35 Burst results for "eighty seven percent"

NBA Big Board: Kevin O'Connor

Chad Ford's NBA Big Board

02:12 min | Last month

NBA Big Board: Kevin O'Connor

"Kevin O'Connor the ringer housing ranked number one on his big board. I can't find any teams that have in there. But I'd love that Kevin did that I I like thinking outside the box I think he makes some really good arguments about why Hayes. Could be that Guy I. Don't think that we're going to see him go a number one and I'm not sure that we'll see I don't think we'll see him go in the top three, but he's fair game. Pretty much anywhere after that and again much like in tires Halliburton's case it little bit I the beholder. He's got off so many strengths going for him and I the big thing that you hear when you talk. To Scouts about Killian haze over and over again is just they love how much he has improved his game how much he's worked on his game how he shown up and become a much better player over time and when you look at young players, you wanna see them evolving. You WanNa see them growing. You want to see them adding to their game and there's just been so much. Of that for Kilian Hayes this year that if you want to talk yourself into Hayes, you talk yourself into now that he faces NBA level competition. What sort of things and wrinkles is he going to add to his game? How is he going to adapt and how much better could he be down the road because he's got the size excels with a ball in his hands he's. Really committed defender he's got hike. He's a high character player. You know that lack of like elite burst or balance is is an issue He's left hand drama net that's an issue is shooting a looks gray. It doesn't always go in and you know he shot around thirty. Thirty percent from the field from three point on this year. But he was eighty seven percent a free throw shooter I think for. He might not be the first international player off. Off The board? Because I denny Adia is is a possibility to go ahead of him, but he's definitely going to be one of the top two international players off the board and right now having ranked slightly higher than Denny.

Kilian Hayes Kevin O'connor Denny Adia Killian Haze Halliburton NBA Kevin
A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

Mac OS Ken

17:29 min | Last month

A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

"Few huge surprises at apple's high speed event though. There were some unexpected bits. Did. Anybody. See The verizon thing coming? Did we have any idea what? MAG SAFE WAS GONNA turn out to be. There we'll get to those. Most of today's presentation is drawn from a couple of viewings of the Apple Park presentation. We'll also pull from the usual suspects doing their usual bang-up jobs. Tuesday's high-speed event presentation started with Apple CEO Tim Cook welcoming viewers back to Apple Park than throwing the presentation almost immediately to others to give the INS and outs of home pod. Many. Bob Board richer's apple VP worldwide product marketing listed the company's desires for home pod. Wanting. The device to have amazing sound to act as an intelligent assistant to serve as a smart home hub all while protecting the privacy and security of the user. This, they say they do in a smaller spherical unit that costs less than one third of the original home pods original asking price. On the amazing sound side company bragged on the devices ro properties as well as how well it plays with others. Others being other apple devices. Users can apparently sink home pod many's either a stereo pairs or to play the same audio throughout the home. The. Inclusion of apples you one processor makes handoff easier to handle according to the company. For what it'll play. Well, there's the usual stuff apple music, apple podcasts, iheartradio radio DOT COM tuned in with Pandora and Amazon music on the way in the coming months. As for the smart part Home Pod, many will handle or interact with messages. Calendar phone calls maps music because. The. Weather reminders and find my feature. There was also an interesting demo where users ask for personal updates and got them. personalized. So he you know multiple voice recognition is key. Now. One new feature mentioned and de Mode was intercom. This is basically what it sounds like. You tell home pod to deliver a message to everybody and the various apple devices in the house including other home pods, iphones, apple watches air pods, and even carplay units play or display the message. I have heard entercom will work with the original home pods as well though not seeing that confirmed. Addressing. It's smart home hub nece home pod many integrates with apple's home APP that lets control home connected accessories said scenes and stuff like that. Covering User Privacy Apple, says no word spoken to Home Pod, leave your home until you touch home pod many or say he. S I are. So, yes, it is always listening but what it here's goes nowhere until you give it the command. Request. A home pot or not associated with apple ID. You choose whether recordings are saved by apple personal requests only work when the associated iphone is home with you. And communications with smart home accessories used strong encryption according to the company. Now I, said earlier that the unit is spiritual. If you've seen a home pod, there is no mistaking what this thing is. Same sort of light up display on the top same mesh wrapping it's roundedness and the same white and space grey options as the original home pod. Coming soon to flat surface near you. Orders for home pod many began on the sixth of November unit, start, shipping the week of the sixteenth of November. Not Price, to beat an echo but not a device that will break the bank. Home Pod many will sell. For, Ninety, nine bucks. Okay. I pretend to hear you say but I'm worried about breaking my home pause many. Not sure why but better to be safe in your case. To that end apple care plus we'll be available for home pod. Many. A piece from macrumors says, that will run buyers fifteen bucks. When Tim Cook was back on camera, he took a moment to Brag on iphones past noting the iphone eleven has been the number one smartphone in the world since its launch and that I phone has led the industry in customer satisfaction every year since it's Get ready to hate all of them as the iphone twelve line makes the scene bringing with it five G. Connectivity. Which one? All of them. Had Been Rumored Apple announced four iphone phone twelve models and has had also been rumored. Each can support five G.. Cook says, five G. Brings A new level of performance for downloads UPLOADS, higher quality video streaming, more responsive gaming, real time interactivity, and more. The CEO says five Jia superfast, which he actually pitched as a security feature speeds are so good. He says you'll be less tempted to sign on the public WIFI limiting exposure to the dangers that lurk there. Every decade brings new technology that provides a step change in what we can do with iphone said Cook. Today. A new era begins for iphone. Today we're bringing by G. to phone. Then began the verizon commercial. Hans Fest Berg Chairman and CEO. Verizon took to the stage talk about big reds five G. offering. Verizon's by ultra wideband with large quantities of millimeter wave access will be live and sixty cities across the US by the end of this year. In ideal conditions, Best Burg says the carriers seen four gigabits down and two hundred megabits up. The four gigabits is kind of funny own Antonio Guy says an ideal conditions. Well it doesn't sound like you're getting four GIGA beds but we'll get, him. The other thing best Burger announced was flipping the switch on Verizon's extensive five gene nationwide network. That apparently went live yesterday. Boy would I like to know the terms of the deal worked out between, that bill and Verizon? Emphasis on particular carrier. I did not see coming. Now I said iphone twelve comes in four models here the rumor mill rang true. The phones are iphone twelve iphone twelve many iphone twelve pro and iphone twelve pro, Max. Starting with iphone twelve, remember the squared off edges of iphone Four. The new design returns us to that. Squared edges that meet flush with the devices front and back glass the front classes something special though. Working with corning delay, this display is protected by what apple. Calls Ceramic. Shield. It is said by the company to be tougher than any other smartphone class with four times better dropped performance than iphone eleven. The display it's protecting is apple custom Ole ed providing truer blacks, better contrast and two times the pixels iphone eleven or four, hundred, sixty pixels per inch. While that displays the same six point one inches iphone eleven, apple shrank the surrounding enough to make iphone. Eleven percent than her fifteen percent smaller and sixteen percent lighter than iphone. Eleven Choice of colors is not huge but they are pretty. With options and black. White Product Red Green. And blue that. Does things for me. I shouldn't talk about in mixed company. The candy coating is nice. Let's talk about. It's Chewy. Chocolate center starting with the phones five Genus Apple says, iphone twelve has the most five G. bands of any smartphone for better performance in more places. Additionally the company's silicon, the software approach. Let's apple make the best use of available five G. including choosing to not use five. G.. It sounds like iphone defaults to lt e tapping into five G. when it's both necessary and available. That is great for power consumption according to the company. Apples tested the new phones on over one hundred carriers and over thirty regions. In ideal conditions iphone twelve gets up to three point five gigabits on. which is what makes the Brian Bragging about four gigabytes down kind of funny yesterday. It does support millimeter wave those so. got that going for it. As, for the phones on workings iphone twelve powered by apple's a fourteen bionic, the first phone powered by the five nanometer processor technology packing eleven point eight billion transistors roughly forty percent more than eight thirteen. A six core CPU that's up to fifty percent faster than last year's phone and a four core GPU graphics that are up to fifty percent faster than last year's model. Machine learning also gets a boost iphone, twelve packs of sixteen coordinator and Gen that's up to eighty percent faster than iphone eleven capable of eleven, trillion operations per second. Company bragged on Games claiming console quality for the phone. To Demonstrate and executive from riot games showed off League of legends wild rift a mobile, only game due out later this year. Well phone twelve is not the phone photographers would choose. There's plenty of improvement and it's cameras. Apple says the phone has a twelve megapixel ultra wide camera and twelve megapixel wide camera. It said the sport, the fastest aperture yet it also features a seven element lens that apple says offers twenty-seven percent improvement in low light performance. Mag Save is an internal thing. Rather than a name for a connector is in days of old MAG. Safe today is a collection of magnets and charging elements that help line up the phone for proper charging. When it's not charging those magnets go to work holding on cases and wallets and third party stuff. Apple expects a thriving ecosystem of third party doodads take advantage of the newly introduced MAG. Safe. Ness. Mag Safety. Safe thing. Anyway. It's a thing built into iphone twelve. Every model in the line. Now's probably phone twelve many. Except for the size, you can take everything I've said so far about iphone twelve and play it back. iphone twelve many has the same specs as iphone twelve though in a slightly smaller size. The company says the mini is smaller and lighter than four point seven inch models like iphone eight but with a bigger five point four inch display. Apple says, this one is the smallest thinnest and lightest five G. phone. In the world. Talking about last night with Frederik, Van Johnson, and a few other folks on Chuck joiners Mac. Voices. We came to the conclusion that the pro phones for two groups, people who wanna spend as much money as they can afford. Or people who really care about the camera. There's nothing wrong with the camera functionality and the iphone twelve or iphone twelve many. Unless you count they're not being as high end as the camera on the high end. No I'm not a high end photo guy. So there was a lot set around iphone twelve pro, an iphone twelve pro Max that escapes me. The camera on iphone twelve pro boxes said by apple to have a sixty five millimeter focal length from fifty two millimeter focal length and last year's counterpart. It's got five times optical zoom range and the set to support an eighty seven percent improvement in low light versus last year's top of the pro line. I do know enough to be impressed by one thing. The pro line can shoot an apple pro raw. or it will be able to with a software update. Later, this year photographers will also be able to edit those images. Directly, in the photos APP. The pros can also handle. HD are video recording catching seven hundred million colors. Sixty Times, the number they could capture before. Apple, said they also sport the first smartphone camera that'll record in dolby vision hd are. And just like the apple pro raw functionality users will be able to edit the dobie vision HDR video in the photos APP. Finally the light are rumors were finely true the twelve pro and twelve pro Mac speech or a world facing light detection and ranging scanner. That let folks scan and modeled their surroundings. Apples Demos showed that put to use for placing objects in an augmented reality environment performing improved autofocus and low light and improving camera that perception in low light for night moat. Working our way out of these phones, Greg, Joswiak, apple's newly minted senior. VP Worldwide Marketing talked about a few of the pro lines features. It's got mad safe. It's got ceramic shield. It's got a Super Ratna FDR display. As for sizes iphone twelve pro gets bumped from five point eight inch display display size of six point one inches the pro Max meanwhile goes six point five inch display to a display size of six point seven. All of it is bound by the same squared off edges as iphone twelve, the with a couple of distinctions. I. The outer band is stainless steel on the pro line and second the colors are a bit more refined. Coming in silver graphite a gold that looks seriously golden. And the Pacific. Blue that doesn't do as much for me as the blue on the IPHONE twelve. Not that I'd turn it down. If cost is your primary concern. Here is what you're looking at across the whole line of iphones. iphone se. Start Three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars iphone ten are starts at four ninety, nine iphone eleven starts at five, ninety, nine iphone many starts at hundred ninety, nine dollars iphone twelve starts at seven ninety, nine, iphone twelve pro starts at nine, ninety nine. An iphone Pro Max starts at one, thousand, ninety, nine dollars. For the new phones though those prices are only Kinda SORTA true. Peace, from the Mac Observer says iphone twelve many an iphone twelve do start at six, ninety, nine and seven, ninety nine if you buy them as a t and T or verizon phones if you buy one is either a sprint or t mobile phone or as an unlocked phone. The starting prices are seven, twenty, nine, and eight, twenty nine. With no indication as to why. While it's great that ceramic shield means less of a chance of broken display. The chance is still there. If that bugs, you apple care pluses there for all of them. macrumors says, two years of coverage will run one, hundred, forty, nine dollars for iphone and twelve mini. Adding loss or theft protection will up that price to to nineteen buyers can get ongoing coverage for seven, ninety, nine per month or eleven dollars and forty nine cents with loss and theft added. As for the higher end phones, the pizzas, two years of Apple Care Plus will cost one, nine, thousand, nine or nine dollars ninety nine cents per month. Theft. And loss coverage bumps that price to two, hundred, sixty, nine dollars or thirteen dollars and forty nine cents per month. Ongoing. As for availability, apple is starting in the middle. And working out. Would owners can order iphone twelve and iphone twelve pro this Friday the sixteenth. October. They'll be delivered the following Friday the twenty third. If you're targeting either end of the range. iphone twelve, many an iphone twelve pro Max will go up for order on the sixth of November. Delivery should hit the following Friday the thirteenth of November. Barring incident which I have to say because. Friday

Apple Verizon Apple Park Tim Cook CEO Bob Board VP Theft United States Corning Macrumors Entercom Chairman And Ceo Antonio Guy Burg
Make the vision a reality.

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:56 min | 6 months ago

Make the vision a reality.

"Welcome back Brown Girls Ashanti here. The founder of the broncos Guy to politics, the Stop Shop podcast for women of color who want to hear and talk about the world of politics. As we continue with our collaboration with she, the people we're highlighting women from their twenty color to watch twenty twenty less. These are all barrier-breaking women Kerr changing the political landscape this year and beyond. ME, insight thought and Jennifer APPs Addison Jennifer at Edison is the president and CO executive, director of the Center for Popular Democracy, which works with affiliates partner organizations across the country to build a more inclusive equitable society and political institutions that worked for everyone. Jen. How are you doing today, i. Doing as well as anybody can be expected I'm surrounded by family I have been able to be in close contact with you know parents in loved ones, and of course I know protected with the benefits of a good union workplace so I, you know all things considered I. I'm feeling very blessed. We love to hear that in before we start the interview we were chatting in. We're talking about being on the road so much doing this work. What inspired you to get involved in community? Organizing I? Mean I think my mother was just born this way you know I grew up a black woman in the state and city that has been named the worst place in America to be Black Milwaukee, Wisconsin and I know most people don't think of black folks when they think of Wisconsin, they think of like beer cheese in the packers, but you know there have been generations of deeply entrenched. Racial segregation in in problems that have. Led to this dichotomy of Wisconsin, being one of the best places in America if you are a white child in the worst, if you are black and so I think I recognized that from an early age felt really passionate about it in a high school student I became really politicized around the around school funding around the idea that you know. Schools in the suburbs were getting twice as much per pupil. Than you know the school that I was going to in the city of Milwaukee. You know the reality is. Is that every single thing that we hold to be sort of like a part of the American dream was. Fought for and won by people organizing their communities in taking collective action in so You know I feel very blessed to be able to spend my life. Really working with folks to help as many people as possible in this country, find their voice empower. That is that is very powerful. What you just said. and. You mentioned being from Milwaukee. Were in the middle of the virus, and we're seeing it as a city where the majority of the black population there is infected with the virus in that has also just spur conversations to about how so many people still had to go to work, and how are essential workers a lot of them? Grocery workers aren't getting a fair wage in Eve. Let so many different campaigns including fight for fifteen. So how are you connecting at the moment all the work that you've been doing with fight for fifteen for people to have a fifteen dollar an hour wage in what you're seeing with essential workers who are putting their. In their lives on the line right now to make sure that we are able to get the benefits that we need and say stay in our homes. I mean first of all. What we saw just as pass Tuesday in Wisconsin was a travesty, a failure of democracy There's no way around it. You have a city. The largest city in the state. Multiple, times, the population of any other city. That is used to having over one hundred fifty polling places that on Tuesday, in the midst of a crisis in which we are not supposed to gather in large crowds, crowds over ten had five polling locations open for a critical election had A. Tens of thousands of people who had requested absentee ballots who had not received them as of Election Day, and the you know the impact on on my community on my people is is not an accident, right? It is the product a decade's worth of policy passed by elected officials who are incredibly hostile towards the city of Milwaukee on the city's behalf towards sort of neo liberal You know business oriented. Democrats who have allowed the city's most vulnerable populations to suffer in struggle and become the scapegoats of the, and so you know I'm really grateful for groups like black leader, organizing communities in the Laki and leaders igniting transformation who are organizing You know black folks. Brown folks in in the city to really demand the future they deserve in at the end of the day. All of these campaigns, the fight for fifteen, the fight for paid sick days. Many people don't know that. In Milwaukee we passed a referendum with more than two thirds of the voter support to require any business in the city of Milwaukee to provide paid sick leave earned sick leave to their workers, and that a law that was passed by voters was overturned by preemption at the state level. At the at the request of the crack mayor when we talk about the now eighty seven percent of the people who have died of Covid nineteen in Wisconsin are black. We have to understand that this is a consequence of lack of. Political Power and UVA intentional suppression of in particular Black Communities in the state of Wisconsin, and so it's important that we're having this conversation in the context of she, the people of you know a movement of a women of color who are demanding more than just to see at the table, but who are demanding real power. That, we can use to transform the lives of our people. That's what women of Color braying and I. Think you know it's if we look at what's happening in Wisconsin through the Lens of women of Color, we begin to understand the multiple layers enrich raises on in sexism and capitalism are creating. This you know are exploding the impact of this crisis in places like Milwaukee, Detroit and New York. City another's

Milwaukee Wisconsin Broncos Kerr Stop Shop Jennifer Founder Center For Popular Democracy America JEN Partner Packers President Trump Director Covid Executive
Changing U.S. Political Landscape

People of the Pod

05:41 min | 7 months ago

Changing U.S. Political Landscape

"I moderate conversation between Bhatia under Sargon the opinion editor of the forward. And Seth Mandell the executive editor of The Washington Examiner magazine. The program was called the changing. Us political landscape. And what's at stake for American Jews? We are pleased to bring you some of that program now yesterday. Ajc's National Leadership Council received an exclusive briefing from Dr Land Schlieffer the CEO Regeneration Pharmaceuticals and toward the end of the call. He made the points. I hope I'm not misrepresenting. You Hear Lynn. He made the point. That PART OF WHY? America hasn't been a world leader in responding to the corona virus crisis. Far From It is because our political polarization has had almost a paralysing effect on the ability of government to address the primary and secondary issues coming from the pandemic put differently in a certain sense. Our political divide is literally making us so just to lay some groundwork I want to start by asking each of you. How did we get here? How is it that the country that dominated the last century now seems at times like it could tear itself apart by? Let's begin with you. I have a bit of a polarization. Scott's back Anna now what I mean by that is I think that when you look around at our nation more generally this polarization in fact that is so clear to us on. Twitter is so clear in Congress and in the Senate and so clear in the media actually really evaporates as soon as you get out of these sort of centers of chattering class. Political classes is just to say that the tragedy of the polarization in our nation's elites is so much greater because it truly is leaving you know our nation behind it does. We are actually much less polarized. As a nation we have ever been in our history. Polling shows that as a nation we have never been more united than we are over. The major issues at this nation was founded on and so it's deeply tragic to see them at in the media and in political classes. We are others throats really failing to represent the people that we are supposed to be representing set to you kind of agree with that formulation you WanNa take a stab at the original question or you also disagree with my premise here. I think that body is basically right. I think the problem is that there's a perception of partisanship but that perception of partisanship actually has a real effect on what's happening in what goes on and and the formation of policy and things like that you have leaders in alternative media in. Party affiliated party associated media that make a lot of noise that noise that gets picked up by the rest of us in the mainstream media and we sort of broadcast it out and it makes it look and sound like there's a real divide here but in reality on the important thing which is compliance. That divide wasn't really there. It was just an argument. We were having in public. But that's what a democracy is. We were having the argument in public. And the lockdown side. The restrictions were winning the argument and both sides more or less complied with the ramifications of that. So in some ways I do really think it's healthier than it looks but I worry that if we're formulating policy and we're having these national conversations based on the perception of division than the reality matters less than it should so we need to somehow find a way to have the leaders in Congress in media those who set the national debate reflect the same level of division or lack thereof as the general public. Were talking about the vanishing center whether it's actually vanishing kind of out in the districts or it's only vanishing maybe in the halls of Congress to set last point right that might matter more or still matter even if the back home kind of get along but if we're talking about the vanishing center the Center makes me think of consensus issues Fighting Antisemitism and supporting Israel both used to be consensus issues and I think that in some ways they're both disappearing maybe the consensus support for Israel is disappearing a little more obviously than the consensus support for fighting antisemitism. But I think you'd both agree that people are trying to instrumentalise the fight against anti-semitism in a way. That's that's really unhelpful. So Seth we'll start with you. Why are consensus issues like this disappearing the issue that I always return to as something that looks better than the American Jewish Committee is response by? Comparison is what happened with Jeremy Corbyn in the UK and on the eve of the election there was a poll that eighty seven percent of British. Jews considered him antisemitic. And I just remember thinking that that's close as a consensus as I can ever remember. I mean I think the reverse was when maybe eight Ludo mayor it had like a five percent approval rating or something. You had ninety. Five percent of Israelis agreeing wasn't a very happy moment at any time you have countries Jews almost ninety percent agreeing on something that's Unity. That's a form of office and it also means that the political ramifications were not what was important. I had people telling me. Hey look. I'm a lifelong Labour member. I'm not leaving the party but I. I am canvassing for bars.

Congress Seth Mandell Bhatia United States Israel National Leadership Council Twitter Executive Editor Editor Jeremy Corbyn Ceo Regeneration Pharmaceutica The Washington Examiner America American Jewish Committee Lynn Dr Land Schlieffer Labour Scott
Coronavirus travel: Visitor quarantine in Florida, Hawaii, and Alaska

John Williams

09:13 min | 8 months ago

Coronavirus travel: Visitor quarantine in Florida, Hawaii, and Alaska

"I just saw this that big vacation states like Florida Hawaii Alaska are saying there's a visitor quarantine tell us what that means well it is a record here it basically means if you show up in a hole I will treat you to stroll by ship or by air or you drive to Florida or fly to Florida same thing with Alaska you're really going to a self imposed fourteen day quarantine but but it's it's not not eating differently when you think about it then you know bring in illegal fruits and vegetables you are the illegal fruit and vegetable in this case so please don't go they came into a little bit late they should have done a little earlier but there's a reason now why airlines like Ryanair is no longer flying to the mainland and then they basically cut out all their service in the in the same thing will soon happen at least in terms of flights down requested between where I am right now in New York and Florida so you know it's interesting because you also heard Florida governor Ron DeSantis talk he issued an executive order it initially was criticized for not forgiving the beach is open for spring break but now he's saying if you're gonna fly in from New York New Jersey or Connecticut you need to self isolate for fourteen days because they're seeing people from New York which is the epicentre in America of this virus right now travel down to Florida to try to get out of the big city where people are on top of each other it makes sense but they are trying to make sure that it doesn't cause a problem there well good luck enforcing that show quarantine says who who's gonna stop in and stop me what they really should do and it's going to happen very soon take a look what's going on in New York in the governor's order here on the governor's order in California and your own governor Eloy sooner or later every state's going to have to do this tomorrow how many cases there reporting because the food was good but what I'm understanding is worries whether but maybe been so few cases reported in what states would say like West Virginia is because they don't have the testing done where you have testing the obvious you're gonna have more cases reported but in terms of how it relates to travel what we're really looking at now it's on the drawing board no announcements have been made is a possible shutdown of domestic air service in this country yeah and the number the airlines would love to have that happen simply because from an economic point of view they can't sustain the traffic loads they're getting a fair averaging only twenty five percent load factors on their flights the reason why the airlines are continuing to fly domestically has nothing to do with us it has to do with how the airlines gotten business when I first started back in the nineteen thirties it's called hall in the U. S. mail and if they can come up with an alternative to do that then there's every reason to believe they're going to try to shut down that service completely enough American Airlines converted one other passenger planes to do is go to an all cargo plane and for the first time in thirty years American Airlines actually flew a cargo flight because most the time when they're taking in the mail it's in the same baggage holds your luggage and thought about that it's some interesting to see our people still flying I mean you file the times you've been on a plane recently I have not I'm I'm heating the governor's order I'm I'm I'm staying in place yesterday I'll give you an example delta air lines's park six hundred airplanes so many planes parked you literally had to close a runway in Atlanta just to hold the planes that were parked up and yet yesterday JFK whatever flights are operated by delta we're averaging about thirty percent load factor that is funny actually unsustainable so the answers to your question yes there are people flying but not very many that the TSA has reported you'll love this and eighty six percent drop in the number of passengers screened for the first time if anybody does fly no long lines of the TSA but you know that's an unintended consequence I'm sure yeah kind it is and I I guess people who are already have bought their travel they they bought their tickets to a cruise or airline of the already planned travel for spring or summer what do you advising those folks to do you're hanging on to those tickets you know you're you're you're wondering maybe even a week or two ago you thought you'd still take that trip now looking less certain well let's be realistic here in terms of time frame if you're holding a ticket for anything now between now and may fifteenth or even may thirtieth your flight your cruise is probably not going to go now the airlines will tell you at this moment because their computers have been reprogrammed that that April twenty first flight is still scheduled to go well you know what the Titanic was still scheduled but the bottom line here is as we get closer to those dates and we haven't really mitigated those of the virus curve those flights will cancel so my advice to everybody is if you're holding a ticket for anyone of those flights don't cancel it now because the airlines will then say you're canceling it based on your decision wait until the airlines cancel and then don't just settle for a voucher insist on a full refund because this was it your decision you didn't wake up one morning just capriciously decide you'd want to go the bottom line is you you you contracted for service you did not get you deserve a full refund because right now is that what's happening Peter if you if you tried to call up and say Hey I'm not gonna travel it end of April mid April whatever it is you we don't are you getting vouchers are you seeing people get refunds well it's a case by case one by airline cruise line by cruise line situation well given example of Southwest Airlines the original program in place it's been program put in place for years would be three basically put everything that you put let you pay for into a a separate fund and then you use that phone to fly for the next year but eventually the essentially with the with the once talk about now that the airlines are desperate to do what hold on to their cash however other airlines have been something else Qantas if they give you read that they give you a voucher now we'll give you a voucher worth ten percent more than what you paid for your ticket thank you your user ticket but let's be real here I'll give you an example in the city of Dallas I'm just using this as an example eighty seven percent of people who flew within Dallas who flew on American Airlines last year only for the airline once these are road warriors are frequent flyers their leisure travelers who say that their hard earned dollars to take that one annual trip why would you hold on their money per year that's just not fair it's not right so if you're listening to this right now and you're one of those people and the other one only once you do a voucher keep calling back ask for a supervisor or call my show when we didn't know it we will give you information on my show on Saturday as to how you can try to get that refund because right now this is totally unfair while the government is bailing out the airlines with cash why should the airlines bail you out I saw that that looks like of them so they there is a package I think their loans to the airlines not grants and that's what I've heard they did government can take stake in your company Boeing has said it doesn't want to accept any government stake so they may not even take the aid that's offered how do you feel about this whole package if you had a chance to take a look at it Peter I have been moved to start with the airlines for starters here I have no problem in defining the airlines as critical to our supply chain in this country and to our infrastructure travel and transportation and so if they're going to give them either these grants or these loans there's every reason to expect and to demand conditions and those conditions the way beyond without the eggs it is it was it was do stock buybacks it has to do with how do we move forward from this are we still gonna do these draconian well you know change please enter Conan rebooking flea season make everything non refundable and it's it's it's it's terrible thirty five billion dollars last year was earned by airlines just on ancillary fees and it had nothing to do with actually flying the airplane so bottom line here we need to see I don't think we will see right now because everybody's moving so quickly on this but sooner or later we need to see a consumer component of consumer protection component anything that's that that is attached to a financial bailout for the airline I would agree with that the other thing we keep that keeps coming up is people saying what if I get sick well it was so then this time when so many people are getting these unexpected illnesses what what what rights would you have with an airline to get a refund well first of all let's let's talk about travel insurance the travel insurance companies are very good at trying to get you to buy the insurance is actually go online to make your reservation otherwise hard to complete you can't complete the transaction unless you opt in or out to the insurance without understanding what it covers but most importantly without understanding what it doesn't cover and right now for example you can't get fire insurance after your second four catches fire and guaranteed that almost every travel insurance policy that's out there has an exclusion for pandemic so what we have to do now is we watch as the airlines on an almost daily basis start changing their refund policies from Detroit from trickled into Leicester cone into slightly less draconian and finally after much public outcry and I'll be leading that charge so it's actually fair and beneficial to you I like the way that sounds Peter Peter Greenberg always has the answers when it comes to travel and all things about it thank you Peter Hey John three to six you can hear him here on

Alaska Florida
Trump proposes eliminating payroll tax through the end of the year

Joel Riley

03:38 min | 9 months ago

Trump proposes eliminating payroll tax through the end of the year

"But we're starting to see that the fact one of the reasons the markets up this morning if you saw the president yesterday after the market closed at the end and pledge support governments all over the world and after doing that president trump talked about a potential payroll tax cut and even some assistance the particular groups in industries these are his words here now that are in the field the pain from the corona virus so it's done is it's just that it's affecting just if individuals in China or a few individual sectors here in the economy it's the economy writ large and that's why you're seeing that really more kind of global economic worry about growth rather than just worry about travel or one particular business right and as I understand it to there were some triggers that fired yesterday you know when when things move too much one way or the other there's kind of some stop gap some safeguard that kind of stuff walk me through how does that stuff work sure well be with the first time in well over a decade a lot of these measures had been have been enacted in and there's a series of them are the most prominent one is eighty seven percent limit in the amount of stocks and drop before they have what they call a cooling off period I think it's kind of funny that that they say would we want to go buy a gun they say you know you need a cooling off period but that in fact stocks stocks trading yesterday for fifteen minutes just after the opening bell as the precipitously dropped about seven percent the market came back a little from that level and kind of treated down all day but those those measures were put in place after the stock market crash of nineteen eighty seven we've been updated over the years to try to stop the panic and a free fall exactly what we saw yesterday we can debate the merits of you know whether that's a positive or negative thing long term but the fact is that this is simply a lot of economic concerns out there and you put it in some context we've had a little blessing year really historic Bull Run market hasn't had a true bear market in years and years so you kind of take a look at the big picture we do however doesn't make it any easier when you're going through a seventh at seven percent decline in one day yeah I mean it it causes you to kind of catch your breath but I'm I'm looking at a graph right now you know biggest S. and P. five hundred one day drops and the CO two four six eight ten twelve fourteen sixteen eighteen this is this is like number twenty so again it makes you have caution any concerns here for your four oh one K. your portfolio and all those things but it's nowhere near the biggest drop we've ever had no no not at all and you don't feel we've talked for months about the Gordon's gonna talk you said that that getting your financial house in order right making sure that you've got that three to six months worth of living expenses you're not living beyond your means then you pay down your credit card debt what you find is that if you have those three tasks accomplished these like yesterday are just so much easier to get through because you know you're not dependent on the market on the Dow for your next meal your next mortgage payment so you don't specially with this rebound today I I think I've used one before the G. P. Morgan said it best you gotta settle down to the sleeping point in the future so financially strapped that a five or even ten percent drop in the market the challenge now is a great turn even given the decline that to put yourself straight get your financial house in order that the president is to where we're headed up this morning and they said about a thousand points after a brutal day the question is can you come to pull itself out yeah I mean we're gonna be having lower gas prices you'll be able to write refinance your mortgage those are all great let's just hope that the slowing economy doesn't slow all the opportunities especially for jobs here in the Midwest in the

President Trump
Gender Inequality and Women in the Workplace

The Big Story

11:42 min | 9 months ago

Gender Inequality and Women in the Workplace

"Take a look around you on any given day and it won't take long to notice. Women don't have equal rights but there's one place where we find some of the more shocking examples that's at work statistics candidates with its latest numbers on the gender wage gap college and university graduates. Who are men earned more on average than their female counterparts worth eighty two percent of Canadian women viewed as over bearing if they had a strong opinion at work but on the flip side to that it's eighty seven percent felt men who expressed strong opinions at work are viewed as leaders and confident woman. Now hold twenty. Four percent of senior management positions globally. Those numbers are important because workplace. Equality is what's generally used to measure women's progress and the progress we've made can't be ignored but women still don't earn or own as much as their male counterparts and those positions at the very top of the power structure. Women rarely occupied them even when they do. The same challenges persist this is despite messages of empowerment being touted globally despite women being encouraged to have more confidence and to own their own careers. So what's stopping us from getting to the top and staying there? And how do we change it? I'm Stephanie Phillips in for Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Laurent mckeon is the author of no more nice girls a book about gender and power. An excerpt from her book recently appeared in the Walrus island so when we look at statistics of women in power in positions of power in Canada however we represented at the top Not Very well in fact in a lot of industries and spheres of public life We're not really represented at all and I think what makes it. Even more depressing is that you can see the disparity between representations sort of at the middle bottom where women are represented and then when we get to the top you know and they're not so for example thirty eight percent of all. Mba Students in Canada are women which is not parody but is okay but then when you look at Executive positions in Canada fewer than ten percent of women occupy those positions. So we start to see the disparity when we look at government has vote. We are represented among half of the voting population But then you get to the level of MP's for example we see that the number hovers around like twenty five thirty percent of most years and we look historically and only eleven percent of premiers in Canada. Have been women so you know it just once you get to the top. It's like where are we? We're not really there at all. So eleven percent. How many premieres is that actually? Eleven Eleven Hodel not even present so eleven total and the I was not elected until nineteen ninety one and one hundred and fifty years. Yeah those are kind of depressing numbers. So what happens when women do get to the top? Yeah I think we believe that wants women get to the top. You know. We're at the top and we will have the you know the power that we fought for for the C. O. You know we will run the company. People will listen to us. We'll stop having to deal with maybe all the B. S. that we dealt with When we were working our way up but that's not true. We have this idea of a glass ceiling and you know we shut her through it and then we are on the other side but we're not thinking about all the broken glass but still there once we shatter and in fact the stats. Here are pretty depressing. As well. We know that once women occupy the C. Suite their pickup actually widens to sixty eight cents For every dollar a man earns from I believe seventy eight or seventy nine so it. It dips earlier and on top of that. We also know that women like women. Ceo's are significantly more likely to be fired forty five percent more likely to be fired even when they're doing well like especially when they're doing well because it's like oh like well now's the time to get the white dude back in here like you know. Now we can You know really. Innovate and exciting. Again women are also far more likely to get hired when a company is in crisis. So it's forty percent of women are hired when a company is crisis versus twenty percent of men and we could say. Well that's great. That's because we trust women when companies in crisis but is actually a research shows that is actually because it's easier to blame women when things don't turn around and it's easier to replace them when they do so. There's this white savior effect where women people of color are often replaced by the white savior. Who Comes in and saves the company from you know the disaster that they put it in and it's all just smoke and mirrors to kind of maintain the power balances that were used to. Can you talk about more of the double standard between women and men when they're in the are in positions of power? Yeah a lot of women that I spoke to and and the research but you know women that spoke to feel that. They're kind of in the situation where they can't win. And it's sort of this double expectation Particularly when your power and the idea that you're supposed to be nice but not too nice and you're supposed to be you know a boss but not bossie or else you might get called another be word that is not as flattering You know they're supposed to be attractive but not too sexual authoritative but not mean and it kind of just swings back and forth until you're like well. What am I supposed to be like? You know I'm you can't win and you're left to follow this very narrow tightrope that is incredibly easy to fall off of. Yeah it's I think you described it as superhuman almost in your writing right yeah. It's the standards set like no one can live up to that. And you know we've found that when you inevitably don't live up to this impossible standard your judge so much more harshly Then men are in a working environment so I wanted to talk about the pedestrian bridge that collapsed at Florida International University. Can you can you tell me about a bit about that story? Yeah so it was a real story. Yes which and why emphasize that will become important in. Just a few seconds so in twenty eighteen other bridge collapsed and six people died and out of that real horrible incident Sort of this myth grew online until people believed it and it was the mid that an all women engineering team built the bridge and people created fake news actual fake news that spread and they cribbed all of these photos from the actual company that was responsible but from their international women's Day posts so they just pretended and made all these fake sites and links so that it looked like only women worked out the company. Wow and then a lot of people would say like well. That's what happens when you hire female engineers. No wonder they aren't in stem and it wasn't just on the Internet. I would hear this story repeated to me more than a year later or just regular people be like. That's not true. It's not what happened but it shows. I think the power of the kind of societal Gulab. That women are not competent in certain fields in particular he feels that are historically male dominated. I mean this is not the only time women have been blamed for something. That isn't their fault wire. Wire women the scapegoat when things go wrong. You know. I think that were just kind of we're primed for it in a lot of ways like as a society were primed to blame women. We blame mothers when kids do something bad and we you know wives when husbands. Do something bad you know. It's always the story of like well. What did she do to make him do that? You know that kind of a narrative that has persisted in politics and pop culture. You know we look back at history and literature. We're just so predisposed to do it when someone nudges us there we go the whole way. And then how does that play out for women? Who are in positions of power. What does that look like at the top were often really adverse to the idea of women in power and you know for a lot of people that I spoke to who you know started thinking about this or maybe changed the way. They approached power and leadership for them. A big moment in history was Hillary Clinton's loss and the polls expected that she was going to come out ahead. You know everyone thought it would be okay. Even though is seeing the herring that she took in the press and sort of the the hate that was happening on social media and and then you know she just became like this ultimate person. Who CAN'T DO ANYTHING RIGHT? You know. It was criticized when she got emotional. She was criticized when she was powerful. Choose was criticized for what she was wearing issues to five hundred masculine and she wasn't perfect of course but she became This symbol for everything like we don't like about women in power and when they get to the top they topple you know they become such a target That people just work very hard to take them down right. So can you explain the he skilled? She's lucky phenomenon. Yeah there's this phenomenon that researchers I've done what you just said that he's skilled. She's lucky and is this tendency that we have to would may look at men and women empower you know and whether that's in a very public position or maybe just like in in our own small company were man's promoted or women has been promoted and we tend to fall back into these very stereotypical traditional narratives. Which are like well. He got there because he's so good at this one account or he really killed this project and of course he deserves to be there and if it's a woman we say well she's lucky is probably because she's attractive or you know she was really nice to the boss or like and it. Kinda just goes from there. But it's not just other people that follow this narrative women fall into this narrative. Allot to you'll hear and that's part of how the term got coined because you'll hear a lot of women. Researchers have heard a lot of women that they interviewed like. Ceo's people in powerful positions when they're asked how they got there. Just had this like really lucky break. I was really lucky to be in the right place at the right time and you know kind of fell my way when I got really lucky with this one piece of success we ha- we buy into the narrative to in it. It perpetuates it. Gotcha I WANNA get more into that in a bid but I. I don't want to ignore the intersection of race and gender here so what happens to a woman of color who has the same qualifications as an a woman with a so called white name? Who's applying for the same job right? Power is so layered and our perceptions of power and who deserves to be empower and who's skilled and not lucky really becomes more complicated

Canada CEO Walrus Island Laurent Mckeon Stephanie Phillips Florida International Universi C. Suite Hillary Clinton Jordan Heath Rawlings Gulab Executive
Antarctic Peninsula is warmer than most of Texas

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:19 sec | 10 months ago

Antarctic Peninsula is warmer than most of Texas

"Analysis a spokeswoman for the world meteorological organization some eighty seven percent of places along the west coast of the Antarctic peninsula have retreated in the last fifty is with most of the showing an accelerated retreat in the past twelve years that record was eight degrees warmer than New York city's high for the

New York City
New survey finds 87% of office workers are stressed out daily

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

New survey finds 87% of office workers are stressed out daily

"You're not alone if you're stressing out at work just about everybody else at the office is feeling the same thing new survey from Harris poll find eighty seven percent of office workers say they are super stressed out every single day most of those workers are going away pastor traditional eight hour work day as well the average worker now puts in more than nine and a half hours every single day seventy three percent say they have a real issue with what they call work life balance the biggest stressors at work we're just over loaded with busy work we can't plug at home and some people have a really really bad

Harris Seventy Three Percent Eighty Seven Percent Eight Hour
First 5 California Launches New Campaign to Talk, Read and Sing So Kids Ages 0-5 Have a Chance to Succeed

Love, Death, and Money

10:31 min | 1 year ago

First 5 California Launches New Campaign to Talk, Read and Sing So Kids Ages 0-5 Have a Chance to Succeed

"But on the show the deciders we like to feature people who are leaders in their field and change agents in their communities on the show I asked people to share their stories and offer insights and today we're going to do something a little unusual I am part of the team from Frasier communications on the show we're gonna be talking about how we build a campaign in very specifically about the first five California campaign in previous shows on this topic of early childhood education the importance of early childhood education I've spoken about the fact that our youngest children really represent our future and research demonstrates now that for every dollar you invest early you can get up to eight dollars back as a result of higher productivity less incarceration a more limited teenage pregnancies and many other ways and the research demonstrates that helping children early from the moment of birth to talk and read returning talking and singing to them not helping them talk of course that early can make a big difference in our brain development there's actually growth inside the brain to the team that developed that talk read saying campaign was here with me today and I'm gonna introduce them all and then we'll go back and forth talking about them so we have Eileen prince who's a senior vice president and director of client services who works every day on the first five account and her partner in that is Molly our who's our director of consumer experience has a Molly works in many ways on first five to create authentic experiences for family members for care givers and for parents amber stunned or the creative director at Frasier communications really brought on the mantra talk read sing to life and has helped us build and identity in the state of California for the campaign I've mentioned before on this show we're very proud of this campaign in particular because it's impacting parents we've been doing it for almost six years now and we have eighty seven percent awareness according to the UCLA us C. H. I. S. study that's done every year and among those of where those parents to wear over ninety percent of them say they're actually talking reading and singing more as a result of the campaign so when I talk about using communications to have a positive impact we really believe we're doing now let's start with a lean Eileen as I mentioned is the director of client services we have a full service media department in the agency but they're not here and I know I lean works very closely with them I think you talk about how this talk re saying message gets created and delivered to people not the creative part so much for the delivery of it to them through media throughout the state of California we started of all of our campaigns by doing a lot of good deep research because there's a lot of learnings that are continually changing and happening as the years go on so we use a mix of MRI or not Nielsen com score Scarborough and this gives us a lot of information about what our audiences are watching listening to and more importantly how they're changing just how they use their media so just a couple little quick nuggets to share like what's new in the the media lands out there is that on average adults are now spending almost six hours a day using their digital media so what does that mean we need to be using at more and more digital media to get our message out there to our parents and a lot of households are now cutting the cord to what does that mean no more subscriptions to a satellite they're going in using more things like Hulu live YouTube live and sling TV that's increased by fifty eight percent which is pretty astonishing Eileen I ate I think you're right as the media habits change we've got to stay on top of them hi you know you mentioned these chefs in media what about also reaching different ethnic groups and making sure we understand how to reach the most effectively yeah that's really really important so again our research helps inform but also our media partners help inform we do a really strong mix of Spanish Chinese Karan to Gauliga just to name a few and we have we know through our research where our audiences are but we also have forged really strong partnerships as a star to say with each of our stations are in language stations and they help us to create relevant messages to each of those audiences that's great I think you know we do something like sixteen languages and we're always evolving I know one another campaign we're looking at check talk out because we're targeting young people agendas ager six fifteen to twenty five years or twenty four year olds and the point is I think it Frasier we really stay on top of the media alternatives Facebook obviously being a big part of it Instagram Pinterest etcetera I'm only I know you've been really involved in the social media side of it and then extensions of the media to will be call integrations tell us about those yeah this building off of what I lean was saying about using the media the as a delivery system the messengers are really important part of that who's actually talking and who's saying our campaign messaging and that we also either work with our media partners for example with Spanish language with Univision we've worked with their star is Omar and our Heliade I'd to do content integration into their shows but then we also use ESPN and their radio talent and across the board let me explain because I don't think people know that term integration and I think this is actually an added value of Frasier being the op having the opportunity to see other people's pictures and their decks I know they often don't do this but when we work with our media partners we asked them to help us deliver the message or we call trusted sources so as part of the deal will be by the media we get these talented people I stand simply for free sometimes are modest payments to them but it's not the same as going that to them independently and we actually worked very hard to create the messaging the talking points but then they deliver and extremely authentic way that's what we mean by integration so Marin R. Heliade did videos for us right it did and it's also important to add to that that we select these messengers because they're relatable their authentic to what we're having to say so Omar not wholly recorded videos with their children and with their parents and we've had them talking about multi generational our conversations and with I mentioned earlier with the S. P. and we use Johnny hacker who's the punter for the rams he is a new dad so we had in coming on talking to other dads using sports as a way to connect and really make sure that he is relatable that his audience and his followers and his fans can trust and not just as a as a hero in their in their medium but as a regular dad that they can just listen to and learn from then follow follow emulate him I think that's really important you know we we could produce as many as fast as we'd like but having it said in their own voice I remember in particular with Omar and how are how on Helly at our hell yeah we we have discovered that there were issues with people who were learn their letters foundation another country like Mexico not being confident they even spoken well enough because our grammar is maybe as a perfect a particularly women who don't want always get to go to school all the way through so many of the women we had invokes regionalist third grade so of the grandparents of Omar and Haley I could talk about the fact that she I don't know if I should speak Spanish for talking in front of my kids but Marano Haley as it is okay it doesn't matter their brain is growing just as a result of you're talking in using words or telling stories right so some of the messages that are new ones are kind of difficult for us to express maybe in a paid spot get shared absolutely and a lot of these influencers and trusted sources have multiple channels in which they reach all of their audiences so we take advantage of all of the outlets that they have in any touch point we can have with their fans and their followers so for example with our help we'll go we'll keep what they are highly a trainer she did a Facebook live for us she's a ton of followers on her Facebook channel they tune in and she talked to them from from the could recall that carpool carpool I don't know if this plan carpal carrier right and she just talked while she was in line waiting to pick up her kids from school she taught three got online and just started talking about her day and now she's going to do and talking with their kids on the way home and the song she sang so it makes it really true now we've also had experiences with Mario I lean can you talk a little bit about Mario Lopez and getting him involved I'd love to talk about Mario Mario has really been a champion for first five California he has now three children he just added to his family just a couple months ago and he has been a true spokesperson for us across the state on his radio he speaks in both English and Spanish so he's able to again just like with Johnny hacker does for sports those listen to entertainment are following him as both a trusted source and a good friend because a lot of folks to listen to radio really do have that kinship to those they listen to in Mario has really resonated throughout the state for us and so much so that first five California's actually even recognized him for all the great work he's done in helping share the message about talk read see now they gave him an award and what and what is your state conferences which was wonderful and Mario is on I E. entertainment right we're just a show so our entertainment to manage he just changed over I think it's acts he just check this out show a Mario also has a following on IG entertainment shows he was on Entertainment Tonight now he's on access Hollywood people really believe in him and of course we go to universal studios to record with it which is a lot of fun which is love and I think trusted messengers are a critical part of what we do but we also have to develop messaging and of course even the theme talk read saying it changes everything first let's talk about how that came to be well we know that done from other brain research review and we also know from our own childhoods the songs we still remember the two the two spider in Riverview boat and and a big catalog of this the thing that is very true is that words in sentences that end up in rhyme are very are more easily remembered if you take that if you take that a K.

Frasier Communications Eighty Seven Percent Fifty Eight Percent Twenty Five Years Twenty Four Year Ninety Percent Eight Dollars Six Hours Six Years
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Get arrested if they have an ounce of what I'm gonna rest about that you will still got arrested by the police okay yeah you will still get arrested by the police listen carefully new Nigel will still rest. now whether you are charged by the press is off is a whole different ball of wax. waste of time then doesn't it because it is I mean because it is now the law of course will tell you is that usually it's a marijuana we smell or the joint we throw that leads to something else you can still get prosecuted for all of that and if it is all just sort of like it well basically what we're right near says like what eighty seven percent of the times of his first offender and it's just under under Graham a pot on an ounce of pot they they end up getting dismissed so why should we waste our bodies valuable time bill or invent pressures are you never will be going after no child molesters and that sort of thing now the flip side of that will always be well his prosecutor he shouldn't pick and choose what law he should enforce the law the law okay fine they said we go now we'll model the speed limit go take your after the conversation say Hey I want to take what's coming up on your big show this weekend we have a conversation with my good friend Tom of young who's a former reporter here in Indiana who covers Mike pence I need to just one new book piety and power and also libertarians give a show them love this week in their candy from your swing by what is there want Monday will not Monday thank god almighty Saturdays at one o'clock there we go Abdul Hakeem should vase as always we appreciate it my friend. not bear standing by in the traffic center all right here we look at a north bound for sixty five on the northwest side crash in the eight sixty five energy to live lane is close because I help with the lead here back past eighty six three that's what we're dealing with not quite the seventy nine west bounty sixty five slow ready for four sixty five sixty five and we're down to one lane because of road work in about sixty nine seven of ninety six street eighty second day and more or less of a dragon here in about sixty five from west street down to the north would delay continues that's not too bad you should be mostly up to speed but you're gonna have company down the Fletcher Avenue on the south side was about four sixty five it is low sixty five over to Harding street traffic sponsored by made in America done job first ever made in America trade show held in the damp was October third through the six your invited to be hundreds of U. S. manufacturers at their product is a made in America dot com I've met their father was on Twitter for instant traffic updates at W. why DC traffic.

eighty seven percent eighty second
CBS News poll: Majority of Americans and Democrats approve of Trump impeachment inquiry

The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

CBS News poll: Majority of Americans and Democrats approve of Trump impeachment inquiry

"A new CBS news poll shows the majority of Americans approve of the impeachment inquiry the breakdown is fifty five percent of those surveyed approve and forty five percent disapprove the percentage is much higher among Democrats eighty seven percent approve while only twenty three percent of Republicans approved and among both parties forty one percent of those surveyed view the president's actions on Ukraine as a legal thirty one percent say they were not

President Trump Ukraine CBS Eighty Seven Percent Twenty Three Percent Fifty Five Percent Forty Five Percent Thirty One Percent Forty One Percent
Paying For Faster Internet? Here's a Reality Check

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Paying For Faster Internet? Here's a Reality Check

"Better faster greener super micro resource-saving server and storage systems with intel zeon scalable processors reduce the cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure learn more at super micro dot com. This is tech news news briefing. I'm tanya bustos. Reporting from the newsroom in new york and has heavily reported on there is journal platforms actually an in-depth analysis from the wall street journal final as to whether faster internet is better spoiler alert it is not it's part of the journals broadband project. We're looking into it after these tablets facebook will start giving users more control over what data is shared with the site a step toward a pledge of enhanced privacy the options the company is rolling out a feature called off facebook activity which will let users see information that apps and websites gather on them and then send to facebook people can use the tool to prevent that data from being associated with their facebook accounts with part of its new tool facebook will both screen apps for potentially inappropriate data and allow. I users to report any that slip through netflix will keep gaining subscribers in the u._s. But the streaming content company will lose market share as rivals vols like hulu keep bolstering their old platforms emarketer says overall netflix share in the u._s. Streaming market will fall to eighty six point three percent by twenty any twenty three. That's from ninety percent in two thousand fourteen. That's at a projected eighty. Seven percent this year in july netflix reported its first drop in u._s. Users in nearly nearly a decade the journals mica maiden berg breaks it down at wsj.com electronic arts apex legends should still meet its forecast to amir three hundred to four hundred million dollars in net bookings for fiscal twenty twenty. This is despite recent social media backlash read. It shows us that a small sample all of players this week found that most would like the events main feature the ability to compete solo rather than on a team to become permanent. Most respondents also said they a plan to continue playing apex legends and with that e._a. Shares rise one point eight percent coming up the coal tar truth about faster internet and the underlying question is it worth it better faster greener super micro resource savings server and storage systems with intel zeon scalable processors. Here's reduce the cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure. Learn more at super micro dot com w._s._j. Testing shows typical u. S. households don't use much of their bandwidth while streaming wall street journal studied the internet use of fifty three three of our journalists across the country over a period of months in coordination with researchers at princeton university and the university of chicago the wall street journal's shawnee ramchandran <unk> has more we put a little small computer and of high-powered wifi router and everybody's home and we worked with researchers at the university of chicago and princeton princeton who created the software that would basically study the speeds of big heavy bandwidth streaming applications like netflix that kind of thing and to what we're trying to get at the heart of his do faster speeds give you a better streaming experience because the way that broadband providers sell us us market internet to us a lot of it is around via faster speed so you can have a better better streaming experience at home. We wanted to just test. Is that true. The the study found that beyond speeds of about one hundred megabits per second. You're not gonna see much benefit to getting faster speeds as it pertains to streaming video video. The tests were of the stress variety the results clear what we did was. We had a stress test. Where a bunch which of our journalists streamed seven things at once in their house. <hes> and these are high bandwidth things <hes> live tv streaming services h._b._o. And all all kinds of things and we wanted to see you know how much does this stuff us and at the parts when people were streaming seven things at once they average not more than about out seven megabits per second and here we are being marketed things like one hundred three hundred five hundred a gigabit but we did learn having a faster speed it is technically beneficial. Marginally for important indicators of streaming quality like resolution in startup time having a fast speed only led to marginal benefit for instance for startup delay which is how fast how how long it takes for a video to load after hit play the difference between all the speed. Here's that we had from like fifteen megabits per second to two speeds over two hundred fifty megabits per second we only i saw a difference of less than a second for netflix amazon youtube in terms of startup time so ask yourself. Perhaps is less than a second or fit it. If you ask me kinda you can find the full analysis at wsj.com download the latest episode of the journal to hear more. That's it for the tech news briefing from the newsroom in new york. I'm tanya bustos. Thanks for listening.

Netflix Facebook Wall Street Journal Tanya Bustos Intel New York Wsj.Com University Of Chicago Hulu Amir Princeton University Princeton U. S. Youtube Four Hundred Million Dollars Two Hundred Fifty Megabits One Hundred Megabits Fifteen Megabits
Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:26 min | 1 year ago

Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply u._s. Immigration and customs enforcement needs more space to house undocumented immigrants and increasingly the agency is finding it in rural regions and new analysis by n._p._r. Indicates a majority of detainees are held in rural areas but as n._p._r.'s yuki noguchi reports those detained in far flung places also have a much harder time finding lawyers and are far more likely to be deported. It took ten and a half months for you. L. alonzo to meet with a lawyer alonzo had turned himself over to immigration officials in laredo texas seeking asylum from cuba last october since then he's been detained in two rural facilities i in louisiana and now in adams tmz county mississippi about a two hour drive from baton rouge alonzo's wife. Madonna's rodriguez is a permanent u._s. resident. She lives in southern florida with their two children the n._b._a. N._b._a. leary very far from anything. She says too far to afford hiring. A private attorney. Lack of legal help is one of many challenges for undocumented undocumented immigrants and an even bigger problem for those detained in remote locations yet. Ice is adding detention facilities far from cities over half fifty. The two percent of detainees are held in rural areas according to n._p._r.'s analysis of ice data and that rate is increasing. Liz martinez is a board member of advocacy z. Group freedom for immigrants. It's very concerning trend that immigration detention is moving to rural areas remote areas where it makes it so much harder for a person in detention to get the support that they need detainees in urban areas or at least four times more likely to find attorneys to represent them. According to a two thousand fifteen university of pennsylvania ovadia law review study last year the southern poverty law center sudeiss and its parent agency the department of homeland security the civil rights group alleges the government is deliberately liberally detaining people in rural areas far from legal resources is which currently detains nearly fifty six thousand people declined comment on that case in in an emailed statement an ice spokesman says the agency looks at airports healthcare and legal resources when selecting facilities he also says detainees have access to phones and video teleconferencing and can meet with lawyers during visiting hours but many immigration attorneys complained rural facilities lack necessary resources there aren't enough. The phones are translators. Call connections are poor. Visiting hours are too restrictive and it's simply too far to travel. You'll alonzo's wife has been able to visit him. Only only once alonzo was recently diagnosed with lung cancer which makes the weight more excruciating. He eventually found a lawyer one of the rare detainees with free three representation but his wife says his asylum request and to request for parole have been denied grumpy what more could a wife with a sick husband one other seven to be with him at the very least i want to offer him my support and for my children's offer support one of the key reasons detainees are held in remote regions appears to be the money cheap labor cheap land. Lauren rich eisen is acting director of the brennan center justice program. She says many rural areas viewed prisons as job. Engines hundreds hundreds of new facilities were built in the nineteen ninety. S inmate population peaked then declined leaving lots of empty beds. Ice is now contracting with those rural prisons. It needs those beds as it continues to detain more immigrants. Just last week is arrested. Nearly seven hundred workers at food processing plants in mississippi loyola university law professor andrew armstrong says she sees that happening across louisiana win. The criminal justice reforms were enacted that left empty not beds that were ripe for contracting with ice. Those contracts can be lucrative. The state pays local sheriff's twenty four dollars and thirty nine cents a day to house an inmate eight by comparison ice pays five times that an average daily rate of more than one hundred twenty six dollars is confirmed it recently opened eight new detention and facilities seven of which are in louisiana all but one of them are in sparsely-populated areas. Lisa lehner is director of americans for immigrant justice. She represents detainees in glades county florida about one hundred miles from miami. Glades is the state's fourth least populated county surrounded by acres of sugarcane infield. I've never seen immigration attorney up there. You've never seen one never detainees there. She says are tweeted like hardened. Criminals glades aids has been the subject of a number of complaints and lawsuits they allege everything from misuse of pepper spray and solitary confinement to religious persecution later argues conditions are worse in rural facilities in part because fewer people can observe what's happening by contrast. She says when a brooklyn new york ice facility lost not for a week during a cold snap in january there was an outcry and if there's going in and out you would imagine that the people who are detaining immigrants are going to behave in a more careful way. It's not just that treatment might differ immigration courts in rural areas denied. Many more asylum cases sending detainees back back to their home countries. N._p._r.'s analysis of research from syracuse university found judges in rural immigration courts denied eighty seven percent of asylum cases compared to just over half an urban courts. Romi learner is associate director of the immigration clinic at the university of miami's law school. It is an issue because it means if you got a bad bucks. I think the team isn't a certain facility then you're almost guaranteed to be deported mississippi detainee. You'll alonzo hopes to beat those odds. He's appealing feeling his case for asylum and hopes to reunite with his family. You can gucci n._p._r. News this message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor comcast business gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary ordinary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com.

L. Alonzo Louisiana N._P._R. Comcast Attorney Florida Lauren Rich Eisen Glades County Florida Adams Tmz County Mississippi Yuki Noguchi Liz Martinez Leary Mississippi University Of Pennsylvania Texas Mississippi Loyola University Religious Persecution Miami Madonna
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Did thirty seven percent of black people are shocked by the blacks are murdered by the blast she gave me a corrected it tell you to Haiti eighty seven percent of white people shot or murder of the white people Adam Scott and so in essence this go around as if there's a difference between who feels that former I've been in the situation we have in this country still that's interesting because at the end of the day somebody getting shot is somebody getting shot dead matter what color you are if you're the shooter or the victim right and so this is you know I I'd be into this happens in the back of meetings and I know my coming back from somebody with the other thing I'd like to say is this guy walking around the Walmart what a weapon after what has happened there's a reason why they should be common sense gun regulation because if you have been blocked the once a day and yeah but death that there could be so insensitive or so careless to do that and and and just shows you the sense of the need to have our we had a background check people turned on you staying open Kerry said not carry over into public places such as Walmart movie theaters alas it made a difference to what to get the weapon he have body armor trying to imitate one of these people out here doing the stand and get people killed if you feel that once you start how to discriminate against who's who lives there yeah college don't have any names on and we know that all too well in our community you know people you know what people get hit innocent people get in a drive by after driving by when you pull the trigger you already passed your target interesting though yeah yeah because I got a run away I got to take a break out again I got to catch traffic at this point but you know what you're writing it bugs me because a lot of these people with these guns don't know how to use them they don't know how to shoot absolutely not Hey Phil thanks for coming on I was a very easily HM Happy Birthday thank you it is ten twenty five brought to you by about a Chevrolet celebrating their grand opening in beaver father now Hey Kathy Ireland we have a major problem for folks over on the parkway east.

murder Walmart Kerry Kathy Ireland Haiti Adam Scott Phil eighty seven percent thirty seven percent
Japan's Inflation Gamble

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Japan's Inflation Gamble

"Episode is about monetary policy. Not just any monetary policy. The future of monetary policy, there is one country that is leaps and bounds ahead of anyone else in experimenting with this future. And it's Japan the late eighties. It was boomtime the stock market the property market. They were all on fire the gardens around the Japanese imperial palace were valued at higher than all of the real estate in California. Of course, the boom, did not last forever. The nineteen nineties brought a really hard reality check to Japan. The stock market fell drastically. Commercial real estate prices fell eighty seven percent from their peak. Yeah. And banks and companies started using all of their money to pay down dead and covered their losses instead of using that money to invest in new things. I talked to Richard COO, the chief economist at the no more research institute. He told me the economic damage was worse than that of the great depression amount. Of wealth, Japanese lost result of what happened to us values with three times the value of Japan's nineteen Eighty-nine GDP in the case of United States. It was one year's worth of nine hundred twenty nine hundred so our damage was re times larger this period, the bursting of this huge asset bubble led to one of communists, worst fears, namely deflation, that's falling prices. When prices start falling, people stop buying things like saying you need a new washing machine Stacey, but you think it'll be cheaper next month. You'd wait, right? Yes, I would. And then people stop buying washing machines and washing machine companies make less money and they lay off workers, or they go out of business. And that leads to even less spending, and more deflation. So all of that. That's why economists call this a deflationary spiral because once you get in it, it's really hard to get out. It's really damaging for an economy. I'm Pamela Boyko,

Japan Richard Coo Pamela Boyko Chief Economist California United States Stacey Eighty Seven Percent One Year
End of Ramadan in Indonesia

Correspondents Report

05:58 min | 1 year ago

End of Ramadan in Indonesia

"Najib Carter is one of the world's great cities twenty to thirty million people with some of the world's worst traffic. And yet for a week or two every year, it suddenly empties as much of the population heads home towns and villages to celebrate the end of Ramadan and just as Christmas affects virtually everyone in Australia non Muslims in Indonesia, find themselves immersed in Ramadan in unexpected ways, his Indonesia correspondent, and Baka just over a week ago, a covered in my kitchen, suddenly Philip Haas when without warning the door came off its hinges and almost brought the pantry down with everything in it within a day. Also, a single tradesman mass Yudi arrived to rebuild the pantry and secure all the surrounding cupboards back on the wool. My natural. Instinct was to offer him a Cup of coffee, some water or something to each but he gently reminded me with a smile on his face that he was fasting. It was Ramadan. And he couldn't eat or dry. Rink even a drop of water till after sunset, not even a cigarette I felt stupid for forgetting and guilty for even expecting such a job to be done by someone who hadn't eaten or drunk things since five AM. It's not like this was the first time I'd experienced Ramadan at previously, spent three and a half years living in the Middle East surrounded by both Muslims and Jews who fast different times of the year. But I've never experienced Ramadan as I have in Indonesia. This is after all the world's biggest Muslim country where eighty seven percent of its two hundred sixty five million people in Muslim, and the vast majority take part in the rituals of Ramadan. That means rising before dawn to eat, as solid breakfast and naughty, eating, or drinking, a drop until after dark, the thirty days fast is meant to bring Muslims closer to God and without the distraction of food is supposedly a time for deeper religious. Flick Shen and prayer, and in an office likely ABC's in Jakarta. It means all of us was limo nor take part in our own way. Those of us, not fasting, of course, respect and try to support those who are at the most obvious level. It means not eating or flaunting food in front of those who are fasting instead of asking Al lunch lady who leehar to pop out at midday to bias food, we discretely go out to eat L elsewhere. And of course, many shops, and cafes a closed during the day, often they have cushions drawn or newspaper plastic over the windows to hide any sign of food at Jakarta's main airport. There are lodge cloth screens positioned around restaurants. So those in the departure lounges aren't distracted by people gorging on snacks, or drinks inside and undoubtedly, many of those making or serving the food, our Muslim and presumably fasting themselves even at night. When fasting is over. There are other rituals to can. Consider staff often leave work early because taxes suddenly skis, as Muslims everywhere, rush home before sunset to break the fast cabs that still run a now twice the price some entertainment venues, like karaoke, bars and massage parlors a close altogether for the entirety of Ramadan, which after all is about learning to resist not only food and drink, but other human pleasures like alcohol sakes, even smoking restaurants instead, serve wine, spirits. Oh beer in a paper Cup. So as not to offend Muslims, who may still eat there, including those who even drink alcohol normally, but choose to abstain during Ramadan as someone who's always lacked discipline when it comes to dieting food. I struggle if I miss out on breakfast, I constantly marvel at how so many millions of people from the very young to the very old managed to fast for a full month every year, and yet, colleagues and friends universal. Tell me they love Ramadan. They take pride in the self-discipline of going without food for twelve or Morales a day, and the religious devotion that entails they relished, the delicious feasts, they eat at the end of each day and above all, they love the deep sense of community that Ramadan brings when they celebrate the Buca plaza or breaking the fast with family and friends every night. One of my colleagues a shoes me he looks forward to the rigor of Ramadan every year. And he's always saddened when it's over, because he misses as communal faced and life returns to the usual routine of eating indeed overeating all day long. And of course, Ramadan ends with Edo fee tree known as lebaron in Indonesia, which is the greatest feast of all time when Muslims eat and drink the best meals of the year. It's the equivalent of Christmas for Christians. When families come together to celebrate with food, drink fireworks and partying, and of course. Prayer. It's also in most Indonesians take a week's leave in Jakarta alone. Millions of people leave on mass for their hometowns in far-flung parts of the country extra flights and buses a put on Jakarta, virtually empties for a week or two. It's notorious traffic for a brief time becomes almost bearable businesses and shopping malls that rarely shot a closed for a few days of the year. It's not so good for the economy, perhaps, but enriching for the soul. And so as I stand in my kitchen, admiring, the newly built cupboards with their shows full of food. I think of mass UD the tradesmen, who spent hours working to repair them without any food or drink. I admire his discipline and devotion. And I imagine him now at home with his family and friends, enjoying the best food of his life. Well earned taka Indonesia correspondent, and Baka there reporting from Jakarta.

Jakarta Indonesia Najib Carter Taka Indonesia Philip Haas Middle East Australia Rink AL ABC Buca Plaza Shen Morales Lebaron Eighty Seven Percent Thirty Days
How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

The Big Story

09:02 min | 1 year ago

How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

"There are lots of myths, and lies and assumptions at their regarding abortions, especially these days, especially in the United States, where things are not going great right now for those who believe and a woman's right to choose what she does with her own body. The dominoes keep falling in the Bush to overturn Roe v. Wade, the Ohio governor signing today would critics condemn as the most restrictive abortion law in the country today. Missouri became the latest state to pass one of the order now becomes the third state since March to sign your loan, thirteen other states have introduced or advanced similar legislation to Alabama the lead. Est battleground in the newly energized abortion. But there is one myth in particular, that we need to talk about. And it's not about the medical procedure or who gets them or when or why it's about the people who oppose access to abortion. And this myth concerns, Canadians to it's very easy to look at the old white faces of the men in power in America who are imposing restrictive state laws and viewed them as the face of the anti-abortion movement. And that's fair. But it is not the whole story. And what you think you know about who exactly is out there in front of clinics or at their marches for life is probably wrong. So if you're a person who believes in the right to choose. And in the progress that has been made on that front over the decades, then it's important for you to take a really hard look at who is pushing the anti-choice agenda, and where they're doing their recruiting. I'm Jordan Rawlings. And this is the big story, Sydney Loni is a freelance journalist, she investigated the anti-abortion movement in Canada for flare dot com. Hi, said, hi, let's start with general question, how supportive are we of rate to choice in Canada? I always thought we were very supportive in this sort of non-issue. There was a poll in two thousand seventeen that found seventy seven percent of Canadians support pro choice, and that's a pretty good number. I thought it was on a low side. And if you compared to other countries like, France, it's actually eighty six in Sweden's eighty seven percent and support. So we're, we're still and we have a little ways to go. What is the typical image of the pro-life abortion activists anti-abortion activists in Canada? Gentleness conception out there that sort of, you know, angry white men yelling at side, abortion clinics. And when I did this piece, and I spoke to many anti-abortion. Vists. That's what they said that they wanted to sort of dispel, that myth at. That's what they are. And but I think that it's sort of persistent. We think that sort of a small fringe group. I know you know, when I was in university. It'd be the handful of people walk by maybe five or six people with signs you kinda give them wide berth, because there is sort of seen as these kind of weird outliers. And I don't think that that's the case anymore. What's changing, I think the biggest thing surprised me the most too, is just sort of the, the size of the movement now and the youth of the movement. It's, it's not it's, it's young educated women women university. Many of them when Wednesday spoke to many of the women, I spoke to are pursuing careers in healthcare, and that also surprised me, but these are sort of young articulate s- university, educated women. How do they come by these views because that does seem really in congress to me? Yeah. And that's a good question. I think one of the women, I spoke to some of it is based on religion. They've been brought up with these views and they say that their family is also PR. Prolife, but many, you know, in highschool, they've sort of set of tapped into this, and it sort of resonated with them. Many women, I spoke to said that they saw as being cool movement whereas really years ago. Yeah. Years ago, you know, the said that being pro pro choice was sort of the default everyone, you know, their grandparents are now pro-choice, and they see this sort of rebellious the new rebellion movement and whereas before it was cool to be pro choice. Now, they say it's cool to be pro life that seems so strange to, to be honest. Handle telegraphing my head around that one as well. But yeah, I think a lot of us who are pro choice or just in general progressive people. They see you, as the future of their movement. Right. Outta your member after the shooting and park land, Florida last year. There was this whole movement from these teens and the, the message around them from adults was youth. They're going to save us. Right. And, and it seems like you know, we see young kids fighting climate change and speaking out against racism, and I feel like abortion, just gets lumped in there, too. And maybe it shouldn't. Yeah, I, I think maybe I think maybe we've become complacent about it. I mean I certainly had no idea how big this movement was earlier in may that the March for life, which I'd never actually even wasn't really on my radar took place. And that sort of where I interviewed on these women who are preparing to go the March, and they're excited about the March when young woman, I interviewed was hosting a gala at in Victoria, the university after the March. So it's like a big it's a big cool party and the March started in nineteen ninety eight and were. Seven hundred participants in this last year, they were fifteen thousand and that's only an Ottawa. So the marches all over your city across the country, and it just shows the size of the growing Amenam of this movement. Tell me about a couple of the young women, you've met, if there are any who stand, particularly to you, and what they're like. Yeah. I think one woman in particular, she's she's eighteen eighteen and she was her first March. And she was just like a kid going on a trip. She was really excited about it. It was her first she's, she just graduated from high school. Her family is she told me was also antiabortion, but she was excited to be other people, our age who share those views, and she wanted to be part of the movement, and wanted to possibly in the future, maybe intern at some of these organizations. And that's the other thing is a lot of these groups have interns, who start very young and use of Ashby, where these people are coming from. They start out, you know, they were being recruited in high school to, to come into the offices and work there. And then they end up also out on the streets holding the signs. And the things that we do. See that was actually my next question is, is this, a conscious effort by anti-abortion organizations to get younger? I would say so definitely and even the place to everyone, who I talked to said that they had I'm been exposed to these ideas in high school and in some schools, one of the women, I didn't end up talking to her article, had followed her, and we had talked a little bit, but she actually goes into high schools and does talks about, you know, the antiabortion movement. And so there's that aspect as well. What are pro choice organizations doing to try to? They must see the tide turning than I, I don't know, if the thought that the right metaphor being possibly one woman, I spoke to was very concerned in and she had no when she found out, she wasn't an activist didn't think of his office when before the March for life. But then this was the first year that there was one in Toronto as well. And that kind of freaked her out a bit. And so she organized a counter protest in got on Facebook and got all these people involved to come out of warn people was happening part of it, and also to sort of. Have a have a voice for the other side for the pro choice side, and another woman in Berta longtime activists said that. Yes, there is momentum and that the people who are active in the movement are doing whatever they can about it. But the society is a whole has become a little bit on the complacence. I we don't really haven't really isn't on our radar, and we look so th and think, oh, that could never happen here. And I think the concern is, you know, if it can happen there, I can happen anywhere and you we have some very vocal pro-life politicians who've been elected, and people are electing them despite having them holding these views. So that is an issue. We did a podcast last week about Sam who Stor off who's, obviously interesting not female, but very young. And very vocally anti-abortion, and when we talk about this stuff, even people who are critics of him say, they would never actually change the law. Stephen Harper didn't change the laws. Andrew Scheer has no plans to change the laws. Right. So there is. It's not necessarily complacency. But there just seems to be a thought that this is a done deal. Right. I think that's maybe dangerous thought I think that the anti-abortion people spoke to said that their goal was to, to support pro life politicians into get into show them that they have a huge movement behind them, but there's also this sort of more insidious things terms of, you know, our, our side in tarot back to the nineties, and we're taking steps back everywhere else in related ways. And just how hard it is for women to access abortion in Canada. I think people don't necessarily realize that I mean, you've only been only got one MP is nineteen thousand seventeen and in other provinces. Well, it's not it's not easy there. It's hard to find clinics to find train doctors long wait times. So it's a lot of barriers that,

Canada United States Missouri America Alabama Intern Ohio Wade Bush Jordan Rawlings Facebook Sydney Loni Congress Andrew Scheer Stephen Harper ROE France Florida Sweden
University Of Iowa College Of Public Health And Eighty Seven Percent discussed on Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

University Of Iowa College Of Public Health And Eighty Seven Percent discussed on Rush Limbaugh

"Finding that skipping breakfast could actually kill you. The study from the university of Iowa college of public health says that people who never eat breakfast have an eighty seven percent higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease compared to people who eat breakfast every day. The study examined nutrition data from sixty five hundred people in the nineteen eighties and nineties researchers say people who skip breakfast tend to be

University Of Iowa College Of Eighty Seven Percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

"For two fifty one which is eighty seven percent, technically eighty six point nine. Yet. No, you can't do offense better than that. How many attempts life like a like a solid number temps again? It was a thirty eight so on seven attempts to game so get into too, and it's like okay for the most part, if if quotas any other kind of defender, it's still Durant wash. But because he I think he's another show. Like now, I just I'm gonna play defense in the playoffs when it matters. Although to be fair. I don't know like Jimmy Butler has been fine offensively. I don't know who is the only one guarding. I'm probably isn't good. Regain one struggle was a game. Came game. Yeah. Game on and I've been gained through your game too. He could I think it'd been fine since game two at thirty game three at twenty two and then game for twenty nine butlers listed as taller and bigger than Coa. But when they're that doesn't feel correct. Yeah. That's what butlers Lissette six eight to thirty two. So what would you say who is it? Butler six eight to thirty two. I mean, I think Kawais like an actual six eight I think Jimmy six eight because he's got like the taller hair. I don't think he's actually six eight. Their weight feels pretty even to me. Pawar six seven to thirty and other. While I was like six six. He's just never he's crazy arms. And right marts..

Jimmy Butler Pawar Durant eighty seven percent
Apparently skipping breakfast could be bad for your heart

Watchdog on Wallstreet

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Apparently skipping breakfast could be bad for your heart

"Johnson. You might wanna think twice about skipping breakfast. Whether you eat breakfast could be linked to a higher risk of dying from heart disease. That's according to a new study published in the journal of the American college of cardiology, researchers found that people who never eat breakfast had an eighty seven percent higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease compared with people who start each day with a meal. Researchers say the link was significant an independent of socio economic status body mass index and cardiovascular risk the authors say the research provides evidence to that breakfast may in fact, be the most important meal of the day. Researchers stay the study links skipping breakfast, heart disease, risk factors, like diabetes, hypertension, and lipid disorders. Some studies suggest intermittent fasting can reduce the risk of obesity and its related diseases such as diabetes and

Diabetes Journal Of The American Colleg Obesity Eighty Seven Percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Recode Decode

"For office without relying on the traditional big donors and the party machines. So the when they get elected, they wouldn't be dependent on anyone other than that constituency wire. Well, yeah. And just to sort of enable small donors mall, donors had a great success. Obama had great success was moved on his buddy, so does. That's great for the big presidential campaigns. The idea was to bring that that energy and dynamism of the small donor movement to every race, not just federal, but state and local as well. A lot of people doing different candidates have different success with that. Exactly. So we were platform to enable that. And we started out very strongly of the view that we ought to be a non-partisan platforms, all kind of position. And when we lost both, that's what crab Polk was. Right at the beginning. Actually, everyone said to me, that's crazy. That's not how politics works in America. You're gonna have to pick a side. You won't be able to make the nonpartisan thing work because there'll be suspicion of you on both sides, right? And that basically turned out to be true. So I'm pleased to say that crap back has done really well in this cycle particularly. But as you could predict the energy in terms of small donors and people running for office and the kind of independent minded person, I news not belittle hack who hasn't done it before. That's basically all been on the left. And so we looked at the data and basically followed the user and it turned out that I think the last time I saw the numbers when I basically stepped down as CEO earlier in the year, I think it was eighty seven percent of the candidates on crop Packwood Democrats democratic or right, and and more than like, ninety four percent of the dollars raised were on the left I left and so. It just increasingly on tenable for me to be heading up. You're not increasingly on the left. Exactly. And so we made the strategic decision would they just say, get this? No, I, you initiated the process because it was clear that actually crowd peck success was being held back by the fact that the CEO was identified as being on the right, and I think that the and so we went through initiated a process which was a senior management and the board and said, I think it makes sense. I just create partisan fundraising organization that's Newark crop now, so it. So we took a strategic decision to officially become a progressive left leaning organization and actually removed the small number of Republican candidates from a handful and they sort of lefty Republicans, there was slightly. No, I would say those more sort of crazy side. Okay. I know you might challenge that times being smoke room. Yeah. Challenge that right these days, everyone has a chance to go crazy for a while, but so you so you left that was this, how do you look at it as success? Because you also wanted to be an information vehicle that was an initial? I think we typical kind of tech. Mistake, frankly, I think looking back on it, but but you learn from them was that I think we wanted to do too many things we didn't have sufficient focus. So so originally, I mean, the initial idea, the very first idea that I pitched to investors when I was doing the rounds was, was this very focused crowd funding platform. I literally my sort of stupid elevator pitch line was kicked off a politics. That was the phrase very much focused on on the crowd funding..

Packwood Democrats CEO Obama Newark Polk America eighty seven percent ninety four percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"Room and found. Doing this crazy, just just experience it on your own and go well, cool. We're just so cool hetero there's an eighty year old out, just blew their minds. Have my phone charging in one room and the TV, which by the way, I don't want to get into too much detail about how mine works, but it's plugged in all the time. There's no problem. Right? And this making fun of me. She just use the kindle for the first time because I'm reading for the first time. So she's a menu cool shit into this for old people. People who use those anyway. So welcome. Making fun of me for reading with technology. Zoellick sites. Do you know you don't even have to check what page you're on to know how good your over eating percent. The book you're done with. It's so funny because I am reading my first book on a kindle, and in three days I got to like eighty seven percent, and I'm like, do I read faster when it's percent? I'm an asshole. If this my juru tes. You can highlight a word thick gives you a definition while you're reading regular book. Yeah, I don't like that. Everyone started telling me that they knew the words. Wondering how short this book was we reading it? Was it a pamphlet? Was it a pamphlet. Eighty seven percent of three days. This thing I'm like, oh, I'm not holding the book. This book could be thirty pages and I'm so excited. The book is the four agreements, Dan Soder last time he was on here. He recommended highly. It's been on my list for a while. It was like a self help kind of thing. Yeah, he's always got a good one. I got a recommended books to me before and they're always thought him. All right. Actually. Yes, turn clinch. Now is it is it is a really good book. It tells you like to, okay. I've been reading a lot of these books and I'm like, okay, that's pretty much says the same thing. Everybody else says, which is what yourself. Well, this one more focuses on. Okay. So you're original agreements, the four agreements, which is like the new ones you original agreements was what you grew up with. So you were an empty canvas and your parents gave you some stuff and you're like, oh, that's how the world works. I agree with that and you continue going, God told you some stuff, you know the church and your teachers. Then when you grow older, if you don't start questioning that with these four new agreements, then you're stuck in this old life. And like, for example, if you're getting mistreated, it's because you're already talking to yourself. So shitty that a person can mistreat you up until how you mistreat yourself. So if I think that let's am dirtball people treat me like dirt ball, but if they treat me like a fucking asshole. That's a little past how bad I feel about myself and that's when I'll break it up. So as bad as you feel about you, that's how bad people will treat you in. You'll break it off when they push even your boundaries of how shit you are to yourself. This is one of the things I'll tell you all the things to say. Just google. That's how on eighty seven percent it just for me, I'm just reading four literal agreement, speak with integrity, impeccable with your words. Don't take anything personally. The second one, third one, I don't make a sumptious. Fourth, always do your best and then surprise the a bonus. One always with these fucks the six pillars of self esteem, there was a seven Hiller just I was like, oh, I'm almost done with this. No, seven Hiller live in the now live in the now take that with you. Yeah, but it seems like all the four agreements will make you live in the now. Does that make sense? Makes to matzo by the way spoiler that's in the last thirteen percent to. All right. What do you think people are doing right now with technology? Can't wait to see in six years. Oh, what are you doing out there? But they have holograms TV like an asshole. And do you think eventually we will be like in that black mirror will be hanging out by ourselves, but we can turn on a display like where with other people. So this could be a hologram or however virtual reality. And we could look like we're sitting here, but we're each in our own rooms in our own home, and we meet in this virtual place that looks like this..

Dan Soder Hiller google Zoellick eighty seven percent three days Eighty seven percent thirteen percent eighty year six years
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Are low the stats that you quoted in the story or scary you called researchers from the university of illinois and ohio state talking about like an eighty seven percent drop in income for some of these grain farms right yes and i believe that was you know that was an average through the next four years and when the when incomes drop a as we pointed out in the story that also is going to have an impact on both on the app within a within a farm operation and also on farmland prices so so you know across the board you're right either either very concerning numbers that people are looking at well we're speaking with wall street journal reporter jesse newman she covers agriculture her piece is called trade fight threatens farm belt businesses the farmers for free trade this advocacy group you talk about in the story what are they after so they are rolling out all kinds of key and web advertisements that are being run both in washington dc with you know an intended audience of of one really not being president trump and also in you know in in world media outlets for for lawmakers to see they you know they've just been warning about the potentially really harmful consequences of these trade battles for farmer then you know they're hoping they're hoping that that you know the us school start to try to negotiate some of the differences that we have with our trading partners day they want to see a successful renegotiation of nafta and you know they they want an end to this sort of kit for tat tariffs site that that we have you know how successful their advocacy is you know remains to be seen but they are just very very anxious for you know for an end to to all of the all of the duties i don't want to put words in their mouth but is this sort of they're hoping for that that's short term pain equals longterm game here well i mean i you know they don't really want to see the short term pain i mean they would like to see a lot of negotiated successfully without having to resort to tariffs but i will say that there are farmers themselves who who say you know who who say something like that they say look you know i'm willing to sort of take it on the chin for a little while if this benefits either the agricultural sector or even some say you know the us economy of the whole long run day many many farmers still support the way that the trump administration is going about this they they look nakas should be modernized and we've got to shrink the us trade deficit with partners particularly china and you know they talk about unfair trade practices and so they just you know they think that this is the president sort of doing his thing the negotiator and you know they're hopeful that everybody wins the america wins in the long run i think the question really is for how long that attitude will be sustained wall street journal agriculture reporter jesse newman twenty minutes now in front of the hour on.

eighty seven percent twenty minutes four years
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGTK

"So that's that's the question i am by again why did i raise the trump issue because i think all of this is a result of donald trump winning nothing succeeds like success the republicans against their better instincts actually succeeded with the only candidate who would have won the last election now i can't prove it i can only tell you the fact is he did win the last election and you know what the new york times had i had it up on my computer i lost it i have to find it again on the day of the election the new york times gave hillary clinton in eighty seven percent chance of winning eighty seven percent is very close to it is as certain as the sun rising in the east tomorrow okay the sun rising in the east tomorrow is one hundred hillary clinton was thirteen away from the certitude that that the sun rises in the east and she lost right right james in greenville south carolina hey how you doing all right is that i think you're kinda stereotype into people that disagree with you you think they disagree with you then like they must be unhappy if somebody's on the other side of positions that are you know going for disagreeing with you so now you can get in on in their regular life is being happy i can say that a blessing clinic antiabortion is unhappy because that's all i know them from i don't know that from anything else.

new york times hillary clinton south carolina donald trump greenville eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"I i did my treatment than i supposedly cured but it could come back its ridiculous rare for to comeback mmhmm so it's interest me but it doesn't the home are you a little leery i am i am to an end one of the reasons is it says it's a tumor specific activated tcell moon well one i have aids reiterated her husband's knows that by now and one the what aides does actually is kill your tcells the hiv virus destroys your t cells so i have a very low number of tcells in my body to begin with compared to most people i wonder how this would react and somebody like me would if i already have a low number of tcells will it make my tcells more effective against everything or does answer or okay so here's what they waiting on that i and what was said this is ronald levy i the senior author of the study he said that thai while the okay he so i he basically said with nearby immune cells to amplify a receptor on the surface of tcells while the other agent is an anti body that binds with a tcell receptor to lead the charge against the cancer cell so it is these as tumor specific activated tcells that go on to search and destroy mission for the other identical tumors in the body so of the ninety ninety mice eighty seven percent of them had tcells that worked on the specific tumor targeted so i know that this may possibly be good news i don't know why they're attaching vaccine to this bosom i'm surprised or not just saying cancer care you notable or treatment of sleep and so i you know i i i actually think we we had the ability to solve cancer decades ago but uh big pharma didn't like it so much on and so we live in the nature of the amount of vaccines that have been touted our way and that have had dangerous consequences my first reaction to this is don't get too excited until we actually see what this is really going to do in in real life and how many people to really get help and do would you sign up for this immediately not me i wouldn't would you go okay why because hey this looks good riot.

ronald levy eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1A

"But almost sixty percent eighty seven percent have two or fewer now net neutrality is necessary because of this lack of competition in one of your former callers talked about europe while europe actually adopted a policy we got rid of in two thousand two which requires dominant providers dominant broadband providers to open up their networks to competitors and when we had that in the early arts in the late 90s the average american had access to thirteen different internet service providers now you're lucky if you have to david in west lafayette indiana david what's on your mind well i have not made up my do food in about birther issue but i didn't want to comment on the the the criticism over not being public hearings with commission i i think that that really is immaterial i have commented to the commission on issues over the years summed using the postal service but last time i heard comments on something that conversion was considering i use the internet and i think that too far far more people can and have commented on this issue without the need to show up at public hearings something i certainly could not do if they had david thanks for calling in with igc what about them or two points number one is chairman pie has said point blank i don't care about the one page public comments that people have submitted to the fcc i only care about the comments that are filed by lawyers and law firms so sir maybe you submitted your comment but i betcha chairman pie doesn't really care about it that's number one number two i have understood that they are congressional offices that are getting more calls on net neutrality than the are on the tax bill this is an issue of public importance broadband is critical to full participation in our society our culture and our economy so yes there should be public hearings both in congress and at the fcc and the fcc should not vote.

europe internet service providers indiana the commission fcc congress david west lafayette chairman law firms eighty seven percent sixty percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on The Film Vault

"I guess what's his face i think it more crime lords like like it was his face and javier are by dan he he's he's ecu crime worked for sure about that specifically drugs okay anyway bad santa two is on my list last year that was ridiculous and i never in butter seehanat foolish for putting another this year fellow feels like the snowman is going to be moved to seeing that's a very very badly yourself a favor and do that do this domain do the nazi do the nazism and well so far so good last year number two my list month fall preview a monster calls i told you do i told you why what are you doing what i told him that it's just ahead on how much there 2016 directed by j biota director of the impossible the much better the impossible why would you isis after you go hold your faithful costa sitting here saying nears they don't waste your time i don't like to have things lingering like i finally solve a council are because unlike things a lingering on the list that it's like i was excited to see it's a one point and i will tell you this eighty seven percent rotten tomatoes at foolish whether it's foolish i did so i was like well this is of bearable or observe your rotten tomatoes means more to them than me please i for children i like children avid child the you watch it with each other i didn't care what are you doing starring lewis mcdougal he is a young man who serve the film felicity jones sigourney weaver and the voice of liam neissen lisa nieces despite his summer 23rd police in these eighty seven percent rugby made as a gross just three point seven million against a budget of get this forty three million dollars a very heavy heavy special effects movie how much that amac.

director liam javier dan ecu lewis mcdougal felicity jones sigourney weaver eighty seven percent forty three million dollars
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Ins and it's like while we do have so many things that are so irradiating and so many problems that we can focus on every day those huge things that way bigger than anything we've even talked about i mean think about this we we would we'll talk for days and days and days about a terrorist attack that killed people and it's horrible may have to stop it in his it's a big deal i'm not saying it's not but i mean we'll talk about that for days and we'll never even mentioned something like that yeah it your millions of children millions of children every year are surviving that used to just die for no reason other than we couldn't feed though if you remember memorize we gave you the stats that in 1830 1830 was at eighty seven percent of the population or ninety three percent oh is ninety eight percent i think in 1820 wasn't it yes lived in extreme poverty ray out at the way it was extreme poverty he was around ninety it was really close to 100 percent it was around ninety percent k extreme poverty that number is now down globally to nine point seven that hello it's a miracle is a miracle salute miracle and it's something that we never think about because it's happened slowly a the you know there's no like in a i remember johnston muscle did a report on this a long time ago about when they fired a tire factory a town and they'll they'll closed down a factory and it's obviously a big deal and what happens is all the news local news organizations go to that factory in.

johnston eighty seven percent ninety eight percent ninety three percent ninety percent 100 percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"That are so irradiating and so many problems that we can focus on every day those huge things that's way bigger than anything we've even talked about i mean think about this we we would we'll talk for days and days and days about a terrorist attack that killed people on it's horrible we have to stop it in his it's a big deal i'm not saying it's not but i mean we'll talk about that for days and we'll never even mentioned something like that yeah he your millions of children millions of children every year are surviving that used to just die for no reason other than we couldn't feed though if you remember lays we gave you the stats that in 1830 1830 was it eighty seven percent of the population or ninety three percent oh is ninety eight percent i think in 1820 was an yes something that lived in extreme poverty ray out at the way it was extreme poverty he was around ninety it was really close to 100 percent it was around ninety percent k extreme poverty that number is now down globally to nine point seven that hello it's a miracle is in miracle absolute miracle and it's something that we never think about because it's happened slowly a the you know there's no like i remember john startled at a report on this a long time ago about when they fired a tire factor in a town and you know the they'll closed down a factory and it's obviously a big deal and what happens is all the news local news organizations go to that factory in everyone's walking out with boxes of their stuff and they're carrying out all their belongings they're crying they've lost their livelihood terrible terrible tragedy and it's easy way.

john eighty seven percent ninety eight percent ninety three percent ninety percent 100 percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"You top mine we've frame mad is the greatest day ever eighty seven percent eighty seven percent as correct god i socket pick in games now here's my dang i lost that game i dug tennessee and the southern georgia winning a close game if you watch game day from uh and and i do once in a while like catch the last 30 minutes at it right when i'm back from basketball mafia with a huge effort on saturday carver i should have seen him can i just say that was the best you've ever played in your life and you know it was doubling the burgers i've heard i've had the last you ever had playing with me then that i any that some good games in a league games but name one day ever heard that you've dominated like you did on saturday because i i gave you the ball 100 times never as much that dominated on this tell me i didn't feed you one basket after the next i just kept finding out who did i could get in albany kept him the ball and i was certain so it all worked out i was like a point guard on saturday you were so here's my dang if you watch a game down saturday i think a herbie as they call him he said the dow will be a close game friday i said i got it would be a close game 'cause i gained neiland stadium rocks everybody of the drunk it's always a great atmosphere and it's always a war georgia tennessee its automatic right but day got slaughtered i mean day god slaughtered so if forty one nothing right so you're telling me that people weren't at that game in that stadium sand boeing and fight fire this guy much jones he was fired in my opinion on saturday is he not dad made their now he's got to be dead i mean he's dead as i had he's like a like a dead fish in the water is he not probably as i mean they were you thing about get rid of him years pass oh he's got liaoyang's last a little longer last a little more keeps getting a little archer no chance came like that definitely in college football knocked uri i mean i think it's overreaction to one game we try to build a programme it takes time but when you.

tennessee georgia point guard football basketball albany eighty seven percent 30 minutes one day
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Those fifteen so eighty seven percent a lot of this case it though we're very narrow well learn when you look at the dispositions and you look at who actually i voted which way there were very many close cases along the business cases years you've cited here do you think that's because the court wasn't taking cases that really difficult to decide for them i think that's exactly right i mean eight if those fifteen cases where unanimous and only three of them had one more than one dissenting vote and i think you know if you go back over five or six tournaments many of the courts business cases have been unanimous i think people think of the blockbuster cases but so many cases are not really that guy professional but that was especially true this term tell us one pick out one case that you would do see as the most significant or one of the most significant can i take a pair that you can pick up there the quakes personal jurisdiction cases this town we're really important so personal jurisdiction relates to the courts power over the party's a defendant can't be hauled into court in another state unless the defendant has some contacts with that state on and there's two kinds of personal jurisdiction that is general which is sort of all purpose and then there are specific jurisdiction which is tied to the facts of the case and a couple of years ago this pimm quite in case called daimler that a corporation can be subjected to general jurisdiction only way it's at home and the quit said we're gonna tell you what that means it means where the corporation's inc aware ted quarter analyze the.

daimler ted eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"That that that was a tragedy that someone that we we don't hold them accountable for ever for anyone they associated with at any time of their life even though they've said in two thousand six ten eleven years ago that they've they've renounced all ties i mean that's this the kind of perspective i wanna put this into especially when you look at the evidence here i found a quinnipiac poll that showed that eighty seven percent of democrats said they consider antisemitism either very or somewhat serious as a problem and only fifty three percent of republicans said so and the all right are the ones who are outwardly pretty antisemitic at times and they're the ones who are in the white house so the the i bringing up his don't framed this as oh this is a problem that is plaguing uh left and right alike we've got the rights got their weirdos in than the less got there no when you're talking about antisemitism in anti lgbt bigoted views don't tell me that progressives are falling down the same path that the ride is on its of it's not even close and it's more mainstream on the right there actively pushing to discriminate against a gay people and against transpeople and all that stuff and on the left it's just some associations with some people who back in the day were heroic civil rights a fighters essentially i mean we're talking associations verses actual agenda and the as i just referenced the numbers by polls eighty seven presented democrats say uh that is prejudiced against jewish people in the united states is a serious problem.

civil rights united states two thousand six ten eleven ye eighty seven percent fifty three percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Jobs that eighty seven percent of our budget i'm confused about people that are snap recipients if i'm on some sort of public assistance will i have to pay this tax not some sort of public assisted it's only snap and although we got an initial read from the department of revenue dead we could apply this to snap they're more recent decision their most recent decision was it was that a snap recipients where he fat were exempt so snap recipient doesn't have to pay that so the retailer has to how does the retailer handle that how they noah fundis the present a card than they don't charge them the tax they pay different price and the other people i do know how that would actually poet apparently apparently leave a range with retailers have posted rule about the thing and those who pay for their benefits with uh with substance which i guess it's called the supplemental nutrition assistance program there there are exempt from both state and local taxes all the local taxes i could see i'm sure you could to how that would be complicated for the retailer somebody has in late but we we initially promulgated rules on this in march we've we've cut of tweet the rule fence all at the request to stakeholders the changes we may we put our initial rules and regulations in march and we've we've added who tweet since then but all at the request of of the stakeholders with whom we've been meeting and actually had a total of of meetings are or conference called him about twenty with with folks in the industry now i'll let you go get the last word in here about all of that so what do you say to the people and the beverage industry the distributors the retailers people that are telling me that it's either going to be an inconvenience for them or may actually cost them money and jobs what do you say to those people what we see now we're in the country is the consumption shifts and in particular its ship to post beverage a jewish for example which are 100 percent was drinks which are exempt from us and water and then people change the social habits in the same way that i think a lot of people were were smoking just because he got expensive if you look at what happened in in berkeley california they the sale a healthier beverages such as water.

berkeley california eighty seven percent 100 percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Home having been home since saturday that was not exactly a thrilla minute lead leaderboard and that was one long treasury of god south and listen i'm not knocking anything kept good did he was a brilliant yesterday absolutely brilliant here's a guy who is the hundred ninety second ranked player out of the rough and you know what he did he manage this they added or off all day all weekend the guy hit eighty seven percent of its fairways and he's obama he basically was hidden in a ninety percent of is greens in regulation usually use a sixty three percent guy and make in parts any ran away and hid as the just broad erin hills to its proverbial knees and even though the wind blew a bullet yesterday he followed up sixty seven seventy sixty eight sixty seven for books kepco who breeders talked about many times as a guy to watch and even talked about it was a guy watch this week although he had pick rickie fowler it came closer than most most of the people will pick in dustin johnson adler johnson were play well this week to and he didn't lotta people pick rory he was worse than the people who big day he was wars and you went on and on and on as nobody was around to be found and it was as we said anything but exciting unexciting is what the yankees were let's be honest.

obama rickie fowler dustin johnson adler johnson rory yankees hundred ninety second eighty seven percent sixty three percent ninety percent