35 Burst results for "eighty years"

Melvin Hazen Helped Segregate Washington DC, And Got A Park In His Name

WAMU: Local News

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Melvin Hazen Helped Segregate Washington DC, And Got A Park In His Name

"Eighty years ago. Any washingtonian would have likely known. The name melvin. Hazen he was the city's defacto mayor before residents were allowed to elect their own leaders now neighbors and officials are calling for hazings name to be removed from local park. Wmu's jacob fenced-in explains why if you've never heard the name. Melvin hazen you're not alone melvyn hayes and was is coretec. Watch hikes to my along. Trail named for mr hazen three times a week with her dog but never knew who was named four or why not. I mean it's got the creek right beside it. The trail crisscrossing. Melvin creek winding valley under a canopy of beach and tulip trees at leads from rock creek. Park up to connecticut avenue. Recently neighbors have begun to learn about the man behind the name basically thanks to him that or free. Upper northwest is as white as it is. Monmouth is a local advisory neighborhood commissioner. She says he's in policies when he ran. The city in the nineteen thirties were racist. He worked to bulldoze one of the only black communities west of rock creek that legacy of segregation is visible to this day word. Three where melvin. Park is located his just seven percent black given the ugly history. Is this really. We want to memorialize answer no in november nemeth and the anc called on the national park service which owns the park to rename it dc congresswoman. Eleanor holmes norton made the same request. It's the latest effort to scrub the city. In the country of names and monuments with racist legacies the scrutiny on hazing is due in part to research done by local historian and writer neil flanagan. It's a story that explains a lot about why. Dc looks the way it does you know why on one side of rock creek park and why qabala live on the other during seasons fifty year career in dc. He went from an axeman clearing land to make way for streets to district. Surveyor president of the board of supervisors

Melvin Hazen Melvyn Hayes Coretec Mr Hazen Melvin Creek Winding Valley Melvin Rock Creek Upper Northwest Hazen WMU Monmouth Nemeth Eleanor Holmes Norton ANC Neil Flanagan National Park Service Park Rock Creek Park DC
Ask Geoffrey: Chicago's Old Passenger Rail Stations

Chicago Tonight

05:29 min | Last month

Ask Geoffrey: Chicago's Old Passenger Rail Stations

"Chicago's old passenger railroad stations for decades acted as the city's front door where people from all over the country arrived seeking a better life or just the thrills of the big city. Jeffrey bayer takes us back to the golden age. Rail travel in this week's ask geoffrey. Hey geoffrey good to see you paris all right so we have a question from larry gardner of skokie he says. Could you do a story on the old train stations that once stood in downtown chicago. Well of course we can. There is as you mentioned. The the late nineteenth century the early twentieth century this was the golden age of rail travel when people traversed the country on trains. And of course right at the center there at the hub of it all was chicago. It's hard to believe. But as recently as the nineteen sixties there were six passenger train stations in downtown chicago today. All passenger trains that come into the city from beyond the suburbs. Go through the last one standing union station which is now owned by amtrak. It's designed including this now. Demolished concourse was right along the river there and the colonnaded main building which is still standing right behind it. In this picture of those things recall the grandeur of rail terminals in those glory days of designed to wow the traveler of the way many airports do today met with. Certainly the goal of another neoclassical designed terminal. Check this one out owned by the chicago and north western railway you know classical buzzards and it stood at what is today. Ogilvie transportation center which is operated by metra. That station included ornate concourses. Waiting rooms even dedicated spaces for barbers and hairdressers. People traveling across the country The chicago north western railway traced its roots to chicago's very first railroad. The galena chicago union established back in eighteen forty eight. By chicago's first mayor actually will be ogden. Certainly the golden age of travel there and then another key player. Of course you hear references pop culture all the time the illinois central oh absolutely That country that company billed itself as the main line of mid america. It was a dominant player. Both in passenger and freight rail their main passenger terminal was called central station once stood just just south of grand part right on the lakefront there. The railroad built this mammoth terminal in one thousand nine hundred three in part to accommodate the influx of visitors. That were expected for the world's fair that year you'll notice almost all of these terminals have clocks or clock towers so people hurrying to catch trains didn't have to fumble around for their pocket watches that of course they had watches it. All central station was also an important point of entry for many african americans who came to chicago from the south during the great migration with like so many of its contemporaries central station met the wrecking ball. In this case in the mid one thousand nine hundred seventy s amtrak diverted there trains to union station but there is still an active platform. Eleven street serving the metra electric line and i gather it's the inspiration for that residential development around their central station. Which i believe. Richard m daley lived there for a while and not to be confused with grand central station. Of course right. That's right and yes. We had our own grand central station. here in chicago. Not new york's wasn't the only one ours was at harrison and wells on the western edge of the loop. Read along the river for about eighty years. It was just north of if you know we're river city's development is today Traffic declined grand central after world war. Two this photo with the board of trade there in the background was taken in nineteen sixty seven at the end of the stations life. It was torn down in nineteen seventy one and this is one of several places in the city. were abandoned. Railroad land is being redeveloped during construction of the new development on this old site buried. Stones from grand central station were actually unearthed and they've been re purposed for a river walk. One chicago train station of actually is still standing So in addition to union station is dearborn station. South loop although of course. It's on train station anymore. You can see its clock tower visible all the way from the north side of lube looking south down on dearborn but what happened to the top of that clock tower. Take a look at this early photo. And you'll notice it once had this huge wooden flemish roof on top of it but in one thousand nine hundred twenty two. It caught fire. Look at these incredible photos from the scene as crowds gathered. Luckily firefighters were able to save the building. But but not that tower roof. I the nineteen seventy s. Most of the train. Shed was demolished but the facade and portions of the terminal were preserved as part of a mall. Serving printers row by the building is still called dearborn station. In fact peres as you just pointed out. Many old stations live on in the names of new developments of the one. You mentioned central station. Just south of grand park word. Mayor daley used to live and then a new apartment building at harrison and wells is using the grim central name

Chicago Jeffrey Bayer Larry Gardner Geoffrey Ogilvie Transportation Center Galena Chicago Union Skokie North Western Railway Amtrak Richard M Daley Grand Central Station Paris Ogden Dearborn Station Illinois River City America Harrison New York Dearborn
Data center gives new life to site of a former coal plant

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Data center gives new life to site of a former coal plant

"For more than eighty years a- coal-fired power plant operated in the city of hammond indiana but when the state line generating plant shutdown in two thousand twelve. The city lost its biggest tax payer so that was a big deal when it decided to close. Dave ryan is executive director of the lakeshore chamber of commerce. In hammond. he says the closure also left behind a giant building that had to be taken down and a massive pile of. It's just sitting there hundred feet high and one hundred feet deep a hole so that all had been remediated but the city was convinced that the site had potential. It's close to chicago and located on lake. Michigan developers agreed and use the site to build a new data center called digital crossroad to build the facility. They recycled some asphalt and concrete from the original plant. Solar panels will help create electricity for the city of hammond. The data center helps provide a new tax base while it was going to be just a environmentally disastrous site. You know with a huge coal pile sitting in the middle of it is now been turned into a beautiful data center and now what was a basket of lemons now lemonade for city of human

Hammond Lakeshore Chamber Of Commerce Dave Ryan Indiana Michigan Chicago
The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:49 min | 2 months ago

The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

"I recently wrote in forbes about how kamala harris may be able to heal the wounds between black women and white women but i defer to our terrific yesterday on these issues. I'd like you to meet dr. Marcia chatelaine a provost distinguished associate professor of history and african american studies at georgetown university here in washington dc. She's a scholar of american life and culture previously. She was an assistant professor of honors in african american studies at the university of oklahoma in norman. She earned her. Phd at brown university and her undergraduate studies at the university of missouri columbia in journalism and religious studies fellow aspiring journalists. They go. Marsha was a terrific expert featured in the recent pbs series. The vote on how women fought for and won the right to vote over an eighty year struggle or more welcomed green connections radio. Marcia thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Oh you're welcome. You're welcome so our start in the heart of this issue. As i said in my introduction i've understood the black and white women had a kind of love hate relationship if you will during the suffrage battles as i understand it. Black women wanted white women to include abolition in their struggle. But the white women leaders believe the combining the two would keep the legislation from. What is your take on it. Tell us the truth. Because you're the historian so the issue at hand between abolition and suffrage are deeply tied. And that's because a number of figures in the suffrage movement were first activists in the fight against slavery and i think the poignancy of the battle for women's suffrage was the fact that many of the white women who were at the lead of the suffrage movement were anti-slavery and they had supported. Abolitionist may have believed that there was a moral reason to end the system of slavery but when it came to suffrage they were divided over the issue of universal suffrage Some do not believe that black women white men should equally have the vote. Some did not believe that black men and black women should have the vote. So i think that the suffrage movement really exposes the limitations of racial solidarity even among people who were on the right side of history one issue were not able to transfer that sense of grace to the issue of suffrage. And that's where you see the fault lines. In the suffrage movement really emerged from it was the fact that they did not want include african american women visibly or prominently or ideologically in their fight for the right to vote because they believed that it would degrade the quality of the vote of degrade the preciousness of the right and a number of these women again. Even though they were morally opposed to slavery they would not immune from white supremacist ideas. Okay so there's so much to unpack in there. You said something really interesting you said and i paraphrase of course but the the the divisions over the vote represented larger divisions in the racial schisms. If you will Racial solidarity behind the vote. Yes so one of the things that i think. A lot of people don't understand from how they're taught history is that we often think of the issue of slavery as one in which people were either pro or anti and it's often presented as a matter of north versus south union versus confederacy. But if you look at the movement to end slavery and look at abolitionists. They all had very different ideas of what happens next. They knew that slavery is a scourge on the nation. But they didn't agree on. What would it mean for african americans to be elevated to the level of status rather the level of a citizen and what that status should mean and so there were people who were abolitionists but they were segregationists. There were abolitionists who believed that african americans should be repatriated to colonies in africa. They were people who believed in complete and total social equality in some people believed in some level of social quality but not marriage and so those debates among the abolitionist movement i think are very much mirrored in the debate among white selfridge's who should get the vote i who should be allowed to vote. And what measures should be taken in order to ensure their desired goals

Marcia Chatelaine University Of Missouri Columbi Kamala Harris University Of Oklahoma Georgetown University Brown University Marsha Marcia PBS Norman DC Washington South Union White Selfridge Africa
TV Dinners

Gastropod

08:38 min | 2 months ago

TV Dinners

"How has food. Tv changed over time. And how has it changed us. All not just us gastropod. That's right. you're listening to gastropod the podcast. That looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm cynthia graber. And i'm nicola twilley and this episode. We're taking a spin around the dial which sounds medieval but believe us when we say. Tv's used to not have remotes. You had to literally spin odile. Even i barely remember those wild and wonderful days. This episode is supported in part by cabot. Creamery cabot is a co-op of new england and new york dairy farmers who make award winning cheeses with pure rich milk straight from family farms their specialty cheeses include unique flavors like roasted garlic cheddar and their team of cheese graders indirect with every batch to ensure award-winning quality. Go to cabinet. She's dot com to find out where to buy cabot near you there. You'll also find pairings how to videos and delicious comfort food recipes like the best mac and cheese and more the first thing to know about the very earliest food. Tv wasn't actually on tv. It was on the radio almost as soon as a radio came into being in the nineteen twenties in the us food radio came into being. It was a really easy way for programs to be created because they were easy and cheap. They were obvious outlets for advertising for sponsorship for food products and appliances. So that's where we saw food before. Tv was even a twinkle in the eye. Kathleen collins is a librarian and professor at john jay college of criminal justice and she's the author of the book watching what we eat. The evolution of television cooking shows the stars of these very first food shows. Were hardly stars in today's cents. These radio shows were unglamorous. It was all teaching housewives. How to economize and optimize and generally do all their chores. Better one of the not remotely. Glamorous stars was a woman named and sammy who we can only imagine was supposed to be the wife of uncle sam which is kind of disturbing. She wasn't actually a person. It was a program delivered by an arm of the. Usda and the she was not just one person but several different actors around the country. Adopting regional accents similarly a figure. That's much more well known was betty crocker. She actually started on the radio and like aunt. Sammy was played by many different actresses and she was one of the first we. Could i guess call her one of the first cooking teachers in broadcasting And we have some fun you one for. You are cooking lessons. This week is on some new christmas cookies. And besides that with sending seven ethically recipes to order numbers of schools who had indicated that they want the wednesday menu ambassador. I hope you'll be sure to watch for them on. Sammy's show was called housekeepers. Chat and betty crocker's was the slightly more enticing cooking school of the air. That sounds as though it was all about meringues and souffles and all things fluffy which it decidedly was not and then the very first television station came into being in the nineteen twenties though at the time the technology was still super experimental and people did not have. Tv's in their homes yet. Even as late as nineteen fifty only nine percent of american homes had a tv set. Foot made the jump to tv before. Tv even made the jump to people's living rooms so more megan was thirst. Tv shafran her snapple titled Tv show was called suggestions for dishes to be prepared and cooked in fifteen minutes and that demonstrated single ring. Cookery back in hundred thirty six. This is julie smith. She's a food writer. And podcast and the author of a new book called taste and the tv chef and she's british so i will translate for her single ring. Cookery means the kind of thing you can make on just one burner in your bed. Sit which is british for a studio apartment. Thanks for the cross pen translation of my uses as well as my bizarre accident. True also interesting. Megan was doing this. Fifteen minute meal about eighty years. Before jamie oliver's tv show and book of the same title. We have a picture of her filming her show dressed in. What looks like a raincoat on our website. Glamour personified where was i but by the nineteen forties food. Tv show started showing up for real in the us to the shows were cheap to produce and they were sponsored by kitchen and food companies and they were pretty boring. It was a very practical probably rather dry and yet a lot of the airtime was filled with these programs in different markets around the country. These shows obviously targeted at women most. Tv's at the time. Were actually in public places rather than homes especially bars where there weren't a lot of housewives. There was a show actually the first national televised. Tv show was james beard and it started in the mid nineteen forties and despite everything i just said about how most of the tv shows and the radio shows were led by home. Economists james beard was not a home economist. He was a gourmet and he was really all about the food and so it was a little strange to have this show on. Tv in a bar being watched by men james beard was kind of a one off for a long time but still here we go right off the bat you can see a gender divide in food tv women were the ones who were proper and teaching viewers had cook the man a ormond. Just appreciate food for food. Food was a chore for women and a pleasure for men until the only lucas came along. So diani lucas. Like james beard was a bit of an anachronism. She was a cordon bleu trained chef. Who was born in. Britain came from a very artistically oriented family. Do you only had a restaurant and cooking school in new york and she treated the kitchen as her art studio. it was her serious creative outlet. Her recipes were complex and mostly french. And they took a lot of time to make she was also kind of a taskmaster her british accent and her scraped back hair and she did not cut corners. But kathleen says the. Tony did occasionally have a little sparkle in her eye. Like when she told viewers to use as much rama's they liked or needed in their cribs. Suzanne that show was on the evening and prime time and it ran from nineteen forty seven until nineteen fifty-six but she was kind of ahead of her time. I would not be surprised if many of your listeners have never heard of the oni lucas. She just came along at the wrong time for the public. Viewing audience at diani did have a big influence on one particularly important person. Julia child the french chef. I'm doolittle she was a california girl. She was not a spy for the cia before being cooking show guru as many people think she was a research assistant at the oh s the precursor to the cia but she was really one of these happy accidents. She married paul child who had a foreign service assignment. in france. They moved to france and she fell in love with food. And she got herself trained. You know at the core blows school which was really challenging as a woman and she just became. You know a master in nineteen sixty one. Julia published a book with two other. Women called mastering the art of french. Cooking it is eight home and that seven hundred fifty. Two page book provided the kick. That landed julia in front of millions of viewers happen was. Julia was doing the rounds promoting her book and she'd been invited onto a book show hosted by a local professor on w. g. b. h. Which is the boston public. Tv station and she decided she didn't want to just talk with the professor. She wanted to cook. She wanted to teach him how to make a proper french omelette. The professor wasn't a particularly skilled cook in this live tv cooking class but people wrote into the show after it aired. They called julia a hoot and the producer thought. Julia was incredibly well-spoken so gbh gave her her own show. It would eventually become the french chef. The show was a huge hit. It was on national. Tv for three decades and it not only made julia household name but it also kind of launched the modern era of food

Cynthia Graber Nicola Twilley Odile Creamery Cabot James Beard Kathleen Collins Betty Crocker Sammy Shafran John Jay College Of Criminal J Cabot Julie Smith New England New York Cabinet Usda Diani Lucas Jamie Oliver
Show #50   Queen of Komdie, from Germany.... Lois Bromfield - burst 2

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Show #50 Queen of Komdie, from Germany.... Lois Bromfield - burst 2

"The london comedy clubs are the best and berlin is pretty good but they are german so always the best audience. Yeah there's always. It's always been a debate if there's a sense of humor in germany but you know what i want to hear about that. But let's i'm gonna take you back a few years. Just for in my podcast. We worked together for over ten years back in the eighties and early nineties before you became a big tv show writer and producer but be four that Share with us just a short story how you ended up in comedy because being a female comic on the road has got to be one of the toughest jobs out there When did you decide to get into comedy. Remember in new york city when i was twenty Nineteen twenty so new york and worked. At the improv. I came out to california and You know what. Honestly i didn't really want to be a road comic. That wasn't like. I just the whole idea that i hated what was great about working to your club was. It wasn't a road gig. Because i only had to drive from l eighty year to sacramento which was like five hours. So rude gig to me was having to get on a train or fly somewhere or do some big long hauling things just two or three days somewhere or or going all the way down to atlanta georgia or someplace where you're still far from home. It just makes you feel you just feel like a hooker.

Berlin London Germany New York City New York California Sacramento Atlanta Georgia
All Good Pizza

Voices of the Community

05:59 min | 2 months ago

All Good Pizza

"George koster your host. This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in the san francisco bay area back in april of twenty twenty when we decided to create this ongoing series on covid nineteen impact i or nonprofits and then on small businesses in the san francisco bay area. We like you had no idea how long the pandemic would go on. And what the health and economic impact would be in our community going into twenty twenty one. The pandemic is now killing more people shutting down more nonprofits and small businesses on with wiping out the livelihoods of families neighborhoods and communities. We will continue to shine a spotlight on the nonprofits and small businesses that make up the fabric of our community along with the founders and staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services is an ability until we can all get to the other side of the pandemic along the way we will also share with you all the amazing solutions that are nonprofits. Small businesses foundations and government leaders are working on to help us all get to the other side of the pandemic and come together to rebuild our communities with more economic social and environmental equality. I think also the restaurant industry is such a tremendous industry worldwide right like restaurants so often provide such a vital resource to communities not just in food around just the structuring of communities and making people feel seeing in heard and welcome and i know for all of my locations. We have regulars that are there every day and you get to know them and their stories and without those spaces you realize how isolated and lonely it can be for people. This is the founder and owner of all good pizza tanto and cafe oma kristen howick. Kristen is part of the baby. Women's food entrepreneurs who are change makers and community leaders providing jobs healthy food options and a hand up to their fellow community members. I'm joined remotely via zoom by kristen. Hoke the owner of august pizza tanto and cafe obama. Thanks for being here. Kristen had any. I've been a long time. Fan of yours in august pizza out in the bayview and i would love it. If you provide a little brief history of why you set up a good pizza and then now why you started to more restaurants in the bayview community. Yeah my been a longtime resident of the baby. Oh i've been here a little over twenty years. And when i first moved to the neighborhood i was really struck. By how few restaurants in food options were available in the community particularly because we exports so much food from the community we've got the produce market which has been here since the sixties that feeds the bay area and beyond really. They've you actually used to be called butcher town. A lot of the packing came from this community. And we still to this day. Have businesses like molinari's salami. They've been here for over eighty years ever good. Sausage also has been here for a very long time. All pizza really started for me as a passion project to bring another healthy option to bayview. And i really wanted to utilize the local resources of the community so it was really my goal early on to use only local businesses to source from. And i did that by using veritable vegetable which is a woman on cooperative. That was started in san francisco. Kind of a pioneer actually in organics. And like i mentioned. Ever get sausage molinari's salami chron brioche. Which is a local bakery. That's been in the community for a few decades as well. I've been in the food business for many many years prior to opening all good pizza and when i opened all good i was actually. The president and ceo of an organization called nama stay direct and we focused on predominantly women involved in food businesses in guatemala and southern mexico and and we did a business development program that focused on financial literacy training and business mentorship and also the sources of business capital. And i thought to myself like i love doing this work. But i'm traveling to them all and mexico all the time and where i really wanna be in the so. I opened all pizza. Like mentioned you know as a passion project and fortunately it was well received and i was able to focus fulltime on aug pizza after about a year so i quit working my other job and the rest is history. I've been in operation all good since the beginning of twenty twelve. So we're quickly coming up on ten years. And then you started to launch two new restaurants tattoo and kaffa elm also in the baby do community so tato my son's nickname taco and his dad is from mexico city and his dad's mom wasn't incredible chef interesting thing that i learned in guatemala and in working with the populations that i worked with. There was a really low rate of literacy and a lot of the women who were these phenomenal chefs. A lot of the more modern girls did not want to be in the kitchen. So the recipes that had existed in families for generations or no longer being created so. I set out to do a project with my mother-in-law. She was a chef in mexico. City and i set out to do a project with her to write down all her recipes because we all love her food so much and did not want to lose those recipes. After she passed she did pass two years ago. So i created a sort of homage to her and an amish to my son's latino roots and really just in celebration of the incredible food that came out of the kitchen from her and from my son's father's family

George Koster San Francisco Bay Kristen Howick Kristen Molinari Hoke Mexico Guatemala Barack Obama Nama San Francisco Mexico City
Actress MJ Rodriguez on Breaking Down Historical Race Barriers

Homo Sapiens

02:44 min | 2 months ago

Actress MJ Rodriguez on Breaking Down Historical Race Barriers

"One thing i wanted to ask you about is on this podcast. We often talk to such a different array of people but people want themselves represented in. The one thing that i think in the uk we fully get is the kind of african american also. Latino experiences like an intersection. And is that like in. its specificity. Well one out say this as person who is likely not and also african american and probably many other things but those are the main things. I know i'm due to just my parents. There's not a lot of representation so there's a lot of There's a lot of anger the way we can fix. That is obviously making sure that there's more representation and also for people to really look back in the history and see that we're all connected. I always that was my main goal. Was to make sure that people know that. Yeah you may be latin. Yeah you may be african or african american or asian or you know you may be them and again whether again but you still are one. We help from one place no matter what. And that's just fact it's proven it's not like something that's whimsical and came out of nowhere. It's fact it's also scientific and a lot of people don't want to believe in science which makes me go crazy but yes it's it's real. It's not something that's just drawn up. So people can digest and when i got hold of vet. That's when i was just like okay. We have to find a way to have people understand. That there's a trickle effect. Where human i. There's also been laws that were laid down to make us feel human and that's why we have to constantly fight for the lives of individuals who are considered marginalized. Because we don't do that then they were never going to get to a space of understanding that were actually human. People will constantly use the device at techniques of white and black. I've gotten i've gotten this whole thing about from radical young individuals who are saying. I hold strong semi whiteness. And i hold strong my blackness not understanding that those things were sectors created for divisiveness. There are white hispanics and white asian and caucasian individuals who feel like they're inferior and then there are people who fall under the umbrella just as well as white. The black umbrella which is dark skinned dominicans dark skinned puerto ricans dark-skinned europeans. Dark is just a so a lot of people. Don't understand that we're human and that once we break down these these laws. What the old old old like eighty year old generations of created. Then we can really move forward and start making this a lot about

UK
Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

"For months senator Patrick Leahy has been released from a Washington hospital expenses the eighty year old senator Patrick Leahy is looking forward to getting back to work after a brief visit to George Washington University hospital Lahey reported not feeling well at the capitol in was sent to the hospital as a precaution and for testing earlier Tuesday he'd been presiding over the Senate as president pro temp at this time I will administer the oath of the senators in the chamber swearing in colleagues ahead of next month's impeachment trial for Donald Trump Leahy is the longest serving member of the U. S. Senate he was elected to Congress in nineteen seventy four Jackie Quinn Washington

Senator Patrick Leahy Lahey George Washington University Washington Senate Donald Trump Leahy Congress Jackie Quinn
Vermont Sen. Leahy taken to hospital for observation

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Vermont Sen. Leahy taken to hospital for observation

"The longest serving member of the U. S. Senate's been hospitalized for observation Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy is eighty years old a spokesman says he wasn't feeling well and was checked out by Congress's position then taken to an area hospital out of an abundance of caution earlier in the day Leahy the Senate president pro temperate had sworn in members of the Senate for the impeachment trial of Donald Trump Saul centers now rise and raise their right hand senator Leahy not a Supreme Court justice was selected to preside over the impeachment trial the Vermont Democrat was first elected to Congress in nineteen seventy four Jackie Quinn Washington

U. S. Senate Patrick Leahy Vermont Donald Trump Saul Leahy Senator Leahy Congress Supreme Court Jackie Quinn Washington
Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC News after 55 years

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC News after 55 years

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC news Tom Brokaw of NBC news says he's retiring from television the eighty year old Brokaw who anchored NBC nightly news from nineteen eighty two to two thousand four says he plans to continue writing books and articles Procol last appeared on air on MSNBC's morning Joe on December thirtieth in two thousand seven Brokaw reflected on his arrival at NBC news after just two years on local TV in the Brzeska arrive in California working for NBC in nineteen fifty six just four years off the Great Plains working class families and small town Brokaw was with NBC news for fifty five years in twenty thirteen roll call was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and curable blood cancer that affects the bone marrow hi Mike Rossio

Tom Brokaw Mike Rossi Brokaw Nbc News NBC Procol Msnbc JOE Great Plains California Curable Blood Cancer Myeloma Mike Rossio
Are Probiotics Ready for Practice?

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:35 min | 3 months ago

Are Probiotics Ready for Practice?

"My first faculty position was a minority turkeys was introduced a college in dublin and was a gastroenterologist. They're not keeling was a very good friend of mine. He persuaded me that. The brain got access was relevant in relation to psychiatric illness at that time. Dopey really considered microbes within the got to be relevant in relation to the brain got access. And when i came back to cork seventeen or eighty years ago. A group of micro biologist and gastrologist decided that they're going to set up a new at brain got institute which we set up so i was involved in setting it up and at that stage. People thought michael might be important in relation to the brand. It wasn't at all clear so we begun researching the area. And i've been working in that area now for the past seventeen eighteen years. I'm a psychiatrist. And i decided at the very beginning that if we were going to engage in this research that we are going to publish the best journals out there because it's an emerging discipline. There's a certain degree of skepticism. About self our initial publications would have been been john peony s to the nineteen nineties. The general sense i got was that the brain is protected from the rest of the body by a tight web called the blood brain barrier other than stroke and a crane disorders and a few infections. There wasn't much that got in their back then. Psychopharmacology was all about synoptic festivals and neurotransmitters. But things have changed one landmark that stands out to me was two thousand thirteen. That was when dr trolls raisins group at emory published. The first randomized controlled trial of a medication that treats depression without even crossing the blood brain barrier. How did it work with saudi getting into the brain. The thought was that it treated depression. By reducing inflammation in the body. The medication was to the crisis factor antagonised inflexible and worked for treatment resistant depression but only in those who had elevated markers of inflammation like crp. You're probably not going to be using inflexible matt in everyday practice because it has to be given. Iv among other things but in this journal we featured a few articles lately on how to treat depression by reducing inflammation and dr dina's work on probiotics and the mind gut connection is one of them. But first let's hear from dr dean about what the gut microbiome is. The god microbiome is essentially the collection of micro organisms within the intestine. Now the majority of them are in the large in stein and the beat assed volume is carried bacteria. Now there are obviously viruses and fungi. There there are a variety of microbes. But we've largely focused on bacteria the golden microbial over navarine adult like you are. I is at least a kilo gram and weight. So it's it's quite a large wage. It's it's pretty much the same way. As the human brain really traditionally. We've always taken the view that their commencement. They don't do anything any harm there. There we feed them because we feed these bacteria as well but it really is only one in the last fifteen years that people have begun to realize that in fact there really is a synergistic relationship between these microbes and dos and was we might feed them that they in turn produce chemicals that our brain and other organs in our body absolutely choir how these gut bacteria influence the brain when i think they influence the brand in a variety of ways that be one of our database of boll is big areas of research over. The years is trying to anything. There are lots of unknown questions but the narva security very important majority. It's a long meandering nerve. It sends signals from brain. To got it sends signals from the brain we showed in taper in peony s their own twelve years ago. That sir microbes could only communicate with the brain. Is the vegas nerve was intact. So we did a gossipy in an animal. The microbe couldn't communicate with the brain. So the vegas nerve has very important author important.

Brain Got Institute Depression John Peony Dr Trolls Keeling Dr Dina Dr Dean Dublin Emory Stroke Michael Saudi Stein Matt Vegas
Interview: Alex Bowman

The Final Lap

07:08 min | 4 months ago

Interview: Alex Bowman

"Once again. Alex bowman welcome back to the program. Yeah thanks for having me all right over your shoulder here. It smelling pretty good. It's it's looking pretty good You got in and out burger there for lunch yet. Not for me for the guys. Yeah my my trainer would kill me. he doesn't know that i had a double double animal style fries and a chocolate shake yesterday when i landed. So we're just not going to tell them that but but today since odds are he's going to walk in here Not gonna eat that. Well you know this is broadcast and online and so he might find out some other way. Yeah we'll just we'll just send it and hope hope he doesn't all right. I noticed that they tony. You had like an all white fire suit. How do you keep that thing clean. You don't yeah that was That's tough valvoline. paint scheme. looks so good firesuits. Look really good I think all white looks really good. It's just so hard to keep playing I think they have a couple of primaries this year so only got to make them last a couple of races but It is tough there destroyed after one race They wanted me to do that for chili bowl. And i said no way Cj who drives my car he he got an all white suit for chile will and it was destroyed after after practice. Pretty much so It is as tough for sure. The first thing. I thought of as that would not work in the days of thunder days. No for sure stuff used to get the pair used to move through the cars. So much more i mean. The cars were cooler inside because of it. Actually but i mean those guys would get so dirty back in the day. I just because there was so much more moving air and everything was sealed up how it is now. But now they're like They're sealed up pretty tight. Except for when i went through the grass i had grass everywhere so That firesuits probably half green at this point. But that's all right. Put mountain dew on that part of it. Yeah yeah if if they wanted to be on eighty eight car for sure. We're halfway there. You did a panting of matt benedetto. I saw it online. You can't get away from it but props to him. He kept the interview going yeah. He's not a very shy human being so it's one of those things we mess with each other. A lot and i did not continue the interview. I was very distracted by it. What happened and what was going on. So that was my way of getting him back so i'm really not looking forward to what comes next knowing him but i'm sure it'll be something i was gonna ask you. Expect retaliation probably It's fun to make fun of matt. you know. He drives for that other manufacturer. But he's still just went and bought a another corvette so We know he's at least got good taste and yeah he's he he just bought another is the are one. But you know. I saw the other day. And you know how corvettes have four taillights he. He had somebody take the tail lights out to like put tent on them. And like put different spoiler on the car. And they didn't tighten the bolts out one of the bolts up and one of the tail lights fell out going down the road. So that's embarrassment. He's got good taste in cars but yeah it's a little bit nursing. What what are you driving personally. No one of those. Yeah so he's actually copying me. He's got the same cars me now. He's he was going to buy the same wheels that i had on my car so i just sold him my wheels about something different. So we weren't matching but yeah you should go ask him about it because it's literally he's copying me. That's that's definitely interesting. Go out there and race. Yeah mine still going to be mine. Still gonna be faster though. So i mean it's obviously got the better driver so it's all driver of course nothing under the hood for sure now. Last time we spoke you were still working out the intricacies of assigned seating at movie theaters. Is there anything else technology wiser in two thousand twenty. That's baffling you I don't think there's been anything yet. I'm sure. I'm sure there will be that movie. Theater incident was largely embarrassing. Pretty sure i'm never going on a date ever again. After that that was that was a struggle But yeah nothing yet. I feel like something will definitely pop up and confuse the heck out of me and all embarrassed myself with it but nothing yet. Truth be told seventeen years. I've been doing this. This is the first time using my phone for notes. I used to use paper mainly because it was lighter. So i'm still getting into the tech stuff too. Yeah yeah there you go. I mean yeah. It's forever changing. Who would think that you have assigned seats at a movie theater. That there's twelve people and it just didn't make any sense. If i were just gone gone up one more row. Adam and just fine definitely definitely definitely all right so you got a bunch of sponsorships onboard this year. How do you keep track of them. All highest kelsey. What's on the car this week Yeah figure out what shirts to bring. And and i mean it's it's written on my chest on the firesuits so i guess i could just look down and figure it out but no it's it's been really cool to have some new partners on board obviously We have this week and chevy goods dot com and everybody. That's going to be out for the rest of the year. Really excited about all that so It'll be neat. I think the black and gold car looks really cool so looking forward to seeing that on the race track. Lamar looks good to its new paint scheme for them so it only looks a little bit similar to the valvoline paint scheme. Just a little bit. But but that's all right. That's that's that's a good luck to you once you're inside it kind of looks the same right. Yeah yeah you can't see it from From where i sit. So i'm here for it. Do you ever bring the wrong stuff to the track. Not recently so when i was driving for junior motorsports We had a couple of different sponsors on the car throughout the year. We went somewhere in. Dave ellen's was the crew chief and really all the sponsors were the same color scheme but he wore the wrong shirt like the race day shirt. He warned completely wrong. One week kelsey did my pr over there. as well. and i thought she was gonna kill him so It was it was a good day for sure with sports. Exploding ni- racing and that's something that you're interested in and doing. Yeah william started his own team starts. I started calling him. Mr be since he's got this big time. I racing team but I wanna talk to him next time. I'm gonna ask him well. How does that work. I mean nothing physical yeah he. He's spent some money on it so I don't know. That's i keep myself really busy with other things and i'm kinda maxed out at the moment. I think it's really neat. I play on. Ira seeing a little bit more to to play around and then taking that super seriously. Is it something you see yourself doing. After nascar maybe retiring you're eighty years old. You're sitting in your living room and you're still raising all that's gonna be so different when i'm eighty years old. Can you imagine what sim racing is going to become at that point Maybe i don't know all probably be at a dirt track somewhere though

Alex Bowman Matt Benedetto Valvoline Chile Tony Kelsey Matt Dave Ellen Adam Lamar William MR
Australia has a coronavirus outbreak. What happens now?

Coronacast

02:20 min | 5 months ago

Australia has a coronavirus outbreak. What happens now?

"Norman as we've been celebrating darnall days left right and center in ustralia over the past week or so. We've now heard that. Three people have tested positive for coronavirus in south australia. Outside of hotel. Quarantine an eighty year old woman. Some of her close contacts. And then there's other people in her circle that have symptoms and they're expecting more cases to come forward. I mean are we ever gonna know this thing. Well the answer is maybe not going to be with us forever. It just depends on how we control it. So i mean just you know. It's not good for south australia. This happened But we have said on. Chronic has many times now. It's not a question of pride that we've said it but everybody knows it that we're importing people who deserve to come back to australia. Australians living overseas who want to come home and the coming home from high prevalence area so the coming home with the covid nineteen virus and sometimes covid nineteen itself and quota quarantine has got to remain secure for the virus not to escape and we'll only find out as time goes on maybe later on today. What exactly happened inside the stereo and confirming the disney escape from hotel quarantine. The testing people emergency department and elsewhere. So they've just straight go to really move and they are really moving into major containment excise as the queensland for example when cases came across the border and as the due south wales when there was a major coster victoria through the motel and southwest sydney so south australia's chief public health officer nicklaus spirit has called it. A up. call is asking people in south australia to get tested if they've got symptoms but it's not really just a wake up call for south australia. Is it everywhere. I mean people coming into every state. I'm not sure that they started yet. In pretoria think we have but for every state. It's a wake up call and hotel. Quarantine is only as good as the security around. It must be quite easy for the virus to escape if people's vigilance relaxes so it's you. It's a system problem. It's probably not a bad egg or anything like that. It's just hard to maintain day in day out. We can we out and this will probably happen more often and the west australian premier mcgowan. Yesterday's press conference was saying the biggest threat to western. Australia was indeed hotel quarantine and here. It is in south australia.

South Australia Ustralia Norman Nicklaus Spirit Australia Disney South Wales Queensland Sydney Pretoria Mcgowan
Tony La Russa Named As Chicago White Sox Manager, Returning After 34 Years

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

01:11 min | 6 months ago

Tony La Russa Named As Chicago White Sox Manager, Returning After 34 Years

"We hear the news well, that news being that the Chicago White Sox have hired Tony Larussa. As their new manager seventy, six year old Tony Larussa, he becomes the oldest manager in the majors by five years. And he's only the second major in Major League baseball history to take over a team as seventy, five years or older. Jack mckeon be and the other one he was eighty rounds. At, which is just that sounds crazy. I mean I guess he was in great shape but he was eighty two over tomorrow marlins they went forty and fifty. and His old job because out there was an old joke about I'm not going to give you the punch line foot. There's an old joke about his nickname was trader Jack Right Jack McKee. At he was eighty years old at the old joke was like he's so old that. Guess what they were trading back. There wasn't ball players like how long he's half. I know where you were going with.

Jack Mckeon Tony Larussa Jack Mckee Chicago White Sox Major League Jack
Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

Business Wars Daily

04:12 min | 6 months ago

Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

"This is a little test. If you're a fan of craft of things that require years of patients to pay off, say a Christmas tree farm, a newly designed luxury car or an eighty year. Old Scotch time is a worthwhile investment to you on the other hand. If speed matters more to you than craft, you may see years invested in, say those Christmas trees as so much wasted time. It's much faster to make an artificial tree after all and you can still hang lights on them but what if you could have convenience and craft at the same time? Seems impossible doesn't well, not anymore at least for one particular beverage, scientific innovation has come to whiskey. There's nothing about whisky that's new. The date of its invention is a little fuzzy but historians say may have existed as long ago as fourteen hundred ad or maybe even further back than that today, the longer it ages the more expensive it is and two connoisseurs typically the better it tastes but not to the founders of silicon. Valley's bespoke in spirits, Stu Aaron, and Martin. JANACEK say they've come up with a laboratory process for making whisky and only a few days if they took my made quiz being the second group, they call the years it takes to age say mark antiquated and wasteful. bespoke spirits doesn't call itself a distillery. Rather the company is Spirits Tech Company intended to help other distillers, grocery chains and celebrities create custom spirits that can move like lightning from lab to store shelves. The name speaks to its intent bespoke means custom-made. The startup uses the lab to bring the barrel to the spirits rather than the other way around in other words, it's using material science massive amounts of data analysis to. Create spirits according to Forbes rather than putting spirits into oak barrels. The company places selected tiny pieces of wood in precise combinations in a kettle with spirits in char- heat and churn or apply again with scientific precision to mimic the aging process much much faster. The company claims they can create seventeen thousand different flavor combinations in three to five days. Most whisky is aged in barrels for about five years according to CNN. So far spoken has made whisky Tequila Rum and brandy mostly for other companies but they also do sell spirits to consumer specifically a line of different whiskies from classic Bourbons to one made with Ron Whiskey of course, the biggest obstacle, any food or drink made in a lab faces scepticism about and quality when it comes to that question bespoke in his taken home about two dozen awards from spirits tasting events since they launched early this year, that's the social proof. They think they need to grow the rest of the business, not just custom blending new products behind the scenes, but also helping distilleries rescue batches of expired beer or spirits from distributors that aren't quite right which seems. To be a good foundation for a promising business, still it's hard to grow a whole new category of anything without enough money. Early, this month, the small business one, two point six, million dollars in seed funding from hall of fame, Baseball Star Derek jeter, and Silicon Valley scientists TJ Rodgers purists may turn up their noses at spoken in America. Popular rival maker's mark is not only one of the oldest whiskey brands. Its history is at selling point founder bill. Samuel senior bought a distillery in Loretto Kentucky in nineteen, fifty three but that distillery began making whisky as far back as the early eighteen hundreds. Maker's marks message today is still it's one bottle at a time every time. And an oppression bit of copy anticipating the changes coming to the Industry today they also say it's been a widely held belief around here that character isn't made by machine. Ouch. Regardless of an expected war between purists and innovators, the time may turn out to be just right for bespoke in the pandemic is spiking demand for spirits but trade wars are making them more expensive to import according to CNN. And when you can't import easily making new spirits here, bottles that can get to the shelf in the blink of an eye could fill a growing demand. and to that investors like, Derek. JETER may well say, cheers.

Spirits Tech Company Derek Jeter CNN Ron Whiskey Stu Aaron Tj Rodgers Forbes Samuel Founder Loretto Kentucky America Martin
Plans for Chicago's Lake Shore Drive overhaul move forward

Chicago Tonight

04:31 min | 6 months ago

Plans for Chicago's Lake Shore Drive overhaul move forward

"North Lake shore drive is getting rebuilt or make that redefined as part of the years long redefined drive project, the Illinois in Chicago Departments of transportation of and gathering feedback, and coming up with potential ways to overhaul the drive from grand to Hollywood. They've narrowed it down to a few options and they're looking for your input ahead of an upcoming public meeting Chicago tonight's Nick Bloomberg takes a look. Lakeshore drive is iconic but with icon status comes aging infrastructure some up to eighty years old and are in need of replacement, and so can we look at some opportunities to really reinvasion the area and solve problems while we rebuild the road problems not just like crumbling infrastructure, but also safety and mobility for all kinds of users. One of the things we heard definitely was improved access to. North shore drive itself. But really to the park, which is an iconic park based on roadway needs and public input planners came up with some essentials lakefront access every quarter mile grade separation for the Lakefront trail where it crosses east West streets getting rid of the pesky signal at Chicago, avenue, and reinforcing the shoreline which has taken a beating of late all the things that we see as critical to install. Harbinson what alternative? The alternatives look at ways to improve travel for buses. One would add a fifth lane in the center just for transit another option would convert an existing lane for transit leaving three for general purpose planners are also considering creating one or two lanes usable by buses and by drivers willing to pay a toll, how do we improve and how do we further manage the traffic? How do we further improve the reliability of that transit but as always a major project like this one has raised Concerns about the character of the Lakefront Lakeshore drive needs it's improvements, but we don't want to see lakeshore drive reconfigured to a point where it becomes a an interstate highway Miller. Says past renovations like near McCormick place created that wide interstate feel. He's also hesitant about a trenched roadway like what's on the table at Chicago Avenue WanNa keep that boulevard character to the drive friends of the Parks Twenty Years Ari agrees she's concerned expanding the drive could put parts at risk our preference is that Improvements be made to make traffic flow better to improve transit access, but not to create more lanes for cars, and while she appreciates the project I toward shoreline stability, this project released should be set within a much larger more comprehensive consulation about our late for neurosurgeon problem others think improvements for transit don't go far enough Kyle Lucas of the group better streets. CHICAGO SAYS ACTIVISTS HAD TO FIGHT TO KEEP the option that converted a lane for buses only, and he wants planners to think bigger like bus rapid transit shifting transportation closer to the edge of the city, and then creating something that's similar to an L. Line a fraction of the cost. Another idea protected bike lanes in both directions since Lucas says, the Lakefront trail isn't always practical for cyclists and none of that taking away from access for cars but we think the data suggests that. If we were to actually invest in alternative of transportation. We need way less space for cars on the Lakefront we could dramatically reduce the footprint of the road and create more park space for people to enjoy and kate low of UIC worries about focusing too much on congestion since transportation is the biggest contributor to greenhouse gases. In the US, we should instead have reducing vehicle miles traveled be one of the primary motivating factors while she appreciates. That improving transit is one of the goals at the heart of a it's about enabling auto commutes during the peak our peak our downtown commuters are disproportionately affluent. So this project would speed their commute and not address transit as on the South and West sides for their part I dont and CDOT say the project is multimodal focused on the future and effort to balance a lot of different interests. Everyone loves lake shore drive for different reasons. We've tried to. Weave into our designs public comment on the five proposed designs is open through November ninth for Chicago Tonight I'm nick. Bloomberg?

Chicago Nick Bloomberg Kyle Lucas Mccormick Place North Lake Lake Shore Hollywood Illinois United States UIC Parks Twenty Kate Low ARI
FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

06:42 min | 7 months ago

FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

"Hi everyone is Rei and welcome back to kindred casts I'll sitting down today with my friend Jill gave the founder President and CEO of Fintech powerhouse and Unicorn Cross riverbank crossover was started by Jill two, thousand eight as one branch bank located teaneck new. Jersey. At the technology company now, powers companies like affirm circle best a coin based rocket loans stripe of star and transfer wise at are backed by big investment from Ktar, a French battery ventures, Andriessen, and Lyari. Issue over the past twelve years, the firm has grown to three hundred fifty employees providing over thirty billion dollars in loans over eighteen million customers, and during the crisis crossover helps nearly two hundred thousand small businesses would be yuan's through the paycheck protection program, which really puts it in the company of the big banks like Bank of America Vicki Morgan Wells Fargo Right? They're pretty impressive and very helpful to our overall recovery drinks endemic last two years it was named the most innovative bank to work for. Job GonNa try to give you a run for your money on that one here line. But I WANNA wish you. A Happy New Year it's a real pleasure and honor to kick off the year in the Jewish calendar fifty, seven, eighty, one podcast, and as I like to say when you have gone for over five, thousand seven hundred, eighty years, there's downs, ups and Dowse said via a shot at the by pleasure to. Today. It's real pleasure. We've. Meeting of last year's restaurants and and peers of isolation and zooms that in person you're one of my first meetings safety and security and I really wanted to stay closed during this dynamic given how busy you've been thus give everyone a background here because I really think through cross. River. Everyone here is going to get a lens of not only the fintech universe and where. We're going in banking what we've come from, but also what has been going on on the ground during the period in helping so many businesses on Main Street get back on their feet again, and that's really why this is such a story around business and building value but also round helping people around a real heartening narrative that I really wanted to to bring out here to. Tell us how the company was founded. In An Giang aid is a quite an unusual and interesting story towns came to be across different, very ginning. Sure. So I don't want to log on the history because I think the more recent stories much more fascinating just trying to help two hundred, thousand small businesses get back on their feet. As, been. Me Crowley the biggest side, my career and I think probably would be the highlight those anybody spuria stage. So something that's we're very proud of York buster the go back in time. So I came to the United States in Paris fries whenever airs went to school there worked a little bit I was actually analysts that CPR venture capital in Paris. Working on. Some of the first. Time nineteen eighty, nine, hundred ninety in Europe actually, and then crossed the Atlantic came in Nineteen ninety-one go to job at bear stearns I was in International. Working on. Of. Banks insurance companies. So that was my first foray on shown initial services got very fortunate. I. Wide. I landed in finishing the group at bear stearns and our retrospect you gentlemen standing of our God does things and just put. So you know some pebbles along the way that one day you're going to be caught to inspire where you heading in. Then I took a Atas when I got married and I went to learn fouls. Wow Yeah Joe Jr ethics, which is a commentary on the on Jewish law. In companion. I did ask a couple of years came back to of making this time. The only job I could land was open difficult to give back to the market I worked for Barclays Capital. Zoom one of the Thomas Tell you that made you on jump back into banking. More by necessity. With all the day will undoubtedly the feedback I needed to go back to work I. Think. All my life savings where it's only exhausted it's not a life that was prepared to date or the rest of my life. So regretfully, so because it's it's really fascinating as size definitely intellectually stimulating. Question about it but I still enjoy doing it. By the way I still earned every single day studying law in this is something that will stay with me Probably you know for the rest of my life. A lot of good business lessons and haven't company in the home. Absolutely I mean there's definitely a concepts of humility ethics respective others listening to the position particularly respecting the physician and there's always a counterpoint that. Is Truly a hundred centre-right nobody's abso-. Medium. Or these always way and ruth compromise, and this is only a life lesson that is invaluable. And by the way, you know any book that I've Read Entrepreneur and as points to she's. Have successfully led their companies through an exponential organization at goal example, Faisal Volleys. So just running about them under different concept different setting and they're trying to allies them intellectually and then trying to fly them. Businessworld is something that I was very fortunate or being able to do the. So you hundred that's that was very formative for me and trolley in the central step along my travels and my journey in becoming the COO crosser in that like say like the only job I could land at the time was in technology banking and nothing about technology. For aqueous capital. Under Sunday night, who's global head of technology and worked on some Fascinating Tales Global Crossing Iridium satellite network in then work on the transaction war on the computer associates CSC sale merger it was really fascinating to. To work on the technology front been trying in in learning about a new trade and look at this you know like some fifteen years later. It's a rejoinder between technology and banking.

Bear Stearns Jill Paris Bank Of America Fintech Barclays Capital Vicki Morgan Wells Unicorn Cross Lyari Founder President And Ceo REI Andriessen Europe Ktar York Businessworld United States
"eighty years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KGO 810

"To retirees eighty years old and he's ready to hand the reins over to one of his sons but at the last minute he decides that you know his son has act as of the struggles with the issues of addiction and all kinds of stuff so he decided not to hand the reins over it throws the family and a complete like they're like oh my god now what we gonna do and then he has a cerebral hemorrhage. and then everybody goes crazy it's like that all all for the kids they the with varying degrees of like you know connection to the company they they start to prepare for this future without their father but he's kind that he's kind of coming back so all my god it's just I I've never seen the level of dysfunction in the and any movie that I've experienced in succession is this because if you know what I was stunned by was I guess it was two weeks ago my husband was reading an article about it because we watch it all the time and and this article was trying that how hysterical it is how it's such a funny show that it's some kind of a comedy I'm not laughing really see I think it's very very funny bits of the humor is really really black. remember in the who's the first second episode he's they're all going to his birthday party and nobody knows what to get him he's like the billionaire who has everything and then he gets one of his I son in law or something get him a sour dough starter from. I don't know from one of the relatives suck ups who who one day wants to own all the water in the world. he's like oh wow this is wonderful I.

cerebral hemorrhage. eighty years two weeks one day
"eighty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Families for over eighty years federally insured by NCUA for a preview of today's game well said inside Fenway Park in Boston with Chris singleton here's John Tshombe all right nice to hear from the new guy Marquez to sure back there in the studio yeah we get ready for CC Sabathia and Eduardo Rodriguez so you for the Yankees of late the problem has been stopping people from scoring last six games they have given up sixty three total runs that's the most runs allowed over a six game stretch in franchise history it's **** ugly now it has and we saw that in the first game of the series on Thursday night it was like a boxing match that somebody's you know scream and throw in the towel Masahiro Tanaka out there just having to wear it and the reason being was that the the bull pen just taxed in in the starters needed to get some links those unfortunate situation is see a big league pitcher having to stay out there and can't get anybody out but that's the state of the Yankees at this point fortune they score a lot of runs but as we approach the July thirty first trade deadline you know for certain that Brian Cashman is out there shopping hard to get a starter or two for that rotation yeah what about the red Sox and their needs I mean because when you look at it realistically despite the game's back number it's still ten in the loss column for both the rays and the red Sox right now in the east it would seem to tracking down the Yankees would be unlikely and so you're trying to make some type of an adjustment get yourself into a better space in terms of how you're playing but one of the red Sox need to do you know who this it it's an interesting discussion in and not just the red Sox but other teams around the league to wear their position what's their willingness to add so many people kind of on that fence as far as do we sell do we add we can talk about sever just go giants but here with the Boston Red Sox a week ago people are talking about well maybe move JD Martinez because of how far back the red Sox are you could opt out out of his deal reports Sello it's a free agent after this year but as it stands half game back in the wildcard for the red Sox in there looking up at the raise their tied with the Oakland Athletics there definitely a team they can get a post season and I think that here in recent memory when you look at these first two games of the series another red Sox haven't had a great year like they had last year but they're looking and saying Hey arguably the best team in baseball the Yankees we just handed it to him two games in a row we might need to add because we can get into the postseason with a wild card game and find ourselves perhaps back in the World Series again so I know it hasn't seem like that with the two eight start for the red Sox but I would think at this point nobody's getting traded they have to look to add and it's got to be in the bull pen Boston's offense has been on track of late last year they led the majors in runs per game and right now as it stands the lead the majors in runs per game we get ready for our first pitch we sent it back to the studio.

NCUA Fenway Park eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Eighty years old he became an Eagle Scout a bald eagle scouts as a matter of fact his final merit badge he got for building a tent it was an oxygen tent is still whole I know what to say Hey listen it's not a good day it's it is best the westbound side just west of the parkway in east orange and we've got a reported collision there and this is in a construction zone they're doing some emergency work on the park when you start to waiting he meant to say between eight to twelve eleven so once again two eighty west jam just past the parkway reported accident in the construction zone of the New Jersey Turnpike getting very busy north central plains approaching fourteen very slow in Newark north bound up to the eastern and western spur split this number three slowing to see caucus you've got some road work there just past Paterson plank road that's going to be with us and on the south lawn garden state parkway with a collision in his lan just before one thirty one two right lanes are blocked you've also got farther down the line locally construction from one fourteen to one nine in north bound the express lanes are jammed in she's quick park and that is all because of construction southbound turn by glazing to form along with real working across the GW Lincoln Holland not too bad this report is sponsored by mothers against drunk driving drunk driving is one hundred percent preventable one hundred percent of the time helping create a future of no more victims of man dot org RG traffic every fifteen minutes mixture for ten thirty three a New Jersey one a one point five New Jersey driving is made possible by these CHRO big news bill of four does not DC age four to beat down just a few doors down at sixty seven route thirty six west during the construction and open for business still the same friendly staff but you know and trust in a new state of the art facility stop by your visit DC age forty beaten down dot com join the Jersey price team had made his discount tire and warned tomorrow at eleven AM.

New Jersey Turnpike Lincoln Holland New Jersey Newark CHRO one hundred percent fifteen minutes Eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"For eighty years. Is individuals. Reading needs. The name it's called. Let them have water short documented by lower senders for the intercept. When we come back, we go to Tucson to speak with Scott Warren, who's arrested in January of two thousand eighteen and our Sonal he goes on trial today. Stay with us. Okay. Cassini. But again. The nation's. This is democracy now. I mean me Goodman, with one Gonzales, join.

Scott Warren Tucson Gonzales Goodman eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Came out in support of equal opportunity for everybody. And by the way, by today's standards raised eight billion dollars for the war effort having said all of that she's out now, that's it. We're judging Kate Smith by nineteen by by by twenty nineteenth standards when she sang a song eighty years ago. But where are you on this? Well, I think it's all Kate. Smith was Smith was the first person to sing the song. That are Berlin wrote. Right. She's saying it on the radio to the morale of American troops in the American calls in the war. I agree with you. There are probably better singer. You play it better on your maybe. Thank you. But here we are situation. Nature reaction. Somebody out there in America says I'm offended. I'm offended and because they're offended or face Seder offended. We have these different ball clubs and other organizations making a decision to so person won't be be offended. I think it's a big mistake and Kate Smith. God bless her. God bless America. I think it was a mistake on the part of the Yankees. But it's because somebody has a I'm offended when people say, they're offended. You have to react you have to do something about it. That's what our current philosophy on political correctness is Ted the name of the team is the Yankees. I'm guessing a lot of southern don't don't like that name shouldn't they change their name, by the way, the Yankees didn't employ a black player till nineteen fifty. So as a racist organization from nineteen o three to nineteen fifty shouldn't they be banned from ever playing baseball again. I mean, it's kind of where we're actually judging people and organizations and icons by two thousand nineteen standards. When when they they are a big part of our history. We can't just get rid of history. Can we? I think it's a mistake to try to rewrite history and try to forget history. We are who we are. And times had changed equals attitudes have changed, and that's a good thing. But to to have a knee jerk reaction at finds something somebody's passing. So you did this and eighty years ago and the country now no longer wants to have anything to do with your singing or anything else? I think is a big mistake. I gotta had on more often because he's just great. He's commonsense. He's logic direct. And he's the man so we'll do Fridays with Paul more often on the Joe pags show Monday through Friday. And of course, it here on the weekend as well. When we do it right here at the weekend with joepags, your thoughts. One eight hundred five zero one seventy eighty joepags dot com. Stay right here. Then..

Kate Smith Yankees America Joe pags Berlin baseball Seder Ted Paul eighty years eight billion dollars
"eighty years" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

Yo, Is This Racist?

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

"Your team is like eighty years old cultures that was of years. How do you think that one is way more important than the other? It's so yeah, you're right. It's like like really you're so into like, the primal beginnings of the, you know, this is this is how it always has been like what no back to how it always has been leave a question that hopefully this isn't too difficult for anyone. But I feel like one thing that that. I know I've struggled with on the past. With callers is like there's a bunch of like. Native appropriating or or whatever shit that is specifically I think it's the thing in New Orleans. That's like very specifically like sort of a black tradition of dressing is that well one I can't the wild choppy, Shula's and stuff. Yeah. I can't speak for those tribes and those people. Because you know, there are dizziness people for sure. For me. I don't appropriations one of those things where I think like whatever you do if you get into the nitty gritty argument with someone like it's just none of you guys are going to feel great about it. But it's a conversation. That's absolutely needed to have. But for me because it's weird because I want so many native American artists, and clothing designers, and just content creators, and everyone I want them to be so successful. So I'm like, well, here's an easy way. Whatever they're selling you trust them because they're selling it to you by offended by from real people. Who know what it is? It's better. It's true. Or the stories are better. It's you know, honesty, is authentic truth is offensive and you're getting it straight from it. So that's like the quick and easy way to go around appropriation. Because for the most part, I mean, obviously, some people would be like, I don't care whatever you want. But for the most part, that's an easy way. It's like, oh, this is a native American like there are amazing. Nate American designers out there, like Bethany yellowtail, she's not going to sell you something that is super wrong for anyone aware because she wants to share like that's how clothing designers work is they they share their designs there are, and, you know, their culture, and that's the okay way. So just do that. Don't don't go out and put a crappy chicken feather headdress together. Also, just stop headdresses. I know they're cool. But like, I wouldn't even wear them. That's like there's a long history. And I'm trying I'm trying there's a long history to everything we do. It's it's tough being native American. But so what I like to do is like a quay is it's like a purple heart. Not like, I would never wear a purple heart because I didn't earn it. And I also wouldn't wear a headdress because I didn't earn it. So like if native Americans won't do that. Just don't do it is like the quick and easy way of doing it. And like there are any of things that you can do there are there are plenty of like native American designers out there where you can wear. It'll be amazing noodle. Look just as good go. It'll look better. So. Yeah. Because you won't have to explain it away. Everywhere you go you won't shame. Yeah. Same won't be excessively. Yeah. She was not enough people's accessory. Be more. I wanna shame. Every shame game needs to be a little stronger. Should we do another voicemail this bad? Boy. Right. My question is what it shortly is it racist? Or is there a problem when mystery people but one of them race next purchase lack identifies being of mixed-race or vibrational incentives? Fully identifying and the back number hind, I'm BI racial my mom's white and my dad is black black women. I have a friend who is fully blacks last month breath to add and she thinks that if..

Shula Bethany yellowtail New Orleans eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"And of course, a really really busy week has just wrapped up here. In DC winter a week of tributes to forty one. Of course, former president George H W Bush passed away last weekend at the age of ninety four and if you remember up until the age of ninety he celebrated his major milestones in life by skydiving something he talked about when he actually jumped out of a plane at the age of eighty get out and do something if you don't want to do a parachute jump do some males. Don't just sit around watching TV. Talking to get out there and realized that eighty years old, you still got a life was one of my favorite quotes from him as we were going through some of the memories this week winter, and it seems like a good lesson for the rest of us doesn't it since hiring? Yeah. That is so inspiring. I think it teaches us something that we know. And a lot of ways I think we we all can see the good example. But it's hard to be that person in almost all aspects. And I think in many ways as we hear stories about George Bush this week we're seeing here's a person who lived life to the fullest. He was in a loving relationship and had a good family, and he really knew how to be a figure well beyond the politics. Yeah. I think that's the major lesson this week the civility and really kind of a somber ceremonies that we go through when we lose the president like this, especially one with this kind of reputation. So a good reminder for all of us here this week, but he lived a long time ninety four years old. And winter we have to face the possibility a lot of us. We. You could end up living that long couldn't we I really don't enjoy talking about mortality. Yeah. I know that right. Isn't it so easy just to think about today lasting forever? Like, we know that were mortal Queen know that we're going to have an end point there's going to be an end to our retirement. But even when you're in your sixties and seventies and eighties. I don't know how tangible it is. Yeah. For people because we just live our lives day today. And it's hard to even give thought to the idea of our longevity or mortality, I would suggest that most people listening this afternoon have no interest in even talking about mortality. You're hearing about it. And I think in a lot of ways that prevents people from really doing planning the way that they should. You know, I think if people who win the lottery and the ability to spend or maybe quit their job or or take care of all those financial dues that it may be bene- burden all the years. And so we know of lottery winners, but I would like to think about longevity in a different way. What about someone in? Maybe this has happened to someone that you know, or love or care about or maybe someone at work, which you can love and care about people at work too. But maybe you known someone who got a cancer diagnosis, and we've talked about on the radio before the my dad got Parkinson's diagnosis, and you know, as I watched mom and dad go through that. I know that that everybody has their own story. Everybody has their own trials and tribulations as listening this afternoon. I'm no different. And so when my parents got the Parkinson's diagnosis for dad, you know, what it did it brought them to the fact that we are mortal, we're human that today isn't guaranteed forever. And yet we don't know when retirement's going to end for us and and watching them. Watching one of my family members. Look at the fact that maybe today was gonna last forever. It gave them a completely different view of their finances. Right in in in. I imagine the same would be true. If a loved one or friend was diagnosed with cancer, whether it was late stage, or whether it was early stage diagnosis that could be overcome health is humbling. Yeah. It makes us refocus on what's most important, and I can tell you right now. And I hope that if you're listening to after noon that that you feel the same way that life is more than rate of return. Our purpose in life has very little to do with the financial vehicle and investment of product. And it has more to do with fulfilling our purpose. And I hate to see someone defer their purpose, right? I'm too busy making financial decisions to think about my purpose. I'm I'm too busy trying to work aged sixty two to really think about my purpose. I'm too busy. Raising my kids to think about my purpose. And I think to me that was what was so inspiring about the quote from George Bush in parachuting age eighty right? You feel like and I didn't know on a daily basis few of us did. But you feel like he knew his purpose that he had meaning to his life beyond being a politician or being a former president or anything. Financial? And I think that's what makes him endearing in. That's what we all need to do is to find our purpose in connect their assets that I can tell you. It's sad for me. Sad for me as a financial adviser to think of all of the conversations that typically go on between advisor in client. Because typically those conversations are centered on the tools, the vehicles investments and mutual funds and 4._0._1._K's and TSP's in the results of those vehicles..

George H W Bush president cancer Parkinson advisor ninety four years eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I said how'd you hit it. And he went into a tirade I can't hit it out of my shadow Crap, and it was a good tirade because he had the same fiery had when he was playing for the hawks Greg golfer. Golf, pro at Camberley and anybody who touched his life for anybody who he touched their life that STAN. Mikita yeah, and we'll keep you up to date with the black sock Blackhawks plans IRAs Blackhawks radio station here so I I, don't know if he sent last time we had Georgia and they talked about their adversary at the, palace grill and then he took it to the, next level of being. Famous as he was on. Windy, city live Lou Ryan. Chevron, to tell. Which was, Georgia which was Ryan? Chevron now it was very difficult. Yeah much skinnier than Ryan yeah your twins But happy anniversary man. How, many years eighty years. Just, eighty years Yeah the? Last what? Am I going I'm, not gonna. Last number eight years This year I the restaurants in your I turned sixty in may and I'm in. My forty three running the. Palace grill so a lot of history there is any business eighty years is something a restaurant. In eighty years is quite an accomplishment you. Got to be such a. People person I am a people person I actually I'm extra quiet and. Reserved in a. Bitter knows me knows I'm quite reserve Yeah. But you gotta love people forty years in the business forty years running a restaurant. I'm the luckiest man the. World I'm I'm a blessed man I've got a great restaurant I've got a great wife I've. Got great kids and the only thing missing. In my life is grandchildren's. Tell your daughter next time we got to get going I tried this. With Dave's Dave George you really don't. Want Steve having that, conversation first time at Dave's daughter-in-law so what's going on. With you to. You and Stephen I need help figuring. Out how this goes come, up Because it's, something else pal once it happens. Speak for the daughter and daughter you guys, don't get it inputs what whether or not they're going to, reproduce definitely not my, son my son still wrong but my, son lives in Dubai he's on the other side of the world but I. Do believe good things are. Happening for him, to, I can't say, anything. But with the next couple of weeks I think that there's going to. Be a special announcement is life to God bless his, Bush grits here thanks for breakfast guys your. Wallets grill Yeah Seven. Seven three says Georgia's a true gentleman in every sense of the word he makes everybody feel. Welcome it's an honor to, say, no I'm Sean from Chicago police department and good morning to. You, Sean thanks for the service you do as. Well You love shaving now of course, you don't, but with Harry's you're gonna love it. I'm telling.

Georgia Lou Ryan Chevron Dave George hawks Golf Greg golfer STAN Sean Stephen I Dubai Harry Chicago Steve Bush eighty years forty years eight years
"eighty years" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WGTK

"Bank heist comedy starring morgan freeman michael kanaan alum arkan but the job according to the article quickly devolved into several months of harassment she alleges that freeman subjected her to unwanted touching and comments about her figure and clothing on a near daily basis freemen would rest his hand on her lower back or rub her lower back she said in one incident she said and this is the absolute worst of what he's charged with in one incident she said freeman quote kept trying to lift up my skirt and asking if i was wearing underwear he never successfully lifted her skirt she said he would touch it and try to lift it she would move away and then he'd try again eventually she said alan arkin made a comment telling him to stop morgan got freaked out and didn't know what to say morgan freeman is eighty years old he is one of the very few people who who just seem to be beyond some of the political and social divisions in hollywood he won a as a kademi award as best supporting actor for million dollar baby the clint eastwood film it also worked with clint eastwood memorably and unforgiven he's a good friend of clint eastwood's but they say is in all sixteen people spoke to cnn about freeman as part of this investigation eight of whom said they were victims of what some called harassment and others called inappropriate behavior by freeman then there another eight people who say they witnessed freemen's alleged conduct these sixteen people together described a pattern of inappropriate behavior by freeman onset while promoting his movies and at his production company revelations entertainment now in presenting this on cnn the smoking gun was an interview that morgan freeman did on on junket and for people who have never experienced a press junket what that is is that a star is asked to sit there on a set that set up and then a bunch of different reporters come up and settle into the chair opposite him and they get to interview him or her for about three minutes i've i've always hated this i think it's really and and again you're sitting there you off you're you're dealing with thirty different people who are each asking you the same question and it's boring as you can imagine and so the star who's out there promoting a new movie and usually as part of his contract he asked.

morgan freeman harassment alan arkin hollywood clint eastwood cnn michael kanaan million dollar three minutes eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Game right here six eighty years giants baseball lemme here in san francisco it is the giants and the reds just a few moments ago our national anthem sponsored by the san mateo credit union fullservice banking focused on community the farming the star spangled banner please welcome we're got z boys car is our i d star spangled banner here very well done by those kids at att park where it is a cool very san francisco kind of night but a beautiful night for a ballgame giants reds will play the second of three tomorrow afternoon and in the rockies come to town on the back end of this homestand giants who are playing much better again swinging the bats again and playing so well at home giants won eight of their last eleven here at home they're one of the better home teams in the national league right now and they're scoring runs at home which has not always been the casey's last few years in his great pitchers ballpark so all those things very encouraging giants at five hundred twenty one and twenty one trying to move back above five hundred.

san francisco giants reds att park casey san mateo six eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A grand jury friday to turn over many emails related to the trump campaign by last evening number reversed his statements and suggested he would cooperate numbered was fired from the trump campaign and white house officials say he's never worked there police in toronto canada have released another set of human remains linked to the alleged serial killer bruce macarthur as dan carping chuck reports of 30s have released a photograph of the victim hoping someone can identify him the photos of the middleaged bearded man with his eyes partially closed it was released during a news conference where police announced they have discovered a seventh victim investigators say the man was likely dead when the photo was taken but refused to say how or when they got the photograph the lead investigator says releasing the photo as a last resort as they hope to identified the victim enclosed that part of their investigation police say the six previous victims have disappeared from toronto's gave village or had ties to the lgbtq community remains of all the victims including the latest were discovered in platters where the sixtysixyearold macarthur worked as a selfemployed landscaper for npr news and dan carping chuck in toronto the united nations says a humanitarian aid convoy unserious eastern gouta enclave could not fully deliver supplies the effort to get aid into eastern good tech comes after attempts continue to fail to secure a ceasefire that will at civilians flee the besieged area this is npr support for npr comes from t rowe price offering a strategic investing approach for their clients investments and retirement goals institutions advisers employers and individuals choose t rowe price for over eighty years t rowe price.

bruce macarthur investigator toronto united nations npr white house canada dan eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"A 33yearold african american woman who wish rejected twice by lenders when she tried to buy a brick row house in philadelphia where reveal found african americans were two point seven times this likeliest whites to be denied a conventional mortgage she was only able to buy a home win her half white partner hanako friend signed on at the time hanako was nearly unemployed and working part time at a grocery store or anambra we welcome you both too much snow erin let's begin with you in san francisco first of all blaine what redlining is and then how africanamericans and latinos are kept out why this is such a critical story today will the eighty years ago the federal government metro lines on maps well we seem to have lost aaron for a moment in a little satellite glitch so why don't we go right off to kind of hocine coats he talked about the legacy of redlining during an appearance on democracy now a few years ago the significance of what this means for the black and latino community there's no way to understand housing as it exists today without federal policy uh black people as was the thing at the time could not be response and we didn't saves the fha louis drew up the redlining and then basically destroy the homeless low corporation actually did and then distributed to banks who use that as policy to determine how they would lennon who they would learn to the racism this this them was pervasive and total and the fact that african americans have been cut out of it is not shocking if you understand what the country was in the 1930s in the 1940s and this rebounds throughout generations as we know homes are how people in america bill wealth largely and if you cut black people out of that opportunity alatas explained about what the african american community looks like today so that was tallahassee coats rachelle for all tell us your story you managed a milliondollar granting your job at the university of pennsylvania are contractor with rutgers university's tool lenders turn you down when you tried.

philadelphia san francisco blaine aaron partner lennon america alatas tallahassee university of pennsylvania rutgers university milliondollar eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And a half to slow down to eight five five being there for hours and hours and hours it's only in the 1970s that they went to this you know file a piece of paper filibuster which is just about the the numbers are the first eighty years on the filibuster it was used a few hundred times it's been used more since the 1970s and the entire of the history of our nation before half so i just think it's one thomas central by the way it's not the only while we got a president trump's uh appointments a couple of hundred of them are languishing in the senate and answered you should change that process that's ridiculous run yeah so so olynyk though like where is your confidence level about the vote coming up in a few hours what what are the chances in your mind that we're going to be reopen at noon today what's the democrats other simple of choice to me and you know joe donnelly both over the weekend the government should be oklahoma needs to be doing more than he needs to be going after chuck schumer he needs to say publicly that he thinks this is law right and if if if uh if folks will come together we can move forward and then get on with these other debates with president trump has said that he wants to deal with immigration he wants to combine boil security with efforts to to handle daca and i think there's an opportunity for an agreement there but you can't do it this way by holding the federal government hostage so look i i would be very confident if it wasn't for chuck schumer and the liberal liberal democratic leadership that seems to want to continue to play um partisan dance because it does seem that when you get to the merits of what were marking about that there is broad consensus government should stay open it's just the democrats seem to be held hostage to uh special interest efforts surrounding immigration yeah said sneaked has its sat seamer were not very company cutter were lally says an we have within there could be bore yeah that i mean at least that's how i feel as as the layperson out here congressman us or just real quick because i were running out of time but i wanted to get your.

trump senate chuck schumer congressman president joe donnelly oklahoma lally eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Network at community f one and who are active life that ovarian cap trash isn't that what it's about because without that community it's it's really difficult and you know many women i have a friend to at eighty years of age was diagnosed with the the bracket gene and um had to have surgery and radiation and she just refused she just refuse to get help she didn't want a lot of help and she took herself to radiation and there's no need in this day and age i mean that's the old school thinking that there really is so many so many wonderful opportunities for women today and man that they don't have to walk lists were down down this right alone yeah yes you're absolutely right and studies have shown that people who receive support airing their camp carat barion actually come to have better how out coverage gas and file what share i'll about providing report from people who had already experienced counter baker kind of had a different perspective on act on what kind of equipment on what it's like to be a fat rain without dr and and receive that wife total tanguy now fast you know they found her it they know exactly what it's like are kind of provide arbiter a real perspective upto prayers people there's no look at gawker at allowed right and i also wish that we could change this is my own pet peeve but i wish we could change the.

gawker eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And do whatever they want they didn't have to go to the game sc games on saturday while they also got the game of the week they got the best match up as opposed avin crappy ram football or chargers the chargers became the local team in terms of tv and radio writes in my buddy gabe rangel who works in like qarterback camps in combine preparatory data now laney trains the guy from maroon five and what not he came up to the raider game in oakland yesterday he flew up and he said that the airport the la adds his flight ninety percent reiter fan skewed have you been to oakland airport on a sunday guy have but that was eighty years ago he adds years ago i i didn't know there still had such an upgrade you know the number one team in la it's not the rams are the chargers it's the race still the rada and so for mark davis to get cut a pinched out of that scene i don't know what the nfl was thinking maybe it was mark davis i'm not sure as a guy who never never i've always been a forty nine er fan and not only that i had a great dislike of the raiders in the '70s because they were winning in the forty nine is word i was as a kid i was jealous in of say cliff france all that stuff but to this day i mean listen respect love reiter veto etcetera i got i just don't i'm i i have friends that are raiders fans i look at them like how not a forty nine if it i mean i just i just i just like i don't speak raider res i just it's a foreign language to me and when i meet people for example preschool dead peters wife heather yeah like lunatic writer fay her whole ifor since coming to life and she's a suburban mom like that what's up she's like raiders baby raiders and i'm like she goes just win baby a mike i just i can't knees it's dutch it's whatever i'm just not in igf and then you see the joy they had over there yesterday.

chargers gabe rangel oakland la rams mark davis nfl raiders peters cliff france reiter writer ninety percent eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"It was hard my wife eighty years old to our american grow call the local company they came out the door down the dow is up a little bit of a quarterback have very different ivan coal would replace door would be very wondering occurs anything i anybody here in a walk and contractor our report rely on help me out yes old the make customs size patio doors and all your said you're worried about the really expensive it depends on what size that is now there was a company called parkview that lead 6foot4 five foot for sized or four inches oversized so there there's companies now that actually called wisconsin door we have a company called sunrise it's a vinyl patio door they will make a custody door and it's a minimal bump to to do something like that but you've still can build that in two inches on each side of the person as well i don't wanna get a drywall what am i gonna do on the outside its brick we build it in will use oversized wall trim you might have through the quarter now go to three and a quarter three and a half inch that takes up to the space on the inside and on the outside we from that out in aluminum so you can go back to a a standard size door with minimal charged her to do that and possibly later oh use correct i mean they're all today slide so much easier than if that's if that's what i think it is much easier oversized rollers the first couple times you use it'll be like slam near cairo a brand new door where you're okay take it easy don't have to do their you'll you'll throw them to the wall you you're not the aggregate me look increase from american someone else across the door chain no d almost always like that you said you you try that once is so difficult to do that and actually have a work all right chances are it's just and who knows it could also be let us that setting in their straighten and that's all a new doors.

ivan coal parkview cairo wisconsin eighty years four inches two inches
"eighty years" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

01:55 min | 5 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"She was eighty years in a matter she would like done here she steps cater she was not worried about her he's she's or hale miss she was only soria not others she would bring people before to doctors that she would never cared herself she didn't arena pain kershaw in here and there us should the center media never watched to me and she knew everything was going on the were all she would see that there was more in there she would have changed the day wishes children's hospital that was all part that and she walk with disputing and said i'm moscow to be wrote you know everybody's moving on the nuns this whole the industry this list this us there's still reap who came into the route there's since the middle of the order the border so close to connect in ok this trade to simply later she was convinced some fisherman to take it to the border is the root through match since in a sooner sweet i right into the recently she's into it to there enter this you to children in texas she took up the skates to different countries to be taking care of this is absolutely the lacing i can tell you suh lane starts marketplace is kimberly out i'm spoke with doctor of nl read into one of the to support the international women's media foundation.

moscow suh lane soria texas eighty years