35 Burst results for "eighty nine percent"

New York Isn't Dead

Squawk Pod

02:04 min | Last month

New York Isn't Dead

"It was the headline struck at the heart of cities. During the pandemic new york is dead. Forever author investor james outdoors op-ed declared new york in a death spiral because quote businesses are remote and they aren't return to the office ended up leading jerry seinfeld to pen. His celebrated appeal declaring that new york. Sure as hell will be back so a year later. Who was right robert. Frank joins us with more robert. Good morning andrew jerry. Seinfeld's words still inspiring new yorkers year later with that hashtag. nyc is not dead and that of course was a response to all tutors. Op ed saying that. Remote work empty office. Buildings boarded up restaurants and hotels. Rising crime and high taxes would hollow out the city for years or decades. Now who was right. Well a year later on the residential real estate size that side that has rebounded sales more than doubling over the past year prices almost back to pre pandemic levels and do rentals having their best quarter in recent history. You look at restaurant traffic. That was down. Eighty nine percent a year ago from pre penned democ. Now it's about half of those prepaid pandemic levels. Mta subway ridership. It is improving but it is still about half what it was pre pandemic hotel occupancy now at around sixty seven percent that compares to about forty percent a year ago so improvement there as well. But new york's recovery future depends a lot on office workers and that is the big unknown. There was forty seven million square feet of empty office space in midtown as the first quarter and then if you look at rental rates they are down nine percent from a year ago a year ago only twelve percent of new york city workers were back in the office. Now it is twenty three percent and guys with the delta variant. We thought people would come back in right after labor day. Now we're looking at mid october. Maybe so until we get those office workers back until we know how many do come back. New york's recovery is still open to question

James Outdoors New York Frank Joins Andrew Jerry ED Robert Jerry Seinfeld Seinfeld NYC New York City
Syrians Vote in Election Certain to Give Assad New Mandate

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Syrians Vote in Election Certain to Give Assad New Mandate

"Syrians have voted in a presidential election almost certain to give the incumbent bashar al assad of forty seven year term. He's ruled the country since the death of his father in two thousand in the last election held in two thousand and fourteen had secured almost eighty nine percent of the vote with turnout at more than seventy three percent. This election is likely to deliver a similar result willett. The result is dependent on the country's two biggest allies russia and iran. Dr laura james is a middle east analyst at the global advisory firm oxford analytica and. She joins me now north. Thanks for coming on. Do we have the results yet. No they're not do until friday evening I think we can make a fair guess at them. Though to be honest. I mean is there any chance that russia could perhaps derail the selection. That's no indication that they want to at the moment There's always a question. Mark over how long russia will see asset is an asset rather than a liability. But i think generally the assumption is that keeping him in place keep things relatively stable that trying to bring somebody else in certainly. It isn't a to be played to soon. Possibly at some point they could bring in somebody similar as part of a deal for western reconstruction aid. But we're very very far from that point. In iran influence iran is also supporting asset again as a source of stability and as a gateway into the country. Pro-iranian militias are playing a very important role there and iran is looking for a reconstruction con contracts and most of all a routine into lebanon where it supports the hezbollah movement so again for a run asset is an important asset.

Bashar Al Assad Dr Laura James Oxford Analytica Russia Iran Willett Middle East Mark Lebanon Hezbollah
Lakers Blown Out By Clippers As Offense Sputters

Lakers Nation Podcast

01:45 min | 6 months ago

Lakers Blown Out By Clippers As Offense Sputters

"Dive into it here. The Lakers do wind up dropping this game. 104 286 not pretty the Clippers were pretty much in demand from the the opening jump. They they were in control. They had the game bending to their whim the entire way. In fact, they started out I believe the score was tended to at one point. The Lakers just could not score and the Clipper scored. I believe their first 5,000 baskets on the night the Clippers shot 48% or on the afternoon. I should say in Forty-Eight percent from the field fifty percent from three eighty-nine percent from the free throw line on nine attempts for a Hummer for points. Whereas the Lakers not quite so good. The Lakers only had 38 points at halftime finished with 86. So I guess there's that and that's birth. 31.4 quarter but by that point the Clippers are kind of packed it in forty percent from the field for the Lakers 30% from 3. That's not good enough to get it done and then 75% from the free throw line 15 to 20 shooting page eighteen from the line eighteen turnovers for the Lakers seven offensive rebounds. Here's the thing what really stood out to me just forget the stats just watching the game. What stood out to me was that the Lakers they were having a hard time first and foremost getting the Lake of the Clippers to miss right? They were trying to get stops and they were struggling to do that. But when they did how many times do they give up offensive rebounds either 13 offensive rebounds for the Clippers? And so that is demoralizing for a defense when you work and you work and you work and you grind and finally you get a stop you get somebody to miss wage and then you give up the offensive rebound and you have to do it all over again. And so thirteen offensive rebounds to the Clippers combined with their field goal percentage already being high. That's a death sentence.

Lakers Clippers
Lakers Lose To The Clippers in Los Angeles Derby

Lakers Nation Podcast

00:39 sec | 6 months ago

Lakers Lose To The Clippers in Los Angeles Derby

"Dive into it here. The Lakers do wind up dropping this game. 104 286 not pretty the Clippers were pretty much in demand from the the opening jump. They they were in control. They had the game bending to their whim the entire way. In fact, they started out I believe the score was tended to at one point. The Lakers just could not score and the Clipper scored. I believe their first 5,000 baskets on the night the Clippers shot 48% or on the afternoon. I should say in Forty-Eight percent from the field fifty percent from three eighty-nine percent from the free throw line on nine attempts for a Hummer for points. Whereas the Lakers not quite so good. The

Lakers Clippers
Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

09:54 min | 6 months ago

Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

"Today i'm joined by ellison who's a student teacher on our secondary religious education program. Hi l. s. that thomas. Thanks for coming today. You've carried out a piece of literature based research for your lead partnership school who we can't name because of the terms of the ethic approval for the research project but this school and they gave you a topic to look into because of interest to them for their own kind of school development. So what was that topic that the school gave you said topic was an kind of split into three parts. They gave us a choice of either looking at vulnerable learners. And whatever that might be whether it's saw or more able and talented excetera ben. They said we could do a study on blended learning on how we teach in a blended learning environment or the third option was to combine those two together. So how do you help. Specific categories of vulnerable learners within a blended learning environment. And given the time that we're in to me that was the one of most interested. That's the one. I counted -able so vulnerable learners in the blended environment. And did you need to narrow that down tool anymore to make it manageable. Did you come from a subject tangled. Did you have to do anything with that topic. Once he picked option three from the hat yes exactly yeah so we had to narrow it much further because obviously vulnerable learners and such a white category and we a recommended that we could narrow that down to a a subject specific points of view a religious education point of view in my perspective in my work in my literature review after a loft inspiration. I actually didn't do that because going through the research i felt like it was applicable from what i knew to a wide range of topics so i didn't feel like bringing it down to a religious education spending was going to bring it was going to enhance it that much more but what i did do was never the butler winning side of things down to adhd specifically and. I did that in all honesty. Because i had an interest in learning more by. Adhd i'm really have a worked with many students with adhd. I didn't know too much about it. So i thought this was going to be a prime community within my sinement to try and understand. Adhd a little bit more given so pregnant and use it. Mapping it onto not blended learning environment saint tyne fascinating. Okay so you got your choice of adhd you justify your choice of looking beyond your subjects harry so then you were able to go out and search for literature and you had to pick six sources that will kind of help get a handle on that topic area so it might be a bit of a bit of a big question to ask but can you talk a street the six sources that you ended up with and so broad sense of what they were saying yes absolutely each so the one thing i should really mention i is that when i started this literature review trying to marry up trying to find resources which spoke about adhd within blended learning environment. There was next to nothing if not nothing at all and so it was a bit of panic. Could bit of a worry at the beginning. But i pushed through. I decided to do in. The end was focused on a selection of literature which focused on adhd specific late at some literature which focused on blended learning specifically. and then. i drew my own conclusions between those two. I'm using a variety of websites and sources as well to try in a match up in a meaningful way and i started by actually looking at the. Adhd you k charity website and there was a really interesting on on quite lamesa. Statistics on eighty nine percent of teachers teach or have taught students with adhd and yet sixty three percents of teachers feel that that training and of understanding adhd on supporting adhd students is a par inadequate So that was quite alarming statistics. So i started from that before. I took a deep dive into more literature. Adhd and blended learning specifically. That was loads of resources. When i looked at them separately. But i'll try and go through on now. My six down spitball. I'll just say best that. I looked into these articles mainly online because of the situation wherein they were mainly searches. Either through google laura our our learning platform at cardiff matt and i prioritized terms. Which article twits mentioned engagement mentioned. Adhd additional learning leads blended learning online learning hybrid learning excetera and the scope for narrowing down. Those obstacles was quite slim. Because as i said the amount of articles that looked at them together that what many of them so narrowing down was quite slim but i prioritized any which kinda did mention allen's on blended learning in one with was the best the easiest way to get more of a focus on my first article which i came across was by how graham relatively recent to the two thousand seventeen on it was titled learner engagement in a blended learning environment and it was a conceptual framework. And this what date. It had a huge skype through research. It had a thousand dollars. Coups chapters and other articles of engagement instruments have engagement. And what they really really. Interestingly came up with they spoke about the inconsistencies at the term engagement itself and then how that gets even more complicated when you transfer into online learning but they came up with indicators of engagements and that was what was really fascinating about this obstacle. We talk and teaching about. How can we. How can we facilitating gauge. How can we increase engagement. A little bit better argument was actually before we do any of that you need to know what the indicators aw. When do you know when your students are engaged. So that was what was really tickly interesting about this. And why recommended it to my league partnership school. They came up. With a whole framework within not they had six indicators of cognitive engagement and seven indicators emotional engagement which i thought were particular interests but within the cognitive engagement. One was based on attention. Which obviously i ate pricked my ears up because oh is robert. Because it was specific to eighty can be specific trade hd and what they aim to do is show you. What the indicates attention within within cognitive engagement by might look like and what you can do about it to understand it and enhance a little bit more now. Within this article on some of the things i thought were a little bit etched. Maybe for example under the intention indicator they said about how you might want to track rain whites or movement and it's not really sure that's going to be possibly the most affluent secondary schools around the country. But the undestanding is that you need to know when your students are engaged. Not indicated first before you can change your teaching style to enhance that facilitated and so it was my suggestion that maybe we could look at using. That's marks of teams with google cross. Rooms trying see when they are most engaged. See what the data. It's like really take a deep dive into that than students are engaged to take up over the second article most cattle again. It was a twenty seventeen obstacle a written. Interestingly was all about the motivations of adhd students so it was titled what motivates individuals they hd it was a qualitative analysis specifically for the adolescents. Point to the so what they did. They hypothesized that there are qualitative differences between motivation attitudes between students with adhd and their typically developing peers. And so they did this study which was largely in a more clinical environment. And that was one of my Concerns i suppose one of my hesitations about the article because they students were interviewed. Sorry the children were intimate in a psychology clinic. That was seven all those order. Which from a psychology background. So my argument was that if you brought in somebody from a different background to maybe the confidence in having no analysis response by us we may have a little bit more confident. That was different backgrounds. Connecticut election is still a valuable valuable. Be such an what they found was the rule. The motivation axe cheats. And this is interest. Day-today life it's not necessarily at school but additional attitudes between students with adhd and students non adhd rudely of very very similar. But there were two very distinct difference is which were really interesting. Adhd perspective the first one was the students with with adhd had a very specific aversion to the slow passing of time to time going slowly was just an absolute. No no for them. They just couldn't stand it on the second one was that students who didn't tough. Adhd also cased venue in having familiar and predictable tasks to toss it. They've done before they know how they works. They know what's expected of them. That value did not appear in students with

Excetera Ben Ellison Adhd Thomas Butler Harry Google Skype Matt Graham Allen Robert Connecticut
January 2021 Income Report For Entrepreneurs on Fire

Entrepreneur on FIRE

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

January 2021 Income Report For Entrepreneurs on Fire

"J. l. d. here with the january twenty twenty one income report for entrepreneurs on fire. Our gross income for january was a hundred and ninety eight thousand six hundred fifty seven dollars our toll expenses. Were just a hair over. Twenty one k for total net profits in january of one hundred seventy seven thousand five hundred and ninety nine dollars for a crazy close difference between january and december of negative one thousand and twelve dollars in giving us a percentage of net profit over gross revenue of eighty nine percent. We almost that magical in almost unhittable ninety percent plus mark which we've only done twice in eight years

Budget deficit totals record $735.7 billion through January

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 8 months ago

Budget deficit totals record $735.7 billion through January

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the federal deficit hits a record totals through January with the pandemic induced recession cutting tax revenues and massive covert relief outlays the deficit for the U. S. government for the first four months of the budget year hit an all time high for the period the treasury department reported Wednesday a federal deficit of seven hundred thirty five point seven billion dollars since the budget year began on October first that's an eighty nine percent hike in the shortfall over the same period a year earlier the report shows spending through the first four months of the budget year hit one point nine two trillion dollars an increase of more than twenty two percent over the previous year Mike Crossey up Washington

Mike Rossi U. S. Government Treasury Department Mike Crossey Washington
Fisher Vs. Keynes: Investing Tragedy And Triumph

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:20 min | 8 months ago

Fisher Vs. Keynes: Investing Tragedy And Triumph

"Irving fisher was born in eighteen sixty seven in the town of saugerties. New york got his phd economics from yale in eighteen ninety one and for most of his adult life he enjoyed this almost unparalleled streak of success. Yeah not just as a great economist but also as an entrepreneur and investor. Tim harford is the author of the data detective. A new book that includes a chapter about irving fisher. He was the basically the inventor of what we now call the rolodex card filing system. That made him a multimillionaire. He was a diet and fitness expert. He published a book called how to live which was the freakonomics of its day. Only sold five hundred thousand copies. He set up the life extension institute. He was a campaigner on prohibition. He was a vegetarian. Assist an astonishing a prolific campaigner and thinker and he made a lot of money in the markets for a while as the stock market in the nineteen twenties was going up and up fisher was investing more and more money into it in fact even though he was already investing a ton of his own money he was also borrowing even more money to invest in stocks so that he could boost his returns fisher was just supremely confident about his forecast that the market would keep going up confident both in his own intelligence and also in the possibility of using data and statistics to predict the future. So that's where irving fisher was right before the crash of nineteen twenty. Nine john maynard. Keynes the other. Great economists of the era got there a little differently. Canes was definitely already considered one of the great economic minds of the time and just like irving fischer canes knew. He was the smartest guy in every room. He walked into same. Yeah me too something. We all share with gains right. But unlike irving fisher john maynard. Keynes had gotten some things wrong. By that point he had been humbled by the market before he had an early investment fund immediately after the first world war that just went went bankrupt and it was fine canes raise more money went back into the market. Got everyone's cashback. Everyone lived happily ever after but he had that experience going. Oh yeah. I thought i was smart on the market. Maybe i'm not smart on the market when the crash of one thousand nine hundred nine arrive. The stock market collapsed more than twenty percent in two days and within three years it had fallen more than eighty nine percent from where it was before the crash. Both and john maynard. Keynes lost a lot of money on their investments in the crash but there is a huge difference in how they responded so after the crash fisher kept doubling down on the same investments. He even kept borrowing money to invest in the same. Losing stocks for example fisher owned stock in a company called remington rand and right before the crash remington rand stock was at fifty eight dollars share but after the crash of two three months it was twenty eight dollars. A share and fisher was borrowing money and buying more shares at twenty eight dollars for years into the crash. It was one dollars a share. That is how to be a millionaire. Lose everything maybe fisher believed that his precious data just could not be wrong or that he could not be wrong or that. His self worth was tied up in this idea that he was right. Whatever the case he couldn't change his mind and he lost everything. Canes was different kane street at his failures as a chance to learn a chance to improve his process up to the crash he'd been investing based on his ability to predict the ups and downs of the whole economy. But after the crash he decided that that was just too hard to unknowable so he changed his strategy to investing in companies that he believed had good management and he thought would go up over time no matter what the overall economy was doing. Canes made a fortune for himself and for the endowment of king's college us money he was managing one of the things he said when he was trying to raise money from his own father was win or lose. This high stakes gaming amuses me. That's that's just an amazing linked to say when you're trying to persuade someone to give you money and yet in the end it helps because he just didn't take it so personally for the past few decades. A psychologist named philip tat. Lock has studied the behaviors that lead to better forecasting being very precise predictions constantly. Checking to see if your forecasts or proving true and updating your forecast if they are not true all of these make you a better forecaster. But tim says if he had to summarize. All of this research on a bumper sticker. Full cost is better when they recognized. They might be wrong and they are asking themselves. What am i missing. What perspective having tie considered. Who haven't i talked to that sort of almost paranoid suspicion that you might have messed up. And the willingness to change your mind that leads to much better forecasting you know it sounds so obvious. Just be able to change your mind and yet in practice. People really struggle to change their minds especially about their deeply held beliefs. That irving fisher could not change his mind and john maynard. Keynes could ended up making all the difference in how they lived the rest of their lives a few months after the second world war at fissuring canes both died fisher was alone and nearly bankrupt hitting bailed out by his millionaire sister-in-law and he'd completely lost his reputation as a result of his failed forecast. It's such a tragic end to a great career. Canes died a millionaire the most famous and celebrated economists on the planet and there is a quote that sometimes gets attributed to canes that. Tim also likes to remember him by. He probably never said it but he lifted which is when the facts change. I change my

Irving Fisher John Maynard Fisher Keynes Tim Harford Saugerties Remington Rand New York Philip Tat TIM
Novavax vaccine seems effective against COVID-19 in UK study

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Novavax vaccine seems effective against COVID-19 in UK study

"Another drug maker says its covert nineteen vaccine seems effective Maryland based Novavax says the vaccine appears eighty nine percent effective in early findings from a British study though it's not quite as effective against the virus variants spreading in the UK and another in South Africa the US now has its first two cases of the south African mutated strain both in South Carolina in adults with no recent travel history health officials say it's almost certain there are more infections not yet identified the Novavax announcement comes amid worry about whether existing vaccines will be strong enough to protect against the variance would seem to spread more easily Sager mag ani Washington

Novavax Maryland South Africa South Carolina UK United States Sager Mag Ani Washington
Phone addiction not driven by notifications, study finds

Daily Tech News Show

04:02 min | 10 months ago

Phone addiction not driven by notifications, study finds

"All right. Let's talk a little more about why you're always picking up your cell phone scott. Some subsides right studies. That's good because i've been wondering what the heck i'm doing a study of smartphone use by the london. School of economics and political science found that eighty nine percent of phone. Interactions were unprompted while the remaining eleven percent were because of notification so some people just picking up the phone to look at it thirty seven percent. Sorry thirty seven participants in the study in the uk. Germany and france were cameras to record their phone. Interactions users spent less time their phone when they were home with other people and the most time when in public transport trains that sort of stuff. The study indicates more research is needed about why people interact with their phones. And how fascinating. The common sense is that. It's all those notifications you get you get barraged with your notifications. Just turn off your notifications reduce your screen time. Apparently not this to me this this entire thing. Mimics my cova lockdown time. I took my time from march until now has been marked with these moments of me going. Why am i looking at my phone again. What am i doing here. I don't need to be here and not because of some notification. Still get those. But it's usually maybe you on slack or it's you know somebody else my mom trying to get a hold of me or something like that and i'll respond to those but most of the time it's just megan. The world's weird. I'm kinda tired. And i think tick tock will take my mind off of it and it's a lot of those interactions way more than before march for me. So more study is needed as a obviously. But i'm really curious about how this how this all pans out if they talked more people around the world. I'm a minimal notification person in fact there are lots of apps that will send me a notification. Every once in a while. I make what to. How did i not turn that often settings already like and i go in and no you don't need to you don't need to ping me about this sort of thing. I'll i will come to you if i want to. But i have found. We've talked about this on the show before because the whole smartphone mobile phone mobile device. Anything that is easy on the go is just not something. I need all that often. I mean sure. If i'm at the dog park i might look at my phone and just make sure i'm not missing anything but i don't really go anywhere so when i'm at home. The phones always near me. You know it's rings but then you know. My laptop brings to on face time i. I'm using my laptop. Almost exclusively even something like talk. I look at my for you page on my laptop because there's just more area and it's easier to it and all my messages. Are there anyway and there are very few things that i can't do on my laptop that i feel like on a regular basis and i don't think that that's just oh because i i don't leave the house anymore. I am now just so less. Used to be an on the go being in transit for example. You know someone's standing on the subway forty-five minutes. Yeah you're going to be looking at your phone now. I'm so not used to it that now. I'm sort of like. I don't look at that. It's just a smaller version of my computer. I don't do notifications ver. I very much limit notifications myself. But i still use my phone a lot so i think what the study is showing is that people don't realize when when they're picking up their phone they're picking it up absent mindedly. A few study participants were were kind of shocked when they looked at the video. And like. I don't remember doing that. I don't remember picking up the phone. I don't remember why did it There's been some other studies that show that psychologically when the phone is in the room with you even if you're not looking at it you think about it it reduces your attention level on other things because it's kind of pulling at you. This is another another study in those planks of what in effect phones are having on. Our mental state at the word addiction gets thrown around a lot. And i'm not sure if it's exactly appropriate or not because it carries a whole lot of clinical meetings. That are complex. But there's certainly a poll to having that phone there and this is another study that shows that

Scott Germany France Megan London UK
Phone addiction not driven by notifications, study finds

Daily Tech News Show

04:02 min | 10 months ago

Phone addiction not driven by notifications, study finds

"Let's talk a little more about why you're always picking up your cell phone. Scott some subsizes right studies. That's good because i've been wondering what the heck i'm doing a study of smartphone use by the london. School of economics and political science found that eighty nine percent of phone. Interactions were unprompted while the remaining eleven percent were because of notification so just picking up the phone to look at it thirty seven percent sorry thirty seven participants in the study in the uk. Germany and france were cameras to record their phone. Interactions users spent less time their phone when they were home with other people and the most time when in public transport trains that sort of stuff. The study indicates more research is needed about why people interact with their phones. And how fascinating. The common sense is that. It's all those notifications you get you get barraged with your notifications. Just turn off your notifications reduce your screen time. Apparently not this to me this this entire thing. Mimics my cova lockdown time. I took my time from march until now has been marked with these moments of me going. Why am i looking at my phone again. What am i doing here. I don't need to be here and not because of some notification. Still get those. But it's usually maybe you on slack or it's you know somebody else my mom trying to get a hold of me or something like that and i'll respond to those but most of the time it's just megan. The world's weird. I'm kinda tired. And i think tick tock will take my mind off of it and it's a lot of those interactions way more than before march for me. So more study is needed as a obviously. But i'm really curious about how this how this all pans out if they talked more people around the world. I'm a minimal notification person in fact there are lots of apps that will send me a notification. Every once in a while. I make what to. How did i not turn that often settings already like and i go in and no you don't need to you don't need to ping me about this sort of thing. I'll i will come to you if i want to. But i have found. We've talked about this on the show before because the whole smartphone mobile phone mobile device. Anything that is easy on the go is just not something. I need all that often. I mean sure. If i'm at the dog park i might look at my phone and just make sure i'm not missing anything but i don't really go anywhere so when i'm at home. The phones always near me. You know it's rings but then you know my laptop brings to on facetime i. I'm using my laptop. Almost exclusively even something like tiktok. I look at my for you page on my laptop because there's just more area and it's easier to it and all my messages. Are there anyway and there are very few things that i can't do on my laptop that i feel like on a regular basis and i don't think that that's just oh because i i don't leave the house anymore. I am now just so less. Used to be an on the go being in transit for example. You know someone's standing on the subway forty-five minutes. Yeah you're going to be looking at your phone now. I'm so not used to it that now. I'm sort of like. I don't look at that. It's just a smaller version of my computer. I don't do notifications ver. I very much limit notifications myself. But i still use my phone a lot so i think what the study is. Showing is that people don't realize when when they're picking up their phone they're picking it up absent mindedly. Few study participants were were kind of shocked when they looked at the video. And like. I don't remember doing that. I don't remember picking up the phone. I don't remember why did it There's been some other studies that show that psychologically when the phone is in the room with you even if you're not looking at it you think about it it reduces your attention level on other things because it's kind of pulling at you. This is another another study in those planks of what in effect phones are having on. Our mental state at the word addiction gets thrown around a lot. And i'm not sure if it's exactly appropriate or not because it carries a whole lot of clinical meetings. That are complex. But there's certainly a poll to having that phone there and this is another study that shows that

Scott Germany France Megan London UK
Phone addiction not driven by notifications, study finds

Daily Tech News Show

00:27 sec | 10 months ago

Phone addiction not driven by notifications, study finds

"Study of smartphone use by the london school of economics and political science found that eighty nine percent of phone. Interactions were unprompted while the remaining eleven percent were because of notifications thirty-seven participants in the study in the uk. Germany and france war cameras to record their phone. Interactions user spent less time on their phone when they were home with other people and the most time when they were on public transport. The study indicates more research is needed about why people interact with their phones.

London School Of Economics And Germany France UK
Houston's rate of unsolved murders is soaring. Experts say the police department is to blame.

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:25 sec | 10 months ago

Houston's rate of unsolved murders is soaring. Experts say the police department is to blame.

"We're also learning more about a newly uncovered internal audit from the houston police department. That oughta chose a big drop in the number of homicides department solves according to the houston chronicle the audit shows that investigators solved about eighty nine percent of homicides and twenty eleven by may of this year that number had fallen to forty nine percent. The department has been losing some of its experienced. Investigators and managers

Houston Police Department Houston Chronicle
The Cider-Sipping, Mitten-Wearing Guide To 2020 Holiday Movies

4 Things with Amy Brown

05:38 min | 11 months ago

The Cider-Sipping, Mitten-Wearing Guide To 2020 Holiday Movies

"Guys it's my d-. I work with amy on the bobby bones show. I'm a head writer and producer over there and also have a podcast in my own called movie. Mike's movie podcast or all. I do is talk about movies. I explore movie topics. i do. Movie reviews and sometimes bring on actors and directors to talk about their movies. So what i wanted to bring to. This episode is my holiday watching movie guide so i have five different categories with five different movies. You can add to your watching playlists. I know it's only november. But i feel like we've pretty much gone straight into christmas holiday mode right now so these are some great movies to go ahead and put on your list in the first category. Let's go with the favorite old school classic. And i'm to have to give it to the original. Og christmas movie. A christmas story from nineteen eighty-three. It's a movie. Probably all grew up watching and at this point we can kind of just have it on in the background and it just gives us that christmas feeling. They're just so many classic moments in classic quotes from this. A christmas story also had the eighty nine percent rating on rotten tomatoes. It's not available to stream anywhere right now but if you want to rent it. It's on amazon for three ninety nine. And then if you have cable subscription service you can usually catch it on pbs or stream. It their on demand. And i feel like when it comes to having a classic. You can't go wrong with the christmas story. Only i didn't say fudge. I said the word the big one. The queen mother of dirty words dash dash dash next up. I had the category of the best modern classics. So i feel like this is a movie been around long enough but it's still relatively new and it's a movie now. That actually came out seventeen years ago. So i feel like it's so far stood the test of time and i don't really seeing any point to where this movie will not be a part of my christmas and if you haven't seen it at this point well i don't know what you're waiting for. I don't know where you've been in the movie. I'm talking about is l. It has eighty four percent rating on rotten tomatoes. It's currently not available to watch anywhere for free but you can read it on amazon for three ninety nine and if you happen to have a stars direct tv subscription you can watch it there. And the thing. I love about this movie that everybody i talked you kind of has their own favourite part of the movie. My favorite part is when buddy the elvis. I leaving to go find his dad and he's saying goodbye to everybody to hope you find your dad. Thanks in our wall. All right the next category is the unconventional christmas movie. I think every year people had a debate on what is an isn't a christmas movie. Several different movies kind of fit into this category. But one i feel that kinda gets left out in the discussion. Every year is harry potter. And the sorcerer's stone now all throughout the harry potter series. I feel like christmas is a pretty big part of it. And not only that. But i feel like christmas scenes. In harry potter are just some of the most magnificently done christmas. Any christmas movie. And i don't know why they get left out of that conversation. The bad thing about the harry potter movies is they are pretty much taken off of any kind of streaming service and you can really only rent them on amazon for three ninety nine but the first one does have eighty one percent rating on rotten tomatoes. If you haven't seen it yet. And i know overall christmas is pretty small. Part of the entire franchise. But harry potter at one point does get the visibility cloak as a christmas gift and therefore i'm dubbing get a christmas movie christmas happy christmas next category. I wanna do favorite rated r. movies. So this is christmas louise for adults so kids. If you're listening you can't watch these movies and parents. I feel like these were made for. Maybe some of us. Who don't necessarily enjoy christmas movies. And just want something to make you laugh. That just has a little bit of christmas in it. Because i know sometimes christmas movies get a little bit cheesy and my all time. Favorite rated r. christmas movie is bad. Santa it literally makes me laugh out loud. And i know it's incredibly rajini incredibly inappropriate. But i love billy bob thornton and even in the crudeness and the rudeness of this movie i do feel like it has a lot of heart and if he can get through the dirty jokes and the bad language you do find a pretty nice christmas story here and bad. Santa has a seventy eight percent rating on rotten tomatoes. And as of right now you would have to pay to ninety nine to streaming on amazon. But i know once it gets closer to christmas. It has popped up on netflix. Maybe check for it. There later was gonna make some sandwiches. I could make you one before you leave. Okay maybe some sandwiches harshest. You want the usual amount. Just whatever you think. Okay right in the last category. I want to get to is a favourite new christmas movie. And i'm gonna go with the holiday. Would you can watch now on net flicks and a little bit of a warning. It is kind of raunchy and crude. Just like the bad santa movie but if you're into movies like bridesmaids or the hangover i feel like it's kind of in that category so it's emma roberts and luke bracy who is australia and he's kind of like the kmart version of chris hemsworth and they come up with this plan to be each other's dates for only the holidays. So let's be only time they ever get together so it starts at christmas goes through all the holidays in the united states and then ends up back at christmas and if you guessed at home that they ended up developing feelings for each other throughout this plane to be each other's holiday. Will you guessed correctly but again. That doesn't spoil. The movie is basically in the trailer. And it's basically what every kind of cheesy romantic comedy. Christmas movie plot is about. But i think overall this movie just makes you kind of turn your brain off and enjoy a nice holiday movie. And isn't that what we all need right now. All right. that's your holiday movie guide if you enjoyed that segment and want to hear more about movies to check out my podcast movie. Mike's movie podcast. Just search movie mike. Wherever you're listening to this right now

Harry Potter Amazon AMY PBS Mike Elvis Santa Billy Bob Thornton Louise Luke Bracy Netflix Emma Roberts Chris Hemsworth Kmart
Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

Post Reports

05:07 min | 1 year ago

Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

"The reality is in the Senate right now, it takes just simple majority to advance any presidential nominee Paul Kane is the senior congressional correspondent for the post whether it is to some random commission overseeing the Great Lakes or the Supreme Court of the United States of America, and that has left the minority party with very few options. The reality is that there's not a whole they can do. and. What are some of these theories that we have heard of that Democrats could do or that people think the Democrats could do right now oh, there's this thought of if you impeached someone anyone bill bar or in the trump again and sent to that resolution across the capital that it would instantly stop all other action and forced them to hold an impeachment trial. You know I got an email from a reader asking about they could just deny unanimous consent blocking unanimous consent is something that blocks the action from taking place and basically would make the voting process go much more slowly. Yeah. But there are provisions. Already in line for how to deal with those things, you file something called a cloture motion. That's the that's the way you blocked a filibuster defeat filibuster and yes, it'll take three days to overcome that process but think of it this way if there really were away for this minority party to block this Supreme Court nominee then Mitch McConnell would have thought of it in the eight years that he served as minority leader and was considered the obstructionist in chief. He was considered the greatest structure in the history of the Senate blocking Brock Obama at every possible way if there were ways for digital block Supreme Court. Nominations of Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan from the minority position McConnell would have done it but he couldn't do it, and then I've heard these ideas that potentially if Democrats were to win control of the Senate in November, and if there were to be a Democratic president that there's this idea, you could pack the court afterward, you could just change the number of justices that there are on the Supreme Court and increase them. So you could have two more. Democrat appointed justices or you could have four more. Well, that is a the that is something that can legitimately be done in the legislative process. There was no. Foundation in the constitution that set the number of surpreme. Court justices at nine. It started with six justices the chief and five associate justices an grew over the years and you know to be sure you know the considered the greatest Democratic president of all Franklin Delano Roosevelt tried in the nineteen thirties to pack the court and very infamous way and eventually was shot down and the reality is if Democrats were to go through the couple year process of adding justices to spring court that would immediately be met in return with Republicans. Next time they have the power and you know we just would go back and forth by. In twenty years, we might have twenty one justices and also probably need support from actual democratic leadership, and this seems like something that Congressional leadership isn't that interested in something that Joe Biden has said that he straight up doesn't think should happen Yeah Biden had got a little bit cagey the other night when he was asked about it in a local interview I think it was in Wisconsin and he basically said that he didn't want to answer the question because of the answers the question. Then that's GonNa change the. Discussion and what Democrats are trying to do right now is to avoid these. These are processed fights. I know that there is a bigger bigger goal at hand here in terms of overall policy and how that policy is reviewed at the supreme. Court. But most of the public tunes this stuff out because they, they hear things about over Republicans are being hypocrites and well like eighty nine percent or more of the public says, yeah, they're all hypocrites no big deal and they really want to try and focus this fight politically. On, what the impact of trading in Ruth? Bader GINSBURG. The most iconic liberal justice of the last twenty five years for a very staunch conservative jurist like amy, Coney Barrett like that is the biggest ideological jump that the court would have seen since thurgood Marshall was replaced by Clarence Thomas They WanNa make this fight politically not about these seemingly random efforts to put more justices on the Supreme Court and they want this fight to be about the impact on the affordable care act on voting rights on clean air clean. Water

Supreme Court Senate Mitch Mcconnell Joe Biden President Trump Great Lakes United States Bader Ginsburg Sonia Sotomayor Brock Obama Paul Kane America Ruth Thurgood Marshall Elena Kagan Franklin Delano Roosevelt Wisconsin Clarence Thomas AMY
Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

WSJ Tech News Briefing

26:19 min | 1 year ago

Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

"Last week John spoke with Facebook Coo Sheryl Sandberg Zoom Call, and we've got their conversation for you as an extended show today. John Obviously people know Sandberg as Facebook, Coo. But what else should they know about her? She's very well known in the tech industry, but also in in circles of leadership in advocacy for women in leadership minorities, leadership But yeah, the most visible role she plays as the number two to mark facebook in that has been enrolled. That's been developing over more than a decade and prior to that, she was a in early employee at Google and played role in the Clinton administration as well. Of course, there's been a lot going on facebook and we've reported on it along the way, but they're kind of always as. So. Why talk to San Merck now it's been particularly busy summer and there was a lot to talk about on the call. You know you've had this advertising boycott. You've had a lot more questions about their willingness to police hate speech and and make sure that civil rights are being protected on the platform You've also had this run up to the election and a lot of focus on small business and what they can do during a pandemic both to stop the spread of misinformation and help small business stay afloat. Cheryl's also well known for her foundation Leinen, and at the time that we talked, it was a black women's payday and Kamala Harris had just been tapped as the vice presidential candidate for Joe Biden. Leinen had just done this study that pointed out some things that are fairly obvious. But maybe we didn't realize how cute the problems really are, and that was related to advancement opportunities for minority women in Business both leadership management opportunities just their ability to move forward in their careers. Here's what she told us the data's incredible right now, men are doing a lot to men are doing an average of fifty hours a week of childcare and housework. That's something. We've never ever seen before women doing an average of seventy one. And Black Women and women of color doing even more that GOP is twenty one hours and single mothers, many of whom are of color but single mothers of all backgrounds are doing twice as many hours per week caring for elderly or sick relatives as well and doing a great majority of childcare and we know that all of these numbers hit women who were core hit poor families harder than wealthier families across the board. But even amongst the elite, what you almost always see is the average woman even if she's working full-time is doing a lot more in the home than the average man and that is a big part of what happens to us in the workforce. Until we get to a quality in the home, we're never getting to a quality in the workplace and that has become even more urgent with coronavirus. These are all important issues to the Wall Street Journal, we cover these things all the time we've been covering them aggressively and comprehensively, but we could only manage to get so much in today's episode. So with the issue at hand is clearly. The election and facebook's huge role to play. They're given what happened in two, thousand, sixteen and expectations in the twenty twenty and that's the part of the conversation we wanted to share with listeners today. Thanks John. A couple of things. We should note here this was a video call. So it's got that feel to it and it was recorded last week we've got that conversation after the break. Robotics, artificial intelligence augmented reality. The future is here listen to tomorrow today with the Wall Street Journal's future of everything the podcast that takes you to the frontlines of science and tech and shows you what's coming next. Look ahead. What do you hear? The future of everything from the Wall Street Journal Subscribe Wherever you get your podcasts. I want to set the context of you know of the problems and our criticisms aimed at your company, not just Sheryl Sandberg the executive, but the user of facebook is well I I. I have to assume that you're not just running a company that you're using the product. The company faces a Lotta Chris the you know. The the frustration about incentivizing the you know spreading misinformation allegedly incentivizing that extremely provocative in hateful speech that that gets through and get seen sometimes gets pushed up in our news feeds. The suspicion facebook is still a place for unwholesome characters and actors can manipulate the system in use misinformation to get results that they're looking for etc.. Nah Not. Not so much yet about the solutions that you guys have put in place in the learnings but how do you feel today about facebook is a place against the backdrop of those criticisms so we do face a lot of those criticisms and anytime you have a platform as large as ours you know three billion plus people on it many many of them daily. We have huge responsibility. And I think that is a responsibility that we really had to grow into. When I look at this election, we are a different company than we were in twenty sixteen and we are going into this election in a very different place in touches on all of the issues that you you're talking about. So let's go back to answer your question to twenty sixteen if you think about the election in two, thousand sixteen. We obviously had systems in place to defend against attacks from other states. But what those normally or thought of what we thought of them I think everyone of them was. People with hacking steal your data, remember the DNC emails remember Sony. That was basically what state actors did, and we've had very good systems in place in great defenses there what we completely missed in two thousand sixteen was not going in and stealing your stuff. But was going in and writing stuff. Fake host trying to get audiences to believe things in ways that you were representing. That's what happened with Russian interference and we completely missed it. So did the FBI. So did every government of the world? That is just not true when you think about the election in twenty eighteen and you think about being election today. We now understand this threat and are deeply engaged in working on it, but we're also not on our own homeland security has a department on miss the FBI has a task force on this in two thousand sixteen we call these groups coordinated inauthentic behaviour. So coordinated authentic like we saw the Russian fake posts in twenty sixteen, we took down networks we'd never heard of it twenty seventeen we took down one. In. The last year we took down over fifty. We now do these. So often at people used to write stories, we've Allah publicly. No one even does does that mean we're going to catch every single thing I will never claim that we will always have every single thing the services big. But does that mean we're in a very different place going into this election Absolutely. And one retake really seriously. We're also trying to get even more proactive on the good like on facebook there's things they're stopping the bad stopping the hate stopping interference with there's also promoting the good at, and that's something that I care a lot about mark as a lot of Bob. So we want yesterday. So it's perfectly timely to talk to you about it, our new voter information center and what that Information Center is a one stop shop where you can go to get accurate information on this election. That's never been more important registering to vote who's eligible that stuff's always hard. But in this election with corona virus and holes potentially closed getting accurate information is even more important. So We'd put this out. It's modeled on our coronavirus center where we put out very definitive information really helped people get the right answers. Now anytime people post about voting on facebook working a link to this center. We're also trying to be as ambitious as we can. I'm a woman I'm I'm owning the word ambitious, but it's ambition by my company. To Register people. So in the last two elections, we registered two million people to vote. which is very large, but we've put out pretty audacious goal that we're GONNA try to help register four million people for this election cycle, which I think would make it the largest effort of its kind by were invasion and were really. We're really proud of that really excited about it. So we I sit here John Taking, you take the criticism when we deserve it very seriously. We take our responsibility very seriously atop to show work every day trying to stop anything bad we gotTA learn quickly bad will always try to get ahead but also trying to use our platform in our services for the good. What do you do as the user? Something on facebook doesn't along there. Do you just pull the red phone out and make a phone call or are you pensive about that and thinking about emits broader context at it needs the nuance as market said it's very hard. To directly police the content and and just hit the button? Yes. So look it is hard to directly police the content. We know that it's very hard to pull heat down. It's very hard to find it and identified. That's why we've invested so much think our standards are the highest not the lowest I think our enforcements the best, but that doesn't make it perfect. You know as a user I actually don't remember seeing something that violated our policies and most people have not most people hear about it or it gets pulled into press and they see it now. I've certainly seen things I. Disagree with I have some family members whose political views I do not share. You know I have some ice stuff about fuck I disagree with. But in terms of my actual experience of seeing real hate yes I would pull I. Don't have a bat phone, but I would definitely take a screen shot in forwarded. Personally, referred infant I haven't had that experience or know how many people actually do see content that violates the rules is there a way to kind of measure that? Millions of people report content millions of not not all of it is actually violated with our standards but millions of people go through that process. In fact, we released our latest community standards enforcement report, and it gets to exactly what you're asking what that shows. Is All the different kinds of content we take down how much? How much violence? Were Nagasaki and it shows what percentage of it. We took down and found ourselves or someone reported to us. And that's where the progress on hate I think really becomes clear when we first did this report years ago, twenty, four percent of the hate we took down, we found ourselves which meant that seventy, six percent of the time someone had reported it to us. That's not a good experience. Our latest report we put out this week were at ninety, five, ninety, five percent of the hate that we take down we are finding before it's reported. That means five percent of what we take down is still being reported to us, which is still alive on facebook. So we have our work cut out for us, but clearly a significant improvement over twenty four percent just a few years ago and it to really the investments we've made in systems in AI in. Huge teams to monitor that's gotten us. There are your standards tough. Enough I mean that's something that we know is a sticky situation because everybody wants what they find to be offensive police in. As you said, sometimes it borders on my own bias is what I don't WanNa see. But when you look at the standards, where are you guys at particularly because they have in freshly criticized and there's rolling dialogue about whether whether you're going to get tougher? Where are we met? Her students are very tough but they're not as tough as some people would want them to be or they're not as comprehensive as some people would want them to be you know one person's opinion. One person's free expression could be another person's he. We work really hard on these definitions and were very public about the our entire standards are publicly out there including most to the material that the people who use inside their references that were very public about them. You know for the most part, we've always been a very protected society and the criticism has always been on both sides I'll give you an example that was very hot for a while was breastfeeding. We don't do pornography, we don't do breasts. In some parts of the world, a new woman who's naked from the top would be on the front page of every newspaper, and there are people that really believe in breastfeeding. It felt that we were suppressing their free speech because our computer systems were picking up any time. You saw a nipple of any kind even if it was a breastfeeding picture so we've worked more nuance there, but I think over the course of time, people have found us to be very strict on the standards. There are people out there that think are hit standards aren't strong enough. We are continually evaluating them continually making improvements. But I think a lot of people think our standards are too hard and so we try to be as transparent as possible. We try to evolve to meet ongoing things that are things. We'd never heard of no one ever heard of years ago. That are brand new movements that are hateful and there are things that some people find offensive that we do leave up because we think three expression in having that too is critically important in a lot of situations sodden. You're thinking on your role as an information broker during corona virus. How did that? I emerge and how did you deal with that at facebook given? All of the things that the most elite elite medical personnel don't know in yet. Here you are with the responsibility of not disseminating misinformation that may cost people's lives or fan pandemic. So our policy on misinformation is we don't take down we send it to third party fact checkers if it's marked as false or partially false, we dramatically decrease the distribution we market this has been marked false or partially falls and we linked to more information that often can tell the whole side of the story. Even, before Corona virus, we had an exception to that, which is information that was going to cause imminent harm and that policy really came out of other parts of the world. Misinformation was leading to death or imminent harm. The Corona virus we took the stand to things we said we're not going to have information that will lead to imminent harm. And we're going to rely on health experts. We are not decided there was no decision made by your marker anyone on our team. This is true about coronavirus and this is not because we're not experts but we partnered from the beginning with local health authorities the CDC the. H. Show the you know the health ministers in different countries to make sure that we were taking down misinformation. No matter who posted it up would also give very accurate information out and I think sometimes in these discussions, we forget that there are two sides. Of course, we need to take down at least marcus false things that are harmful, but we also have to use our services. To, get out the information people need. So governments like the UK, government local governments when they needed to get messages to their citizens, they've turned on us and we've been I think a very effective way of getting messages out. Interested. In in several high profile advertisers including some that I shot from it said, we're gonNA take a break and it wasn't just facebook it with social media have companies come back and what what are those conversations and like I know. The effect on the bottom line may not be what well understood you do rely. So heavily on smaller and middle sized companies for revenue but but it was a huge moment, a big headline where where are you guys at conversations are they back? So advertisers are starting to come back not but a good number are coming back have come back in process. Look those conversations were really hard John because normally. If someone is boycotting you or is protesting you want you to do a whatever a is in. You don't want to do it. That's not the case at all here the boycotters and the advertisers didn't want hate on facebook and we don't want this book Sosa. I think we had completely aligned goals and we have challenges in enforcing that. So again, we just released our enforcement report. We were at eighty nine percent of finding hate we take down ourselves. Now we're up to ninety five. That's an improvement and we know we have we have further to go. We also do have some notice agreement with people on what hate is we tend to take a broader swath of allowing some information that we think it's free expression to stay on so that people can have dialogue but in terms of hate, I think the real issue is that there's a fundamental misunderstanding of our service out there that we need to do a better job correcting we don't want. Hey. We don't benefit from hey, we don't profit from hey users don't want to see it. Consumers don't WANNA. See it. Advertisers don't want to be next to it. So the the narrative of facebook is leaving pay because they WANNA profit for. That's just just you talked about voters earlier and the initiatives that you're putting your proactively being part of a solution is what I hear you saying. But Marquez said very recently with this electric this unprecedented situation and I'm I'm guessing given your. Your half glass full mentality it's an opportunity but what's at stake here for facebook I? Mean we're all GonNa Blaine facebook if things go wrong and a certain candidate decides to use the platform and you're not taking down information with speed or at all is it a noble no-win situation here or what's at stake for this platforms ability to prove its productive place in this discussion? So we all know that there's a lot at stake for the selection full stop. There's more concern in confusion about how to register to vote what is valid I think there's more concern around misinformation around any kind of coordinated attacks. I think we're going into this election in a totally different place than twenty sixteen and interestingly, I think our track record in twenty eighteen was actually fairly good when people talk about things facebook missed in an election getting upset at us for things that are almost always talking about twenty sixteen you almost never hear about twenty eighteen and there have been hundreds of elections around the world and to look our job is to get people accurate information to be proactive. We are being much more proactive around. Pushing out information in this election and we have or have been before, and that is modeled on what we did with Toronto virus. We are taking that approach doing everything to get rid of the bad. We are doing everything to get in front of people the accurate information as well. And then we want to make sure that people can use the prop. One thing that's worth really thinking about is how many small people small people running for smaller offices. Are Using our platform provisionally when we're in social distancing and can't campaign. That's right. So how do you advertise to? No one's ever heard of me. I'm running for State Senate or I'm running for school board and I want to do it cheaply and efficiently we allow that to happen and we're proud of that role replied. There are you prepared I mean thinking about four more years of questions regarding how quickly you should be policing the president and his tweets given the thus far has a track record that trump is definitely more aggressive with platform Vice President Biden ever has been he trump wins. You're already in a in a in a situation where you guys are have been accused of dragging your feet on or taking a less aggressive stance against him. How do you think about that in a world where we might see four more years of that? It's our. It's our job to have clear and consistent rules. That, we apply in a fair way globally and I know we are very focused that we should be very focused on this election. There are important elections all over the world with people on different sides, and so we have experienced not just in the US cycle, but obviously the hundreds of elections that have happened since since last US cycle and we do we. Get accused from conservatives of being anti-conservative. They look it. Awesome. A see liberal silicon, Valley company I mean, I've been very affiliated Democrat. I remain unaffiliated Democrat other people look at us and they say we're not going far enough and our answer is going to be very clear about what our rules are and working apply them as even handed away as possible we also. Recognize that there should be limits to our power to decide what stays up in. Probably one of the most important things that's going to happen in the upcoming twelve months is the rollout of our content for which we've announced but has not yet come together to play. So for the first time, there's GonNa be a possibility that if you either have something taken down. And you think that's unfair or you take it down or you WanNa leave up in either direction, you can appeal it to the content board in your case much like the court right they'll have more than they can but they'll try to hear the big months. Someone else will decide and that board is independent does not report to mark does not report to me. Were also working with governments around the world. We think government has a very big role to play. Wouldn't it be good if governments to find hate rather than private companies would you be good if governments defined what is a political ad? Not Private companies were working hard to make sure that there are checks and balances and that the government's role is really important not just here around the world. You're not just the Democrat I mean you're you're a friend of the president presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket at an I I don't know the. Friendship, but definitely, it's been noted that the two of you have relationship you've been support I'm wondering if you're kind of jaw drops a little bit about the delicate role that you need to play his business leader given facebook's place in society if you're running Ben and Jerry's, which is much smaller if you're running. Patagonia. If you were running for Motor Company, you probably feel a little bit more free an mistaken to be supportive and to give the porch that you want to feel it all that your your ability to help is checked by your role I mean, my day job is facebook and my nights on Facebook, and then you know I work on my foundation as well, and so it is not my job to be very active in the political process and I've chosen a career that keeps me in business. So I don't wake up in the morning. You know what should I be doing politics 'cause I wake up in the morning with a very big job for facebook I. think that's consistent with business leaders. You know as a woman and as a woman who's long fought for the role of women to have more to celebrate ambition to celebrate what we're reaching for the highest office I'm thrilled to see a woman about to be nominated a woman of color about to be nominated and I spoke out anatomy horse I would do. Of course, I would do that and my foundation has done that as well. Do need to think twice about how supportive I mean it it's not a heavy lifting to be supportive publicly. Meaning you don't have to put in a lot of hours, but like running a news organization, I mean it kind of is a proxy for what facebook has become what we think of as a neutral platform even well, I've said, we're GONNA work with anyone who wins for us. So when I'm asked when you work with trump, if he wins the election, will you work with Biden if he sorry president trump if he wins the election we work with Vice, President Biden. Of course, we don't get to pick. Citizens elect their governments and we work with them, and we work with all over the world and we have to be willing and able to do that. Would you work for President Biden if there was a president Biden, you know I have a long decided I had my time. I worked at the Treasury Department under President Clinton and it was an amazing opportunity. What about the open seat in California right now not interested at all I mean. I really love my job and I really have so much respect for mark and my colleagues. Every day is not easy I don't expect anyone feel sorry for me or any of us we have great opportunities big role to play. We have serious responsibility to get this election right? We have serious responsibility to get hate and you know misogyny off the platform. against, wake up every business, I feel lucky to have this opportunity and I feel lucky to work for someone who is strong and has such conditions as mark. Are you having a guest one final question is the enormity of that task of getting it right. Your back and forth about what that looks like all day. But getting it right as a business challenge. Also, when I say this, I wonder if you are amazed at the trajectory of the importance of this as a public trust, almost as a is an institution and we aren't just considering a business but has a responsibility to society. Is there one? That outweighs the other giving you have shareholders, others, or is there is there a way to balance those two things at the same time? These things that people think are in conflict sometimes, but I really don't think they are we need people to trust our service we need people to trust that we're GONNA make content decisions not for profit on either side. But for the right for the right reasons and to doing the things that need our responsibility to protect elections takedown hit, they don't trade off against the business. They're important to drive the business. Now, there is a resource tradeoff rehiring engineer. We can put them on an ad program to build rags ads we can put them on safety we can put them on security. Of course, we have resource trade-offs, research trips of my time reserves tradeoffs mark if you look at how do our jobs and you compare it to for years ago, Mark Myself All of our senior leaders Chris Cox who just came back. Incredible. Chief Product Officer Mike Shrimp for our incredible. CTO We all spend a lot more of our time on the protection of the community. Then we did five years ago but I think that is super important and for a while we were playing catch up and I think all of these things work together. There's not a trade offs. We have to absolutely meet our responsibility and build our business and without meeting our responsibility, we're not going to build Turkishness. Kyi No your plane to grab people from. What you go Thank you for your time. It's always nice talking to and. Until next up. On.

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How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

The 3:59

10:49 min | 1 year ago

How NBA players are using the Oura smart ring to warn of coronavirus

"What exactly does the Smart Ring Do, and and let's start with what its original purpose is, and what it was marketed for initially sure, so the has been around for two years and never got to review. It was one of these things I meant to, but it is a it is. A fitness rang health ring much. Much like the ring made by motive years ago, it checks heart rate it contract sleep it contract motion and activity, but it also tracks temperature. The temperature sensor is the interesting part because there aren't any other wearables that do that, but it's not necessarily the temperature sensing. You think it can't give you like an actual body. Reading of like you know what hundred point seven or whatever? It's a relative temperature that's. Night to show temperature fluctuations plus or minus degrees Fahrenheit. That's mentioned. Just show your changes in your baseline, so to speak, and so how is it being used as a early warning system for covid nineteen? Now been working with a couple of research teams UCSF has a study that you can opt into in the APP. That's been going on for a while. That's asking people to log You know their own moods and symptoms to try to study correlations. That's similar to what other companies are doing trying to see. If there could a way could help connect to symptoms and krona virus, but those researchers are seeing that you can with with the temperature capabilities see signs of illness symptoms a couple of days in advance of when you would normally perceive them. That could line up with the couple of day. Lead time that people believe might might be you know a symptomatic spread period now I'm not a another doctor. My research scientist from talking to researchers working with this and I've been I've been really curious about what that could actually mean. Another research team at Rockford Neuroscience Institute West Virginia University. Has Been Looking at trying to create a health forecasting APP that they have in place that they're using with with frontline workers and seeing if you could provide you know a couple of day pre forecast of whether you're likely to be getting sick. And built on a similar idea of using temperature mainly as a way to pick up ways that you're you're readings are hinting towards the sign of sickness, but not necessarily a sign of coronavirus, just a sign of sickness general from what they perceive. They claim it's like eighty nine percent. Accurate in predicting so far signs of upcoming sickness that will be when you get a coronavirus. You know that's when you get tested. That's when you would maybe. Go into work in some future world where we go back to work, and you know the reason why folks might be more familiar, we're now is because NBA players are supposed to be wearing them as they. Get set to kick off their their special. BUBBLE SEASON DOWN IN FLORIDA. Yes so NBA players have been wearing this of chosen this this wearable. OPT in program and. Coaches that that can look at the stats get kind of a distilled subset of the stats that aware of the ring, now like the consumer version would get so I see all these different pieces of information. There is a respiration. There's heart rate variability temperature these are estimated again. A couple of those key factors of four of them were pulled out and turn into a risk score. That idea is that if you seem like you're, you're scoring significantly high on that, you would Pull yourself out. Get Kobe test, and that type of thing. But you. You get something like that on the on the order APP itself. There's a score, the kind of shows like a whole bunch of factors and talks about like you know Harry feeling today. It sometimes it correlates with our. I feel sometimes a dozen so. Same thing asleep scores but it will let me remind me of like how I'm sleeping. And how much I'm you know? Both bedtime in some element of restiveness, how much I can do about that is is the other thing, but that the NBA is using again is kind of a pre screening tool for those who were bubbling Brian. So you're obviously not an NBA player, Sarah Scott, but how how are you using this? And how does that differ from what they're using this for? As as Early Warning System, yeah, so again as curious and I've not been doing any of those those things and I'm not using any advance APPS. I'm just using the consumer version and seeing what it's like so I just live with it. I've been wearing three months since late April. All the time and what have been noticing is that a lot of ways I don't notice anything because I. Just live my life, and then I check the APP in Awhile, and it says okay. This is sleeping and I tried to make myself sleep better, but like a lot of sleep tracking things. I don't act on those things as well. They should still go to bed super late, even knowing do. But the temperature thing is mostly been fluctuating around the same thing, a little down a little, if I who knows I, haven't knock on wood. I haven't gotten sick over this period. If I had actually gotten sick or perceived something that might be kind of interesting so hard to tell in that vacuum, but. I just wear. It will give some testing with it and I'm curious. I don't think it's it wouldn't replace a fitness watch because it's not as detailed as that and the one thing that the ring is, it's totally invisible with how it shows stuff. It's this nettle ring with no readouts doesn't buzz no buttons and you'd have to check the APP and also if you don't know if it's running out of batteries on the seven day battery life. Until you check the APP where you get a notification from your phone, so there's times where just went dead, and then I had like five days of no readings because I forgot to charge it, which is not ideal if you want a wearable, that's going to help provide early detection for people in a future workplace so that that's one challenge with it. The other thing is talking to the researchers and thinking about what would we all be doing with this? The NBA is bubbling now in a world where you go back to work and have some sort of you know wearable screening tool, which is what people are imagining. Its Eye, contact tracing unit everyone to opt in. And that means rock varner sciences. He was also trying to build towards. Maybe eventually a ways like at that would show ideally like where signs of potential illness popping up through crowdsourcing, but much contact tracing that requires people to participate and right now you still have questions. People are still refusing to wear masks so I mean. The. The degree to which you get people to all agree to wear wearable. Seems extremely optimistic and then when you deal with things like public. It adds all sorts of other complications so an office. Could all agree to do it? But how do you? What do you do in the larger world? I think those are questions. It still hadn't been worked out because the systems are only as good as everyone else's reporting, and just to be clear that this is not a cheap option. This is not cheap solution. Right? Like how much does this thing go for? And how easy is it the by one? The pretty easy to buy, and they're not that cheap there four hundred dollars so. Yeah the falls line with with. Your standard good smartwatch or Apple Watch or thing like that, but you know it's made like titanium plastic on the interior and It's it feels nice, but that's a lot of money, and I think some people will really like it because it's convenient. Enter praying and not a watch Some of the researchers also pointed out that a doctor's and frontline workers don't like wearing rings because they're not good that the germs could get in there. LEXIE! Shoes she's wearing. It didn't like it because of swelling and for exercise, the ring didn't feel ideal was uncomfortable for her and you have to get fitted. You have to get a particular size on the ring. They send you a sizing kit, so if your size changes, that's not great. A watch is adjustable, so there's a lot of things that are weird about it, but I think. It opens interesting questions about what temperature could possibly do. On, wearables in I'm really curious, what will pops up after this? It seemed like from your experience that made you call it somewhat invisible and the data I mean how ultimately how useful is this data? Have you used it to change your life for because you sort of hinted that that you looked at the data? then. It hasn't really changed anything, but like ultimately is this useful? In terms of changing my life. No, because you're right. You know this reminds me of like the talk. I had with with Kevin Lynch on Apple. Watch and apple could be making a lot of decisions on this to why they're only doing. Certain elements of sleep tracking. You know they're just doing the bedtime. Wake up is they claim that the rest is not actionable? Now they call so it could be that apple isn't fully develop the rest of the tools to their liking. But I think that's true in terms of when you get sleep scores like on this. What do I really do with like that? I didn't rest well enough you. There's really not much you can. Do you try to get to bed earlier? Maybe try to take it easy. Me could try to like take on yourself, and that's what the APP recommends like. You know you're reading the scores. Great. Go do it today, or it's not great. Take care a little bit today and I think that's interesting. So in that sense did change the way I would perceive some days I go. Hey, I'm not a great readiness score. just be a little easy on myself. What I know that just waking up and just feeling like crap. Probably you know I think some of these things correlate with how you would normally feel. Feel anyhow, if you're a self aware, but I think the getting back to work thing, the bigger question which is like you know I hate to even leave with that in the story, but it's what people think about about the possible Kobe awareness. I can't yeah for me I'm I you know I? Pi- blood pressure. I'm not going to put myself at risk going out. Out in the world, even if there's a sliver of it and then if I don't know that the APP, the rest of the world is behaving in a responsible way. Then I don't want to put myself there and that doesn't have to do other a wearing ring. It's like so the hard part. There was a halo over everyone's head. That said you know yes I. I am using the device I. Am I am part of your network? Then that's bubbling I. think that would be. That might be a different story, but again. None of these data things that these research programmes are absolute yet. These are all experiments, and all the researchers things a tip of the iceberg, so look how long people have been researching sleep and possible signs of. OF APNEA. or All. These research programmes with wearables they can go on for years and the NBA is very much an experiment. We don't know at all how that's going to turn out

NBA Apple Ucsf Florida Research Scientist Rockford Neuroscience Institut Kobe Sarah Scott Apnea. Harry Rock Varner Sciences Lexie Kevin Lynch
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on AP News

"Eighty nine percent of Republicans have introduced their most ambitious policing reform plan in years A. B. Washington correspondent saga Madani has more the justice act includes an enhanced use of force database chokehold restrictions and new panels to study law enforcement and race the Senate's lone black Republican Tim Scott led the group putting it together this package speaks very clearly to the young person who's concerned when he stopped by the law enforcement officers we see you saying the nation can both support police and the people of color Senate chief Mitch McConnell's challenging Democrats to support the effort but but already leader Chuck Schumer says the GOP hasn't gone far enough the Senate Republican proposal on policing does not rise to the moment saying it provides far less police accountability than the house Democrats more sweeping police reform bill Sager mag ani Washington the house Judiciary Committee is holding a markup hearing on its police bill George Floyd's brother feel unease Floyd addressed members of the U. N. human rights commission telling the panel that protesters in the U. S. have been injured and killed as they demonstrated against his brother's killing several people allows us as suffer brain damage to rubble but it's protesters were shot and killed by police journalist what pain yeah but I did want to try to save the world the brutality happening if the penalty is the forty seven member council is also discussing a draft resolution floated by the Africa group that singles out the United States the text calls for a commission of enquiring to examine and report on systemic racism and abuses against Africans and people of African descent in the U. S. and beyond in early afternoon trading the Dow has gained just six points while the nasdaq is up eighty three S. and P. is up eight this is a P. news a federal appeals court says the trump administration does not have the legal authority to force drug companies disclose their prices in their TV ads president trump has been pushing for transparency in prescription drug prices citizens deserve to know the lowest price available at our pharmacy is drug companies complain disclosing prices violates free speech rights the ruling said the administration overstepped its legal authority by requiring disclosure under the umbrella of its stewardship of Medicare and Medicaid health and Human Services spokesman Michael Caputo tweeted if the drug companies are embarrassed by their prices or afraid the prices will scare patients away they should lower them at Donahue Washington a former CEO of bumble bee foods has been sentenced to more than three years in jail for his role in a canned tuna price fixing conspiracy that involved three major companies Christopher let you ski has also been ordered to pay one hundred thousand dollars in fines I'm to acquire AP news.

U. N. Donahue Washington CEO bumble bee foods Christopher A. B. Washington bill Sager ani Washington house Judiciary Committee Michael Caputo Africa president Medicaid price fixing AP Madani Medicare trump
The Latest: Biden sweeps all 7 presidential primaries

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: Biden sweeps all 7 presidential primaries

"With primary elections held Tuesday some voters have to navigate long lines because the virus restrictions and tense neighborhoods because of protests nine states and the district of Columbia held primary elections for a number of state and federal contests Democrat Joe Biden and president trump easily won their respective races might be needed to clinch eighty nine percent of the delegates at stake to officially become the party nominee before the summer convention voters in Washington DC and Pennsylvania we're dealing with large protests fewer polling stations and the worry they'd be stopped for violating curfews and in Montana which voted by mail the governor Steve bullock won a democratic Senate primary will challenge incumbent Republican senator Steve Daines in the fall I'm Jackie Quinn

Columbia Pennsylvania Montana Steve Bullock Steve Daines Jackie Quinn Joe Biden President Trump Senate Senator
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KGO 810

"Continues on KGO eight ten listen at home by simply saying Google play KGO eight ten good afternoon I'm Pat thirst and we're talking about bart what are we gonna do about part of the crime on bark is ridiculous the fair jumpers are ridiculous the homeless situation and what that means to everybody's quality of life the quality of life of the people who are living on the street to the people who are homeless and the quality of life of other people who are attempting to use part in order to be transported which is what it's supposed to be a transportation system bay area rapid transit that's what it stands for it's it's ridiculous that it has gotten so out of hand it seems as if there should be enough money in the coffers to be able to address some of these issues let me tell you what one thing there were people they began citing people who were fair jumpers I don't know why it took so long but they began to FTA first they started issuing warnings I don't know why they every every should warnings they should just started issuing citations people knew that they were supposed to jump the the fair gate so anyway they began issuing citations to violators they issued three thousand eight hundred thirteen citations eighty nine percent of recipients ignored them nine percent of recipients pay the fine two percent of recipients perform community service those twenty nine thousand dollars so that was collected in fines the rest of the affairs went unpaid so they it what they say in this again is in the grand jury report only zero point zero four percent of violators were caught during the first six months for every violator cited twenty three hundred got away with not paying and by the way this is not a matter of affordability there are places where bart will help people who are not able to afford the ticket there are ways for that to be accomplished and as far as crime is concerned the crime rates have I mean they're they're ridiculous when you look at for example the robbery rates on bart in twenty fourteen there were one hundred fifty three robberies in for four years in twenty eighteen there were three hundred and forty nine that was an increase of a hundred and twenty eight percent aggravated assault there were seventy one aggravated assaults in twenty fourteen a hundred and thirty in twenty eighteen it went up eighty three percent auto theft of a claims went down okay so maybe they have more security in the parking lot so auto theft went down I'm still stunned by the rape numbers they're not astronomical but it's bizarre that people can be raped at a on a bart trainer at a bart station there were two in twenty fourteen there were three in twenty eighteen the year with the most was twenty seventeen and there were eight rapes at that point in time what are we gonna do about part I mean it's a great system for what it's supposed to be except who wants to write it when it's filthy dirty when it's become a place for homeless people to live and I hate to say it but you know that smell keeps people off the cars and those people don't they need more than that you know we're better than leaving them in that condition and simply enabling them and then there's you know not being safe because you're worried about being victimized by somebody who means you ill there are the panhandlers there are the buskers all of those have to do with the quality of life of the people who want to use part for transportation okay eighty eighty eight ten is the telephone number eighty eighty eight ten let's go to versus going to Joe calling from Mountain View Hey Joe welcome to KGO thanks for taking my call you back cal train conductor and I can tell you firsthand are the best way to prevent it a troublemaker from day on where to get rid of one is to check their tickets and I'm pretty sure that almost killed someone would have wanted that someone check a check that we might have a guy it's a very someone else is still the issue that any help train conductor will tell you that's how we do it that's how we get rid of the people that we don't have on board as we just check check it out once to improve the letter grades that's are they really need to do is that more people on board check it just gets more transit police presence would be a great way to prevent all kinds of crap look across the bed so what they're saying though it bart is that they have been asking for tickets and then giving issuing citations and people just thrown away what do you do on muny that actually has an impact that's.

Google Pat thirst twenty nine thousand dollars eighty three percent twenty eight percent eighty nine percent zero four percent nine percent two percent four years six months
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Up to eighty nine percent less last year the average member who switched from factly to wait six three hundred and seventy five dollars coverage from way but is portable and being away from member comes with great benefits like premium refunds to compare your factly coverage to way back visit W. A. E. P. A. dot org today hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans thirty percent of Americans who are planning home improvement of five thousand dollars or more will pay for those renovations with a high interest credit card that may not be a great idea a better idea maybe to take cash out of your home with the quicken loans thirty year fixed rate mortgage the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is four point one two five percent APR four point two two percent call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com rates of exchange between eight percent the receiver to kind of recover because information intelligence because when it wasn't enough to six and one hundred thirty to die without having a living trust that your heirs may spend thousands of dollars in probate fees and more than a year in court let's see you have a will but no living trust and your home is worth five hundred thousand dollars probate fees could cost your heirs over twenty thousand dollars but this can be avoided by having a living trust here's good news Doug Cobb the Cobb planning group of Orange County invites you to the free living trust breakfast seminar on Saturday September twenty first learn how to avoid probate and save your heirs thousands of dollars well we'll just isn't enough anymore every home owner single or married needs to attend this free living trust breakfast seminar on Saturday September twenty first at the embassy suites hotel in Anaheim at nine AM there are only a limited number of free seats available if you would like to attend call right now on your ticket is free grab your cell phone and dial pound two fifty and say living trust for your free ticket to the living trust breakfast seminar on your cell phone dial pound two fifty and say living trust you will have an option to receive an auto dial text message from KFI..

CEO Doug Cobb Orange County Anaheim KFI W. A. E. P. Jay Farner quicken thirty year five hundred thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars five thousand dollars one two five percent seventy five dollars eighty nine percent two two percent thirty percent eight percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KTRH

"Costs up to eighty nine percent less last year the average member who switched from factly to wait six three hundred and seventy five dollars coverage from way but is portable and being away from member comes with great benefits like premium refunds to compare your factly coverage to way back visit W. A. E. P. A. dot org today for all your vehicle care you need experience honesty and integrity certified female friendly manner curry's Cressman auto care rockstar technicians you can trust and Cressman auto care dot com so we have here on ninety seven point one wash FM he what are you doing Saturday September fourteenth from three one eight Santana moss formally of your Washington Redskins without Peter Bondra formerly of your Washington Capitals they will be at the grand opening of the new **** store in Tyson's Saturday September fourteenth from noon to three and yes you can take photos you can score autographs gets inside the merchandise all yours while supplies last and while you're there enter to win exciting electronics for the home and for on the go like the pope magnify Max S. our sound bar home theater system or the onyx do you five by Harman Kardon it's happening on Saturday September fourteenth at the new **** store inside Tyson's from noon to three Santana moss will be there Peter Bondra from the caps will be there and myself in Chile will be there to the Toby chilly morning show come say hi it's ninety seven point one wash FM we can't wait to see you there at the grand opening of the new **** store fourteen ninety seven course at Boulevard at Tyson's just off Leesburg pike near the Walmart supercenter and the twenty four fitness hello beautiful jewelry.

curry Santana moss Washington Redskins Peter Bondra Tyson Harman Kardon Chile Leesburg pike W. A. E. P. Cressman Washington Toby Walmart seventy five dollars eighty nine percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Up to eighty nine percent less last year the average member who switched from factly to wait six three hundred and seventy five dollars coverage from way but is portable and being away from member comes with great benefits like premium refunds to compare your factly coverage to way back visit W. A. E. P. A. dot org today gone are the days of spending hours in a dealership check out the express store at eastern stock com eastern's automotive group now empowers you to start the process from home for whatever's convenient to your schedule you can even buy your next vehicle one hundred percent online you already know eastern's automotive group has a tremendous legacy where there's always thousands of vehicles to choose from plus Easter's has served over one hundred fifty thousand customers in this community over the past thirty years they have been named a dealer of the year by dealer raider dot com three years in a row and their eight plus a credit is on B. B. B. and they treat their people right the service was just named a top place to work in DC by The Washington Post every eastern spherical goes through a rigorous multi point inspection process their standards are high and it shows they've got over twenty five thousand reviews averaging four point nine stars every vehicle also includes seven day return policy and a complimentary thirty day warranty visit eastern's dot com just her shopping today at eastern dot com. mattress firm Labor Day sale has been extended through Tuesday get a king that just for the price of a queen or a queen for a twin it's our best bet deal of the season with savings of up to six hundred dollars plus get up for you just will base with your mattress purchase of just four ninety nine visit mattress firm dot com or store near you to find your perfect but don't wait this sale ends Tuesday mattress firm. the wind out of which is a very patient on the property. it while.

The Washington Post W. A. E. P. seventy five dollars eighty nine percent one hundred percent six hundred dollars thirty years three years thirty day seven day
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on KTRH

"Up to eighty nine percent less last year the average member who switched from factly to wait six three hundred and seventy five dollars coverage from way but is portable and being away from member comes with great benefits like premium refunds to compare your factly coverage to way back visit W. H. E. P. A. dot org today then you're doing golden things and it's why again way more in the garden center even though we called a true gardeners nurseries parks quite literally inspired collection includes unusual plants artisan created decorative pieces they understand art in the garden better than almost anybody out the Arbor day they're constantly changing array of items that bring beauty and comfort even flavor to your home and garden Arbor gate right it's your entry into the symphony of color fragrance form and function that can infuse your indoor and outdoor living spaces with that personal warmth and beauty we love the place it's like second home for our family maybe because we're pretty close to it but it's also just great people helping you along the way and I love sending people to those kinda nurseries and garden centers where you're gonna get help you can ask the questions you need to ask you're not going to be ignored you're not gonna be able to speak a second language to do it you will get help and they will walk and talk with you never be intimidated when you walk into the Arbor day always be impressed and know that they're there to help you every step along the way they're on FM twenty nine twenty a mile and a half west at two forty nine and yes this is an exam one of those nurses guards there's we'd love for you to name drop get on in there and say I came because Randy lemon told me to I came because I heard about the love for you guys on the garden line S. M. twenty nine twenty a mile and a half west to two forty nine online Arbor gate dot com retirement.

Randy lemon W. H. E. P. seventy five dollars eighty nine percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"W. CVM sixty are you buying that it was suicide somebody help them commits suicide or do suspect foul play what do we see through the full investigation is over for president defending Israel calling out the squad it will get to some of his tweets here in just a moment as we are told about what some of the governor of the governor not there on the when commission and the car would commission they that because of this commission of the thing that you know it's like when he fought speaks as like when when the current commission speaks people oh my god they pay attention Hey listen they have to do what they say hi and of course now all they are worried about the on going to you know we spend especially bowl over cities gets it's around twenty thousand dollars a year per child then Baltimore city I and there are some school do jurisdiction Howard County schools Montgomery AL school for most part of have pretty good track record Balmer city pretty peachy going out so much but a lot of it is depending upon the learning environment but day here as far as how we're going to pay for the school construction fully implementing occur when commission's recommendation would cost nearly four billion dollars a year then a decade for K. through twelve education and the Maryland department of budget displays of paying for the proposals would require a thirty nine percent increase in the personal income tax an eighty nine percent increase in the sales tax and wait for a five hundred and thirty five percent increase in the property tax you talk about a triple whammy you're gonna get screwed on the personal income tax you're gonna get a double whammy on the sales tax and then if you if you happen all property well it's over yeah that'll that'll send people fleeing out of the state those of us who can leave because there is just this is a much governor Hogan said quote now I know the county leaders are just as concerned as I am and as the taxpayers are so let me just be crystal clear not a single one of those things is ever going to happen as long as I'm governor of the state of Maryland end of quote now how can we make that promise he does not have veto proof of majorities and I mean if anything he vetoes they can over ride in both houses so I don't know if he's throwing a gauntlet down is is clear drawing a red line across the bay here in Maryland these is this a challenge to the Democrats in the journal simply knowing that they may not want to raise taxes because governor Hogan's done after his term it's over so you'll either run for president run for Senate or maybe run for the hills we don't know but is is is a big big gamble ladies taken that Democrats are going to be willing to do this and hopes that their next the nominee or candid would be punished bill Malley got voted out or you mean the laws of the photos he served his two terms but o'malley left the state in such a horrible financial condition regarding taxes and fees and so on and so forth and directly led to Hogan's election the first time minister sorry Sir let me just be crystal clear not a single one of these things is ever going to happen again he's talking about thirty nine percent hike in personal income tax eighty nine percent increase in sales tax and a five hundred and thirty five percent increase in the property tax which to me is a little bit of a crocodile tears because for the last two years you're everything they go to the state reassessment of the of your state property tax might have been jacked up every year every year under the Hogan administration I have been five or thirty five percent of the that but every other jacking up the the status as one of your property tax self again do you think you'll be able to keep that promise that is the question I have for you today for ten W. C. B. M.'s X. eighty one eight hundred W. CBM six eighty and you our love to hear from you let's go to leverage on the eastern shore Luigi good morning well if you are you there a lot of the cell maybe for those fellow which if you are good so here is called back was the window to reestablish in the end that's all then the other local sorry wanted to talk about here this morning is a did you know that when judges make rulings on on certain cases whether that everything from speeding or traffic tickets all the way up to there really isn't a consistent way of reporting the judge's name in court records not a lot of times you'll see the judge's name reference the newspaper articles or television coverage of either high profile cases or even just but now delegate the robin grammar boulder county Republican visitors to bill for this year's General Assembly that will require the name of the person overseeing some form of judicial action or hearing judges were magistrates to appear in the Maryland judiciary case research results that did not pass last the last session but they're saying they could make a comeback this year I think it's common sense isn't I mean you're is a matter of public record the over judge providing your presiding over you know you've heard of the traffic Kayser speeding case or do you why or even a high profile murder case whatever.

president Israel thirty five percent eighty nine percent thirty nine percent eighty one eight hundred W twenty thousand dollars four billion dollars two years ten W
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"What is the poll question? What are the results thus far if someone attack? That's a president on Twitter. Is it appropriate for him to respond it, most certainly is eighty nine percent. Still with you. All right. Eight four four five hundred forty two forty two. That is the toll free number of the Howie Carr show. I wanna play a couple more cuts here from the, the hearing yesterday with the Doug Collins has been the congressman the congressman from Georgia. He's been doing a pretty good job on this to he's on the judiciary committee. And I think he's a former prosecutor or at least he knows his stuff. And so he was talking about how, you know, when in two thousand twelve remember Obama set to, to Mitt Romney, the, the eighties of called, and they want their foreign policy back when he said, they will Russia was our leading geopolitical, fol- follow. So, you know, Collins from Georgia mentioned that to, to, to John, the cut one and I'm reminded the Russia priority issue because just a few years ago, it was brought up in one of our Candice talked about rush. Sabina threat in the former President, Mr Obama said, you know, that the eighties are asking for their foreign policy by guess what this committee is now hearing from the seventies and they won't their star witness back. That was so good. Yes, exactly. And so let's, let's let you apply. What a play some of the cuts from this morning to this is Trump on the White House lawn before he leaves for. Oh, I'm sure they'll be more tonight. But this was this morning. His description of Joe Biden cut eighteen. That was not a competitor. Joe Biden is a dummy, Joe Biden thought China was not a competitor China may five hundred billion dollars over a short period of time against Obama Biden for many, many years at all fairness to them..

Obama Biden Doug Collins Russia Mr Obama judiciary committee congressman Mitt Romney Howie Carr Georgia Twitter president China White House President Candice John five hundred billion dollars eighty nine percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Like eighty nine percent of the time. Every now, and then you'll get that one person. You'll throw smile at them. And they're like, you know. What are you looking at like? Okay. Well, I tried. I'll see all in the door. The help you with your groceries put them in the car smile at you. What are you smiling? At don't you hate that trying to be nice. These findings addressing critical question about the links between our internal experience in our bodies. Yes. We can feel happier. If we smile. But psychologists have actually disagreed about this idea for over a hundred years says another guy who's in the know that would be nNcholas Coles. He's the lead author of the paper. Now these disagreements became more pronounced in two thousand sixteen when seventeen teams researches failed a failed to replicate. A well-known experiment demonstrating that the physical act of smiling can make people happier. There'll be a pop quiz on this KENDALL. Snoop paper for psychological or for the psychological bulletin. However describes how the team used a statistical technique called meta analysis to combine data. See I'm going back from data to data. So I cover both of them from one hundred thirty eight studies testing over eleven thousand participants from all around the world now. Corning to the meta analysis posing facial expressions has a small impact on our feelings. For example. Smiling makes people feel happier. Scowling makes them feel angrier and frowning. Makes them feel sad. It makes sense doesn't it? Make sense. Yes. Why we're doing it isn't that why we're making these kinds of body language. I mean, I can't really I'm not going to smile angry. I'm not gonna smile or if I'm just crack, you know, unless you're one of those moments where you're just kind of three your hands up in the air. Okay. Yeah. All right. I've had it up to here. And then you just smile through the pain. Yeah. Well, that's disturbing. When you get someone that's really disturbing and they're super they've reached their their the cracking, the crack. Turns into cat woman in the smile just goes, they're angry. And then all of a sudden it just goes into. Hamm smiling. Now, gosh, I really go back to your anger because the smile things scaring me because I know just a second ago you were very angry. Please don't smile like that. For example. Okay. So if we don't they say if we don't think that people can smile. Their way to happiness. But these findings are exciting because they say because well, they provide a clue about how the.

nNcholas Coles psychological bulletin Hamm Scowling Corning eighty nine percent hundred years
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"Campus program, you'll see fast results to eighty nine percent of students were promoted or changed jobs while enrolled with a twenty four percent average starting salary increase after graduation in a salary of close to one hundred sixty thousand dollars. Check out the Lincoln the notes to learn more about the program. Hello and welcome. I'm outscored Nick. And this is moving up a podcast about secrets to success struggles along the way and life in general, they in the pod Eric von from hustle fund, Eric's the first investor and pay club to come on the pod. So that's exciting before Eric became a VC. He was a founder himself. Plus, he. A cool and interesting guy. I think you're gonna like this conversation. I'm back from the masters two days without my phone getting back to the car both days and having like fifteen misc- phone calls and about one hundred emails that's a little stressful. But the experience of being one of the most beautiful courses in the world having conversations with people from all over. It's actually super nice not having the phone. And I heard the same thing from lots of people. Yes, it's great. Having our entire life's right in our pocket, but it's also great living life and connecting with people which the phone usually gets in the way of not having the phone definitely enhances the experience. I bet it true with other things in life to you should give it a try besides the phone the tournament is so special. I don't know of anything like it. It's an incredibly delightful experience from the moment, you pull into the free parking to the way you can play a chair down in the morning and come back to it. Whenever you want later in the day, the food's delicious, especially the Georgia peach and sugar ice. Cream sandwich, which I had to of both days, and then everything costs.

founder Eric Nick Georgia one hundred sixty thousand dol eighty nine percent twenty four percent two days
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Think about I, there are new monitors and that that can be anything that's new, analyze, like a new diagnostic to new vital sign. I'll give two examples there. Then there are existing monitors that we make. Faster, better, cheaper, safer, easier to get. I I r- them sits in that EKG's were not new, but they just did it way better. Ten x better. Maybe twenty x better than there are platforms Dahmer was talking about companies like early sons that have this bed pad that gets you a number of vital signs without touching the patient which allows you to more efficiently run a hospital because you could monitor patients without humans looking at them all the time. But I think each one has its own set of criteria look at. So in the case of new, the biggest difference in the case of new existing in platform, is that a new sensor? And I'll use an example with Massimo and pulse ox. Symmetry, when pulse x number, she tells you your is how much oxygen is in your hemoglobin super important clinically. When it first came out, it was a new diagnostic. We had to learn clinically how to use it. What do we do when it's ninety versus at many hospitals, you admit a patient that has an ammonia with an eighty nine percent pulse ox. Cole sat oxide, whereas with ninety five or send them home, the that rule based. It took a bit to develop, whereas with EKG's in existing diagnostic, we know what to do. If we see a fit, we noted with TV tack, and then platforms are mixture vote because platforms have an integration of sensors, even if they're all known. For example, in early census case where we're still trying to figure out what the combination of existing diagnostics should look like, what is a bad or good one or what should we do with it? So it ends up being in between in terms of the amount of evidence required. And of course the the effect of that on the on the system. So I'm a big believer in all of this. I think the great part about monitoring whether to new diagnostic Zinger platform is that if we can get ahead of disease or issues, we tend to save a lot more money on the treatment side and also people are happier, so big and I think there's big opportunity to make money, but these companies are not therapeutics company. So the way in which they spend capital and prosecute, the business has to be different. They tend to be a little bit more cost conscious in should. Because the exits are not as large, usually in the amount of time it takes can be the same as law at or as long as as therapeutic. You know, it's interesting in one of the one of the most interesting remote monitoring companies I've seen is alive court, right? I think they felt real interested in patents. Real interesting data sets. You know, if you if you FDA cleared, you know, if you read through their comments on the app.

Massimo Dahmer FDA Cole eighty nine percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"The process of just going into the restorative justice procedure where the victim has to weigh in on what he or she wants that process is often is often worry that that is sort of revictimizes additional cost being imposed on the victim yes and that's the worry and in in some cases that worry is it's real and actual in a lot of cases though there is a degree of empowerment that sexual assault survivors or victims get when they face their offender in one of these kinds of conferences or mediation centers so they did this survey in canada recently eighty nine percent of violent crime victims wanted to meet their offenders and seventy percent of rape survivors said they would welcome the opportunity for victims to be able to meet with their offenders in in a kind of conference settings so these kind of empowering effects that can come are i think surprising and something that you can only fully appreciate if you are if you either get a detailed account of these encounters or you you ex you know you're actually a witness to them but but yeah of course to go back to your point you need to set these boundaries that take into account what kind of message you're sending to potentially future criminals right to future criminals who might be thinking about acting in a certain way so that's where the floor for punishment comes and it's also where the ceiling for punishment might come as well although i think the ceiling is more set by.

assault canada rape eighty nine percent seventy percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Being affordable birth control for everybody i've got some stats eighty nine percent of catholic women who are at risk of pregnancy and ninety percent of protestant women who are at risk of pregnancy currently use a contraceptive method at amongst sexually experience religious woman ninety nine percent of catholic and protestant have ever use some form of contraception so this is something that is pretty i mean ever it's pretty universal yes so asia what are what you're saying with those statistics is that it it is approaching uh every woman who has some point used birth control can we should be able to get you would think every woman about issue you know admitted lip comment about this on facebook the other day but i i so i take a birth control pill iii tried in ied in it didn't work well for my buddy and i've tried generic pills in they did also did not work well for my body so i i have a birth control pill that is a brand name that works very well it it you know it is the the right solution for my body that i've worked out with my doctor and i went to pick it up the other day in a 3months supply was seventy dollars i mean that is with insurance lake without insurance i don't even notes by five hundred or something but like with my very good insurance plan it was seventy dollars my insurance would allow me to be pregnant in deliver for less than that not on the whole but you know just the sort of being in the hospital in giving birth there's no way it makes more sense for my insurance company on him.

birth control facebook insurance plan insurance company asia ied seventy dollars eighty nine percent ninety nine percent ninety percent 3months
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on The Daily

"Eighty nine percent of cell phone towers are broken and seventy three percent of atms are still not working with residents frustrated by a delayed response from federal officials and communication to and from the island limited a group of new york times reporters travel the island for 24 hours to see the conditions for themselves one of them is francis rubas who goes by french versed with him so i drew the short straw and ended up with a night shift so erica rodriguez who is a local photographer she lives here in puerto rico we climbed into her nissan versailles and now we just said about driving along the south coast to see what we would find this road is opened the three that connects miama zoo on this we were driving along this oh yeah smells now and we smell this really terrible stench like what is that looks look and i looked up and there was a supermarket it was called the plus side boom boom at gallo or something like that more should we go over there didn't even look like it had been hit by a hurricane it look like somebody needed and spit it out while seeing that these folks will taunts when asked yes ain't nobody bed that new york times it's obviously the food had gone bad there's a lot of food riding in that supermarket samih some of the things that you've seen since the hurricane he came through here.

francis rubas miama zoo gallo new york times erica rodriguez puerto rico new york seventy three percent Eighty nine percent 24 hours
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"President trump endorsed a steep cuts in legal immigration on wednesday economists say that's a grave mistake washington post survey of 18 economists in july found that eighty nine percent believe it's a terrible idea for trump to curb immigration to the united states sea trump couldn't do the plan that might be hard but would help the economy that would appeal to yes his base but also the business community and democrats as well instead he had to float a stupid unrealistic draconian cut that will appeal to ciro democrats that will turn off the business community and that will only appeal to his base well this base likes it they got a policy proposal that will give them cheer that is almost no chance of turning into law in the real world why why does this go on because we're living in something of a calcul stock resi definition of which his government by the stupidest and least leastqualified stephen miller by the way is not stupid and he's not unqualified he just unqualified to govern its government by the least qualified the guy's qualified to make very cutting arguments he in fact all the people in the administration just don't have the skills to actually get an agenda past stephen miller can get his people dancing in the streets or in the streets more cosmopolitan locales the reverse on the show today i know what you're asking yourself with their skara mucci but to understand where the merge might go from here and he is having a press conference slash online town hall tomorrow we need to understand where he's coming from so i got zoe chase in here because she interviewed him back when he was a potential republican donor looking for a vessel and i'm gonna talk to zoe and we're going to play the tapes of those interviews this one this was for the true scaramucci complete list but i know you're out there this whole thing goes on for some length such as the complexity and majesty of scaramucci so i will count with your about here as both our interview and our spiel so now enjoy the education of anthony scaramucci a blossoming as told in three movements d d d d d d d d d.

President trump stephen miller zoe chase washington united states anthony scaramucci eighty nine percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

This Is Why You're Single

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

"I would think it had little to no affect on my sex life i won't say yeah i mean i'm not like leni see that people with a cigar the a you guys would be in the minority because last november twenty fit when fidel castro died searches for cuba went up one hundred and four percent especially popular was the search cubanmade an big budi cuban was the number four search that day because when i think of fidel castro big buddha cuban yes i was oh he had that as i mean i don't know what is asked to use use a charismatic figure barbara walters him and barbara walters salute little chemistry yawns are not going to be on the side of defence just in january when rumors of the tape involving donald trump i surfaced what do you think people searched cooled incheon girl made the golden showers spiked by two hundred eighty nine percent on father's day searches for data and daddy went up one thousand three hundred and sixty one percent and at christmas time angeles favorite holiday what do you think people were searching baby jesus what do you think alana oh i can literally limping of reindeer been afraid elf it's all about address it'll us the love that elf porn 400 and sixty four percent it went up i ha i just want to go back to the golden showers which i love it you know the industry term nothing made me drier than thinking of donald trump having prostitutes pee on abed let on his experience a little golden shower by accident do tower and again at okay am i going to tell the story right now is a little quickie yellow alec wasn't an intentional golden shower so it was the worst kind of golden shower my boyfriend on my birthday thought it would be funny to pee on my leg we're just taking a shower together it wasn't like a sexual thing was like over in a hurry and it as a show and he pete and i was like and then i let's have newly was like dad's not funny and i turned into a demon and then he realized he came to his senses that it wasn't funny and apologize and that was his birthday gift to me and also gathered today got the accidental bolden shower a single wondering wanted to go back to it.

fidel castro cuba barbara walters donald trump alec leni incheon christmas abed pete bolden two hundred eighty nine percen sixty four percent sixty one percent four percent
"eighty nine percent" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"eighty nine percent" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

"Eighty nine percent of the population spends every free second surfing i do i know very few people who actually have ever served alone at low treat it like a religion either way i wish i could do it i that i think what people in la there are people from around the country their opinions of la whether they know it or not are formed by new yorkers new yorker shape opinions much more than most people would can see really la in new york shapes national opinion largely because they control without getting into a dumb conversation about fake news and the allegedly fake news which is and he would that's upside down another conversation anyhow new yorkers would never leave anywhere other than new york except la and that's because of the business they come out here to to be in the entertainment business shane the devil they would never moved to kansas city on a whim you know they were pittsburgh they would out there that so they moved la and then they resent the la not because la's bad it's just not new york and so they hate it and then they talk about how they hate it and then that permeates its way in the tv and movies and now everybody thinks starting with woody allen in any hall everybody thinks the only food you can get in la is health food and it's very small portions road and everybody's very pretentious and everybody's constantly handing you a screenplay rise and everyone's a phony and all the women have fake boobs and no one's to be trusted road.

la new yorkers kansas city new york woody allen new yorker pittsburgh la Eighty nine percent