35 Burst results for "eighty percent"

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 1 d ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 1 d ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Stitch Fix is betting youll buy clothes its way

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:20 min | 1 d ago

Stitch Fix is betting youll buy clothes its way

"Bashing has changed since the covid nineteen outbreak began in that there is none. Okay. I'm exaggerating a little but what we're wearing has changed a lot one company of knows exactly how much is stitch fix it learns your style through a mix of online quizzes and outcomes and higher stylist who choose clothes specifically for you, you get a box of personalized items one at a time or as a subscription, keep what you want and send back the rest behind the scenes. The company's tack predicts what you and people like you might like. So it's always updating inventory and its in house brands but. What happens to a clothing company? Even a super techie one in a pandemic Katrina. Lake is the founder and CEO of stitch fix. We've been able to meet the client where she is where he is because our business model is predicated on this notion of personalization, and while we haven't seen these big macro disruptions all that often we see it on the micro level all the time we see people who are switching jobs. Now they're in a more casual workplace and so like those types of micro trends that we. have been able to meet the client where he or she is for years and years like that. Same Muscle help us in the last six months as we've seen this massive trend towards casualization and and frankly people buying less close. But buying more meaningful more on more thoughtfully buying clothes that that are really what they need that exact moment. How would it help you overcome something like supply chain leg, which we saw so many businesses suffer from I mean our business model has always been. We put things. Out in the world, we can know within a few a matter of weeks. This color is working better than that one this size, and we should only make this in these sizes and not those, and so that flexibility was already a capability that we were building with our vendors where we needed them to be flexible because we had such great data so that we could evolve our buys and so that was a muscle we already had created with our vendors as we think about kind of big not crow shifts like. The casualization of the workplace trend like we actually already were working on that like we already knew that the workplace was becoming more casual and so yes, like we pulled up a lot of volume in happened faster than we anticipated but I think this pandemic really has accelerated trends that were already happening. What does the data tell you about what might be coming? I think right now what we're seeing is I think some of these changes are going to be permanent. The data is showing us that first of all people are going to be buying apparel online and much much greater proportions and they were historically. So right now people are buying less close people are going on fewer vacations. People have less weddings to go to You know all the reasons people are buying less close at this very moment. And even as the market is shrinking, we are growing in the face of that. So we are taking share in that world at some point some of those categories will come back up like people will start going back out going to dinner is going on vacations, and so we do think some of that market will come back up I do think that like some of the desire to be more. Thoughtful and what people buy I think that's permanent like I mean we are all living with our things right now and I. Think we are. We are all I think realizing that there are things in our closet that we bought just because it was eighty percent off or that we bought for just one occasion and it was super cheap and now we feel weird about it being in our closet and So I do think people are going to be more thoughtfully buying probably fewer things that mean more in their lives and I think that's a good trend for us and I think the casualization of the workplace is a permanent trend I mean I think that's that's one that's been happening for years and years, and you know if we imagine a world in which more people are working from home and. People have more flexibility you know we're going to be asking are close to be serving more of a multi-purpose. You know like kind of the I want something that I could wear on zoom and then work out and then come back to work beyond Zuma gotten right and so you know I think that there is going to I think that that casualization or the workplace trend will will certainly continue. You mentioned that you know people may by fewer things that have more meaning to them. How is that good for you? Oh, that's great for us on our businesses always been about we want to be your partner in helping you find things that you love. So if people are less likely to be buying things just because it's on a steep discount or you know buying something to where it wants even though it doesn't fit perfectly like this is actually how we win is actually when people are really looking for the one thing that fits for the. One thing they going to really love and that's where I think. We our capabilities around personalization are much much a really showcase. I think if people are much more focused on like I'm GonNa buy not as many things, but I really WanNa love them like that is great for us. How if at all have you developed new technology or tweaked your existing recommendation technology during the pandemic, our core business has really been the. Six model where clients let us know what they're looking for, and we send them items to try on in the comfort of their own home, and of course, that model is very resonant today but we also have introduced direct by in ways that people can engage with our recommendations in new ways, and so now people can actually use their apt to be able to to buy things directly from us from recommendations and that helps. as people have more sporadic needs than they used to and so we've really thought about how do we capitalize on this moment when people are really thinking about kind of new ways to do things and and we'd be as relevant as we can. Your Chief Operating Officer said on your most recent earnings, call that the company plans to automate more to approve improve efficiency. Can you give me some details about how to work? You know we still have a lot of low hanging fruit in our on in our operations and You know this has been a business that grew to be you know one point, seven, billion dollars in just about ten years and and so we we built a lot of things quickly and You know there are simple things like as examples you know we can make our warehouses more dense by having multiple kind of layers of how we store things, and so that's kind of a simple example of like if we can actually build more vertically in our warehouses, we can make our warehouses more efficient we also have been starting to use. Robots to help our. Associates to be able to do their jobs more efficiently, and so that's capital investment that we've been making our warehouses and so you know I think there's still a fair amount of low hanging fruit in terms of making sure that our warehouses can be as efficient and that we're using as much technology to make our warehouse associates jobs as as good as we can. Necessarily talking about algorithms that fully replace actual human stylists. No, that's not actually what we are referring to. There I mean we are algorithms can continue to be better in butter but like our stylists are such a valuable and differentiating part of our business like I think we really believe that we can continue to invest in Algorithms to help our silence to be better and help me are stylish jobs better and more effective and easier But I think that that combination is such a secret sauce of ours. Katrina Lake is the founder and CEO of stitch. Fix.

Founder And Ceo Katrina Lake Zuma Chief Operating Officer Partner
I wouldn't go near this with YOUR money

MarketFoolery

06:00 min | 2 d ago

I wouldn't go near this with YOUR money

"Continues. I've seen the ETF INVESCO SOLAR THE TICKER SYMBOL IS T. A. N. I've seen this increased significantly this year it follows stocks such as soon technologies n Phase Energy and son run inc.. I'm wondering if these stocks are goodbye and if they are still good at these prices given their recent release. Given their recent increase. I will just point out. Just. A time stamp this this ETF INVESCO solar hitting a year high today. Yes do you want the short answer the long? Well, this is a friend from Calgary. So I felt Canadian I'M GONNA. I'M GONNA go along how about the medium answer? Okay. I love this question. I am a big proponent of solar I have solar on my house, which helps the power mostly electric car I'm a big fan here. I wouldn't go near this ETF if with your money Chris. So. So here is, here's the problem I off This is a this is almost a textbook example of investing in the rear view mirror or using the river mirror to govern are investing I'M GONNA since we've already talked before being recorded about a little bit of history and Black Friday I'm even another little piece of history. Okay in two thousand. Nine one thousand nine was the the the apex of the Great Tech Bubble. Okay. The Nasdaq index was I believe a up over eighty percent that year and so now you're in two thousand and I'm GonNa get a Canadian cut here Canada we are retirement accounts RSP's we tend to tell you big marketing push to fund your RSP around February. Okay. So the first two months of the year. Would you like to hazard a guess at what industry was the single greatest and it's not close the single greatest benefit Sherie of new money flowing into the market in February of two thousand. And if you said Tech. Gold Star. Most of the money that came in that year went into tech funds because they had done so well, the year before the two years before. This is easy. Money right it. Of course, the bubble popped in March of two thousand starting off touched off grinding down market from March two, thousand, October two, thousand and two that killed the Nasdaq I believe over sixty five, seventy percent over that time I, could be wrong. So the point is. This the people who are going into tech funds at that time were investing in their review. So this ETF said hitting multiyear highs today Chris. The one year performance with this fund is about one hundred and twenty percent which. Not, not, by coincidence is roughly the one year performance of the index purports to track the global. Solar. Energy. Index okay up about one hundred, twenty percent but dial out. Don't look at one year look at five years five years the performances annualized roughly. Twenty percent now, five years twenty percents still, pretty good. Right. But realize you're getting this last year, which is not one hundred twenty percent is influencing those five years. Okay. So it's probably had a bunch of flat to negative numbers in the first four and then attack one hundred and twenty percent on an annualized that and he got twenty percent dial back out even further. The ten year performance for both the index and this ETF is negative. Okay. So to put it in perspective ten years ago, Chris you and I go put ten, thousand dollars into the market you today you have about twenty four and a half thousand dollars I go ten years ago and I put ten thousand dollars into this ETF? I have roughly ten thousand dollars. Okay. So this has not been a long-term this the performance in the last year solely because people have kind of gone a little crazy chasing these solar companies now again, I mentioned I have solar install on my house. Okay and I will tell you the single biggest risk factor. You should be worried about when you put solar on your house or you look at solar as an investment. Is that you are highly dependent on the subsidy programs within the jurisdictions where these companies sell their products because frankly solar commodity invaders, nothing special Mike Panels, versus yours is about my versus yours or my racking systems or whatever. Okay. In my town. I got I get a little bit of a benefit because I put it. I do we have what's called net metering so I put some of my generating energy back into the grid I get some credit for that It's not great but it is what it is and I put it on my house because I. My background bioengineering couple of degrees. In that thing I spent a decade in practice This is kind of what I like so I took the opportunity we put on. I can tell you friends of mine before the government changed the rules to go two net metering friends of mine put solar on their house. They're getting a nice fat check every month because their system is grandfathered. Okay. It was so generous that the people who put solar in at that point in time got these generous pay offs. The government said Hey we want to stop giving generous payoffs and so they changed the rules to go two net metering I. Don't get a check every month. That's fine. It's okay. But I can tell you. Speaking. To The installer for the system when he put on my house just over a year ago, I asked him how's business and he basically said when the government changed the rules. The number of installs we did dropped by almost ninety percent. So if that happens in any of the jurisdictions where these companies, he mentioned solar edge and faith son run. These are really expensive companies on in terms of their valuation. I. Think I look Sola registrating almost seventy times free cash flow. You had best hope that wherever they are selling their products they don't change the rules because if you do that stocks go a lot cheaper

Chris Phase Energy Calgary Canada Mike Panels
Interview with Norman Wolfe

Breakfast Leadership

05:57 min | 2 d ago

Interview with Norman Wolfe

"Welcome back that Norman Wolf on the line. Norman how are you? Doing really good surly more. Time but we have to be on your show that glad to finally have gone here. I know we've been shedding for quite a long time so good to have you on the show. So you wrote a book while back called Living Organization and It's one of those timeless books. So it shows the audience a little bit about you in in the story behind this book. Be. Happy to Michael. Yes. I wrote the book back in Two Thousand and eleven which time I'd say that seems like, wow. So many years ago I wrote the book because of three reasons one is. The success rate of of organizations and people individually. Achieving the goals that the stated objectives, the strategic initiatives, whatever you WANNA call it is is pretty poor. This statistics say that they they succeed to. Fail other rate of seventy percent. So only less than thirty percent of those and I said individuals because. I was reading statistics recently that says New Year's resolutions. Success Rate is less than twenty percent so that feeling about eighty percent. So so I began to realize there's something about the way we go about life in in in businesses especially. That is missing something and the second reason the book is after being in business for well over forty years now. There's almost like a I hate to use the word pandemic these days. There's almost A. Pandemic of sadness people just ending engage they you know the the engagement factor against twenty three percent of people engaged in what they do. Not, a very high success rate. And so you know I. After working with so many companies I began to realize why is that in? Can we do about it and? The solution I realized is that we have. Kind of as a society of all the way of looking at life through a lens of you might call it Newtonian physics. It's a very mechanical approach to life. And at least off some Elise out all the stuff around relationships and and meaning and purpose in belief systems and assumptions that just says focused on what you WanNa do and just do it and boom. That's it and you know that just isn't good enough. So I wrote the book to explain how all that works and. In in how businesses themselves really are living entities. Like people they operate like people You look at the department, any leader who who really steps back and looks at the various departments they. They always can sense that the departments are Personalities like my sales department is going to have a fundamentally different personality than. Been My accounting department. And it's just like people different proclivities, different personalities, different belief systems. And and we think the only way to get them aligned and working together as through set of goals you know give as an they ignored this whole relationship piece in what I call context piece. The belief systems the sense of identity of who we are as an individual also applies to the sense of identity of who we are as a collective of individuals. And we have no all of that stuff. So I wrote a book to explain how all that happens being a scientist and engineer by training I have a very logical. Approach to things. So I created a SORTA engineering formula for how it all plays together. And that's really what I wrote about in the book. Like I said before it's a timeless book and when you said about how the people aren't engaged in. Monster Dot. com just released a study. That right now close to seventy percent of people are. Saying that they're they're really stressed or burned out about work and. So you take that percentage of seven out of ten people burned out. There's a percentage of those people that would be normally engaged in willing to go the extra mile to do whatever they can because they want things to be better enough only for themselves, but for their organization. But if they're too tired and fatigued, they're not even engaged anymore. So it has such a huge effect on the strength of an organization and. During, times like pandemic or any type of economic downturn if your organization isn't acting at its best, you're vulnerable and you might end up seeing a four lease sign in your office space because you won't be there anymore. And that's what we're seeing. You know one of the. The. Interesting I'll say byproducts of the pandemic is as talked to leaders around the world beginning to realize that. He has the way I say it we used to come to work for the purpose of getting work done by we went to the office because that's what you you did things. And a byproduct of that is. We build social connections. Really don't pay attention to that just sort of happened it unconsciously or as a byproduct. Of speaking with the c o the other day in in he said. You know he's he's closed as office space independent Macapa sent everybody home and asked him if he was going to. Go back as things are opening up and he said now we don't need to meet. Together to get the work done anymore.

Norman Wolf Living Organization Strategic Initiatives Macapa Michael Sales Department Elise Scientist Engineer
Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:04 min | 6 d ago

Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

"The brexit transition period is due to expire on the thirty first of December at which point the UK will leave the single market without a deal unless an agreement with the EU is reached in the next few weeks British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he wanted the broad outlines of the deal to be in place by the time the European Council Summit begins, today. The McCaffrey is your news political editor. He joins me on the line from Brussels could money cheat today it's the deadline. So why aren't we walking away? In this process is brexit process. We're very very used to deadlines coming and going out we gene and two large degree. At today he's GonNa come and go again and what we're expecting is no deal at the end of today when. Leaders meet in Brussels who were also not expecting Britain at top walk away either in fact we're expecting. Probably weeks of negotiations. Why is that I? Think because progress has been made though it is interesting last night the Boris Johnson spoke to US London line the EU Commission, Presidents and chose Michelle the EU council president in a joint to call and he. Exposure of his disappointment that the had not being a substantial or not progress. But clearly think that there is still an opportunity to get a deal. Hence why these talks will continue. We have to remember at the end of all of this book Britain and the e You have repeatedly said, they do wolves future trade deal I. Think both of them are willing to give it another shot of you like a bit more time So what are the underlying issues that holding up this process? Will listen to you though kind of three key areas in all of this at first of all is the so-called level playing fields or state AIDS, which is essentially the e you wanting you to adhere to the same rules and regulations to a large degree that and they already do as a former member of the European Union and things like environmental protections, food standards, for example, so that Britain can't undercut those in a more competitive way and join to that is this issue of state AIDS. The idea that the state can subsidize heavily industries to keep them afloat if you like, and again the EU is king the Britain essentially really can do that because it could convey. Could gain a competitive edge. Undercut the E. U., two degree now Britain would point out and rightly so some would say that actually if there is any part of the two sides who are used to subsidizing their industries, it's more likely to be countries like France and Italy than it needs to be the UK or indeed Germany for example, who just failed out Lufthansa to the tune of ten billion euros I mean the UK hasn't yet bailed out any of Big Airlines then disease you have governance How to settle speech future future disputes in essence the EU, has conceded that it's no longer going to be the European Court of Justice and they're trying to work out to kind of independent tradition if you like. And then finally, there's this kind of issue of fishing which economically is not important either to the EU or the UK in the sense it doesn't really make much of any countries economies to large degree, but it is politically symbolic. Ephraim. Brexit. As it will is what Brexit was all of out retaining sheesh water and also some European countries. It's incredibly symbolic importance at French fishermen, for example, or at pretty significant force in France and Emmanuel macron is staring down election in the not too distant future. So that is an issue. That actually is always the most difficult of issues because as as a Britain wants to gain back control of its waters, the EU still wants to be allowed to fish in those waters and it suggesting that if it cannot will. Then Britain is not going to be able to sell its fish to the rest of Europe and that is by far the largest markets. So shortly, collapse the whole deal on fishing. Think not though there are genuine concerns that it could be at the key issue. In the trade talks over the next couple of weeks, not least of all, because as become this to the issue in from both sides that for Britain. It's very symbolic as I say what Brexit is, they are absolutely determined. That they can have you know European fishermen essentially in the seas for years and years to come. Katrina to the fish they just think that is fundamentally unacceptable. It is not in essence taking back control. For the EU are equally determined. That if Britain wants to gain access to it single market by selling fish and eighty I, think it's eighty percent of British Fisher exploited in sixty percents. In, total those to the rest of the EU then. You're. Not, GONNA be able to sell your fish and you can have all your efficient chips he wants, but they'll have to be British people are going to eat them and not the EU, and they would also point that actually half of the so-called Bush's boats that fish in fresh waters at the moment are actually forward. So in practical terms, would it make that much difference I think the compromise, the them at may well come, and with this idea of quotas every year that potentially will start where we all now and year after year decrease. On a negotiated faces a bit like Norway has dumb but for Emmanuel macron fishing is a key key factor in all of this. Simply because you know French, fishermen are a potent political force but for the countries like Germany. In essence fishing's not very important and they would be very, very disappointed when push on for the deal to collapse on that single issue. So I mean what happens next and is a no deal Nella a probability rather than A. So. When you talk to people here and is being a whole range of MVP's and official yesterday, they were putting it at a probability of sixty percents. Gene essentially, that will be no deal, which is point stalk in many ways given the fact that we are getting into the game and we really all because time is to Michelle Volley ticking in this process I think what will happen next though is that they will conclude. Leaders at tomorrow that enough progress has been made and the talk should continue. I expect the British will accept that and talks will continue for the next couple of weeks. up until. Either the end of this month or the start of next. But then a deal is going to have to be done or essentially both sides have to accept the will be no deal because ultimately if there is to be a deal, it is a massive. Weighty Hefty document that has to be translated into all the official languages of the EU. EU Paul, we'll have to vote on the British parliament, some national parliaments to and so that decision will have to be pretty soon at the start of the next month because ultimately, they'll only have up until the end of to send the. It's because Boris Johnson his always all. And that he will not extend beyond December thirty. First, we've heard of course that before I think this time that really is a hard deadline and so at the Mo- wind, you'd have to conclude or less things substantially change that you know no deal. Is a real. Possibility, but probability, how is the British parliament reacting to this brinkmanship? Well, there's this. Thing is when we kind of what? It's not weird actually, it's probably not surprising the tool. But, it's not really consuming European on British national politics. At the moment clearly, we're in the middle of a pandemic. Clearly everyone's focusing on not just the fact that there is a second surge affecting almost every corner of Europe and deed every corner of the British isles. And Other increasing restrictions, talks about lockdown. So not not anyone's really talking about Brexit I think. Boris. Johnson's going to take enough majority that no deal is not good to trouble him like it. It was last year when there was a possibility that the government collapse on the issue I don't think that's GonNa happen this time round for the genuine concerns in Britain about what this will mean. Already, the government is already having to spend millions and millions of pounds to get a border posts. Customs checks to employ people essentially to work on that border from the first of January and no matter what the trade will be there will be extra checks a respectable. What happens

European Union Britain Boris Johnson Brussels Brexit British Parliament Eu Commission Europe Michelle Volley France Germany UK European Council Summit Aids Mccaffrey Political Editor Ephraim European Court Of Justice
How to Buy in a Hot Housing Market

Money For the Rest of Us

04:46 min | Last week

How to Buy in a Hot Housing Market

"I recently got an email from listeners listening about six months or so has listened to well over one hundred episodes of the show. He writes that he's relatively new to investing. He's been investing for three years now, as he graduated from college in two thousand seventeen. He's been saving for his first home purchase in Austin. Texas. He writes the Austin Housing Market is very hot at the moment arguably one of the hottest markets in the country even with the recent effects of covid nineteen. He points out the median sales price in Austin has increased over eleven percent since this time last year, and there are forty five percent fewer homes on the market now versus a year ago he would like to buy a house in early twenty, twenty one. But after seeing the market conditions, he's worried that he might be entering the real estate market at the wrong time. He has heard of stories from realtors in home buyers about individuals and families putting offers of ten to fifteen thousand dollars over the asking price for homes that aren't even on the market yet only to find out, they did not win the bidding war. In short, he continues I'm wondering if you could offer some. Rules of thumb to look for as a first time home buyer in I. Hot Market such as Austin. I'm conflicted because I don't want to buy at the wrong time and potentially lose value in my home only after a few short years however at the same time if this market to continue at this pace for several years to come buying in the near future, I think might be the right move. He points out he's tired of handing over his money to landlords and would like to start building equity in a home to diversify his current return drivers. Austin is not the only hot housing market. There are a number of them in fact, nationally in the US housing is on fire. In August of two, thousand, twenty, there were five point nine million homes sold on a seasonally adjusted annual rate. That's the highest number of home since two thousand six and it's being driven because the average thirty year fixed rate mortgage at the end, of August was two, point, nine, four percent. The median single family home price in the US is up eleven point seven percent in the past year ending August twenty twenty. That's the biggest annual increase in twenty thirteen. Sales of newly built homes are up forty, three percent year over year the highest increase since one, thousand, nine, hundred, two. There have been about one million new homes built in the past year highest level since two, thousand six. The market is being driven because of the low interest rate, which is pushing up the value of all assets. Plus there's a desire for many given covid nineteen to move out of their city, for example, out more into the suburbs or the country. So increased demand and reduced supply because of concern regarding the pandemic. Some. People don't want potential buyers traipsing through their homes. Others don't want to sell because they're not sure they'll be able to find something to buy. The frenzy to purchase homes has pushed up valuations if we look at the value of household real estate. So the total value of houses and condos as a percent of economic output in the US GDP, it's a hundred and fifty eight percent. Total value of all houses divided by GDP is one hundred and fifty eight percent that's up from hundred and forty percent at the beginning of the year the all time high was one, hundred, eighty percent in two, thousand, seven, and the recent low was in two thousand twelve of one hundred, fifteen percent. This is data from Ned Davis Research. The. So the value of the housing stock relative to GDP is approaching that all time high of two, thousand seven, and then if we look at the case Schiller Index, it has appreciated since nineteen fifty-three on a real net of inflation basis of about point seven percent per year. That's the trend line. So we statistically create a trend line again, data from Davis research that trend line increases at point seven percent per year, and then we can see well, how much do current prices differ from that trend line and right now we're fifteen percent above the trendline. In two thousand, six, US home prices were forty percent above the trend line and then by twenty twelve, two, thousand, thirteen, they had fallen two point, nine percent below the trendline.

Austin United States Ned Davis Research Texas
A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

Mac OS Ken

17:29 min | Last week

A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

"Few huge surprises at apple's high speed event though. There were some unexpected bits. Did. Anybody. See The verizon thing coming? Did we have any idea what? MAG SAFE WAS GONNA turn out to be. There we'll get to those. Most of today's presentation is drawn from a couple of viewings of the Apple Park presentation. We'll also pull from the usual suspects doing their usual bang-up jobs. Tuesday's high-speed event presentation started with Apple CEO Tim Cook welcoming viewers back to Apple Park than throwing the presentation almost immediately to others to give the INS and outs of home pod. Many. Bob Board richer's apple VP worldwide product marketing listed the company's desires for home pod. Wanting. The device to have amazing sound to act as an intelligent assistant to serve as a smart home hub all while protecting the privacy and security of the user. This, they say they do in a smaller spherical unit that costs less than one third of the original home pods original asking price. On the amazing sound side company bragged on the devices ro properties as well as how well it plays with others. Others being other apple devices. Users can apparently sink home pod many's either a stereo pairs or to play the same audio throughout the home. The. Inclusion of apples you one processor makes handoff easier to handle according to the company. For what it'll play. Well, there's the usual stuff apple music, apple podcasts, iheartradio radio DOT COM tuned in with Pandora and Amazon music on the way in the coming months. As for the smart part Home Pod, many will handle or interact with messages. Calendar phone calls maps music because. The. Weather reminders and find my feature. There was also an interesting demo where users ask for personal updates and got them. personalized. So he you know multiple voice recognition is key. Now. One new feature mentioned and de Mode was intercom. This is basically what it sounds like. You tell home pod to deliver a message to everybody and the various apple devices in the house including other home pods, iphones, apple watches air pods, and even carplay units play or display the message. I have heard entercom will work with the original home pods as well though not seeing that confirmed. Addressing. It's smart home hub nece home pod many integrates with apple's home APP that lets control home connected accessories said scenes and stuff like that. Covering User Privacy Apple, says no word spoken to Home Pod, leave your home until you touch home pod many or say he. S I are. So, yes, it is always listening but what it here's goes nowhere until you give it the command. Request. A home pot or not associated with apple ID. You choose whether recordings are saved by apple personal requests only work when the associated iphone is home with you. And communications with smart home accessories used strong encryption according to the company. Now I, said earlier that the unit is spiritual. If you've seen a home pod, there is no mistaking what this thing is. Same sort of light up display on the top same mesh wrapping it's roundedness and the same white and space grey options as the original home pod. Coming soon to flat surface near you. Orders for home pod many began on the sixth of November unit, start, shipping the week of the sixteenth of November. Not Price, to beat an echo but not a device that will break the bank. Home Pod many will sell. For, Ninety, nine bucks. Okay. I pretend to hear you say but I'm worried about breaking my home pause many. Not sure why but better to be safe in your case. To that end apple care plus we'll be available for home pod. Many. A piece from macrumors says, that will run buyers fifteen bucks. When Tim Cook was back on camera, he took a moment to Brag on iphones past noting the iphone eleven has been the number one smartphone in the world since its launch and that I phone has led the industry in customer satisfaction every year since it's Get ready to hate all of them as the iphone twelve line makes the scene bringing with it five G. Connectivity. Which one? All of them. Had Been Rumored Apple announced four iphone phone twelve models and has had also been rumored. Each can support five G.. Cook says, five G. Brings A new level of performance for downloads UPLOADS, higher quality video streaming, more responsive gaming, real time interactivity, and more. The CEO says five Jia superfast, which he actually pitched as a security feature speeds are so good. He says you'll be less tempted to sign on the public WIFI limiting exposure to the dangers that lurk there. Every decade brings new technology that provides a step change in what we can do with iphone said Cook. Today. A new era begins for iphone. Today we're bringing by G. to phone. Then began the verizon commercial. Hans Fest Berg Chairman and CEO. Verizon took to the stage talk about big reds five G. offering. Verizon's by ultra wideband with large quantities of millimeter wave access will be live and sixty cities across the US by the end of this year. In ideal conditions, Best Burg says the carriers seen four gigabits down and two hundred megabits up. The four gigabits is kind of funny own Antonio Guy says an ideal conditions. Well it doesn't sound like you're getting four GIGA beds but we'll get, him. The other thing best Burger announced was flipping the switch on Verizon's extensive five gene nationwide network. That apparently went live yesterday. Boy would I like to know the terms of the deal worked out between, that bill and Verizon? Emphasis on particular carrier. I did not see coming. Now I said iphone twelve comes in four models here the rumor mill rang true. The phones are iphone twelve iphone twelve many iphone twelve pro and iphone twelve pro, Max. Starting with iphone twelve, remember the squared off edges of iphone Four. The new design returns us to that. Squared edges that meet flush with the devices front and back glass the front classes something special though. Working with corning delay, this display is protected by what apple. Calls Ceramic. Shield. It is said by the company to be tougher than any other smartphone class with four times better dropped performance than iphone eleven. The display it's protecting is apple custom Ole ed providing truer blacks, better contrast and two times the pixels iphone eleven or four, hundred, sixty pixels per inch. While that displays the same six point one inches iphone eleven, apple shrank the surrounding enough to make iphone. Eleven percent than her fifteen percent smaller and sixteen percent lighter than iphone. Eleven Choice of colors is not huge but they are pretty. With options and black. White Product Red Green. And blue that. Does things for me. I shouldn't talk about in mixed company. The candy coating is nice. Let's talk about. It's Chewy. Chocolate center starting with the phones five Genus Apple says, iphone twelve has the most five G. bands of any smartphone for better performance in more places. Additionally the company's silicon, the software approach. Let's apple make the best use of available five G. including choosing to not use five. G.. It sounds like iphone defaults to lt e tapping into five G. when it's both necessary and available. That is great for power consumption according to the company. Apples tested the new phones on over one hundred carriers and over thirty regions. In ideal conditions iphone twelve gets up to three point five gigabits on. which is what makes the Brian Bragging about four gigabytes down kind of funny yesterday. It does support millimeter wave those so. got that going for it. As, for the phones on workings iphone twelve powered by apple's a fourteen bionic, the first phone powered by the five nanometer processor technology packing eleven point eight billion transistors roughly forty percent more than eight thirteen. A six core CPU that's up to fifty percent faster than last year's phone and a four core GPU graphics that are up to fifty percent faster than last year's model. Machine learning also gets a boost iphone, twelve packs of sixteen coordinator and Gen that's up to eighty percent faster than iphone eleven capable of eleven, trillion operations per second. Company bragged on Games claiming console quality for the phone. To Demonstrate and executive from riot games showed off League of legends wild rift a mobile, only game due out later this year. Well phone twelve is not the phone photographers would choose. There's plenty of improvement and it's cameras. Apple says the phone has a twelve megapixel ultra wide camera and twelve megapixel wide camera. It said the sport, the fastest aperture yet it also features a seven element lens that apple says offers twenty-seven percent improvement in low light performance. Mag Save is an internal thing. Rather than a name for a connector is in days of old MAG. Safe today is a collection of magnets and charging elements that help line up the phone for proper charging. When it's not charging those magnets go to work holding on cases and wallets and third party stuff. Apple expects a thriving ecosystem of third party doodads take advantage of the newly introduced MAG. Safe. Ness. Mag Safety. Safe thing. Anyway. It's a thing built into iphone twelve. Every model in the line. Now's probably phone twelve many. Except for the size, you can take everything I've said so far about iphone twelve and play it back. iphone twelve many has the same specs as iphone twelve though in a slightly smaller size. The company says the mini is smaller and lighter than four point seven inch models like iphone eight but with a bigger five point four inch display. Apple says, this one is the smallest thinnest and lightest five G. phone. In the world. Talking about last night with Frederik, Van Johnson, and a few other folks on Chuck joiners Mac. Voices. We came to the conclusion that the pro phones for two groups, people who wanna spend as much money as they can afford. Or people who really care about the camera. There's nothing wrong with the camera functionality and the iphone twelve or iphone twelve many. Unless you count they're not being as high end as the camera on the high end. No I'm not a high end photo guy. So there was a lot set around iphone twelve pro, an iphone twelve pro Max that escapes me. The camera on iphone twelve pro boxes said by apple to have a sixty five millimeter focal length from fifty two millimeter focal length and last year's counterpart. It's got five times optical zoom range and the set to support an eighty seven percent improvement in low light versus last year's top of the pro line. I do know enough to be impressed by one thing. The pro line can shoot an apple pro raw. or it will be able to with a software update. Later, this year photographers will also be able to edit those images. Directly, in the photos APP. The pros can also handle. HD are video recording catching seven hundred million colors. Sixty Times, the number they could capture before. Apple, said they also sport the first smartphone camera that'll record in dolby vision hd are. And just like the apple pro raw functionality users will be able to edit the dobie vision HDR video in the photos APP. Finally the light are rumors were finely true the twelve pro and twelve pro Mac speech or a world facing light detection and ranging scanner. That let folks scan and modeled their surroundings. Apples Demos showed that put to use for placing objects in an augmented reality environment performing improved autofocus and low light and improving camera that perception in low light for night moat. Working our way out of these phones, Greg, Joswiak, apple's newly minted senior. VP Worldwide Marketing talked about a few of the pro lines features. It's got mad safe. It's got ceramic shield. It's got a Super Ratna FDR display. As for sizes iphone twelve pro gets bumped from five point eight inch display display size of six point one inches the pro Max meanwhile goes six point five inch display to a display size of six point seven. All of it is bound by the same squared off edges as iphone twelve, the with a couple of distinctions. I. The outer band is stainless steel on the pro line and second the colors are a bit more refined. Coming in silver graphite a gold that looks seriously golden. And the Pacific. Blue that doesn't do as much for me as the blue on the IPHONE twelve. Not that I'd turn it down. If cost is your primary concern. Here is what you're looking at across the whole line of iphones. iphone se. Start Three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars iphone ten are starts at four ninety, nine iphone eleven starts at five, ninety, nine iphone many starts at hundred ninety, nine dollars iphone twelve starts at seven ninety, nine, iphone twelve pro starts at nine, ninety nine. An iphone Pro Max starts at one, thousand, ninety, nine dollars. For the new phones though those prices are only Kinda SORTA true. Peace, from the Mac Observer says iphone twelve many an iphone twelve do start at six, ninety, nine and seven, ninety nine if you buy them as a t and T or verizon phones if you buy one is either a sprint or t mobile phone or as an unlocked phone. The starting prices are seven, twenty, nine, and eight, twenty nine. With no indication as to why. While it's great that ceramic shield means less of a chance of broken display. The chance is still there. If that bugs, you apple care pluses there for all of them. macrumors says, two years of coverage will run one, hundred, forty, nine dollars for iphone and twelve mini. Adding loss or theft protection will up that price to to nineteen buyers can get ongoing coverage for seven, ninety, nine per month or eleven dollars and forty nine cents with loss and theft added. As for the higher end phones, the pizzas, two years of Apple Care Plus will cost one, nine, thousand, nine or nine dollars ninety nine cents per month. Theft. And loss coverage bumps that price to two, hundred, sixty, nine dollars or thirteen dollars and forty nine cents per month. Ongoing. As for availability, apple is starting in the middle. And working out. Would owners can order iphone twelve and iphone twelve pro this Friday the sixteenth. October. They'll be delivered the following Friday the twenty third. If you're targeting either end of the range. iphone twelve, many an iphone twelve pro Max will go up for order on the sixth of November. Delivery should hit the following Friday the thirteenth of November. Barring incident which I have to say because. Friday

Apple Verizon Apple Park Tim Cook CEO Bob Board VP Theft United States Corning Macrumors Entercom Chairman And Ceo Antonio Guy Burg
BlackRocks Larry Fink; Johnson & Johnsons Vaccine Study

Squawk Pod

13:12 min | Last week

BlackRocks Larry Fink; Johnson & Johnsons Vaccine Study

"Johnson and Johnson is temporarily paused. It's cove nineteen vaccine clinical trials due to an unexplained illness in a study participant the development first reported by stat news notes that the study is not under a clinical hold that's the more serious hold and it's not immediately apparent whether the volunteer received the actual treatment. Or a placebo. That would be key difference J. J. says adverse events. Events like illnesses aren't expected part of clinical studies but if they do find out, yeah, it was the placebo. Well then. It goes without saying. Apparently. It's not always immediately available for that but I read through that a lot because it it seems to me like you'd be able to figure out pretty quickly it to shutting down your entire thing if this was somebody who got the placebo. That's why it's called the blind, a double blind study or whatever you want people knowing who? Didn't. I guess somebody knows I hope so or else you get. Jeez. Yeah. Wow maybe. Striking, about this, this is now the second one of these that we've had AstraZeneca's you know put a hold of briefly internationally on their efforts but by the way that effort I believe is not ongoing right now in the United States. So if for example, there was a hold on the Astra Zeneca project in the United States and they separate hold now on the Johnson and Johnson one minute. It's not this is not a whole. Holistic. Pause. Right. A pause, but there was a I the point I was trying to make was there was a pause if you WANNA use the word pause and hold I know there now there's a distinction between the two, but there was also a pause on the Astra Zeneca program in the United States if they're also pause on the Johnson and Johnson Program in the United. States then you're then you're now down to Pfizer and Madonna as the most promising. The only other two that are even ongoing when you think about the time line for when these things become available, it could become more challenged. I I would. I would wait until. You know. That's not like you to find the negative part of it, but I mean I. Came back. It's not I hadn't realized I. Don't know if you want. I not. Not a spinal thing like the other one I understand that. Thousands of people in all these trials and you're talking about two cases that you don't even know we're going to result in Holt. So it made push it out to ask what if the dates maybe bad possibly, what possible what have you imagined that would have you imagined that the Astra Zeneca program would be running everywhere else in the in the world except the United States right now I I haven't thought realized that tried to mad and haven't tried Ed Needs is this means it's going to be the Astra Zeneca program to become available here at the United States in any kind of similar time. That's the point. For more on the news from Johnson and Johnson. Let's bring in Dr Zeke Emanuel. He of course, the former White House health policy advisor under President Obama he's now vice provost of global initiatives at the university, of Pennsylvania, and he's currently an informal adviser to the Joe Biden campaign and the Covid nineteen and Vaccine Recommendations. By the way he just co authored a research letter for the Journal of the American Medical Association comparing us, covert fatalities to those of some larger OECD countries to talk about that in just a moment. But Dr Manual let's start with this news from J. and J. Does this concern you? Well, any time? There's a serious adverse event it has to concern you but I think as. J. F. O. explained. You know you have to let the process evolve you have to actually examine carefully what the? Situation is the adverse event is related to the vaccine or placebo. Related to something else a pre existing condition, and so those are exactly the kind of questions at. Researchers will look at and try to uncover in the next few hours. And then we'll find out more. If it's in the you know arm with of the vaccine it does raise serious questions because you only have a few thousand people in the study like this one adverse event is serious especially when you're considering a vaccine that you're going to roll out to tens, hundreds of millions of people maybe even billions of people. So you know. That's the that's the ultimate concern, and this is actually standard process. For every research study you get a serious adverse event, you investigate it, it happens all the time. It's just the world's not always watching. So closely to see what the developers are excited worth pointing out that the the CFO of Johnson and Johnson also pointed out, they don't know any of these answers because they have turned it all over to independent investigators, and that is what kind of beefs up the credibility issues around those. The CFO himself has no idea even though this was thirty six hours ago whether this was in a placebo patients someone who actually received the vaccine will continue. That they've been carefully collaborating with the NIH on this trial and you know that I also think should give the American public. Some reassurance at this is going to be done thoroughly and to the highest scientific standards might detrimental. Let's talk about that paper that you wrote. You found that the United States did have higher death rates from Cova. I think the big question is was that something that was taking place very early on in the pandemic and that has improved since then and what have you found? Tell us a little bit about your study. So what we did is to take the United States mortality from it. Compare it to eighteen. Countries a high income countries like Japan and Australia Canada and Jeremy and also the countries that were hit very hard at the start Italy Spain, France and other. European countries. And we looked at the whole period and compared to most countries We actually the United States has done poorly even if you include the early phase but if you exclude the early phase March and April when every many countries were overwhelmed especially places like Italy and Spain. And you exclude them and then look say may after countries have experienced, got their arms around how to manage this of virus. I turns out the United States at extraordinarily bad even compared to places like Italy a we had from. May Tenth. To today roughly ninety thousand more deaths and we should have had we followed Italy scores ninety thousand Americans who died needlessly. As I have pointed out before Italy didn't have anything special or different in terms of Treatment Vaccines Diagnostics compared to the United States, what they have is better public health. Implementation of the public health measures, and that actually is a could could have saved tens of thousands of lives in the United States. and. We can see that when we compare our experience to those of other countries. What are you talking about in terms of reactions? You mean people wearing masks, you mean contact tracing do you mean testing that's put out? How much this you think falls on the healthcare system. As a fault and how much of it rely falls on public policy reaction to it. How much falls on just citizens following the rules well. It's all of it, but it's mainly the public health response in public policy. It really is implementing those public health measures, countrywide with fidelity. And then slowly reopening. So you do have to have social distancing you do have to have a trying not to go indoors. You do have to have having crowds less than twenty. You do have to have wearing face masks doing hand hygiene and focusing your testing and contact tracing capacity first of all, building it up, which we never did successfully in this country, and then focusing it on hot spots because we know this virus breaks out. A super spreading events it's not the usual person to person to person you know eighty to ninety percent of people will not pass this to anyone. Ten percent to twenty percent of people 'cause eighty percent of the infection. So you have to be able to identify them and quickly suppressed that we never built up that capacity the federal government under president trump punted it to the states and then states did very different. Things had Florida right now as rapidly opened up restaurants and many other things and a lot of us are expecting super spreading situations in Florida. We've seen. Places that kind of ignored? This up and down the Midwest saying Oh it's not here. Now having very high rates of cases we've had thirty one states that are going up and not down which is a very worrisome situation going into the fall and we're going to move inside. It's going to much easier to pass this virus along. And a lot of us are seriously worried about the consequences hazy I'm trying to do whether that was apples to apple. So when in May in the United. States. We got we got a later start right in Europe and by May they're already seeing. Progress over in Europe did you adjust I'm not sure whether you adjusted for that because we were right at the height. Close to it in May still and and they were on the downside in. Europe is. Standardized that in a way or wrong on that or or because we were going to have a lot more. A lot more deaths in in May than they would because they they were they got it a lot earlier there. Then I have a follow up question to. That is a super sophisticated question and you're one hundred percent, right we started a week or two later than European countries like Italy France But if you make that adjustment, it makes a slight difference not. Difference Yeah. So it's not it's not. Our peak was in May and their peak was in the end of March early April. In fact, our peak was earlier in April. and. By, by May tenth, we should have gotten our arms around and then also in our paper, we look at June seven and subsequently, and even if you look at June seven, we have tens of thousands of more debts that other countries like again the Netherlands France Spain. Italy. So we've done poorly, and by the way our data collection goes through mid September. So we've done poorly even with the August blip because of the. Spring summer vacations in many European countries where we know people like Silvio Berlusconi in Italy partied and ignored all the recommendations and got cove it So we have done badly even after even if you include the fact that we got this about a week or two later compared to other countries that was a very good question typically on the high level statisticians or clinical researchers ask that kind of. I don't with. Feeling so good about myself. All of a sudden the problems we've had here the number of cases the number of that's a number of hospitalizations was not inevitable. It was a result of bad public health measures being implemented or not implemented as the case may be and you can see this repeatedly states seeming seeming to learn nothing like Florida rushing to open up restaurants bars when we should be slowly slowly be opening. Detrimental very quickly. It I guess we do have time for one more question how how much of an impact do you think a Americans healthiness versus other countries have how do we rate just in terms of underlying co morbidity is that might be there well, it's a mixed bag for one thing our population skews younger than most European countries, they have a much older population more people over sixty five. And we know that older people tend to die from this disease unfortunately we have more co morbidity in terms of diabetes in terms of obesity, but they have more Komo British in terms of lung problems because they have higher smoking rates in the United States Net Nan. It probably comes out in the wash but we're going to have to do some more. Rigorous Studies of the CO morbidity situation and the age distribution of the population. But I don't think it's GonNa be tens of thousands of deaths. It might be a few thousand maybe even ten thousand but the overwhelming response effect that about half of our deaths or unnecessary that's not gonNA come out because of small differences in co morbidity between our countries and their country. Zeke thank you very much for your time. It's really great talking to you. Thank you very sophisticated questions this morning.

United States Johnson Astrazeneca Italy Europe J. J. Florida Dr Zeke Emanuel Obesity President Trump NIH Journal Of The American Medica Midwest CFO Holt Pfizer Apple Silvio Berlusconi Italy France
How To Become an Author Without Writing a Single Thing

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

05:09 min | Last week

How To Become an Author Without Writing a Single Thing

"Hello and welcome to another top advisor marketing podcast We love having repeat guests ones who've been super on the show previously and even better the ones who have their ear down to the proverbial marketing train track that is Something that we all want to pay attention to seth green founder of market domination. LLC. Dot Com is our guest again and I'm just going to be peppering him with some question south. Welcome to show my friend. Thanks much for having me back. Always. Two hundred shower and. NOT GOING TO BE FINE I See. I'll try to. Remember what we did the last show that you think it was. A It's been a little while even though that actually was. I. Was just on your show we recorded that yesterday but I want to ask you some questions brother because I know that we're kind of in the same space we do some of the similar things but you have some products and services that we obviously don't offer and you have a different perspective, right. So what are you seeing in your clientele right now that is really working not just in this covert environment, but this virtual environment we seem to have been thrust into. Okay. So we're recording this at the height of the first year of the COVID pandemic I'm going to put that out there. So it's time less because who knows how many how long has gotten to last right my crystal ball's a little murky. So, one of the things that we have found were recording this before the election, the presidential election of two, thousand twenty and the cost generate a lead. For example, I'm facebook ads has gone up significantly because of all the election spending. And our ads get lumped into because their financial related generating prospects for financial advisers, they get lumped into the financial slash political realm, which means they compete with all the election money in the last couple of weeks or cost per lead is dramatically gone up and our number of leads generated gone dramatically Dow. So, we have stopped that program temporarily until the election's over. So obviously, we've had to do on we been doing other things for them this whole time. So those taken more at the forefront that facebook ads in particular have become quite cost prohibitive. They were increasing throughout the pandemic since March because everybody went virtual, right every financial adviser who was doing seminars and can't do them. Now, a lot of them have switched to eighty percent at least have switched to webinars. So you can't go three scrolls on your news feed. Without seeing another ad for another Webinar, you can't do the same as everybody else and expect to stand out a couple of the things that are work really well for our advisors that are time less no matter why are podcasting program as you have one is well ours is focused specifically on getting accountants attorneys other professional centers of influence to be on our. Clients, the advisers show we've had turned the show into a book. We promote the book we host a monthly now virtual networking meeting of everybody in the book that the adviser leads and we coach them through that. So that still works because more people as you as you pointed out. So eloquently, on my show yesterday more people are listening to podcasts now than ever. Is I told my wife who's podcast lot I her second episode records tonight She's not a financial advisor. She is a mommy blogger is said to her this is the new ground floor podcast. She's like, why'd you say new five times? That's annoy and they said, no, it's because it keeps changing. The original PODCAST, ten, fifteen years ago. Every couple of years, there's a new resurgence, a new billion couple of hundred million people find podcasting. It's new. So. That's why I said. It's new new. Nubia see how many drinking game everyone watching every time I say we're. GonNa. Take a shot. I gotTA. Make it through the whole podcast brother their ten shots in already. So they're probably at the hospital by now. So don't do that maybe half a shot I'll sit I simply you're go. There you go. All right. So the podcasting model that generate centers of influence to drive accidental referrals is working really really well always has always will. Are Limited campaigns are working better than ever. Because if you think about it, so many people change jobs. Yeah. They got furlough. They got laid off. Or they decided if I'm GonNa work from home I can go work somewhere else. I can work virtually from any company. I don't have to stick with this boss I don't like so are linked in job changer 401k rollover campaigns are working better than ever before because so many people have changed jobs. Are Other Lincoln campaigns are working also better simply because people are checking Lincoln more than they used to. Yeah. They're paying attention now because even if they didn't switch jobs, they might think just in case maybe. Even. If I have a limiting belief and I only think of Lincoln resume, maybe Oughta, punch it up and updated I haven't touched it in a while just in case means there are more ripe to receive our advisers messages.

Advisor Facebook Lincoln Seth Green Founder Nubia DOW
Biggest Mistake Lawyers Make in Debtors Exams

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:18 min | Last week

Biggest Mistake Lawyers Make in Debtors Exams

"What what steps give me two or three that people typically take that they shouldn't be taking. Well, the first one is that the typical attorneys first thing they want to do is well. Let's get them in for dinners exam. And the meantime, we'll be sending out some interrogatories will interrogatories are written questions that they have to answer under oath. Yep. They asked the same questions generally that they would ask in a deposition. You know, where do you Bank? How much do you have in? Where do you work? Where's your investment accounts? All those kind of common questions. Are they bring them in for a deposition and they give them what's called a subpoena DT which is subpoena duces tecum, which means bring with you the documents are the records and they Faith bring up surprise surprise when they get to the deposition, they don't have any or certainly not eighty or ninety percent of the records. They're supposed to bring in the ones they bring are incomplete wage and the questions they answer are all dancing around the truth the facts they always say, oh you met those bank records I misunderstood you wanted took all my records. I thought you just wanted my personal checking account. Oh, well, my my attorney has those they're working on our taxes. And of course I couldn't bring tax returns because they're not complete yet, ma'am. Soon as those are done. I'll really get them to you and it's just not effective. I think that taking an early deposition before you have the answer to at least eighty percent of the questions and I know this is kind of a strong position but I think it should be malpractice because the only thing you're accomplishing with your early deposition is you're telling them what you know and what you're after so they can really go hide that information and make it much more difficult more expensive if not impossible to get it. So it's better to get the information about the legal process have it then ask the questions to the 20% that you don't have the answers to your probably not going to get the truth. But at least you can get some perjury on the record wage. So when you do get the answers to those you get some additional charges that you can hold over their head to encourage them to settle.

Duces Tecum Perjury Attorney
Pandemic Relief Money To Help Narrow Digital Divide On Native American Reservations

Native America Calling

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Pandemic Relief Money To Help Narrow Digital Divide On Native American Reservations

"America's digital divide is especially stark on reservations where broadband does often unaffordable or just not available federal pandemic relief money as providing an opportunity to narrow the divide Aaron Bolton reports. Of Small Mountain on the flathead Indian reservation in western Montana sits a brand new one, hundred and eighty foot cell tower confederated sailors and Kootenai tribe infrastructure administrator. Chuck. Reese says in the coming months, it will help Ron can't wireless hyphen Internet's over roughly eighty percent of the reservation to give you an idea of we're bringing fiber optic right in here to all the way up this mountain. I missed his first class connective nearly half of local residents here have no access to high-speed Internet recess. This change will now allow them to take advantage of online education and telehealth and give tribal police connectivity. Ours in February the Federal Communications Commission offered Free Broadband, wireless spectrum, capable of broadcasting high speed wireless Internet tribes initially, not many applied because to make the equipment on those towers really robust. You need a healthy amount of power to the and strong fiber Jeff Blackwell as with Amarin Risk Management and native owned Insurance Company that helps tribes improve digital access within five years. Tribes have to pay to build towers and run fiber optic cable and other utilities to actually make these wireless networks reality. Each project could cost hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars after Congress passed eight billion dollars in federal corona virus relief funding for tribes. In late March tribes submitted more than four hundred applications for the free wireless. Bank trump is it's worthy took this step for broadband purposes. But also utilizing a mechanism that recognizes that placing tribal nations, themselves and the center of the regulatory process has a chance of significance success. However, Blackwell says many tribal lands weren't included in that the F. C. C. will need to make more spectrum available to tribes in the future to shrink the digital divide in Indian country. In the meantime, those like blackwell will be focused on helping tribes currently in the build process succeed

Jeff Blackwell Small Mountain Federal Communications Commiss Aaron Bolton Montana America Kootenai Administrator Chuck Reese Amarin Risk Management RON Congress
Should big tech be broken up?

Talking Tech

02:32 min | 2 weeks ago

Should big tech be broken up?

"Let's start with facebook. It owns the world's largest social network, the most popular photo sharing and Communication Service, namely, facebook instagram and WHATSAPP. It's algorithm decides what you want to see based on how it tracks your every move. The number of people who belong to the facebook network is over two billion people. That's bigger than a combined China united. States Brazil and Russia. And that's before we even start talking about the membership of Instagram in WHATSAPP, which isn't generally duplicative. Well that's too much power for any one company to have. If he asked me Google the default search engine for pretty much anything. You WanNa see. The. ANDROID mobile operating system that has a whopping eighty percent market share worldwide, and if you watch any online video anywhere, it's probably on youtube which Google also. Google's hands are also in self driving cars home smart speaker is designed to run your smart home and way more. You tell me if the world wouldn't be better off having an independent video network or an operating system for mobile that wasn't run by Google. Amazon how many small businesses has gone decimated? Its pricing model undercuts most retailers and when it finds popular selling products. Instead of letting others profit, it copies them with house brand knockoffs and it charges retailers for prime position to. Beyond that, it's aws software is the backbone that runs so many Internet companies from net flicks in linked into facebook and its line of speakers our in our home listening to us in taking notes on what were asking about and being entertained by its prime video competes with TV world. I can see some obvious break-up parts with aws leading the chart. Finally apple the iphone maker argued in Congress that it was rarely number one in any category not phones or computers certainly but it does ranked number one in watches and tablets. So that wasn't exactly truthful. The worry area is the APP store where apple dictates a hefty thirty percent tax on APP developers to show their wares. APP. Developers are starting to fight back and there's certainly no reason why apple should get to be the gatekeeper to APP makers in such a heavy handed way break it up.

Facebook Google Apple Instagram AWS Communication Service China Amazon Brazil Youtube Congress Russia
Am I Supporting My Immune System?

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

04:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Am I Supporting My Immune System?

"Nicole. Thank you so much for being here with us today. Thanks for having me. I'm so excited to be here I. Love This podcast. We love having you on and this is a topic that I think is at the forefront of people's minds, and that is our immune system. So can you give us a little bit of information about why supporting our immune system is so important? I couldn't be more to end thank heavens. Many incredible tools with Tara to help us do that. But. Why it's so important support our immune system is I learn and like many of you that are listening I'm sure you learned a lot it convention and I learned a lot about our immune system. I love how they dove into it and really expanded on it in ensure in simple terms, it's important to support our body's immune system because it's our body's natural defense system. Dr Oskoui four talked about if we didn't have an immune system, you know our bodies, we would only live for a short amount of time because they fight off you know all these dangerous things that are body really needs Armenian system to to protect us against. So I thought that was really interesting and We certainly need an immune system to not only survive but to thrive. You know in our lives. So it's really apparent how important having a high functioning optimal immune system can be to keep us are healthiest are healthy selves. You're absolutely right. It's one of those things we take for granted a little bit until we don't have it anymore. That's right. That's absolutely correct. So what are some things I can do every day? What are some lifestyle changes I can make to help support my immune system I mean if you all have been around. Or just new Tara we love a routine. We love and have learned that you know less is more in our essential oils, and in the products we use it's a long steady strain versus these massive doses and that's what I love about setting up a routine and what can I do? What lifestyle changes can I make to help support my immune system again can be really simple. I keep referring back a doctor Oh doctor ask because he says, you know wash your hands being aware is another great way to support your immune system. Going back to drinking a lot of water, you know it's recommended to drink half are bought half our bodies ideal weight in ounces every day, and you know what will boost your immune system even more is go ahead and add one to two to if you're drinking a large amount of water like myself every day a few drops of citrus essential oils, Mike favorite is. Tangerine. But this just helps our bodies flush those toxins naturally in allows our immune system to function you know at a high level, the function properly, another really great way to boost your immune system is movement exercise. It helps our bodies start to produce those happy hormones in that. Again, we everything is always so interesting how it goes back to to stress our emotions and how. Well, our body is feeling how well it is functioning really has a direct link to how how we're feeling emotionally. So when we're able to move our bodies around and get those happy hormones up, we feel better we feel better immune system can can be supported better sleep sleep sleep sleep our sleep cycle can wreck havoc. I want you to think back to a time Maybe you're cyclical like a lot of us this time of year that time of year you're like, this is a major I wanNA talk to accountants. You know we get the tax season and that's a great time to offer some immune support to them because they're sleeping. Poorly, their diet is wonky because they're working such long hours in this really really affects immune system if you've ever. Pushed really hard for something or had high stress. You'll find your body often after there will be a little bit of a letdown. It's really interesting again, if you'll notice what's your body's trying to tell you? So sleep wash your hands plenty of water diet. It said that anywhere between sixty to eighty percent of our immune system is found in our gut how healthy is your diet? What are we doing to improve our gut helped? Those are all little lifestyle changes that we can make. That really helps support healthy immune system.

Tara Nicole. Dr Oskoui Mike Favorite
'Dune' ditches 2020, while AMC commits to staying open

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

'Dune' ditches 2020, while AMC commits to staying open

"The corona virus pandemic is pushing the rest of this year's movie season into uncertain territory as theaters close and movie releases are delayed I marches are a letter with the latest control scifi film dune was supposed to be one of the big box office draws for the holidays this year but its release has been pushed to next October with other big films like the new James Bond movie and the sequel to the matrix delayed as well theater still have much to count on to fill seats regal cinemas will close temporarily but about eighty percent of AMC theaters are still open a few big movies are still on the schedule for this year like Pixar soul in universal's new cruise movie in November and Wonder Woman nineteen eighty four in December

James Bond AMC Pixar
Mirati to Rival Amgen in Solid Tumors

Breaking Biotech

08:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Mirati to Rival Amgen in Solid Tumors

"So to start I wanNA talk about exact sciences ticker symbol e x a s, and they are now trading at around twelve billion dollar market cap, and what they announced is liquid biopsy testing data in six different cancer types showing a sensitivity of eighty six percent and a specificity of ninety five percent, and they did kind of a grab bag of cancer types. We have lung ovarian, liver pancreatic, and Alpha Jill. And so I did video on exact sciences quite a while ago I thought their evaluation was a little bit toppy back then and was waiting for dipped to buy, and that's what I did during the Cova crisis I took a small position and then I sold just recently at around ninety four and I think is trading just over one hundred dollars right now but this. Is Nice to see them kind of moving into new areas because I think one of the things that they're struggling with is leaning on their old testing kit the colours guard while all these other companies are trying to get into things like liquid biopsy, which it's going to be a real game changer in the space. Once these treatments get validated and approved by the FDA. Now. They're not alone doing this exact sciences is kind of just finally getting into this because other big players like alumina through grail they just acquired this private company called grail officially officially. We've garden health personalisation of been floating around and invitations. Well, who just acquired archer DSL there's a lot of companies in the space, but exact scientists has shown some pretty good success in their previous testing kits. So it just makes sense them to jump into this new area and be a good competitor. So I think right now probably a little bit toppy with the price around one hundred but I'm pretty pleased with the small profit. I made given the number shares that I have. So that's exact sciences. Want to move now into regeneration ticker symbol. And they're trading at a sixty billion dollar market CAP. I did a video on them also a few months ago, looking at kind of their staples in terms of the different products that they offer and I concluded that they were relatively over-valued back. Then I think now also a little bit overvalued, but it does depend on how well their product. So and the kind of revenue they can bring in obviously but the news that we heard is that they released data on their antibody cocktail for covid nineteen. and. What we saw is that it reduced viral loads and symptoms versus placebo in non. Patients who are infected with SARS co to and what they shared our results from initial cohort of two hundred and seventy five patients, and they also have nine hundred or more patients enrolled. So this is kind of a preliminary analysis that they're showing US and they've called it a phase one, two, three trials. So they're doing the PK the safety along with the efficacy and other sorts of secondary outcomes all at once and when I look through their stuff, they started off by kind of categorizing patients based. On Sarah Negative or zero positive and I, think it's important that they do this because we're looking at a treatment for covid nineteen and if people are already sero-positive in their bodies, already mounted an antibody response in order to bring down viral loads. So what regeneration is trying to pose here is that the negative patients which means they have not mount that antibody response have significantly higher viral load and they make a better target for most treatments probably also their antibody cocktail that they're gonNA share data with. So. Then the data that they show here shows a range of efficacy based off of viral load. So we have tended the power of four copies, parallel all the way to tend to the seven copies personnel. So quite a big range in viral load here and I just blew this up on the screen. What we're seeing is that at the higher viral load, the treatment and there two different doses here in the green and the red line, we see that much more dramatic decrease in the amount of viral load in. These patients and it does kind of make sense because if your body's already mounted an antibody response, the window of efficacy is just going to be a bit smaller than if it's before the at which your body's manning response. So I think for these patients, it's definitely positive data. They also looked at other other metrics as well and I'm not going to get into everything but they did look at a day to alleviation of symptoms and they looked at the overall population of patients. It's the difference of nine with Placebo. To between six and eight, depending on the dose that they gave the antibody cocktail with the negative group alone, the placebo was thirteen days and then the low and high dose was six and eight respectively. So obviously a big difference when it comes to whether or not the patient is zero negative or positive. So that's probably going to inform the FDA when it comes to approving the drug or giving some kind of guidance on which patients should take the drug and who are likely to see more positive outcomes from that. So overall. I think it's good. It gets a step ahead of the Gilead data where I don't think we've even seen a placebo group yet. So it's nice to see regenerate actually do this placebo controlled trial. We can see whether or not there is efficacy and I, look forward to seeing the rest of the data I'm not if this merits taking a position regenerate here given that they're such a large company already and they have so many different assets that are I would say more likely to contribute to their bottom line. This doesn't entice me to take a position, but it's nice to see that we're getting all these therapies are starting to see vaccine data, and this just makes me feel better in general that we're going to move towards being able to treat this disease and hopefully get out from under this and then Kinda recover with the economy. With that, let's talk about the main story for today, and that is morality Therapeutics Ticker Symbol M rt ex, and they're trading at a price of one sixty, two point zero five per share giving them a market cap of seven point two, billion dollars. Their Q. Two, twenty, twenty, net loss was eighty, three, million dollars, and this represents an eighty percent increase year over year there their q two net current cash is six, hundred million dollars giving them a runway of about until twenty twenty two I would say but let's also be careful that if they see positive data. This year or next year is a good chance that they're going to raise again. And what Morad is trying to do is develop targeted cancer treatments and they're specifically looking at solid tumors and even more specific than that are K. Rasa inhibitors, and so they have to compounds Marta six, eight, four, nine, and x, one, three, three. They're also looking at checkpoint inhibitor resistance with their compound sicher Vance it, and I'll talk about that in a bit later. To start though we gotta talk about chaos and the reason why this is so important is that chaos mutations are present in a large population of cancer patients. The first thing it's important to note is that chaos is pretty ubiquitous. It's a critical part of the map kinase signaling pathway, and this is very important in basically every single cell. This pathways involved in Cell Proliferation Cell Survival had differentiation here. There's a whole bunch of other stuff and it makes a little bit confusing because it is involved in. So many different pathways that if you were just to inhibit this molecule non specifically, you're likely to see significant side effects with patients. It's for this reason that it's important that we can come up with a targeted therapy that will only target cells that have a mutation in chaos rather than the healthy normal. KS. To talk a little bit more about its function, it works as a GT as and what this means is that it takes a molecule GDP converts it to GDP using that phosphate group to continue the signaling pathway. The next step is Raff or something like that mutations in. A company twenty, one point, six percent of all human cancers, and then I have here that chaos the predominant or exclusive Rask's mutated in three of the top four neoplasms that account for cancer deaths in the US lung colon and pancreatic. Cancer.

FDA United States Cancer Alpha Jill Sarah Negative KS Raff Rask Manning Gilead Solid Tumors Morad Marta
What is the 64-4 Rule and Why You Need to Start Leveraging It with Dennis Brown

Growth Experts with Dennis Brown

04:24 min | 3 weeks ago

What is the 64-4 Rule and Why You Need to Start Leveraging It with Dennis Brown

"A welcome back everybody in day we have a solo episode I. Hope You're not upset it's just me I'm flying solo today but unless you've been living under a rock, most everyone has heard of the eighty twenty principle. So we're gonNA talk about today. But what we're GONNA do is we're going to put the eighty twenty principle on steroids jacket up we're GONNA, put it on steroids to give you even more significant impact on your business. So the short version of the PARETO principle says that eighty percent. Of Your facts come from twenty percent of your causes. Now, when I I read that it was kind of confusing but here's how it translates in a business context. Okay. Because we're here on the growth experts podcast though that's what we talk about businesses in growth right? So let me transition into more of a business conversation. You've probably heard the phrase eighty percent of your results come from twenty percent of your activities or maybe you heard eighty percent of your profits come from twenty percent of your customers. Or maybe you've even heard that eighty percent of your sales come from twenty percent of your sales people. Now, those are just a few. Here's a couple of more they may resonate with you eighty percent of your leads come from twenty percent of your marketing, and the last one of them to share with you unfortunately is that eighty percent of your customer complaints come from twenty percent of your customers. So it makes sense right? Because the fact is not all customers, prospects, sales, people, or even business related. Activities are equal. Therefore, we shouldn't try to treat them as equal right. This means that if you identify the twenty percent and then you focus in double down on those twenty percent of activities, you can see huge dramatic improvement in your productivity and even in your sales. All right. So again, hopefully you're not confused but if you are let me add your confusion now really I'm hoping that I can clarify this by the end. But what I'm about to do is put this eighty twenty principle on steroids all. Right so for example, we know that eighty percent of our profits come from the top twenty percent of our customers. What if we peel the onion back one layer more and did the math again, right. So if we applied the eighty twenty rule to the eighty twenty rule that we've already applied, right so this would equal sixty four percent of our prophet coming from the top four percent of our customers. So let me just walk you through that again again, if it's your applying the eighty twenty rule. To the eighty twenty rule, twenty percent of twenty that's four, and if you do eighty percent of eighty that sixty four. So I'm not very good at math in, it's not an exact science, but that's the basic framework of what we're doing. So think about it after you identify your top twenty percent of customers or better yet you apply the the sixty four four rule and you identify the top four percent of your customers that are generating sixty four percent of your prophet imagine creating a profile of. What each of those groups looks like what each of those customers look like right or prospects or whatever it is that you're you're leveraging here for the eighty twenty rule and focusing all of your sales and marketing efforts towards those potential clients that most closely match that profile I mean it's pretty amazing. How by simply focusing on the right activities on the right customers can have a huge impact on your business. So I decided to share this quick nugget with you today because I truly believe even if. You apply the eighty twenty rule, but even more. So if you apply the sixty four rule that we talked about today I, think it can have a huge impact in many areas of your business, including increasing sales, increasing prophet, increasing, productivity, identifying, and fixing problems within your organization and even improving your overall customer service experience.

How to Grow Faster By Doing Less

Growth Experts with Dennis Brown

03:08 min | Last month

How to Grow Faster By Doing Less

"Everybody. It's me. It's Thursday I'm back for another quick hit with a solo episode and today we're GonNa talk about how to grow faster by doing less i. know it seems a little bit counter intuitive but the fact is if you WanNa grow faster, you need to learn how to do less. So today I'm GonNa talk about the difference between multitasking and Mono tasking studies have shown. That ninety eight percent of people are less effective when trying to multitask I, know that's the case for me but I also understand the lure to trying to do too many things at once the challenge is again, Ninety eight percent of people are less effective when they're trying to multitask. So my strategy for many years now has been more of a focused mono tasking strategy. No matter where. You are in Your Business Journey, you need to understand the power of prioritizing your activities. PARETO's principle otherwise known as the eighty twenty rule shares and establishes the fact that eighty percent of your results are going to come from twenty percent of your activities in other words if you were to put together a to do list for today and you made that list two of the activities on. That list are going to give you eighty percent of your benefit. They're going to contribute to eighty percent of your success while the other eight out of those ten or only going to contribute to twenty percent of your success. So the power of prioritizing your activities is really really important I remember early in my career as an entrepreneur, I would put together my to do list every day and It wasn't unusual to have ten or fifteen or even twenty things on my list but rarely if ever did I accomplish them all. But for some reason having a big to do list made it seem like I was busy made it seemed like I was more productive. made it seem like I was going to grow faster but in reality that couldn't be further from the truth so what? I learned to do with those big to do list was to take one of four actions either to dump it off my list to delegate it to defer it or to just do it and I focused on prioritizing those activities that we're GonNa have the biggest impact on my business, and from that point forward my to do list every day shrank down to something that was much more. Manageable, which are typically a list of two or maybe three activities or goals for the day things that I absolutely must focus on and need to get done because they are gonNa have a huge impact on my business. It's well known that any successful entrepreneurs going to tell you that focus is one of the most powerful forces in business. So you need to learn how to mono task. Verses Multitask and again, this is just another way to say focus is the key to success. Don't forget about those four D's when it comes to your to do list either dump it, delegate it, defer it or just do it. It's worked for Nike, it's worked for me I'm sure it will work for you

Nike
"eighty percent" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

03:15 min | 11 months ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"And I understand you're gonna be there for that one it it'll be really interesting to see because I read a lot of stories I know you have to about just this this weird relationship or lack there of between the Chargers in LA yeah the charges are clearly really NFL orphaned by no earlier in the year Pittsburgh was out there and it was eighty percent Steeler fans and they even played the Steelers theme song from sticks and that that upset the Chargers recently the Packers were out there and a lot of Green Bay fans were chanting GOPAC go in and this is something you're seeing around the NFL's the V. D. I. I think it's because of the secondary market StubHub vivid in the way you can get tickets now I saw the highlights of of the Steelers and cardinals in Glendale and all you saw were terrible towels in the stands and and that's in suburban Phoenix so it'll be a very weird vibe in Carson next Sunday it in for me it's it's kind of a personal mission once I go to that stadium I can say I've been to every NFL venue and this is really my last chance because they're gonna we Carson angle the angle of next year so I figure I better get out there and hearing one final thought on on stadiums and visiting fan base is coming in I think Vegas is going to be like that for the raiders now there's going to be a ton of raider fans are going to make the trip to Vegas eight times a year from the bay area and all those raider fans in the LA area are going to make that trip trip I mean that that's kind of a weekend tradition in California to go to Vegas I get that but when you have teams like the Vikings making in that rare trip to Vegas to play the raiders I think it's going to be insane you're you're gonna see a ton of out of town fans in Vegas whenever the raiders holes I think you're absolutely right I mean it's a go to destination as it is as far as tourism goals and so so Vegas is going to be another one of those spots I I I think you know South Florida southern California even Phoenix to some degree and probably Vegas in the future it is right for these these visiting fan bases to stage a coup d'etat I mean when I talk to look one trade will after the game and by the way look want a great story he's really emerging as a as a guy who can help the Vikings moving forward but one but I brought up the fact you'll have a lot of fans next week in so cal and he said yeah we'll probably see him at the beach and I mean he knew about that the Vikings are expecting that so I think you're going to going to a very friendly situation what they have to do is is is not get too comfortable because that's a green base that happen when they won out their loss to the Chargers that they maybe got lulled to sleep by all their fans they saw on the stance ninety always good to visit with you we'll talk soon for sure all right we have a great night all right Gerry is Eric Nelson who is over a US bank stadium saw the lakes workman like victory over the lions twenty to seven bugs tonight and for the final three in a way to play the Chargers next Sunday at three home to Green Bay two weeks from tomorrow night a Monday night game and then the bears in a new in game in the finale hopefully the bears still don't have a shot by that time the lakes of already wrapped.

eighty percent two weeks
"eighty percent" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Over eighty percent of them are in lockstep with forty five and I asked the question earlier in the show because it appears to me that if Donald Trump I'll say his name I generally don't but he is the chosen one as he has proclaimed if if he is a messianic character then what religion is he connected with other than the religion of white supremacy four four eight nine two two seven zero three and is the entity the religion of white supremacy I guess that's the real question brotherly come does a zero extraordinaire change from the rat a mine is the door because the music on radio angle hello I agree with that and it is you know I wonder how terrified they are what they're listening to the internet letter exchanging with getting to your main thing it's not religion we must teach our young people and people that are presently in all religions will reject in psychology that religion was use for religion is not the TT religion is the format that for winner of the war allow you to you ask he determined how to keep you under his command would you agree with me on that yes I would knowing this now and having the intellectual properties to address it is the important aspect of our age back to Florida the beloved community and some of the elderly we've got some folks out here in the fifties that need a home to operate from and that's what we should be developing to address the refrigerators not to think we're going to change the oil changes basically the wall and that's what's happening we were involved it makes me nervous it makes us nervous because literally they've given us survival and we're used to serve five we're not used to thrive you feel what I'm saying look you all would you say no no I would you take this a.

Florida Donald Trump eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Friends an eighty percent chance might not be enough to order tent and it's that kind of it's that sort of is that is that sense of where you know where you know how what's the use of a better forecast if it doesn't help our decisions I think that's reasonable with the day to day forecast you know just because it was clear was gonna rain Monday morning in DC from four days ago of wasn't clear how it was going to rain why we're talking before you know you know what point this morning you know what point it seemed like things were getting intense and even more significantly what decisions would people have made differently had Thursday's forecast been clear and I think that that idea that you can strive technically for perfect perfect forecast but if it doesn't help you make decisions I think it's kind of where I mean you're all just love it because it acknowledges that they're right you know that it's like the ball is in some ways I think out of out of your court but it it's only out of your court if you recognize that technical superiority to technical achievement of the forecast itself right right but you still get angry emails yeah I know for sure I mean I and I thank you it I think we you know weather forecasts have come a long way and we're really good at capturing what I've what what we call synoptic scale weather systems is our large scale systems fronts a low pressure systems but when it comes down to for casting individual thunderstorms which was what we had this morning models are still just developing in that area we have what we call conduction allowing models which try to get thunderstorms and small scale whether features correct and that you can only do sometimes within a couple hours I mean even at five AM six AM this morning it wasn't clear that that complex of thunderstorms was really going to light up and then tracked straight through the the DC area on a leash historic flooding about so there's a lot of progress we need to make I mean even as our forecast of god in the day better each decade as you you tell you spoke about it's it's a it's a really localize pine scale forecast where there's a lot of progress where I think we can still we still make which I think is a good segue to my next question which is you know the importance of observations because of it and all models they require observations and what whether yet and we talked about all the different types of observations which are are needed for a robust numerical weather prediction system but there are there are some concerns right now in the larger sort of public private international whether community about where will be collecting data in the future they're a lot more their new data sources coming online there are private companies which are law launching weather satellites which want to sell their data to a rather than making them three you have you have remote sensing.

eighty percent four days
"eighty percent" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"If eighty percent lighter virtually dust free odor control fantastic. It's beautiful on, on both to see and for your cat's paws to us. It's low tracking and of course, most importantly, it will keep tabs on your cats health, all at the same price the one supply, some of the other great litters that are out there at the market. So I encourage listeners to give us a try and check out the testimonials from other customers. I feel very confident they'll be very satisfied as being the best litter that they've ever used. I know that my cat crew had no problem adjusting right away. They jumped in Dana, no one had a problem with the litter box, and I didn't see any color. So I'm glad happy. It's nice to know it's so nice to know that if, if I see colors, then I know I can act on them versus the mystery of, you know, my cats help exactly. We already created this litter to already do. All the things are already doing one also just add the beautiful tool. Inconvenience also having something to actively, keeping tabs overtime over months over years. So just in case, something, everyone wrong, you'd be the first to know fabulous, and thank you so much for the offer. Everyone go to pretty little dot com. Cat one on one in the promo box and you'll get twenty percent off on your first order. Thank you so much for coming on cata tude, and telling us all about the wonders, and all about pretty litter. Absolutely pleasure. Thank you Bye-bye. I love this show. I love hearing about these fabulous products.

Dana eighty percent twenty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on WSB-AM

"You're taking eighty percent of sales tax revenue from sporting goods stores and reserve it for this fund depriving, the general fund of this money, which ultimately means you're depriving other things of money that you don't necessarily need here. There are other ways to fund parks in these sources. I mean, for example, there are already conservation. They're already fees to get into Georgia state parks. I don't think this is necessary in all it's gonna do is deprive other resources of money and create a slush fund here that you, and I both know we're going to be abused by legislators and bureaucrats. I don't think this is necessary. However, good the intention is for something. Like this the second amendment. You will confront is one. I am vehemently opposed to and I have a lot of fringe who support it you should see my text messages in the last week over the second amendment. Now, the second amendment creates a statewide business court in it claims to lower costs, enhance efficiency and promote predictable judicial outcomes. Now what happens here in Georgia? We have municipal courts, we have state courts, we have superior courts, we have a court of appeals, and we have a supreme court, and what this would do. Create a whole new branch within the judiciary, a state business court and business disputes that are considered complex would go to this court. And the reason they want to do it is basically because they think juries are dumb. And we they want essentially to have special courts with experts decide business issues. I have a problem with this. And I'll tell you why after we.

Georgia eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Just really wanna do this gm of a sports team almost she is and she has connections right and we've worked with great people before like allison jones is one of the greatest kombi casting directors ever she did master of none for us and parks and rec and a good casting director again making a movie making a show isn't a singular endeavor can't stress that enough it's so many different people and when someone like the casting director brings their talents their hard work their effort it just changes everything because they might show you someone you've never seen before and that person transforms the movie there's an old saying that a you know a movie is eighty percent script and casting and somewhat you know i it's just if one of those things is is off yes screwed you know it just grew it it just you it's i challenge anyone to make a great movie out of a dog shit script or with really really poor actors it's just really hard it's just really hard so yeah we just started reading people and we're still in that process right now so you're going the process how many characters do you have to fill all of a man so in this movie got i in this movie i don't know some thirty or something like that most of them they're all there's this movie is i believe all asian i think there's one black woman that so i i don't know if there's any basically brown the the background basically so man it's a lot as actors and she'll be the title of the movie why people in the back there well that was that was kind of funny because there was a there was an upset of master none that we did last year that i directed called new york i love you and that episode actually for months and months was the working title was background because one of the ideas was what if you took the people who are always in the background of big movies and shows like a doorman or like someone who was a clerk at bodega or someone who's a cab driver everyone of them has an interesting story probably more interesting than the main so let's just follow them around colorado is great nerving with the scene of the deaf person to because i never happens right put you in their shoe yeah that was one of the things i really fought for i remember early on we writing the script and i was walking on the street and i texted his eason i said hey for this chapter that we're doing about the the death cleric that should just be silent it's just totally silently drop out all audio and we'll have it all be an aunt cell and he was like oh that's a great idea and so we did it and we shot it that way everything and then who turned it in netflix like you guys to be silent because i thought my computer was fucking broken i like you guys you know put some sound effects in really no deaf people don't get the luxury of adding sound effects of airlines like that's not the case but it was really important to us also in that episode that we you know that it wasn't like oh these people's leser said they have to work so hard it's like yeah that's part of their lives but everyone has their job like it's more like their lives are funny and it's you know they have the they fall in love and they complain and they argue about their sex lives and all that stuff and so yeah that's that's part of it as well so you know the other thing about this movie is you know we've talked about this before where when you cast a you know a white lead and suddenly it's about their family will then it's ten white people so basically the.

gm allison jones eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The power should go out we'll keep you posted seven thirty three now the record heat continuing and the wildfire that's destroyed more than twenty structures including several homes in the santa barbara county city of kalita is now eighty percent contained most people who'd been forced to leave their neighborhoods have now been allowed to return one of them tell cbs to heat originally planned to stay and was actually watering down his roof as the fire approach but then he thought better of and my son's yelling because things are falling on him you know he's getting burned and said let's get out here let's just go despite the devastation there are no reports of anyone being hurt by that fire and local authorities think the early evacuation orders are the major reason for that authorities say a brush fire burning their homes in the verduga mountains just north of burbank no longer is threatening homes saudi officials say evacuation orders were lifted last night for neighborhoods near wildwood canyon park at fire broke out yesterday afternoon and quickly grew to more than forty five acres but firefighters from several area agencies rushed to assist and helped establish containment lines around thirty percent of the fire as of last night and three homes have been damaged in two cars destroyed in a small brushfire in granada hills it ignited yesterday afternoon near the no would golf course a resident tells cbs to the flames approached fast i was in the house and all of a sudden i saw flames come rise above the golf course and we're scared to death that came the flames came right up to my back lawn firefighters held the blaze to about an acre in size there is no word on a cause as you've been hearing four at least four of those young boys rescued from the cave in thailand will continue to update that story for you right now seven thirty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the fives this report brought to you by.

kalita cbs burbank wildwood canyon park granada hills thailand santa barbara county verduga mountains golf forty five acres eighty percent thirty percent ten minutes
"eighty percent" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Affected by salah clusters with a accuracy is over eighty percent now it's important to note that even more accurate diagnoses can be made by taking some some trees and testing them in the lab but that's not necessarily practical his annika trine malign from the institute of beet research in germany so the copy everywhere so sometime we have farms which quite large size and define mars not able to monitor and observe each field on his on his own so therefore would be helpful to have this kind of remote sensing technologies and also not every an expert and one could be much more accurate of the us these kind of noninvasive sends an isn't just cameras on flying vehicles the for sensing a much broda yes so there many new developments regarding robotics ryden also there are autonomous vehicles which can drive over your fear they can be quick camera come take picture and can obtain inflammation from your robot for example so what's next that public system his research is produced with the european commission but how it's used or implemented is down to the individual member states his public well we are doing here the jails e to develop methodologies that will will help the member state in order to better monitor on quantify undetected the presence of the disease in their areas there's also a lot of interest in technologies light publiz from private companies here's katrina again that's a very interesting meant right now more and more digital technologies find to way too technical technological development and different companies invest money and projects in these kind of technologies depth floor it is expected to vivian vanda before the farmer more more in near future but most of the work which is published as basic research and the next step would be to provide to the foul that was annexed trine marleine from the institute for sugarbeet research in gemini before you had poplar soccer tejada from the joint research centre part of the european commission you can read published paper for nature dot com food slash and plants late in the show it's the news channel where we'll be discussing plans to harness brac terrier to fight disease before that benjamin thompson is here with this week's for such highlights researchers in china of greatest super hydrophobic material from eggshells capable of withstanding radiation corrosive liquids an abrasion super hydrophobic materials have a range of uses for example creating self cleaning windows filtering water from oil that many existing options fragile the team behind this new work may have cracked that problem by collecting eggs from local supermarkets mixing them i mistook acid then zinc oxide particles the resulting material showed extraordinary stability retaining its ability to repel water even after being attacked by sandpaper strongly acidic or alkaline solutions and uv radiation the research is that the material will provide new ideas for realworld applications for super hydrophobic technologies this exciting research over at advanced engineering materials trees can survive the hundreds.

eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

"Of a better way to put it an awfully have been very epidemic and women but featuring a women's speakers which i think is a pretty exciting way to do it so the audience is a bit mixed even if it is maybe eighty percent women but the panels and the speaking and the hosting in the moderating and the and saying all of it is one lead which is kind of exciting at an you know i've done these before myself i like to do them where i don't talk about it at all i just make sure that all the guests are women because i think sometimes you have to you have to lead normalcy by being normal right and i think you have to speak up so it certainly come up in my life frequently and more than one time i've heard you know we would have met women but we just couldn't find any that were qualified and anyway i hope we can put in the show notes one of my favorite twitter accounts satire counts as man who has it all basically reverses things that you would hear he changes the gender of of common tweets or common sayings and i think it originated coming off of women's magazines so you'll wake up and it'll be like you know men wake up early you know wife's gonna work time to stress about your weight and eight to almonds helpful things like that but one of the most beloved threads was one where i think it was a set a history teacher was looking for famous men in history and having having trouble coming up with them and you know it was it just the the wisdom of crowds right people wasn't didn't cleopatra have a husband didn't he do something like it just went on and on like this and that's kinda my that's kinda my answer i've heard too often like we just can't find a woman who fits the bill you're not looking right you're not looking yeah have you been invited to events or benefit to be on panels and they sort of go well we'd love to have you on i mean we definitely wanna have woman on the panel and that sort of snakes its way in to the to the decision process i said out loud and again i won't name the guilty parties of i'm nobody's token but yes set in a public setting so none of us appreciate that either i do understand that somebody's got a lead but i love what i'm saying in the community of take somebody with you i think there's a it's like a the ultimate amway's game i mean we hear about the boys network the good old boys network i think things can work in reverse people people are going to gather and cluster and pair bond based on some shared quality right and it can be any number of things but if you have friends in the industry who fit the bill and provided versity of voice for whatever slice that is you know and there's a million of them i love diversity of voice works i always try to have diverse teams because as much as you try to think outside your own narrow confines is just easier when you when you add anybody to it that's not like you for any reason age time in career cultural background anything it really does improve the conversation yeah no i agree i agree part of part of what we're sort of going with this and i wanna bounce ideas off you maybe maybe we should've bounce it off you just sent an email but i thought it would bounce it off on the show so i think if we go back and look at the guests that have been on the cloud cast we probably you know the makeup of the guests probably look very much like a lot of tech events it is very male dominated we've been we've had a number of female guests but not in any sort of large proportion maybe more so than anywhere else and i think we we we try very hard with sort of all the guests where we're trying we always have you just want we just want your passionate come across we're not trying to we don't have really any agenda with or trying to do but i suspect that somewhere in there like everything that we do on the show is interviewing somebody else right so no matter what their point of view is it always sort of comes across from whatever questions.

eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Of the state's in about eighty percent the of the bill state's alone could cost the bill the democrats alone could a cost few the seats democrats in the us a senate few seats and set november in the us because senate people and set november because people are not with the democrats are not on with this issue the democrats on this all issue the horror stories all that they the horror throw at stories us your that pending they throw mistreatment at us of you'll illegal penny alien mistreatment children on of the illegal trump alien administration children on the trump administration it you'll be it painted hurry you'll be painted hysterically upon the liberal hysterically left journalistic upon the canvas liberal left journalistic it canvas people it are not stupid people on this are issue not stupid the problem on this is issue it's the all problem a bunch of lies is and it's desperate all a bunch attempt of lies user and losing desperate attempt legal user alien position losing a legal as alien a weapon position against the current as administration a weapon against the current and administration the voters are saying you know and the voters i don't are care saying you how know you gonna paint i don't this care i'm how you're gonna sorry paint this for these i'm people sorry but for you these you people don't want but to separate you families you don't want to separate it's very families easy it's don't very cross easy the border in the don't first cross place the border you in want the to first stop place the separation you of want families to stop the separation build of families the wall build the wall the democrats would rather have the a campaign democrats would issue rather than have a a solution campaign they issue want than a a problem solution they want a problem they didn't want a solution they they didn't never want a solution remember they never the remember the the obama administration bomb go bama had administration both houses of congress had for a both few houses for of a congress couple of for years a few for a couple they sure years as heck didn't do and anything they about sure as it heck then didn't do because anything they about didn't want it then to do because anything they didn't about want it then to do anything about it then because they need the campaign because they issue need they the don't campaign want solutions issue they don't want solutions and the solution is a wall and the of solution solution is is a wall the solution doubling is down on doubling down enforcement on of enforcement existing of law existing law because a crime because is being a committed crime is being committed illegal aliens are guilty illegal aliens of are guilty of committing a crime committing a they crime are federal they fugitives are federal because they fugitives have broken federal because they have broken law federal law besides this idea besides that this idea that children are just being stuck children in cages are just or whatever being stuck in cages in the last or whatever fiscal year in ninety the last percent fiscal of apprehended year ninety children percent released of apprehended to a sponsor children released whose to a sponsor either parent or close whose relative either parent or close number relative one number two number allies one children number are two coming allies coming children over are coming unaccompanied coming over unaccompanied and there's nothing you can do and that there's they're nothing already you separated can do that they're already separated and also understand and that not also all of them understand are these that precious not all of little them are children these precious little children while the democrats work on while bringing the democrats tears work here on is bringing because tears criminals here may is be separated because criminals from their children may be separated from their children and remember many of these and children remember came many unaccompanied of these children came what about on unaccompanied the ms thirteen what members about the posing ms thirteen as children members posing as children what what about the people what like what the ranchers about the people along the like border the ranchers who live in along the the border who live who live with in shadows the who live moving with shadows across the property moving across often the property young people often young people who caused damage to their property who caused a damage deaf to to their their property livestock a deaf.

us eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Takeout

"A longtime career staffer who has counted although i'm not sure the countess accurate that there have been eleven nobel prize winners who've worked at ca but very often it was some junior kid who just got out of grad school that turned out to what as an example one of them was paul krugman who was a junior person at the working for mardi feldstein in the reagan administration it might surprise paul's readers to know that he and paul krugman 'cause he described a book you co authored in nineteen ninety nine with james glassman called dow thirty six thousand as youthful indiscretion he did was it well no in fact if you look that he if you really wanna go to paul and you want to wonder about like how his personality changed as he joined the new york times a he wrote a column for fortune before he wrote a column for the new york times and i would commend you to you and when he went to the new york times he came much more political and i would commend to you the fortune article about my book and i pretty much agree with that it was much more positive than thinks he said and again the the negative stuff that he said about it started after i became a political figure in two thousand because you as you recall was the chief economic adviser for john mccain and john mccain wins new hampshire and all of a sudden this nobody can it has it is more politically interesting to you know possible opponents since then all of a sudden you know there's all this mischaracterization that he did of what's in the book and so on but i mean the basic ideas and let's just say this way because i know it's not the purpose of the podcast to discuss it only is that if you go back to the late nineties right then the equity markets have gone up a lot a few years in a row kind of like what we're experiencing right now yeah and then there are a lot of people who didn't make any money on that because they had always been afraid of stocks they had known any stocks and then if you went around people would say well is it too late to get in is it too to get in and as the market peaked and webby buying high backstory in the backstory was that i was at the at the fed advising alan greenspan on the state of the economy when bob schiller came to the fed when the dow was at about five thousand and said that there'd be eighty percent drop it let me tell you if there was eighty percent drop in the stock market then it would be really bad for the fed and the economy and so i had to really analyze arguments and i decided that if you modeled correct me that it wasn't too late to buy stocks at five thousand wasn't to buy stocks eighty six hundred or so your team out with a ten thousand and let me just finish it to the thirty six thousand is how i would market have to be for you to know that it that it's too late and that was the math problem that we solve the wealth it's thirty six thousand than if you're buying eight you should feel comfortable that you'll make money over the next x years right so you weren't wrong with the book provocative title as are supposed to have yeah and there's nothing that you look back on in any way cautiously about the confidence of your ability to analyze things economic okay very good let me ask you about the economics of immigration is it a net positive for this country yeah so i think the immigration is something that of course is very heated issue right now and before i entered the administration you know has the communists at the american enterprise institute of course wrote lots and lots of things and one of the things that i wrote a long time ago was a an article about immigration in the us and i was just analyzing the share of the workforce that is immigrants both legal and illegal in the us compared to other countries and the the thing that i found fascinating which i think is thought provoking for the kind of thinkers that listen to take out or takeout excuse me is that the share of the labor force of the us that is immigrants beagle illegal is about the lowest share of any developed country like we're right down there with japan and france in terms.

eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Nerve in your body called the vegas nerve now what most people don't understand is the vegas nerve is sending like eighty percent of its data from the body to the brain thinking not from the brain to the body which is what people think that your brain is telling your body what to do with the feel all of that eighty percent of the biggest nerve in your body is reporting sensations back to the brain to say this is the state that we're in now who's the loudest communicator the microbiome so now you have this nerve that facilitates the communication of colony of trillions of little bugs literally bugs that are in a mood they're in some state and they're telling you how to feel about your you're feeling it is that's part of it for sure but it all creates a systemic sense that you're getting this toy little feedback loop from your body that there is no difference between your brain your brain is not some standalone oregon and your body it's just it's like total communication feedback loop which is how the body becomes a subconscious it it has so much ability to god this is where now i'm using dangerous words because they're not accurate they're just directionally correct but like they remember they perceive they anticipate and so you'll walk into a room and you'll feel the hairs on your arm center and you're like why are the hairs sending i don't even know where i'm at i don't know what i'm picking up on your picking up on something right the bodies read some signal or some something that's in your subconscious as read some signal somewhere and suddenly you're totally unnerved you don't know why and you start trying to piece together with your conscious mind what's happening do you watch it lanta loveland okay great show there's a cool moment where they go to get his jacket.

oregon eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Well they're jammed into this teeny little area they're probably not fed some of the women could have been raped happens all the time they're exploited they're beaten they're raped in some cases and sometimes they're killed and democrats want nothing done with any of it they'll just say well they're just looking for a better life well no i mean they're not gonna find it because the coyotes don't allow it and the coyotes want their eight thousand dollars per person and if you don't have it you're going to pay a price in these aren't necessarily just people that are coming here to make a better life you've got ice rating the businesses in new york last week yeah and i just did the math on the arrest they arrested a couple hundred eighty percent of those that they arrested in these ice rates in new york state in new york city i believe it was eighty percent of them had criminal records so they're actually just eighty percent just the eighty percents so so i mean there are mostly just good hardworking decent people why why are we breaking up families i mean they're just here to live a better life i mean they're not doing you know why it's hate mongering it's they hate people different than them yeah they hate people i don't have a criminal record so you're right that's probably what it triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three more pecorelli's coming up.

new york eighty percent eight thousand dollars hundred eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"To get alone i don't think fifty thousand i mean if she's making a mistake anywhere i don't think so well let's let's just why i don't even understand what you're saying i mean to get alone an eighty percent loan why why what would what does that to value right there look at seventy two to thirty take a home just take a two thirty just take two thirty yes and and do eighty percent percent of that is is eighty let's see what is eighty percent of that hold on she has me let me see is one hundred eighty four thousand he's it's right there tom no no i'm saying one hundred and eighty four thousand on an eighty percent loan to value in let's say another five year let's say your mom lives another five or six years words that can obey yeah but there's nothing to prevent you do you want to refinance it sooner a means she can do it i don't know if she'll qualify she probably that's kind of my question she's not she's not going to qualify i was thinking well because there needs to be so many home improvements done i'm not sure how much it's going to as you may just want to buy it from her that's the best way to do it seriously to buy it from her because otherwise otherwise you get the same tax benefits if you buy it from her they don't have the money to pay the loan though i heard on you guys to show that that there was some kind of mortgage company that that helps you like get a mortgage and then helps you gives you enough money so that you can do some of their needed repairs got to qualify okay so let's talk about this your your mom's not going to qualify do you qualify for a loan i think i do credit although what is your what is your income income.

tom eighty percent five year six years
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"That's a huge number and now you compare that uh other places that you know we we condemn them for their uh their stance on on female rates but then we're lucky golfway more peaceful and then eighty percent of those women in prison are mothers there are two point seven million children in america with a parent in prison so what we're doing is breaking up this whole family dynamic making the streets unsafe about providing a structure fifteen cool so we just want to open up the conversation you know it's really easy to get up the they've done a crime they should go away hell but it's just not the case that's not what works a lot of the people in jail have been victimized themselves so when they go into prison we've victor buys them even more one in ten people going to prison or raped we're not putting a stop to that we're allowing your we're making jokes about it so we just want to open up the discussion that's really important there's a lot of change going on and our world now we just want me to do a little part of it david these are all important things you're talking about survivors guide to prison in theaters now but the question has to be asked are you walking up hill are you are are why are you are you are you fighting a sneeze uh why these very passionate but why do you sound so deal.

america david eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Tons of uh you have more of a chance of being locked up in america than anywhere else in the world and we call our country the land of the free and it's just not the case we lock up onethird of all of the women in the world that's a huge number and now you compares to other places that you know we we condemn them for their uh their stance on on female rates but then we're lucky your way more peaceful and then eighty percent of those women in prison are mothers there are two point seven million children in america with a parent in prison so what we're doing is breaking up this whole family dynamic making the streets unsafe about providing a structure for people so we just want to open up the conversation and you know it's really easy to get a child the of they've done a crime they should go away but but it's just not the case that's not what works a lot of the people who in jail have been victimized themselves so when they go into prisons we vic the buys them even more one in ten people going to prison or reach but we're not putting a stop to that we're allowing you we're making jokes about his so we just want to open up the discussion it's really important there's a lot of change going on and our world now just want to do a little part of it david these are all important things you're talking about survivors guide to prison in theaters now but the question has to be asks are you walking up hill are you are are why are you are you a treadmill argue you fighting a sneeze uh why do you very passionate but why do you sound so wind deal.

america david eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Then as i see hey in some cases as you giving it to people like planned parenthood around sharp then or or um where the clintons i mean they're giving it to people like nothing to do with collective bargaining and what's worse is is that when we have asked union household members if they are okay with this practice no eighty percent are opposed and we have dvd burden not fifty but eighty percent or oppose so even some union members that i would guess are either register democrats and door liberal progressives by their own definition said they don't like this practice well actually we have done the demographic breakdown we've done uh hispanics we've got republicans independence repub democrats everybody pivot surround an eighty percent eighty percent approval of stopping this practice and the only people who are generally in support of it our number one the left politicians who benefit from having this um this p these pr campaigns supporting their agendas or you know the union the union leadership you know the unions today are not about wages and working conditions they're not about calling strikes which uh which i think is fine the unions today or political parties they are they are the atm of the democratic party and they collect all this money because if you want a certain job you have to join the union you don't have a lot of choice and then they collect this money out of your do's and they give it to these people and they curry favour with them and the other they're crazy part about it is that while we now have about a hundred and 75 republican house and senate members who have signed on to stop this practice we don't have every one of them and if you went to our website which is employee rights act dot com employee rights act outcome you can see all the members on the republican party who have agreed that this should be stopped but there is a budget for them who have not agreed and they.

democratic party republican party senate eighty percent