, what I think he really did have PTSD had some horrible stuff as everyone did in World War Two. And then, of course, men came out of the war, and they jumped right into the America was they were the greatest generation America was great. The economy was booming and all these men of obviously than are women in the military back then, but then jumped out, and they were expected to just ride the economic boom, and the women were expected to stay home and have a baby bump, but the men never had time to process all the horrors of war. And I think. I think you can ask a lot of baby boomers how their how their fathers dealt with that. And I think, you know, I, I know many people who who said, you know, my father was really messed up by that. I never got a chance to talk to talk about it. My father finally years later. I mean, literally when he was in his eighties. He found a group of veterans from World War Two, and they got together and talk to each other than this mentioned on the part of that's mentioned in the podcast. Yeah. And they talked for hours, and none of them had ever spoken about it, or you know, really processed it their experiences there. So, you know, he my father was difficult. But he was also he was a victim of of his era, and you know, the expectations of men, and and their and their post war, you know, inability to process so funny because listening tonight, I really just connected all these so many of these moves you've been in a Kootenai. The original superior, but entering someone looks the has appearance of being something that people might want to be part of. And in fact, is not is the worst possible thing. It's it's gonna be fascinating looking back because even with phantom of the paradise or or pennies from heaven, for God's sakes. I mean, so many things about the being two sides. So these these even in the comedy you did in in in my favorite year. It's about finding out that Benji has a lot that we don't know about. He's trying to hide this side of himself because he wants to appear to be probably the kind of guy your father would have been. So you given any thought this alone is a common thread, I hadn't really put that together Elvis. But now that you mention it that's very interesting and certainly on full display in suspicions about one and two. Yes. You calling it. Superior to Lucas reaction. Tell me because obviously Darrow Gento must have seen phantom paradise. Yes. He did. That's why he was interested in casting Mansa spirit because whatever that quality was that I displayed and phantom of the paradise seemed to him to be a good fit for his project. And I think, you know, there is a relationship there as you say, I was sort of, you know, the phantom of the paradise which is for those. Sort of a takeoff on phantom of the opera that takes place in a rock and roll house instead of you know, an opera house, and and I play that sort of innocent, but maybe a little bit ambitious. Maybe. Finger maybe a little bit of a diva, but. A bit. Yeah. And then and then suspicious. Sort of an innocent. We also. Monetarily innocent. Yeah. There's a little there's a little bit of a streak in both of those characters that I'm not gonna argue that with you, by the way is the true, my guess, who's funding yourself off the hook for her character's. Ambition is Jessica Harper. She has a terrific podcast. She's she's hosting naked by her own family history. But is in Luca Guadagnino retake on superior and the nine hundred seventy seven in the original. But it's interesting too. Because you also in my favorite years over with some ambition is kind of fort looking, and and it's almost in this way about you playing these characters who are a little too advanced for the period. Yeah. I think that's true. I think there's a there's a consistent quality and these characters which sort of reminds me of my mother and away, and you know, in in each case the women in these characters I play are somewhat trapped in their time. And certainly when when the original superior was made it wasn't wasn't professionalism. But feminism was. Not the subject of national conversation as much as it is say today, for example, so eleven wasn't necessarily expected to express her power the way she is now and in phantom of the paradise. I was at the mercy pretty much of some pretty evil men one nice man, but he got screwed by the bad guy. And in fact, that there's a CD opening scene phantom of the paradise as a very sort of echoes the metoo complaints that we're hearing now and in which I am auditioning for a part in this in this rock musical. And they say, okay, it's time for you to audition, and that came out of the line and go into the room with the casting director who's played by George Memoli who is wearing turquoise boxer shorts and very little else. And I go in the room and seconds later. I emerged from the room with my clothes. Disheveled, and obviously the victim of sexual assault. Although this is all done, very campy comic style. Brian. I don't know if you get away with that today. But anyway, and that film I was a character is subjected to what was kind of normal casting protocol. And then as you say going forward to to my favorite year. But that of course, that movie took place in the fifties. So and I was yes, I played ambitious young woman in the TV production setting. And I think in all of these characters I had a little a little bit of fierce ambition that that powered me through this compromising situations, but I just want so interesting, especially. Nervous by saying this allowed. But I did see some parts of your mother. Having heard the podcast looking back. I can see that. I wonder if you felt some influence and playing some those characters about trying to play this woman who really had a sense of what it was that. She wanted something more than what she had. Yeah. Well, that's that's what I learned from my mother, really among other things was that. She I mean, she accepted what she had. And that was partly because she and my father grew up during the depression, and when it came to them for them to decide what to do with their lives. My father really wanted to be a screenwriter. My mother was a nightclub singer who wanted to be an actor, but they made a decisions to take more traditional roles because you know, they saw how people suffer during the depression, and they wanted a little more security than what an artistic pursuit might offer. So he went into advertising, and she became a housewife. But she was always I always knew that she was a bit of a rebel. You know, we. We lived in a very waspy traditional community in Winnetka, Illinois. But they joked about the country club, they called it the red pants club because of for those who haven't been to a red bands club. They know they don't know. But if you go to Nantucket and look at what men are wearing you'll understand and she didn't like to wear the color blue because she thought it was too normal. She always opted to wear green. Instead, you know, she had these little little rebellious acts that she. So I picked that up from her. I picked up her first of all she was really smart. And you know, she was Bryn Mawr educated. And here she was running around with six babies, but she she did love being a mother as well. And I also got that from her, which was lovely. But I always understood that she was a really bright. And she that she might have done other things. And she has said if I had had only had two children, I think I might have done much more with my life as we know from the show this opponent. She thought she was going to have to and suddenly she had three. Yeah. And then she had six. Yeah. My guess who was quite the storyteller. And after this and.

America Jessica Harper PTSD Brian depalma Elvis Mitchell Woody Allen Alvis Luca Guadagnino John Cheever Herbert Ross Nantucket Richard Benjamin Daria Chicago Darrow Gento Bryn Mawr Kootenai
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Elvis Mitchell. Becca KCRW t I forgot this place. Looked like. Has been there, and I was able to park. So is my guest Barunholtz late. Oh, Chicago more recently of Los Angeles from we know from gosh, the Mindy project, I know for wears movie. This elevator movie. I saw cannon summer of two thousand and one the e you saw the left. Yes. It was called down. When I saw it called down. I can't believe for some talking to you. I can't believe them down came up because no one I know has seen it. It's the artist movie and to remake of his original disag- driven him. Dick moss who did the lift which is actually the great version to think of American comp. I mean, I think it would be easy to say Spielberg. But it's no it's actually more if you saw intersect this Spielberg and tobe Hooper the guy who made. Yeah. Yeah. That's what it is. It's like if tobe Hooper at Toby brands, Steven Spielberg had a Dutch child. It would be dick moss, and it anyway, more recently, there's news films. I I guess you writing directing debut, the answer is the L and one of the things I wanted to mention to you about it is the perfect ending. Because for those of you who are inside liberal comedy, the show ends with classical gas by Mason Williams, which is the not too. I'm guessing you're you're your heritage and legacy is a comedy writer. I Mason Williams was a key reference. Smothers brothers. Absolutely and. It's one of my favorite songs, something I wanted to end the movie on this kind of optimistic American note, and it's such a great just American hard twenty Qatar. But like the majestic orchestra in the back, and there's a little bit of a by liberal comedy writer too. I know I listen, I tried to get you know, Seth Meyers to write a song, but he wouldn't. So I just wanna make them less. Well, unfortunately for probably wanted to sing or rap over. So I think you're better off if I ended up with Seth Meyers during some kind of.

Steven Spielberg tobe Hooper Seth Meyers Mason Williams Dick moss writer Elvis Mitchell Barunholtz Chicago Qatar Los Angeles disag
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"Another? I mean for all the rollercoaster Albert Brooks. You know, you're doing so many usual, you're talking about Patty's energy you talking about Norman Jewison investment. You can kind of let early on to Kanye you can I mean. Yeah. Absolutely. Can the show that most people know me for now, which is the Walking Dead. And what was that show again? I made fifty six years I've been an actor Herschel. The first day on the set. The first episode was directed by the great northern stickers and. I knew right away. Should I love working with this, man? I it's. You know, right away. If you if you're going to have help when you don't really think you're going to need help. But you do and you don't realize it sometimes until someone says the right thing to you. And then you say, yes, boom. You know, it it's it. It's interesting. The performing arts are interesting and. Not to be boring. But now with film, the performing arts singing, dancing, everything is joined their peer group that has been there forever. The art is the the composers writers. But anyway, no. And you've been a big part of that that rising from we just talked about a handful of classic films that people love and love you being in them. And I I can't thank you for doing this new walkner comeback or anything. I think. Cool. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. My pleasure. My guest is Scott Wilson. He's got so much stuff. Again. This is fifty years. He's still working still scaring people because he has both legs on fifty years ago. He did two films that we will always be remembered in the heat of the night and in cold blood or recording engineer here at KCRW forgiving. Also makes the shelves categories. Edify Blake white associate producer, I'm Elvis Mitchell. I'm Phil to be here. It's the treatment. To catch up on passive obsessed with treatment Goto, KCRW dot com. Police on your smartphone case for ws mobile, apps or subscribed podcast on itunes, Stitcher. Or if you listen to podcasts the treatment is produced and distributed by KCRW, Santa Monica. Twenty nine daily is next right after NPR news.

Scott Wilson Kanye KCRW Albert Brooks Patty NPR Herschel Elvis Mitchell Phil Santa Monica Blake engineer producer fifty years fifty six years
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"The treatment i'm elvis mitchell my guess is bestselling author game show host comedian but more importantly an emmy award winning actor performances christine baskets in the show baskets louie anderson his new book is hey mom hey louis thanks i'm doing well how are you good good name to get i mean a lot of pressure when you get elvis now there's precious being a family of eleven kids now i'm from a small fm i only family of nine kids oh are you what number are you i'm right in the middle oh that's why you're in show business that's what i always wondered that you know how they say that middle thing i figured like hey what about me hello well i think it's touchy that you think of this is being show business but anyway i think what's really i think that npr is definitely in the in the in a lane of show business i listen to npr all the time and people give it another gravitas you know if you've been on npr they they sneak up like next year and go is john elvis one of the book of me think about numbers of kids as which number are you never finished reading a book that's i'm number ten yes that's that's the child who never finishes oh yeah oh yeah true true like i have a thousand books that i have never finished why not because people give me books all the time but you're can throw it out off i think i might have a little bit of a learning disability reading okay i always felt like like i listen i've listened to a few thousand audiobooks because when i read i have a hard time not reading quickly enough and i think it's because of some sort of learning disability that i never really found out about oh gosh okay i wonder if it's the books and i was just rereading do your dad to get ready for this and what's interesting between these two books is you seem to work that a lot of your anger in yeah dad listen this is a much this is a much sweeter book and also too because you've written it after getting the bill christine baskets right yes yes you know the dare dad was an indictment and cry for love you know to my dad and why why didn't you love me and this is a love letter in fact chevron's with love louis right and meanwhile with your dad each chapter ahead a very different kind of that was a little more say little more fury in those those chapter you know but i needed that fury in order to get it get square with my dad because that book really healed me that's that book when i was done writing when i read those letters at my dad's grave that healed me i felt a honest to god i was able to leave that all you know almost all of it there wow that's fascinating because i found myself thinking about that book and the the the baskets episode touched on both books will your dad was drunk driving union brother and there's that same with young christine going through the same kind of thing with her dad yeah the writers were kind enough i always go to the writers room and let them know all the things that i think christine could do you know and i said when i was young i had to drive the car on my dad was drunk and i know christine's father you know had a drinking problem so i said what you know maybe you'll recreate that and they did and so the good thing is the good and the bad thing is i wanted to be exactly like mine is but the good thing is the writers are smart enough not to indulge me like that because you know that's their that's their expertise and they beautifully wove it in and i was very emotional when i watched the scene yeah yeah because i just i realized i you you when you're completely helpless and your dad's drunk and you're driving the car there's a part of you that knows i this isn't right they shouldn't be doing this but he's not session you talk about where you know.

emmy award elvis mitchell
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"Kcrw dot com it's the treatment welcome to the treatment i'm elvis mitchell and the terrific new hbo documentary the diaries of carries yanling there's a moment that's a visual metaphor for the film where we see a young garry shandling with his mom carrying her horseback which is basically in so many ways the movie is about is director at our old friend jude appetizer for jeff good to have you back good to be back and that moment really is the metaphor piece of film usa thought i've got my movie it's funny because he had stacks of vhs tapes and we were so anal we were just going through anything that wasn't labeled and there was a tape i think on it just had liked memories you like it was from some company and we had no idea what it was and it was a vhs dob of all of the family's home movies shot on super eight back in the day and on it were a lot of images that were very powerful where you could see let's say the intensity of his his mother's engulf ment oven and one of them was her writing down his back as he ran around the room at at some birthday party i think it's a really painful and kind of honest bone to watch and it's so interesting because the thing that the movie doesn't do is to make his life reductive i mean what we get from all.

jeff elvis mitchell hbo garry shandling director
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on KCRW

"In ben tell a day engineer the broadcast force i'm car rosedale we will see itamar bug this is apm coal as a way of life for people in central appalachia but relying on coal might not offer bright future for appalachians economy as well here on marketplace tomorrow too it's to twenty nine the preakness next with elvis mitchell and president trump says it's outrageous that a san francisco federal judge has blocked his administration from stripping nearly seven hundred thousand young immigrants of their protections against being deported all things considered will look at what this might mean poor a dhaka deal that is coming up at great casey i w sponsors include universal pictures presenting the film get out from writerproducer director jordan peel nominated for our producers guild award for best film of the year academy eligible in all categories and on the witness guest endured roger does guest willem dafoe when i was a kid songs like love minus zero no limit were rare in fort cuts appertaining on those words you know one and things like gas now success and failure fairness no success law import a kid misaki joulwan that's willem dafoe explaining bob dylan's influence on his view of success get this episode and more at qaiseer wjr com slash gets dj project or wherever you get your podcasts nl from casey w santa monica and case here w dot com it's the treatment woo.

engineer central appalachia trump san francisco jordan peel roger willem dafoe bob dylan appalachians elvis mitchell president dhaka writerproducer director
"elvis mitchell" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"elvis mitchell" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"With like a great argument i'm really happy to engage in that conversation that's really fun and maybe i'll learn something open but the blowback tends to be white supremacists going like fuck you ju and you know so what am i gonna say actually you know i was raised jewish but i'm an atheist i mean i'm not gonna throw i wouldn't if i were you i you know what can you do you don't there's been can't do anything of that human brain you have your own podcast it's called the moment with brain koppelman in it focuses i'm key moments that people had in their careers what me decide to start a podcast in doing this series of vines that i did where i talked about creativity and giving yourself permission to do this kind of work during the time was listening to let a podcast and particularly listening to merrin an elvis mitchell and corolla a lot i would sometimes be listening to mark and wish he asked a different question or or listening to elvis in wishing the show was twice as long as elvis asks all the right questions um and then i went on a few podcast and when i did i would get tons of feedback from people asking me to do it again do more of it and i just decided fuck it um and i'm gonna do this and see what happens and realized that i had this organizing principle i wanted to chase which was about inflection points in a conflict on points of people's lives moments of uh real highs or real lows when they had to decide how to move forward when in even in great success it so he's very hard to then figure out what the next steps are my pakist is the show i wish i had when i was 25 because i could have used those lessons that people come on and give me and taken them and maybe i would have gotten where i got to sooner.

elvis mitchell