35 Burst results for "eighty five percent"

Fast Food Giants are Reinventing the Restaurant, Pandemic Style

Business Wars Daily

03:08 min | Last week

Fast Food Giants are Reinventing the Restaurant, Pandemic Style

"Not so long ago fast food restaurants were looking for ways to get you to stay a little longer they sprucing up their dining rooms and building ball pits for the kids after all the more time at your table the more likely you are to order another menu item or two, but dining in is so two thousand nineteen isn't it? Now thanks in part to the pandemic, these quick service eateries or redesigning their restaurants to get you in and out as fast as possible. Burger, King has just unveiled its pandemic inspired restaurants of the future. There are two concepts, both of which maximize social distance. The smaller of the two designs has no dining room at all. Instead, the would-be dining space is used for additional drive through lanes two lanes to be exact. Once your order is ready, a conveyor belt will deliver it to your car window. Of course, if you're craving more human contact, you can also go old school and walk up to an order window. The second concept is a t shaped two storey restaurant with the kitchen. Upstairs this, let's Burger King devote more real estate to park in order spots in various drive-thru options the companies. Also, experimenting with lockers where you can pick up your food, you get the locker number and a unique combination when you order on the APP, the idea is to make the experience as contact free as possible, and that's important to customers drive throughs and meal delivery services like Rub and eats have been a lifeline for burger king as indoor dining was banned or restricted during a large part of the pandemic CNN reports in the second quarter through sales made up eighty five percent of the company's total US sales. Burger King says it will be testing. It's new concepts in warm climate areas like Florida, and the Caribbean but no word on exactly when that will start. Another major fast-food player that's also trying to get you out of its restaurants quickly is Taco Bell. TACO Bell so-called go mobile locations have been in development for a few years but the pandemic accelerated plans for them according to nation's restaurant news. These locations are smaller because like Burger kings, restaurants of the future. They also eliminate dining space also liked burger king concept. You can place or on the TACO BELL APP and have your meal brought out to you by a bellhop get the company will begin opening new stores early next year the design is a far cry from the one that the TACO giant unveiled in early March, a gaming concept restaurant plan to test in California customers would. be able to play video games in addition to dining and in January burger king announced plans to make gets dining experience a little posher the king plan to make over a Saint Louis location with white subway tiles on the floor bench seats inspired by classic cadillacs and warm lighting retail wire reported. You might be munching on your fries, but you'd be doing it in style. Now, a combination of pandemic dining restrictions and changing customer behavior has made such concepts as Cadillac benches obsolete. Well, it was fun while it lasted, but it's time to say so long to indoor play grounds and Walker inspired light fixtures for the time being at least fast food customers are opting out of dining in. Choosing the biddle dashboard diner in Stan.

Burger King Taco Bell Taco Giant Caribbean Biddle United States CNN Walker Florida Saint Louis California
Designing Your Work Life

Good Life Project

05:29 min | Last month

Designing Your Work Life

"Let's give a little bit of context just to who you are and how you came to work together because you come from sort like different walks of life and somehow ended up originally teaching this course together and trying to figure out. Okay. What is this thing called design thinking and why is it being used in this one domain but we're not really applying this process this way of thinking to actually creating a better life. So how does the marriage I happen here? Under the origin and through to you in spring of two thousand. So. Going all the way back to when I was a Stanford Sophomore here seventy five thousand years ago when they retire on the plaza and struggling with the question, what do I do with my life? I found most of the grown-ups were supposed to be helpful not helpful at all and I found it really difficult to figure my own life and get into my career and apple in the early days and find myself on the first corporate culture. Committee was Steve In one, thousand, nine hundred because we're worried about what makes apple won't be apple anymore someday, and over the subsequent thirty years noticed everybody's got this question particularly workplace about I wanted to many for work on to work for you. Want, it to work for me. I want this to be generative used language with that's what they were looking for and with. So everybody's got this question fast forward many years. Later I'm having coffee with a guy named Randy over at Berkeley and he says Gosh have you should teach a class on this. So minor problems I'm not of the Faculty don't of a PhD don't have any contacts there I can solve everything but the lousy commute I said deal. So I taught a course experimentally one student said, are you teaching in the spring because my roommate wants to take I said sure I made a deal the universe of the kid show up I'll show up so fourteen semesters later. I'm teaching this class of Berkeley called finding your vocation and then how platinum David. Kelly get together an event. This thing called the D school decided to invent the school, which is where we are now and in order to focus on that David Kelly s this Guy Bill Burnett run the design program, and so in two thousand and seventy heard bill was coming here to run the design program said. Hey. Bill Gates. This kind of stuff he cares about students in Stanford's a lot less terrible from me. Let's have lunch and so we had lunch in two thousand and seven in the spring, which was the first of ten lunches over a year talking about this ambiguous idea of students find their way and about a minute and a half bill goes after great idea it's a huge problem. We should totally fix it design. Thinking is the way to solve this thing. So take all that stuff you're doing and flip it ended design give me a proposal will teach it. It will prototype at the summer we'll teach at this fall. Let's go I gotTA gotta run so it was a two minute meeting and I guess an appointment we gotta go. So what are the few times the bill talk faster than I do and so then we start that spring thinking of ideas and that fall teaching design students, which eventually teaching author students. But in particular design thing really did work why West go? Why did design work? Design is inherently human centered. The way we teach it and both of you and I have been working with students for longtime I started I finished my masters in eighty two I started teaching part time eighty, three I'm doing this for like thirty. Six years or something. And in office our after office hours after office. Our really smart capable students going I don't know what to do. I. Don't know how to launch. is working to suck as much as everybody tells me. How. Will I find something that I want or I like or might even be meaningful people keep asking me stupid questions like what's my passion and I don't know. So wrong broken. With me professor and it's nothing wrong with you. And then Dave, this experience over Berkeley and you know basically the class happened because he wanted a shorter commute and I wanted to. Free up my office our time but no, it's a real. It's a really big problem I. Mean you look around look at the data around the world sixty United States sixty, eight percent of the people say I'm just engaged from are highly disengaged from my job. I hate my job eighty-five percent worldwide people hate their jobs, right? So the students you know we started with students and then pretty soon after we pick kind of gone all over the university and by the way now we and we give the class to any university that wants it. We're not being taught at one hundred, fifteen, some universities and courtesy of that wonderful woman over there Gabrielle. Runs our studios. Everybody's got the same question like life be meaningful. Will this be interesting? What's work? How does work it into this big thing called life? And it's essentially a human problem because we're trying to. But designers do is make things that have happened in the world. You know, hey, this is an iphone never happened before how do you do it while you build lots and lots of prototypes and figure it out because you can't get any about the future. So when you want to do something in the future that's brand new. You need a process design thinking process it works over and over again if you apply to your life, well, what are you trying to do something new in the world your. Future. Right you've never you've never been there before you don't know what it's going to be like you probably are a little anxious or you're at a point of change we started working with thirty and forty something. I. Have This career thing but it's not exactly what I didn't really work out the way I thought or it's okay to go faster. So everybody's got this problem. How do I invent the future? Well, design thinking and design is a wave in Benton your future. I tell the students you I wanted to choice. Whether Students Twenty launching a thirty in board or fifty, and thinking about their own career you got only two choices the futures coming. You don't get to choose that. You, get the default future stuff happens in you react to it. or You design it, you put your intention in the world and you try to make the world do things that you're interested in and

Berkeley David Kelly Apple Bill Gates Bill Burnett Stanford Bill United States Randy Benton Steve Professor Gabrielle Dave
The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

The Energy Gang

06:17 min | Last month

The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

"So. Let's turn to our topics this week, and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five percent. It's simple. It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. The authors are Saul Griffith. Sam College Alex Laskey you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. So they're part of a team called rewiring America, which is putting out a series of technical reports, mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, and putting a lot of people to work in the process. So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. So Melissa, let's look at the origins It doesn't start with emissions instead, it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. like modeling thing saying what happens with that? From a modeling approach. I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, targets, economic development targets, etc, and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? So they said, okay, what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. So it was this bottom up, call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? So, in this modeling, they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On the electrification side, they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, okay, every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. Anything, but it would help if you did. I like. I think this is fantastic. Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. I think that part of this that. Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me is what are the forces around here that will make it happen i. You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. The when we think about for instance The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. In the local level, you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. So whenever someone's gas boiler? goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. But I. Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The math actually works. Now, where's the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, a commodity report that I think many of us who've been steeped in this? No but for think the first time watcher is shocking. Right So the energy information, administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to primary energy. Right. So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. Then people say look how small it is. But in fact, when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, Levin's would say. It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. How to put it into a refinery, converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and diesel. Then actually burning that fuel and you know and creating the electricity that then actually keeps your beer cold all the losses in there are eliminated when you go directly to electricity but in but we are constantly comparing ourselves to primary energy and so part of what this report shows is a week actually eliminate fifty percent of our entire primary energy usage just by electrifying everything right because you lose all those losses

Alex Laskey Engineer America Saul Griffith Co Founder United States Dan Yates Melissa Emery Cap Bax Levin
The Internet Is Everything. But Is It Accessible?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:03 min | Last month

The Internet Is Everything. But Is It Accessible?

"We spent some time digging into just how crucial Internet access is during the pandemic. But even if you have access to the Internet, many parts of it are still not accessible this summer, the Americans with Disabilities Act the ADA turned thirty years old and a lot of the tech that makes things convenient for everyone can be game changing for people with disabilities, screen readers that help visually impaired people read websites and software that lets us type with our voice, Nicholas? Dean, how does a Web accessibility consultant and trainer? He says that? That despite these advances, some products that claim to help actually make things worse. There is no doubt in my mind that we must include people with disabilities at every stage of any project. An example here there's a solution for web accessibility that his being pushed really hard lately, and those are overlays. So you you go, you pay for a service, they inject one line of code and your site, and they claim that it makes the site accessible. When in fact, it reduces accessibility, it is not reliable it conflicts with users. assistive technologies, and we have a solution that is really appealing to people that don't have a disability. They're appealing to people think that can get quick fix. But in fact, it's breaking things. So. When you are advising companies, what features do you tell them that they should include in their websites to make those sites more accessible while there's there's a few things to to focus on to look at making sure you can use the site with keyboard. Only you WANNA, make sure your color contrasts are sufficient something that's been very fashionable as great text on grey background That's really Really, really hard to beat for people that have low vision, and incidentally, if you try to read it on your cellphone outside in full sun chances are you're not gonna be able to read it either, and this is where I'm saying accessibility is good for everyone. Those are really good tips for companies designing their websites. But what can we do to make say our social media posts more accessible. Twitter now offers the ability to add descriptions or alternate text for images and I urge everybody to actually take a moment and described image. They're posting be careful about using emojis too much screen reader users are really going to struggle always think as to how is this? GonNa. Be perceived and how can I make sure that more people can get the message? What kind of innovations in tech are you excited about? As it pertains to the disability community? There's a lot of things happening when we're looking at tick a lot of the excitement, Ron that right now is Rhonda. Emergence and there's a lot of that that can be leveraged for for accessibility. For example, you may have heard of using a I to. Interpret. What a photo is and be able to give her a description of that fo four screen reader users or using air. I. For automating transcription for shows like the one we're having right now. So there's there's a lot of promise in in that field at the same time I. Think we have to be aware that there's there's promise, but it's not quite ready. For Primetime, a lot of the automated transcription or automated captions. You may see on, Youtube, for example, are not one hundred percent accurate. Especially if people have a bit of an accent or use a tech lingo. The accuracy is not perfect. So as a result, people who rely on captions or transcripts will not get. All the information. So they may get eighty percent or eighty, five percent and those ten or fifteen percent missing can be crucial. So. That's that's exciting. There's stuff moving. It's going to, it's going to help, but it's going to. It's not helping now because we can't rely on it and I think that's That's probably a a trap that we have to be careful not to fall into, is that while the technology is there, the technology's not perfect yet? So we can't rely on twitter can't decide well, I don't need to bother. Describing my images when I post on social media, because there's no intelligence that can do that yet while we're not quite there yet. So we have to be careful to. Not Get carried away with excitement as to what's new and shiny and make sure that we still you ju-, diligence to make sure accessibility is taken care of by humans. Nicholas? Is A web accessibility consultant and trainer.

Youtube Twitter Dean Consultant Nicholas Rhonda ADA RON
Discipleship: Hearing Who We Are with Jeff McDaniel

Legacy-Dads Podcast

15:55 min | Last month

Discipleship: Hearing Who We Are with Jeff McDaniel

"Jeff, what are you doing your PhD in right now? Right, now it's in communication I am looking at A. Self efficacy in how we can help people change voluntary behaviors towards discipleship. The. The problem is eighty. Five percent of churches in America are either plateaued or declining zero churches in America are multiplying. And there's gotta be a reason why. So CS Lewis said scientists nothing more than I pointed my telescope it in this direction at this time towards this planet, and this is what I saw. So even social science is nothing more than critically looking at what God is doing and how God made us. So I'm taking a seminary degree, an MD, matching it up with a social science. And trying to see what God is doing and how we can better make disciples makes sense makes sense and so we we kinda talked we were talking about last week Kyle, this in a what if and this is something it came up in conversation wasn't even planned that we were saying what if you know God is pushing this cove is a mechanism to get us to relook at how we do quote Unquote Corporate Church gatherings or discipleship, and that's where we thought. Hey. You're the guy that's been doing this. You've been preaching this for years saying We need to get away from this corporate entertainment. You know consumer model in back to. First Century Early Church Christian discipleship so can you talk a little bit about some of the stuff you've been talking about working with where do you see the problems and then you know, what do you see? We can talk a little bit about You know, what are some solutions here?

America Jeff Lewis Kyle Relook
Conversation With Mountain West Commissioner Craig Thompson

The Paul Finebaum Show

12:30 min | 2 months ago

Conversation With Mountain West Commissioner Craig Thompson

"Delighted to welcome. To our program, a very important guests at this unbelievably strange time from the Mountain West Conference Commissioner Craig Thompson Commissioner thank you very very much for making the time I I, I can only imagine what your schedule is like. These days especially Zoom Bill Assuming there is one good afternoon. Paul good to be with you. You know I hope to mode no more about The next ninety minutes to two hours I have a four o'clock board calling five o'clock standing Monday de call, so we all compare notes and Kinda live by that old adage. God gave us two ears and one off for a reason, right? We're trying to learn from each other. Well we appreciate you making time I'm curious before we get down to some of the obvious questions Since, this occurred you. You've been very obviously active in in the NCAA, basketball tournament, having chaired the the men's basketball committee, and it all started there, and and I know in in your many many years is as commissioner. You've experienced so much but How do you? How do you prepare yourself for something like this? which is literally off the charts. Really is and you know again you don't because. no-one there might have been a few people worldwide They'd be well into their hundreds that were around nineteen eighteen. Spanish flu days, but For the most part, nobody's dealt with any of this Paul. So it's all new, and and it's It's disconcerting. It's hard. It's sad, but it's It's life and it's something we. We have to adjust to and and moved from. In as you get closer to what are really critical decisions, other conferences have made these choices many have not What what do you weigh as you're about to go onto? Another call here how how do you determine these things? Well, it's really got to beat a the safety and the health soccer you I think it's simply going to come down to what is the risk tolerance for for all the various groups just within our FBI subdivision and certainly there's. A rank and file and differences between the autonomous five leaks and a group of five leaks, but You've got you've got. A ton of governors. There's fifty state governors in that up BS group, one hundred thirty board of trustees, regions, one hundred thirty university presidents and Chancellors hundred thirty athletic directors under thirty head, football coaches, and I guarantee it dollar on the same page, and so you know we're. We're just trying to adjust on what makes the most sense for my university and ultimately our conferences. And everyone has a different set of circumstances as you said Commissioner Thompson but. It is late I think you know that we all we all know that. As you are about to go on these calls here in the next hour or two How do you start narrowing the window and coming to? Conclusions! Well we all kind of went into that false pretense and hope that fans should be better in July and August and we had time right back in March. We had four months to figure this out when we've got probably less than four weeks. A couple of weeks a big date coming up on Friday with you know the the six week period starting extended team practices, and then most camps opening somewhat in that August seventh time friend I! I had a good exchange with one of our head. Football coaches today saying you know I don't even know what to do. Because of campus regulations and concerns, we have one institution that's had nearly one hundred football players for little over a month. Now Paul and we have another institution that literally has no football players, conditioning of or working out degree, and so you know we're all over the map based on a local and university, muncipality rules and regulations and. I said this for months gone on standby. One of one of the big concerns and focal points for us is the state of California They just announced today that they're going to delay. The start of their prep season suggested until December or January didn't give an exacting, and they join a couple of states that the prep seasons have been canceled altogether one of our states New Mexico, so just just trying to deal with all the nuances and differences in rules, policies and allowances. As you as you try to deal with with some some issues before that certainly, the non-conference issues a lot of non conference. Games have been scrubbed. I. Has that been a major issue for you or Were you in reasonably good shape. Well it is a big issue, and of course years of all years. This is our twenty seven season A. We had more home games against PAC twelve than any time in our previous 21-year-history, we lost home games. Ucla at both. San Diego State ally. Utah, Colorado Washington state calendars on a state. They were GONNA play at the new two billion dollar NFL stadium in Las Vegas against UNLV so a lot of people like to point to that financial loss of losing the the six road at twelve games and a and a guarantee. Those seven home games from from both of financial interest level, and then ultimately you know television perspective CBS. Fox Aren't real thrilled. You know that we lost those seven home games. Talking to the Commissioner of the Mountain West Craig Thompson discussing all the variables. Commissioner. We. We've talked to so many different commissioners over these past few months, and as you as you so eloquently pointed out a minute ago. Everyone has a different set of circumstances and challenges you maybe more than than most because of the geographical aspect. But how do you think and it shouldn't be that hard to think about it since it's not far off? How how do you ultimately come up with what you would say? Good solution, not only for your member institutions, but for the safety of the athletes. Well again. You not to lean on your medical people and that's one of the. Major aspects of this board call coming up in an hour, so Paul because It's the first time that they in a while. They've heard directly from the the medical advisory group and you know they don't depend on them. You know they. They are the experts, will we? The board are economists and Then different walks of life. They're not medical people, per se, and so you know you really have to lean heavily on what makes sense I. I said four months ago and I I contend today. A lot of this is going to be perhaps probably triggered by what happens on our campuses. What they look like in the next month or so you know everybody's either hybrid mostly online You know there's GonNa. Be Certainly people walking around campus, but you know you. You really can't expect to have a college athletics if you don't have a fairly open in some degree. Campus. Commissioner I, it's no secret Wherever conferences are located and and and spread that football pays the majority of the bills there. There's some outliers of course but What's at stake you just from a revenue standpoint? Well you know. Let's all kinds of figures in I I know that A couple of our department said have lost Well in excess of ten million dollars now, and then could jump into without football alum Paul you know double and triple, and you know those are not insignificant numbers. They're smaller than the world. You live in I lived in Atlanta. For four years. New Orleans for twelve years both children born in New Orleans and well versed in an SEC football, and what it means in a walk of life, and so it's different, no question it's different I live in Colorado and and what it's like in Western states, but but none the less. You, do not escape whatever love your Ad. That football is probably that you know eighty eighty five percent of of an athletic budget, and and so it's so very important, but you know as harmful as painful rather as it is from the financial perspective now that cannot be the driving force won't be the driving force. It will be that the health and safety it'll be university decisions. You know I've always. Always felt. The presidents of universities and chances have an extremely difficult position now more so than ever because they're pushed him pulled in and all these different directions and you know I. Don't know how the decision will. Ultimately made would fall looks like from terms of football. I don't know who makes that decision, but Hopefully they'll be some clobbering collective. Let's let's go right to the College Football playoff. Can you even imagine a world where pick a number? Three conferences can play in the fall and seven up to play in the spring. What happens to see a p.? Is there a CFP? Does that make sense to have a CFP? I guess it might depend on those three conferences are and I use. You know you, you're GONNA have to look at this for for the good of everybody, and and you know the collaboration and collective exchange and we've seen conferences. Do things unilaterally I mean as a commissioner. You Work for twelve schools. You don't work for honored thirty FBI schools, and so you're doing what's right, and what's your membership is is directing and advise you to do, but we do have to get together and get the same page in some regards spor for the sake of the CFD for instance and the bowl system. I know at least I'm told in talking to your colleagues commissioners. We wind down. I know you've got a lot of meetings to that. You are a collaborative group. I mean that's a fact. I mean we see that all the time but it but I wonder though. Because we've already seen some some. Some schisms as we had the big ten, and then everyone else said something else I mean the PAC twelve and the big ten, and do you. Are you concerned about the stability of of what you do every day and try to work with everyone else within the framework of college athletics. I am and I'm not I mean again. We try to work together, but at the end of the day our plan for fourteen or ten members, order media have will dictate. What direction are leagues go and I know the NCAA takes a ton of shots, but the NCAA is membership driven. It's schools that are that are ultimately making decisions and the conferences the exact same way, so you know we can compare but I. I am concerned about The postseason college football, the the CFC's a five hundred million dollar enterprise NCAA. Basketball Championship is a six hundred million dollars in a prize number of conferences of two hundred and fifty to three hundred million dollar annual TV, contracts, and and we can't go ten I don't well. Yeah, anything's possible. You could go ten separate ways I. certainly don't think it's going to be that way at the end of the day. Commissioner will let you get back to your meetings, but thank you for making time. It was just a pleasure to to hear your perspective as someone who is so well respected. And revered in this industry we be well and let's hope for some good news. Stay safe yourself my friend.

Commissioner Football Paul Commissioner Thompson Ncaa Basketball FBI Mountain West Conference Colorado Craig Thompson PAC New Mexico Soccer Ucla California San Diego FLU NFL
Summer Water Rose 2019

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:26 min | 2 months ago

Summer Water Rose 2019

"It's day from cheap wine finder dot com again. And today we have a summer wine was. Ninety degrees in Chicago today with Do Point of a thousand something ridiculous I do believe. So I was thinking about Rosa. And I went to the store and I found let me grab the bottle. Summer water. Twenty nineteen from the central coast of California. Eighty five percent grenache fifteen percent Acerra. So, keep a chill. And there you go. and. We did a podcast recently about. How nothing the wine bottle tells you anything actually hear it dealt with the grapes are and what percentages and That's from the central coast, even though it's hundreds of miles Lisa, tell you something. But. The name of the artwork on the label and the name the labels. That everything I needed to know. You can't get any information label normally this one that gives you a little bit. But I was looking for Rose Day. I'm in the Rosa. I'll, and it's like ten yards, zero reserves or popular right now. And Yeah walk in trying to see what's what and summer water and. These little pink water droplets. Label again! That's what I want I want. I want summer water I want. Some pink one I. Want something cool refreshing. The label everything I wanted to know when I tasted it. Yeah, they were right. This, is from a company called. Out Spell W I and. they do a membership line thing where they send you out wine. But this one is for sale in stores And it's really good. It's They say an approval. Style from the central coast with Rome Valley. Grapes. And is and sometimes prevents rose. They can be a little, Brittle and the Palette. This little softer little rounded. I'M GONNA. Take a little SIP now. You know it's got a great knows it's got. A lot of flavor thousands got that acidity. That I like that Knicks you want to. Take another SIP. That's got some on lease things going on and I. Don't know. rose as not really the. Tackle whiny US on lease for by Guy Little. Salty can't shoot thing a little creamy thing though though in provence they do do some on lease. So, maybe we I've tasted it. See never know. Always go with what you, what you taste, don't guess yourself. So there you have it. I wanted. A legit Rosa. And this is legit Rosa. Minute this was going to be resolved from the time it was in the vineyard to have. This isn't one of those where they. Bleed off some of the grapes for red wine and other we. For another for Rosa where it's. There, it's fifty fifty. This legitimate Rosa by people know what they're doing. I like tastes great. It's about fifteen dollars. If you're looking for one I mean there are less expensive out there, but this is pretty legit. There, you go. That acidity got to me. Maybe take another SIP. So you can You can't judge a book by its cover, but you can buy a one by the label. That's the lesson we learned today. What's hot and sticky outside? Even though I'm inside in the air conditioning. Outside. Rose as still does just fine.

Rosa Knicks Rose United States California Chicago Rome Valley Lisa
337 - Test Your Summer Nutrition Smarts

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

03:17 min | 2 months ago

337 - Test Your Summer Nutrition Smarts

"Hi There Monica Rheingau here. Thanks for tuning in to this week's nutrition diva podcast. Summer officially begins this weekend here in the Northern Hemisphere, anyway and to celebrate have a little quiz for you to test your summer nutrition savvy. Can you get a perfect score if you're a longtime listener I bet you can. Now. Are you ready for our summertime nutrition quiz, question, number, one, true or false eating certain foods can repel mosquitoes. True, Eating garlic may give you some mild protection against mosquitoes, both from the odor on your breath as well as the sulfur compounds that you emit through your skin when you eat garlic. Smearing. Garlic scented lotion on your skin is even more effective, but it has some obvious drawbacks. In the end, though scientists estimate that genetics account for about eighty five percent of our attractiveness to mosquitoes, so we -squitoes, maggots may have to reconcile ourselves to our fate. For more foods that can help repel mosquitoes. See my episode what to eat to avoid mosquito bites. Question number two true or false. Watermelon is a good way to stay hydrated. True Watermelon is over ninety percent water, and it also contains potassium and other electrolytes, so it's just like those sports drinks, but with less sugar, other super hydrating fruits and vegetables, including cucumbers, grapes, Honeydew, cantaloupe, celery, and tomatoes. Question number three, true or false. Air Conditioning makes you gain weight. The Swan is false. In fact, you burn slightly more calories in a cool room because your body has to work bit harder to maintain your body temperature. And not only that, but when it gets hot, people tend to move around less. You expend less energy, and therefore you burn fewer calories, and for the whole story on this see my episode does air conditioning make you fat? Question number four true or false. marinating meats before grilling can make them healthier. This, of course is true marinating meats for just thirty minutes before throwing them on the grill can reduce the formation of harmful compounds when grilling by up to ninety percent, and here's a bonus tip for you. Marinate and based your chicken in Italian dressing instead of barbecue sauce, and you'll also slash sugar and calories by ninety percent. Question number, five, true or false, certain foods can make you look Tan One's true Kinda very high intakes of Keratin. Lloyd's can give your Skin Tan, while Orange Hue, and that's what's in all. Those all natural self tanning pills you see advertised on the back of Magazines Food Tien Keratin noise include carrots of course, but also sweet potatoes, Kale Spinach and winter squash, and if you overdo it, don't worry. The effect is temporary. You might also want to check out my episode what to eat for gorgeous skin.

Air Conditioning Monica Rheingau Lloyd
Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon 4100 promises faster Wear OS smartwatches

Daily Tech News Show

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon 4100 promises faster Wear OS smartwatches

"Announced two new WAIROA s processors today, the snapdragon wear, forty, one hundred, and the always on forty one hundred plus qualcomm promises eighty five percent faster speed than the previous generation two and a half times faster, GP, you performance and faster memory I watches with. The chips will arrive in the coming

Wairoa Qualcomm
American Airlines will book flights to full capacity

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

American Airlines will book flights to full capacity

"American Airlines is ending social distancing on its flights next week joining some rivals who are flying their jets at full capacity American Airlines says come July first it will no longer leave some of the middle seats open to allow for distancing among passengers matching the policies of United Airlines and spirit American had been flying get eighty five percent capacity and says it will allow customers to change flights at no extra cost if they object to a full flight rivals delta southwest and jet blue are still blocking out some seats for social distancing Americans passengers will be asked to verify they don't have by receptors and will be required to wear a mask one travel analyst says this is putting profitability ahead of the health of both passengers and airline employees I'm Jackie Quinn

American Airlines United Airlines Analyst Jackie Quinn
American Airlines will book flights to full capacity

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

American Airlines will book flights to full capacity

"American Airlines is ending social distancing on its flights next week joining some rivals who are flying their jets at full capacity American Airlines says come July first it will no longer leave some of the middle seats open to allow for distancing among passengers matching the policies of United Airlines and spirit American had been flying get eighty five percent capacity and says it will allow customers to change flights at no extra cost if they object to a full flight rivals delta southwest and jet blue are still blocking out some seats for social distancing Americans passengers will be asked to verify they don't have by receptors and will be required to wear a mask one travel analyst says this is putting profitability ahead of the health of both passengers and airline employees I'm Jackie Quinn

American Airlines United Airlines Analyst Jackie Quinn
American Airlines will book flights to full capacity

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

American Airlines will book flights to full capacity

"American Airlines is ending social distancing on its flights next week joining some rivals who are flying their jets at full capacity American Airlines says come July first it will no longer leave some of the middle seats open to allow for distancing among passengers matching the policies of United Airlines and spirit American had been flying get eighty five percent capacity and says it will allow customers to change flights at no extra cost if they object to a full flight rivals delta southwest and jet blue are still blocking out some seats for social distancing Americans passengers will be asked to verify they don't have by receptors and will be required to wear a mask one travel analyst says this is putting profitability ahead of the health of both passengers and airline employees I'm Jackie Quinn

American Airlines United Airlines Analyst Jackie Quinn
Malawi to go to polls again, after first election nullified

The World

03:55 min | 3 months ago

Malawi to go to polls again, after first election nullified

"They Connie is struggling it's actually shrinking in Malawi food shortages and hunger had been serious challenges before the corona virus cover nineteen only major challenges in southern Africa harder so when Malawians go to the polls this week to elect a new president all of this will be on their minds the world's only make a Condi has our story for millions of Malawians planning to vote for president tomorrow there's a sense of deja vu that's because the country just had a presidential election last year in may the incumbent president Peter Mutharika narrowly won with thirty eight percent of the vote he's been in office since two thousand fourteen international election monitors said it was a free fair and democratic contest but many Malawians didn't feel that way demonstrators across the country Hughes president of stealing the election the runner up opposition candidate Lazarus Chakwera did too so he took the issue to court to dollar packaging was too late is the president of the women lawyers association of Malawi she said the law is constitutional court noted several irregularities in the first election they are very good at it he's running strong the use of different parishes may require internal errors with the use of two banks was the right thing the two picks that she's referring to here was a white correctional fluid used on ballots apparently electoral officers used it to correct the so called voting errors this was only one issue that led to allow this court to take an unprecedented step in February they nullified the results of last year's election record even stays late ninety five elections because they leave plus the regular entities that affected the will of the people not brings us to Tuesday's vote once again the incumbent president with the recount is running against Lazarus to Cora a former pastor Bonnie faster Lani is a political scientist at the university of Malawi he says most Malawians are happy to have the chance to vote again they call me certainly it is very bad right state tourney recently published a poll finding that eighty five percent of Malawians feel their country's headed in the wrong direction under president with the Rica check where a is running on a message of change he says he wants to turn the country around improve the lives of poor people and fight corruption check where spoke about his platform during the weapon are on Friday so we have come up with an approach that says let the farmers out there get out of abject poverty to quit Aurora is promising to help farmers and create new jobs and despite the pandemic his campaign has attracted big crowds of supporters on the other side president Vikas campaign efforts have been relatively quiet another recent poll predicted check where I could beat with every guy in this election that sounds good to G. M. T. ECA she's a party vendor and the capital of the long way whose business has been hurting badly antica says she hopes this election it will be a turning point for Malawi I think tomorrow the government is changing in but I would I would be very happy for that if not doesn't happen Bonnie foster Lani says he worries that Chakwera supporters might say the election was rigged again and even if he does win Duong he says turning around the economy won't be easy that's not to forget the coronavirus the electoral commission has said it will put out hand washing stations and enforce social distancing at polling places the election results for the presidential vote and allow we are expected later this week

Connie Malawi
AP-NORC poll: Politics drive divergent view of US economy

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

AP-NORC poll: Politics drive divergent view of US economy

"A poll suggests Americans views on the economy's recovery depend on their political leanings it's a tale of alternate economic realities the A. P. E. N. O. R. C. center for public affairs research poll finds eighty five percent of Democrats call economic conditions poor sixty five percent of Republicans described them as good overall sixty three percent of the nation's says the economy is in poor shape down seven percent from last month the change was driven by increasingly optimistic Republicans fewer than half fed described the economy as good in may the divide reflects the country's depolarization months before the presidential election Sager macaroni Washington

A. P. E. N. O. R. C. Center Washington
Why the Covid-19 economy is devastating to millennials

Ric Edelman

03:33 min | 3 months ago

Why the Covid-19 economy is devastating to millennials

"The cove in nineteen crisis is an unprecedented health and economic and human challenge for investors and we really wanted to delve deeper into learning more about how employees were handling that crisis and what we found out was that nearly fifty percent of American employees indicate there have significant financial stress related to the crisis while and when you look deeper at the data what you see is that there are certain groups that are even more impacted people who are not saving today people who do not have a financial plan which you know we all know is so important non white workers are more stressed than white workers and millennials are caring the most draft of any of that demographic or tell you and I aren't surprised that millennials are the most stressed but I think many of our listeners might be surprised to hear that one of the findings in the survey confirms something that that you and I know very well because of the work that we do but I think would be surprising to a lot of our listeners that millennials are struggling with stress and and other aspects of their finances more so than workers or even younger than that yeah that's right right we're staying that millennials are very concerned and feeling a lot of financial stress across the board they're the ones that are most interested in talking with an adviser right now and I think it's a lot because you know they are starting their career at the beginning of the last quite that we had and are now looking at another potential setback so we shouldn't think that they are kind of in that group that is less affected they're actually at a at a really important point in their financial journey and will need to pay special attention to them so talk about the the nature of the stress of the what is it that they're stressing about isn't that they are not able to pay their bills are they you know tells tells what the sources of stress are yeah so I think the biggest area of concern was really the stability of their household income eighty five percent of workers told us that they had some level of concern in that area so what you see a lot of concern around their employers the community one area that we all we know is of concern to individuals is the value in their savings and investment accounts the cost of healthcare is top of mind and that something that you know we know is that a big factor as someone looking at their long term goals the level of stress that they're facing is that has it increased since the pandemic started or have these levels of stress you always been there there's definitely been financial stress for employees echo that but we have seen a significant increase and it's really impacting productivity absenteeism and the overall health of our American workforce and the crazy thing here is that this is a survey of those who still have their jobs because clearly among these thousands of employers there have been layoffs and furloughs winning survey them these are the folks who have jobs and they're the ones feeling stress they're fearful that they are going to suffer a furlough or a pay cut for reduction in employee benefits such as perhaps health insurance coverage or the employer match in a four one K. X. cetera and so if they're feeling stressed and they still have jobs imagine the stress among Americans who are now had to file

Southwest to limit seats sold on flights through September

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 3 months ago

Southwest to limit seats sold on flights through September

"Southwest Airlines is the limiting ticket sales to two thirds of capacity through at least September thirtieth southwest also now says it expects June operating revenue will be down seventy percent from a year ago but its previous forecast was as much as eighty five percent

Southwest Airlines
Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

1A

05:32 min | 3 months ago

Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

"States across the US are in their second straight week of protests over the killing of George Floyd by a police officer many hope to see police reform they have reached a current though and that's often the police unions to talk about the role of police unions and the power they hold over reforms we have Booker Hodges assistant commissioner at the Minnesota department of public safety and let's bring it round the lord a police union labor negotiator former police officer and the former president of a state wide police union in Texas run thank you so much for joining us well thanks for having me we're getting a lot of comments from the moment given example one listener tweets it seems all other unions are under attack but police unions only gets stronger what accounts for this and then Richard tweets the left is finally realizing public unions make it very difficult to remove crappy employees teacher police if you suck at your job you've got to find another job these these questions Rauner kind of centered around what makes police unions different I think and could you answer that for us to can we look back to the history of police used to get the answer well sure and I think the I always call it kind of the duck billed platypus of unions they're in a union but they don't look like other unions and there's a big reason for that because of the nineteen nineteen Boston police strike it pretty much wiped out unionization in America until really into the nineteen sixties they do said paternal so ninety eighty five ninety percent of all the police United States do not belong to the AFL-CIO they have one chartered union and it's a it's a small percentage so the police were late getting into the labor firefighters had an international in nineteen eighty S. all the public employee unions construction units you know that some of those are a hundred years old so police were late to the game they were used in many times as strike breakers and picket lines and so they didn't gravitate in there tend to be conservative by nature so their unions look different but they're still just working people their blue collar working people who form the groups who have become adept at using the American political system to increase our wages and pay in for job security so I'm not ashamed to be in a policeman or representing the police they can only do in a increase their strength or get their message out it's all illegitimate nature so different than people that are anti gun and pro gun you know free speech no free speech in America everyone has a right to speak out on things so well of concern to their members we got this tweet Booker from Tracey Wheeler and she mentions what Ron just said about the fraternal order of police Tracy says the police union's name the fraternal order of police is symbolic of the fact that it operates like an old boys club officers who speak up about bad cop behavior are ostracized in this culture and I want to put this book or in the context of what we heard earlier from you lie at the the Marshall project who was saying that often times African American cops don't want to join leadership because they don't want to be part of that culture yes so yeah I think there's there are some differences between African American officers on what offices regarding union membership I mean mia love the vast majority of my career I was in the union I was a union president you know so I didn't have some of those issues but a lot of the other people I know who are in other organizations did have issues regarding how that they didn't feel that the union represented them or didn't defend them as strongly as they did white officer so I I I'm fully aware that that issue does exist within the labor unions run it sounds like you wanted to respond to that as well well that issue exist in America so you could say I'm a seventy two year old white man who grew up in the south where our view the world may be different than a black person my age who grew up different but men and women officers have different views about things Hispanic officers have different views are Asian awesome so that's in it in and of itself but you have to say policing in America is eighty five percent means there's been no woman firefighter president that I'm aware of any part of union in America ever so so we look at it and then we say yes but they appear to be older white men yes but there haven't democratic elections welcome back officers in America only about twelve percent of the police no less maybe nineteen so that's wrong but the pollution is not hurting anybody the city hires the city provides room recruitment in six cities were even worse off when it comes to female officers their lesson about twelve percent of the police which is half the number of Canada Australia and other European countries so thank you in that profession is eighty five percent median and whatever sixty seventy percent white means that white men tend to gravitate up yes but lots of officers don't become involved in the

United States George Floyd Officer
Women are perceived to become liabilities the moment they become mothers. And that's just not true

Dare I Say

04:44 min | 4 months ago

Women are perceived to become liabilities the moment they become mothers. And that's just not true

"You know I grew up in the Philippines. I had really strong female role models my mother my grandmothers. We had a female President Corazon Aquino when I was growing up and I grew up as an empowered girl you know part of the Ywca of Manila's one of their team leaders. When I was thirteen and a started organizing leadership conferences for girls when I was eighteen and then so when I left the Philippines to come to school I left Venus. This empowered girl and then I went to Mongolia College. Which is the first ever and oldest college for Women in America which has a strong tradition if educating female leaders that would change the world and right out of college and I was working at Goldman Sachs. I was sparked of launching the Investment Banking Women's Network for Goldman and so all of these experiences. Really you know allowed me to appreciate the importance of having strong female role models in women leaders all around. I think there's a surprising number of similarities. I also grew up with a very strong mother. Who set a wonderful example of how to work hard and achieve your dreams but also have a clear opinion and share that I also went to an all women's college so Wellesley and it was a really powerful example for me to see all the leadership roles filled by women because that was just the assumption. Why wouldn't the leadership refilled by a woman? I think couple of differences. I grew up in a lot of other countries. As well you came from the Philippines. I I grew up in China for three years in Japan in Ecuador and France and so seeing gender equality quite differently in all of those countries and comparing that to the United States was a real surprise for me it was it was so different from country to country in China for example. There's a saying that women hold up half the sky and that struck me as clearly women would would have half of the opportunities would be just as strong and through both school but then also work and now I have three young daughters six year old and almost four year old twin girls and so I care about gender equality even more But this has been with me from his as far as I can remember. We NEED TO ACCELERATE GENDER EQUALITY. So we can have it in your daughter's life exactly that quite a bit actually at the rate we're going. The whole world stands to benefit if women participate in the economy identically. Demand according to Quinlan's research at McKinsey it would boost the world's economy annually by twenty trillion dollars. That's the size of China and US economies combined. It's all countries align their gender equality efforts with the progress made by their most impressive neighbors. The world's economy could grow by eleven percent that's twelve trillion dollars. A remedy for inequality is a daunting task and it starts at home from the United States may seem like a developed nation but the United States for the last decade has been ranking in the twenties to thirties and the global gender gap report and so there is a lot of progress that needs to be achieved and one of these areas is an economic empowerment so the gender pay gap still persists here in the United States. The gap has narrowed since nineteen eighty. But it's been stable over the last fifteen years and as of last year on average women have earned only eighty five percent of what men earned and based on this estimate. This means it would take an extra thirty nine days of work for women to earn what men did. As of last year there is also the perception that this gender pay gap is imaginary. The latest survey shows that around half of the men believed that there is no gender pay gap so this is very much like half of the men are denying climate change. You know. It's the same principle of denying Ariel that exists which makes it even more problematic to solve when we think about the intersection of race and gender gap. It gets even worse with African American women getting paid the least on average a second area around economic empowerment for women as access to capital for women. Women receive less than ten percent of venture capital funding and ever ge US women are starting more and more companies access to capital is not as easy for women as it is for men. If you're a woman of color the probability that you'll get funding from a venture capitalist is less than one percent so there is a lot of work we need to do around economic empowerment women.

Investment Banking Women United States Philippines Mongolia College Corazon Aquino Goldman Sachs Manila President Trump Goldman China Mckinsey Wellesley Ariel Quinlan America Japan Ecuador
"eighty five percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Eighty five percent of the payments they made but the deal does not resolve claims for the actual wild fire victims that is still on going as utility tries to emerge from bankruptcy by next year the trump administration has announced it is going to try to tackle the homelessness problem in California and aids have been sent to our state on fact finding missions then I talked with second area congressman Armey bear about the homeless problem homelessness is a major issue not just in the city of Sacramento but also in the suburbs and now we're obviously going to welcome any federal assistance but yes some of the language in the rhetoric that the the president and the ministrations using makes it seem overly political again I would have I would urge the administration the president release funds to the local communities because again the local communities probably have a better sense of what those causes of home with a far. right and apparently some administration officials have already visited Los Angeles so I it's uncertain whether or not any federal funding would come out to our area but of course our mayor Gerald Steinberg is on the governor's. the governor's homelessness commission and Mehrestan Berg saying was aware of what the president could offer but would certainly accept any federal funds. yeah I I I I think I would echo what matter Steinberg's indicators is. yeah the the way the presence approaching this almost sounds like you're gonna gonna be warehouse thing the homeless in the three human beings and yeah they fall on hard times in their home was for one reason or another I'm not denying that there's the urgency in California and in Sacramento to help address this but again I would urge the administration to release additional funding to the local communities and let the local communities use those funds in the most efficient way possible and finding that the most efficient and best way of course is key are there any strategies are ideas that you've heard of that resonate with you on how to tackle this you know certainly a couple I mean homelessness isn't one size fits all you know certainly there's the need to address the underlying mental health or substance abuse issues the housing crisis and the lack of affordable housing as well as enough housing certainly is contracted services as well and he you know I think its multi factorial yeah I know mash Feinberg I talked them a couple weeks ago and damn he's obviously pushing to do you have in person and okay folks and said livable shelters that bad of a a great first step but I also think we've got to make sure we address the underlying issues you know fast mental health or substance abuse we've got a can comment we address those issues as well. all right and that is congressman Armey bearer for of course from the Sacramento area bring your time to five fifty it's time for your traffic.

Eighty five percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Eighty five percent faster than the competition. I would definitely use them again. Great job. Look sorry. I had a curse, but leave. I wrote it, and I'm sure people can relate the guy was in a living h e double hockey sticks because of some other mortgage company, how many times do you hear from people that have had a terrible experience in the past. And they're almost like, you know, a puppy that's been kicked. I wish I was telling you guys at very rarely comes up. And unfortunately, we're hearing this on I'd say one out of every ten calls to where they're just they're just upset at how the process is unfolding. They're not getting back to the customer in time. They're constantly having to explain their story to the next person because they don't always kind of work efficiently. They're not under one building. What really helps network capital when it comes to the turn times and the communication in the transparency is everyone's under the same building. So you'd have processing underwriting post closing sales marketing ownership everybody working under the same roof on the same floor. Is really just easy to push clean in clean out in the customers. Enjoy because they develop a relationship. They don't wanna have to constantly keep explaining the same information over and over and over all they want to do is call in tell you what they want put you to work sit back and enjoy the ride and hope and hope it gets done in ten business days. So if you guys like trying to save five hundred twenty eight a month six thousand three hundred thirty six year, here's your opportunity. All you have to do is make contact be a friend about your situations. And I think you're gonna like what you hear the number eight hundred seven hundred eight zero six eight, and if you are reading the paper work, it is not that scary shots going gonna break it down when we come back..

six thousand three hundred thi Eighty five percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Taxes by one trillion dollars if, it gets much more factual knowing that and not being able to certainly ascertain what will. Happen in what won't happen what's, your basic advice front investor The, basic advice if you're well diversified and your plan is on track that. You stand Pat the best advice, there again eighty five percent of the time had you made changes in prior election years. You would have made a mistake Stand-pat if you've got a lot of cash sitting around I'd say maybe you wanna play a little, defense I wouldn't make radical changes to. The portfolio but you could play, a little defense be a little bit more. Cautious because there is going to be increased volatility in the months leading up to the election like ran, right now the weeks leading up to the election so we do see increase volatility but not necessarily changes and trends to, play a little defense can make. That it's really years two and three of. A presidential cycle that the market That the president The president's term is defined by the market market to the most differentiated in. Those two years third years in, the first year they're laying. Out their policies they're putting. Their team together there's a lot of, angst and hand but nothing's really happening yet this in the second and third years where you start to see increases in debt and deficit driving interest rates out or increases, in taxation, driving you know Grosso let me let me just interject by saying you're bringing these really salient points up I'm gonna have you get more specific and we'll. Address couple of the issues that, I brought up on on. On taxes on on bonds. Etc so scenario when again I wanna, tell Al speak on your behalf did this is really a political it's really your speculation based clarify here on qualifying from incorrect it's based upon your speculation not what you, want to, happen not not you love or hate Friday the opponents and I that's accurate isn't it Yeah and it was so much speculation it's looking at the historical data. Running across sexual analysis and looking at by party and by. Presidential year in the cycle, so it's not even speculation data. All right. Let's look at the data let's go, to tax, policy Clinton. Versus Trump Okay so now. Who want. To now look the market. Overall but look at how it affects individual Yeah I think before I jump into the cat policies. And things like that we're looking. At here is Clinton looks to be, doing more of the same she wants to do a. Better she wants to do it. More together but it's more of the same. Which. Is slow growth so we've had very slow growth we've, had increasing deficit been a slow rate Really been. A very blah stagnant sort of economic environment Taking quote unquote down but, very very slowly yeah there are positive thinking, talked about I'm not talking about, the Obama presidency down but the economy. Is really blah and Clinton, wants more of, the same so it's much more predictable not really attractive but you know not terrible Trump, represents radical change now at work that could be great but there's also, a much higher risk because, if if it doesn't work if the naysayers are right, there could be catastrophic qualified people talk about so trumpet. It gave the really, good or really bad with Clinton it. Much more steady but the trend, is not really attractive So As far as policy, goes Clinton wants to continue? What..

Clinton president Pat Grosso Obama Al one trillion dollars eighty five percent two years
"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"As well so the guy's an expert a wizard i've quoted him before many times on social security taxation and here's what he had to say many retirees pay a higher marginal tax rate on their income in retirement than they do before retirement even if their tax bracket falls in retirement years due to the taxation of social security benefits many low and middle income retirees will pay a marginal tax rate which by the way is the tax rate on the very next dollar of income that is one hundred and fifty percent to one hundred and eighty five percent of their tax bracket this this is why you need to have a team of financial professionals that are well skilled in this area if you are on the precipice of retirement or you are already retired because this can make a big difference and the utilization of tax free income such as the roth ira can be very very beneficial for these individuals so when we come back i'll give you a couple of examples of this enormous tax increase i mean a person that's making like thirty grand a year could find themselves in a twenty or thirty or forty percent tax bracket when they're only supposed to be in the twelve percent bracket that's what the topic is for today creating some tax free income and also explain how you can create a lifetime of.

eighty five percent twelve percent fifty percent forty percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"As well so the guy's an expert a wizard i've quoted him before many times on social security taxation and here's what he had to say many retirees pay a higher marginal tax rate on their income in retirement than they do before retirement even if their tax bracket falls in retirement years due to the taxation of social security benefits many low and middle income retirees will pay a marginal tax rate which by the way is the tax rate on the very next dollar of income that is one hundred and fifty percent to one hundred and eighty five percent of their tax bracket this this is why you need to have a team of financial professionals that are well skilled in this area if you are on the precipice of retirement or you are already retired because this can make a big difference and the utilization of tax free income such as the roth ira can be very very beneficial for these individuals so when we come back i'll give you a couple of examples of this enormous tax increase i mean a person that's making like thirty grand a year could find themselves in a twenty or thirty or forty percent tax bracket when they're only supposed to be in the twelve percent bracket that's what the topic is for today creating some tax free income and also explain how you can create a lifetime of tax free income a little bit later on make sure you stay tuned because this is the one talk show you must do every day because i will single handedly help you make better money moves.

eighty five percent twelve percent fifty percent forty percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Says eighty five percents and this is from the same study eighty five percent of gun owners who have children eighty five percent of those gun owners do not practice safe gun storage like leave 'em slain around unlocked i guess i mean maybe it's up on a shelf but apparently not locked not in a vault not how it would be recommended it's not getting more specific than that but i would have to assume by and large this would mean unlocked unless maybe some of them and i'm sure some of them would have done this maybe some of them have it locked but loaded and they recommend that you don't have it loaded and that you lock it up maybe that's part of it but i'm sure this means according to this study a significant number of gun owners who are also parents do not lock up their weapons and i just find that so hard to believe because gun owners by and large in my opinion are some of the most responsible people you're going to meet our they're always the the outliers of course there are you know the brandon holt story and that was a tragedy i it was it was heartbreaking where the neighbor had a had a loaded rifle underneath a bed yes just just lying there but this is saying maybe not necessarily loaded but the certainly not properly stored and locked away that eighty five percent of legal gun owners who are parents don't have their gun stored properly that's what i want to ask.

brandon holt eighty five percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on WGN Radio

"We went public i mean we knew from the beginning we could not go public unless we had we were extremely confident that we had the support among all of our colleagues and when we went public it took us less than a week to have signed cards from eighty five percent of our colleagues so that is an enormous statement and i'm sure trunk took notice of that and that's that's unequivocal we all knew that this was the way to affect positive changes in our newsroom and that was less than a month ago so a month later we have you know formal union recognition we're expecting that the national labor relations board is going to certify us within the next few days and yeah it was not a bidder it was not a protracted process at all but i think that is in part because that's a testament to all the work that we did behind the scenes that's a testament to all of the commodity that we form among us and that we really all came together as a group and got on board and we agreed that this was the right way to go and we made trunk take notice of us heidi there was some on social media especially some of your colleagues were very emotional this has been an emotional process hasn't it yeah i was really touched by something that mary should meet tweeted last night she said in her thirty three years of the tribune she's never felt prouder at this is someone who's won a pulitzer i mean to to feel more proud last night than on the day that you find out you've won the highest honor in journalism says quite a bit that that certainly brought a tear to my eye people do feel emotional about it people feel optimistic in a way that they we haven't felt in a decade or more frankly i've been here since ninety eight it felt like a different place to walk into twenty years ago than it does now just because of the winds of change of you know affected the entire industry just various owners and you know changing business model and all that kind of stuff but i think we feel now like we have a voice in.

mary eighty five percent thirty three years twenty years
"eighty five percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Seven five to sixty seven forty two so let's talk taxes for a minute you no doubt know that your taxes are changing two thousand eighteen there's a new tax code and there's a lot of changes compared to what you've been used to one is the tax brackets are different there little bit lower the percentages are a little bit lower in most cases but they're big changes beyond that will one of the debates that has come up is is this tax code fair and one of the ways people look at that is we have a progressive tax structure meaning the more income you make the higher tax you pay the higher the rate well is the new tax bill making it easier for the rich harder for the rich what's the answer and there are a lot of ways you can dissect this but the tax policy center took a stab at it and they looked at the top twenty percent of income earners in america and you're in the top twenty if your income is around one hundred and fifty thousand a year or more well they said in two thousand seventeen that these top twenty percent if you will paid eighty four percent of the income taxes their estimate in two thousand eighteen is this top twenty percent their share of the total taxes is going to go up slightly to eighty seven percent so not a big change but this seems to say that there was not a big big change in the total amount of tax that the wealthy will pay moving forward compared to what they have in the past taxes are complicated and if you don't believe me look at this study the study asked a thousand adults about their federal income tax rate eighty five percent of those surveyed overstated what they actually paid and their numbers were not even close they guest on average that they pay twenty six percent in federal income taxes and the study showed that the average tax bill was around fourteen percent so i think there's a lot of confusion in taxes it's only going to be greater most likely in two thousand and eighteen because we're dealing with rules that are new we didn't have them in two thousand seventeen and so if you haven't yet taken a.

america twenty percent eighty seven percent eighty five percent eighty four percent twenty six percent fourteen percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Is the place where he is going to probably see the end of his career as a governor and potentially going forward when you have eighty five percent of the legislature that means the republicans own the missouri legislature brian this is a real problem for the governor and i think the end is near what what happens though if if through the courts he is not convicted does that really matter anymore well it certainly will have an effect is you know and we don't have the articles of impeachment drafted as of yet we may never have them but i think we will those articles are going to spell out a series of charges and then the legislature is gonna vote i think if you look at it today it would i'd be hard pressed to see see the legislature not impeaching the governor at this point given just the volume of folks at signed the special session notice that has never happened in the history of missouri ever so this is historic where we are in you know one of the things that i hope doesn't get lost in this brian is that our system of government works checks and balances the legislative branch checking the executive branch that system works it's in place in his so much talk about how our political system and establishment is broken down and can't operate any longer well it's operating here and at least that to me is gratifying and michael back to the point about the court cases your thoughts on if he is acquitted in the courts well as going to say that should they should courts are completely separate issue that's related to his affair with his mistress and in who knows what happens with that the michigan ten years is also in the courts that's another thing we we've seen the missouri legislature which will as essential we act as a grand jury here has pulled together enough facts that it shows that aired writings has real problems was running a shadow campaign and not disclosing it was paying people out of a business when you're supposed to be able to this is exactly what aircraft and said he wasn't going to do he was going to be the most transparent governor i don't think whatever happens with kim gardner in here in.

legislature brian kim gardner missouri executive michael michigan eighty five percent ten years
"eighty five percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Seven five to sixty seven forty two so let's talk taxes for a minute you no doubt know that your taxes are changing two thousand eighteen there's a new tax code and there's a lot of changes compared to what you've been used to one is the tax brackets are different there little bit lower lower the percentages are a little bit lower in most cases but they're big changes beyond that well one of the debates that has come up is is this tax code fair and one of the ways people look at that is we have a progressive tax structure meaning the more income you make the higher tax you pay the higher the rate well is the new tax bill making it easier for the rich harder for the rich what's the answer and there are a lot of ways you can dissect this but the tax policy center took a stab at it and they looked at the top twenty percent of income earners in america and you're in the top twenty if your income is around one hundred and fifty thousand a year or more well they said in two thousand seventeen that these top twenty percent if you will paid eighty four percent of the income taxes their estimate in two thousand eighteen is this top twenty percent their share of the total taxes is going to go up slightly to eighty seven percent so not a big change but this seems to say that there was not a big big change in the total amount of tax that the wealthy will pay moving forward compared to what they have in the past taxes are complicated and if you don't believe me look at this study the study asked a thousand adults about their federal income tax rate eighty five percent of those surveyed overstated what they actually paid and their numbers were not even close they guest on average that they paid twenty six percent in federal income taxes and the study showed that the average tax bill was around fourteen percent so i think there's a lot of confusion in taxes it's only gonna be greater most likely in two thousand eighteen because we're dealing with rules that are new we didn't have them in two thousand seventeen and so if you haven't yet taken a look at how this new tax code is going.

america twenty percent eighty seven percent eighty five percent eighty four percent twenty six percent fourteen percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Our website is money matters dot net and on our website we have podcasts of this show we have articles we have videos on a variety of topics that i think you'll find interesting with regard to retirement planning and all those kinds of things so moneymatters dot net is our website now i wanna talk with you about a topic that comes up almost with every single client and and every time we meet and that is social security and this week wanna talk with you about how eighty five percent of your social security could be taxed the deal is that that eighty five percent now i want to clarify okay when i say eighty five percent i don't mean they're going to take away eighty five percent of your social security what it means is that they're going to tax they're gonna count eighty five percent of your social security benefits as taxable income okay just like you earned it as a wage and then they tax the wage they tacked your social security benefit so let me go over with you the rules on that so that you are aware so social security taxes are based on what's known as your provisional income and you know at the seminars that we do we you know i've i've asked people in the room how many of you know what your provisional income is when it comes to figuring out whether you're going to have your social security benefits taxed or not and i would say about two percent of the room raises their out of every hundred people only to raise their hand but anyway so your provisional income so the provisional income is your adjusted gross income which is the number at the bottom of the front page of your tax return okay it's that plus any tax free interest that you have okay so if you tax tax free municipal bonds etc plus fifty percent of your social security benefits if you have.

eighty five percent fifty percent two percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Dot net and on our website we have podcast of this show we have articles we have videos on a variety of topics that i think you'll find interesting with regard to retirement planning and all those kinds of things so moneymatters dot net is our website now i wanna talk with you about a topic that comes up almost with every single client and every time we meet and that is social security and this week wanna talk with you about how eighty five percent of your social security could be taxed the deal is that that eighty five percent now i want to clarify okay when i say eighty five percent i don't mean they're going to take away eighty five percent of your social security what it means is that they're going to tax they're gonna count eighty five percent of your social security benefits as taxable income okay just like you earned it as a wage and then they tax the wage they tacked your social security benefit so let me go over with you the rules on that so that you are aware social security taxes are based on what's known as your provisional income and you know at the seminars that we do we you know i've asked people in the room how many of you know what your provisional income is when it comes to figuring out whether you're going to have your social security benefits taxed or not and i would say about two percent of the room raises their hand out of every hundred people only to raise their hand but anyway so your provisional income so the provisional income is your adjusted gross income which is the number at the bottom of the front page of your tax return okay it's that plus any tax free interest that you have okay so if you tax tax free municipal bonds etc plus fifty percent of your social security benefits if you have.

eighty five percent fifty percent two percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"On eighty five percent of at social security but the reverse mortgage money that you put in your pocket has absolutely nothing to do without calculations just like a roth ira race taking money out of a rough has nothing to do with that calculation smith number seven there are restrictions on how the money is used and taxes will have to be paid on it no no i just talked about the tax situation but there are no restrictions the government doesn't say well if you're gonna spend this money on fun stuff we're not going to insure the loan now they don't do that germany spin it out ever you want and then finally reverse mortgages are only for seniors in need four four the house rich cash individual votes certainly get help the house poor person but it's not one of those things where you have to be you know in need and over sixty two as i mentioned just getting the line of credit set up at age sixty two that's as soon as you can do us and letting it grow over time can be a tremendous financial resource for those that might be running a little thin on their retirement income and frankly as most of us we'll talk about this in the fed interest rates and preparing to get a home loan twenty eighteen that's coming up sit around and says the one talk show you got a tune into every day israel sure got.

israel ira germany eighty five percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Eighty five percent of married men who cheat never actually wind up getting a divorce from their wife which means if you're the other woman the side piece or whatever in a relationship he's never going to lee did a good chance he never will cost it will break right his financial situation oh yeah absolutely yeah so it but being put in the position where you have to cover for them or it wouldn't let me get that phone call hey can you would you mind you know in case my guy calls tell him that you know i'm staying over there tonight i wanna go out with you about a block it really puts you in a weird position outlined in his there's other funny about it now fine and a dispute island i wouldn't do it i would never cover for some and for that no i don't think i would not away your best friend nope come on i don't care to be a stupid trap on that now i'm daniel would if it was me now one of our said look would you please just say that i was out to dinner with your last night nope i'm on your abs ally doing he's not going to say that stepping stupid okay you never know did on count on anyone tough one planting some thinking you know no it's just you know cheating is just it it's a it takes a lot of work anyway i'm very sure but to bring other people into your you're out you're you're evil plot yeah no hello jerry like guys will do it though i i think like a guy will live for another guy before woman with absolutely a scare you'll do for you ask him hello june for more info call eight eight what's going on june arm primary are upholding a married guy or she asked the night before my wedding if she could bring 'em dry wedding and i no cited martha at my wedding rush who shows up with him anyway i didn't have any way to see them so.

daniel jerry martha lee Eighty five percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"On eighty five percent of at social security but the reverse mortgage money that you put in your pocket has absolutely nothing to do with that calculation just like a roth ira taking money out of a rough has nothing to do with that calculation myths number seven there are restrictions on how the money is used and taxes will have to be paid on it no no i just talked about the tax situation but there are no restrictions the government doesn't say well if you're gonna spend this money on fun stuff we're not going to you know ensured alone now they don't do that your money spent it out ever you want and then finally reverse mortgages are only for seniors in need or for the house rich cash individual world certainly get help the house poor person but it's not one of those things where you have to be you know in need and over sixty two as i mentioned just getting the line of credit set up at age sixty two that's as soon as you can do it and letting it grow grover time can be a tremendous financial resource for those that might be running a little thin on their retirement income and frankly that's most of us we'll talk about this the fed interest rates and preparing to get a home loan in 20 eighteen that's coming up.

social security interest rates the house eighty five percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"So news that is eighty five percent cure rate included a thirty percent mortality rate did not actually come out to the public because this hearing that would cut short cotton that went on to work perfectly healthy so he he's fine now that is teeth remove knee goes back to work now he's back to work but things are never really the same after that in 1930 he was once again he found himself on on these scrutiny because of the high number of deaths from his surgeries i'm glad that keeps rearing its ugly keeps happening and at the same time the circle surgical method of treating mental and the start to fall out of favour as something called psychoanalysis picked up steam gone was gradually being pushed at a power at trend state hospital he responded by digging in and becoming more radical he had more radical he had the rest of his own teeth removed jesus christ's i made this guy is swinging and then he had all of his teeth he had all of his wife's teeth removes what did she do she was there loving is mary biz loaded tick lows as well pull up easily so then is less power so he opens up a private clinic in trim he was still with well thought of by the public so he continued pulling teeth tonsils removing gall bladders coghlan's services testicles and other assorted parts of now mostly rich people which i'm totally i'm with you don't mind i'm no i'm a huge like i'm a huge working class union guys that's what i came from so i'm totally into that in a so i had this part of me that wants rich people and i was up i tell you want rich people to be taken apart in little pieces snow any time well that that really is the difference though it obviously is it's like any time that someone is like.

mortality rate trend state hospital eighty five percent thirty percent
"eighty five percent" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"eighty five percent" Discussed on Freakonomics

"And eighty five percent in stock funds and as you get older now you're gonna probably want more and bond funds and less in stock funds because he ill the fear losses going to be greater when you have a very large amount of money obviously it can be really hard for the average person to take in and execute all this investment advice on their own so you might consider hiring a financial advisor but pollock says not just any financial advisor rule number six make your financial advisor commit to the fiduciary standard with the do sherry standard is a federal requirement designed to ensure that financial advisers don't sell clients products that are better for themselves dan the clients it basically says all the advice you're giving me and all the products at your offering me are designed to maximize my own financial wellbeing you're not being paid by anybody except me i understand in a transparent way your financial incentives and if you don't have the fiduciary standards a little bit like walking under the ford lot and saying do you think i need new car yet or do you think i should keep driving the oone for another couple of years there was a wonderful study done by some uh researchers at harvard were they just sent out actors who had different kinds of retirement savings and they would go into storefront financial firms and they would just say hey here's what we're doing tell us if we should do something different.

investment advice advisor pollock harvard fiduciary ford eighty five percent