18 Burst results for "eighty eighty eight percent"

Harassment in Online Gaming

Good Code

08:58 min | 8 months ago

Harassment in Online Gaming

"Over two billion people play games globally in the US sixty four percent of online population play video games in games a much more than just games live. MULTIPLAYER Games are social platforms forms where people interact chat and sometimes get harassed. According to a poll made for the Untidy Formation League in two thousand eighteen Americans reported only gaming as the fifth place where the experienced harassment online just after facebook. Luke twitter youtube an instagram. Welcome to good code the weekly podcast on ethics in our digital lives. My name is Sheila Eh. I'm a visiting journalist at Cornell Tax Digital Life Initiative and I'm your host a few weeks ago. I sat down with Daniel Kelly in his office office in New York City. He's the associate director of the Center for Technology and society within the Anti Defamation League he leads the center's work to fight hate bias and harassment in online gaming to be clear he's job is not to look at the contents of video games he studied side conversations. That gamers have with one another wild plane. I began by asking him to explain where exactly these conversations happen. This is a question that I get a lot especially for people who aren't familiar with these kinds of conversations which is sometimes Parents right right when you're talking about communications online games. They can happen usually in two places so the one place would be an text chat so that would be a chat box that usually lives at the bottom of your screen and you can type in different words and you know dialogue. Often people communicate that way. They're playing playing as they're playing. They are if they're on a PC. They're typing if they're if they're on an xbox or playstation they could be there could be shortcuts or there or they could be typing in with their with their control or other things and for those cotton's of communications. You can use the same. A well trod techniques for detecting Abuse that you can use on facebook twitter you have the same model of being able to use machine learning or AI and human review to we able to flag content. There's sort of a baseline to start from in terms of the content. Moderation that happens there the area which is much more of a wild west which exists in games and and in some maybe perhaps live streamed social media But is a big part of games is voice chat so in addition to people typing in some things that they say to people people are actually speaking to each other stranger. They're speaking to each other again as they're playing as they're playing commencing on what's happening. Yeah exactly commenting on what's happening openings. Sometimes being competitive sometimes crossing the line into being hateful and sometimes being you know supportive and encouraging and engaging with with the people as as they're playing the game but when we talk about voice chat the methods to do content moderation in live voice chat are super nascent. And and so. There's a real need. I think to push research and advocacy forward for that because as bad as things can be in the text environments we don't even have the framework to address them in or the tools to address them in voice chat. And so yeah. We'll get back to that. That's something I want to ask. Ask You about Just to understand do most gamers take part in these chatrooms Whether text are vocal is that is that like a wide. I practice the AARP which is an organization that is geared towards Folks who are fifty plus did a survey of Gamers who are art fifty plus and they've found that thirty three percent of Gamers who are fifty plus who play online play with other adults play in in a way that they're communicating with the people they're playing with and so if you can imagine that you know a third of Of older adults are are communicating. When they're playing these games? I don't know there's been a similar measurements of other age groups but I could imagine that the the amount the degree to which if it's part of their game plan part of the way they interact in and see the platform would would be significantly more. I think at the game developers conference in March of last year the CEO of epoch which makes fortnight which is a very popular game talked talked about fortnight and games like it being sort of forms of social media that the folks who are playing these are playing them as games in of themselves but they also are means to build community and to connect with one another. And you know these sort of continuous free to play. Online Games are a form form of social media social platform yet social platforms. And they're places where people are communicating regularly. Our focus right now is really Focused on games as social platforms there. I think there's been a lot of good work in Games as media looking at games in the same way that you you might look at movies in terms of a representation. whose stories are being told? How has that story being told but I at least in the sort of NGOs space this and certainly in the sort of traditional historical civil rights organization space? There hasn't been as much work looking at games as social spaces. uh-huh you were at rights con last year. Which is one of the biggest Tree conferences on human rights and technology and there was no workshop on gaming and that you were surprised prices. Do you think that's changing that people are realizing that Games are social platforms. Is that slowly taking into consideration thing. I I think you know. I think it is starting to become more of a consideration. There's just a lot of educating on both on both sides from the gaming industry and from civil society about how how do we find a way to work together But I think yeah. I think it's urgent. A game industry is larger than film and music combined In terms of the amount out of money that it makes so this is a an urgent space for folks to be looking at there are people who are specifically in the game space. That are focused on us. But it hasn't yet. I think permeated the larger discourse in the same with the social media has for large NGOs. I share. Let's get into the report you rotor a report in July two thousand nineteen. That was cold free to play hate harassment and positive social experiences in line gaming. And you we'll get into the details of it. I you start your report by saying something quite positive which was surprising. The first result that you shares at eighty eighty eight percents of adults who play online those multi-player Games In the US report positive social experiences while playing online and there is even a non trivial amount of US adults who report positive experiences in online should gain so probably some of the most violent when so this is sort of counter intuitive even silver lining to start a report on harassment Shuzo. Why why why was it important to have that at the beginning? We're still in kind of a moral panic place with games James In the way that perhaps we were with comic books in the fifties where something terrible happens in the world that everyone wants to blame it on video games and so my experience talking to folks about these issues has been that when you start from this place of video games are bad. People who are are working in the space with Love Games who games are part of their identity part of how they interact socially it just shuts them down and I. I don't think it's a path towards change. If if you just say that x form of media all books are terrible right. Miguel necessarily say that and so it was important for me. The report port is focused on games as social spaces so both the positive side of things and and I think it was unclear as when we ask these questions rate we we wanted to get to some level of understanding of our game online game spaces are are they as bad as you know people the worst of the worst say hey they are right. I think some folks pleasantly surprised that that there were so many people who had positive experiences is no measurement and because there is this a reactive mode to video games. I wanted to start from a place of like. There are many positive experiences that people have in online games and there's also reality of negative experiences that need to be engaged with be dressed because then it opens the conversation of. How can we fix this? Not just get rid of those

Harassment United States Facebook Cornell Tax Digital Life Initi Sheila Eh Untidy Formation League Luke Daniel Kelly New York City Aarp Center For Technology And Soci Associate Director Miguel CEO
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Mass extinction. This time around it is in volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote close what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times the number of all drafts that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going.

Brooke Jarvis New York Times Africa France Eighty eight percent ninety seven percent one hundred percent thirty five years ninety percent thirty percent
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are going to be of longer duration. You're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects in many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology. And to deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and there were times when it seemed like more than one hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that. And with that, we're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now may be up in temperate zone. Maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers may be fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer preceding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of variety of species, some of the most dearly love species, the icon expe-, she's will be lost. But there's always something that survives. I'm I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches there'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens from the peon AS report. That insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been dependent upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators. Basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North Americans honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe start domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees many. Locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides very pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's land-use changes its agricultural intensification, and all of these factors combined which are ganging up on. Species and making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish reptiles. And that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people. We see Carey and building. Up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in it. Yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is in volcanoes. It isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November. They New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote closed what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And he said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times the number of all drafts that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully American extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it. That's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He does he say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientists. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's not very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather extinction. Rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against wetter called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the land the water has been absorbing a lot of his heat and things are dying because.

scientist professor Wagner California New York Times Knicks United Nations Europe murder Brooke Jarvis Deng Connecticut Colorado Carey France Africa George twenty twenty two twenty thirt Eighty eight percent
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KNSS

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are gonna be of longer duration. They're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects and many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology. And to deal with these droughts. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then that's what we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and there were times when it seemed like more than a hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that than with that. We're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now maybe up in temperate zone, maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be a very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers. Maybe fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer proceeding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of variety of species some of the most dearly love species iconic species. We'll be lost. But there's always something that survives. I'm I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches. They'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon AS report that insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been depended upon for food? We're gonna have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators, basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on the uneven at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe. Starts domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these nations services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides very pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is a hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at? Pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's still land-use changes its agricultural intensification in all of these factors combined ganging up on species in making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with us, professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab. Boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish, reptiles and fittings that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people we see Kerry and building up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in it. I like, yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is involved. Kino's? It isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote, quote, what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And he said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's that's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He does he say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's not very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather extinction. Rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against what are called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the land the water has been absorbing a lot of his heat and things are dying because.

Scientist professor Wagner United Nations New York Times California Knicks Europe murder Brooke Jarvis Connecticut Colorado Kino France Kerry Africa Deng George
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KTRH

"Without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab. Boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish, reptiles and amphibians that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people we see Kerry and building up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in. Yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it isn't volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Jarvis wrote quote, but we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity, and you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost a hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully your merrily extinct. Close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He. Deceased say. How much time we have. Talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that sound very long. That we're going to be having more and more violent weather, the extinction rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line. So that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius, then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against letter called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere's water the land, the water has been absorbing a lot of his heat and things are dying because of that and that with it comes a point. Where the changes begin to accelerate past us being able to have any impact faster and faster and faster up next. The secret astronaut..

Scientist George professor Wagner New York Times United Nations Kerry Deng Africa Jarvis France Eighty eight percent ninety seven percent two degrees celsius thirty five years hundred percent ninety percent thirty percent three decades
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

09:27 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are gonna be of longer duration. They're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects in many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology. And to deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and never times. And it seemed like more than one hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that than with that. We're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now may be up in the temperate zone, maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers, maybe fewer birds much the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer proceeding or the six great extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of righty of species some of the most dearly love species, the iconic species. We'll be lost. But there's always something that survives. I'm I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But may might be mosquitoes and cockroaches. They'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens from the peon AS report that insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been dependent upon for food? We're gonna have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators, basically human portfolios entirely dependent on the honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe. Start domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects? It could be pesticides pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at? Pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's still land-use changes its agricultural intensification in all of these factors combined which are ganging up on species in making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with us professor Wagner where right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab. Boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish reptiles. And that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people. We see carrying building up along roads we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in it. Like, yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is involved. Kino's? It isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us. Humans. Tara forming the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Jarvis wrote closed what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And he said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times the number of all drafts that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He. Deceased say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's a very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather extinction. Rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against wetter called tipping point. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the land, the water has been absorbing a lot of heat and things are dying because of that and that with it comes a point where the changes.

Scientist professor Wagner California Knicks United Nations Europe New York Times murder Deng Connecticut Kino Colorado professor Jarvis France Africa Tara
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WRVA

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are gonna be of longer duration. They're going to be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects and many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology. And to deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then that's what we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and never times. And it seemed like more than one hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that. And with that, we're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now maybe up in the temperate zone, maybe up in in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be a very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers m maybe fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer proceeding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of variety of species some of the most dearly love species, the iconic species. Will be lost. But there's always something that survives. I'm I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches there'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon AS report that insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been dependent upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators, basically, the human portfolios entirely dependent on the honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe. Domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides herbicides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at? Pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads land-use changes, its argricultural intensification, and all of these factors combined ganging up on species and making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab. Boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish, reptiles and Infineon's that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people we see Kerry and building up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in it. Yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is involved. Kino's? It isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote, quote, what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully America extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He does he say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's not very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather extinction. Rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against wetter called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the land, the water has been absorbing a lot of.

Scientist professor Wagner Infineon New York Times California Knicks United Nations Europe murder Brooke Jarvis Connecticut Kino Colorado France Kerry Africa Deng
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KNSS

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are gonna be of longer duration. They're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects in many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology. And to deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then what we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and there were times when it seemed like more than one hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that than with that. We're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now maybe up in the temperate zone, maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be a very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers. Maybe fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of all species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer preceding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of variety of species, some of the most dearly love species, the iconic species will be lost. But there's always something that survives. I'm I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches there'll be winners and losers. Mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon a ass report that insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been depended upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators. Basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on the honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going. To have to maybe start domesticating, some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is a hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be? We have to look at pesticides. There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's land-use changes its agricultural intensification, and all of these factors combined are ganging up on species and making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish reptiles amphibians that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people. We see carrying building up along roads we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in it. Yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is in volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November. They New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote, quote, what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of bluefin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully Emeric extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He. Deceased say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientists. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's not very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather extinction. Rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against wetter called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the land, the water has been absorbing a lot of his heat and things are dying because of that and.

scientist professor Wagner New York Times California Knicks United Nations Europe murder Emeric Brooke Jarvis Deng Connecticut Colorado France Africa George twenty twenty two twenty thirt
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WLAC

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are going to be of longer duration. They're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects and many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology. And to deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and never times when it seemed like more than one hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that than with that. We're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the dropbox now may be up in the temperate zone, maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be a very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers may be fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer proceeding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of variety of species, some of the most dearly love species, the iconic species will be lost. But there's always something that survives. I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches there'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon AS report. That insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been dependent upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators. Basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on the honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe start domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees many. Locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides very pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's land-use changes its argricultural intensification, and all of these factors combined were ganging up on. Species in making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish, reptiles and Fabian that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people we see Kerry and building. Up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in it. Like, yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is involved. Kino's? It isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote, quote, what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out, he deceased say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's not very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather extinction. Rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line. So that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius, then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against what are called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the.

Scientist professor Wagner New York Times California Knicks United Nations Europe murder Deng Brooke Jarvis Connecticut Fabian Colorado Kino Kerry France Africa
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are going to be longer duration. They're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects and many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology and. To deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and there were times when it seemed like more than a hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that than with that. We're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the drop now maybe up in temperate zone, maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers. Maybe fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer preceding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of variety of species some of the most dearly love species, the iconic species. We'll be lost. But there's always something that survives. I'm I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches there'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon AS report that insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been depended upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators. Basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on the honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe. We start domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts to do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides very pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at? Pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's land-use changes its agricultural intensification, and all of these factors combined which are ganging up on species and making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner where right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades sin. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab. Boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish, reptiles and amphibians that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people we see Kerry and building up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in. Yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is in volcanoes. It isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote, quote, what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul, and that we can't lose that on this planet. Maybe Linda that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He. Deceased say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's not very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather, the extinction rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against what called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the land, the.

Scientist professor Wagner New York Times California Knicks United Nations Europe murder Brooke Jarvis Connecticut Colorado France Africa Kerry Linda Deng George
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"The sixth mass extinction. This time around it isn't volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote close, but we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully America extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves..

Brooke Jarvis New York Times France Africa America Eighty eight percent ninety seven percent one hundred percent thirty five years ninety percent thirty percent
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are gonna be longer duration. They're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects in many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology and to deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and there were times when it seemed like more than one hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that than with that. We're gonna see losses. Of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now maybe up in temperate zone, maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be beautiful with wildflowers, and maybe fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with will be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now, it's fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer preceding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of righty of species and some of the most dearly love species, the icon expe-, she's will be lost. But there's always something that survives. I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches. They'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon AS report. That insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been depended upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators. Basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on the honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe start domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many. Locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides the very best decides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light blues. And it's all the roads, it's still land-use changes agricultural intensification in all of these factors combined which are ganging up on. Species and making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish reptiles amphibians that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people. We see carrying building. Up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live at. Like, yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is in volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote close, but we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times the number of all drafts that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George is the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out, he deceased say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather, the extinction rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that might pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against wetter called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the atmosphere. The water the land the.

Scientist professor Wagner New York Times California Knicks United Nations Europe murder Brooke Jarvis Deng Connecticut Colorado France Africa George twenty twenty two twenty thirt Eighty eight percent
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are gonna be longer duration. They're going to be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects in many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology. And to deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then that's what we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and there were times when it seemed like more than a hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that than with that. We're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that no matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now maybe up in temperate zone, maybe up in in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think there'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be a very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers m maybe fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with. We'll be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up is changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer preceding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of variety of species some of the most dearly love species, the iconic species. We'll be lost. But there's always something that survives. I'm I hope it's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches. They'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon a report that insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been dependent upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators. Basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on the honeybee at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe. Start domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many locations. So that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects? It could be pesticides. So very pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at? Pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's land-use changes its argricultural intensification in all of these factors combined which are ganging up on species and making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab. Boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish reptiles amphibians that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people. We see Kerry and building up along roads we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in. Yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is in volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote, quote, what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And he said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's the ones that are have weight and territory. But maybe George it's the beauty and the grace and the vibrancy of a living soul. And that we can't lose that on this planet, maybe window that would be dramatic. If we could do that and get this all straightened out. He does he say how much time we have talking to professor Wagner who is a really down to earth. Scientist. I get the impression from him, and I have from other scientists, but I think he feels that by the twenty thirties to the twenty forty and that's not very long that we're going to be having more and more violent weather, the extinction rates are going to be increasing. And that the only thing that my pull this back is what the United Nations has been trying to get the world to do now for two or three decades. And that is if we could just cut back on the carbon dioxide in the methane and just hold a line that we wouldn't exceed that two degrees celsius. Then it might help stabilize the planet. Otherwise, every scientist says we are that we are up against wetter called tipping points. And that's when whatever is changing in the app. Fears the water the land, the water has been absorbing a lot of his heat and things are dying because of that and that.

Scientist professor Wagner New York Times California Knicks United Nations Europe murder Brooke Jarvis Connecticut Colorado France Africa Kerry Deng George twenty twenty two twenty thirt
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Without songbirds. We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish reptiles. And that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people. We see carrying building. Up along roads, we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in it. Yeah. The sixth mass extinction. This time around it is in volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us. Humans. Tara forming the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Brooke Jarvis wrote, quote, what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And you said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times the number of all draft that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct close quote. Well, we could ask ourselves. What does give a creature value from a human to Dragonfly and a lot of people say, well, it's.

Brooke Jarvis Deng New York Times Africa Tara France Eighty eight percent ninety seven percent one hundred percent thirty five years ninety percent thirty percent
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"In global average temperatures. It's the droughts that are going to cause massive problems in extinctions. These droughts are gonna be of longer duration. They're gonna be more intense, and they're going to be more frequent, and I don't think insects and many other animals plants in particular have the capacity to evolve different moisture physiology and. To deal with these drought. So that is going to be catastrophic. And then we saw in the American west this past summer when we have droughts we have fires and never times. And it seemed like more than a hundred fires were burning every western state had more fires this summer. We're going to see more of that. And with that, we're gonna see losses of our plant and wildlife and nature in general. When would you see a signal that said to you? We have reached an are passing a tipping point of being able to actually live on the surface of the planet. Like we have in the past. If so many insects are dying out along with other animals and creatures that can't keep up with what is going to happen with global climate change. I actually think that new matter what scenario if we're talking about climate change. There will be winners and losers. Some of the species that are in the tropics now may be up in temperate zone. Maybe up in Connecticut, and Colorado, and what have you? So I think they'll be a great redistribution of species. It will be very diminished fauna on our planet. It may not be as beautiful with wildflowers may be fewer birds much of the nature that we grew up with. We'll be gone. I think extinction is the fate of all species, essentially, I think ninety nine point nine nine percent of. All species have gone extinct what climate change does. Especially now with this heating up its changes the rate of loss and we're losing species. Now as fast as we've ever lost in the entire history of the planet. So we're entering what we call the answer proceeding or the sixth grade extinction. And so there will be a great diminishment of kind of righty of species some of the most dearly love species, the iconic species. We'll be lost. But there's always something that survives. I hope. It's not mosquitoes and cockroaches. But it might be mosquitoes and cockroaches. They'll be winners and losers mostly losers. Isn't there a serious threshold having to do with the pollinators? We have colony collapse in the problems with honeybees extending out to other kinds of pollinators. But if we are now looking through a lens for the peon AS report that insects are dying at huge rates unexpectedly around the whole world. What do we do about pollinators of crops that humans have been dependent upon for food? We're going to have to maybe look for different sets of pollinators. Basically, the human portfolio is entirely dependent on at this point in time, which is sort of ridiculous. We are so dependent on the honeybee. I mean, even to pollinate the almonds in California. I think when those trees are in flower, we have to put eighty percent of North American honeybees in trucks and truck them to California to pollinate. And so we're going to have to maybe. He start domesticating some bees or learning how we can use other wild beasts to do some of these pollination services. I don't think we're talking about losing all pollinators. I think what we're talking about is losing many. And I I know for example in northern Europe they've lost half of their bumblebees in many locations. And so that's what we're talking about in terms of our future. If we don't stand up and start paying attention and find out what the cause is how do we solve this mystery? I mean, it's basically a murder mystery that we have to figure out we can't solve the problem until we understand what the causes. What is murdering so many insects could be pesticides very pesticides that we need to protect our food could be killing the animals that we need to pollinate that food. You know, life's not simple. This is a hard problem of huge economic importance. And how do you scientists find out who the murderer could be we have to look at? Pesticides? There's new systemic pesticides called new Knicks. I'm thinking that it's just sort of death by a thousand cuts where it's the light pollution. It's all the roads. It's land-use changes its agricultural intensification, and all of these factors combined which are ganging up on species and making it very hard for them to continue on their journey with professor Wagner. We're right at the end of twenty eighteen and we're going to be entering the twenty twenty two twenty thirty decades soon. What is the worst case if scientists around the world working with political forces cannot understand or get some kind of control on the rapid decline of insects worst case scenario is we have spring without songbirds? We have a planet diminished in all wildflowers. And so we have a very drab. Boring nature. We start losing almost all of the small mammals and birds and bats fish reptiles amphibians that are dependent on insects. We start seeing the unraveling of ecosystems we see less food available for people. We see Kerry and building up along roads we have Deng accumulating in our yards. It's not a pretty world. Nobody wants to live in. I like the sixth mass extinction. This time around it is in volcano it isn't sheets of ice. It isn't a large asteroid. It's us humans tariff warming, the planet and changing the atmosphere and the oceans and the land and at the end of November the New York Times took on this subject in a feature entitled the insect. Apocalypse is here and ask what does a massive insect? Decline means for the rest of life on earth, and the author Jarvis wrote close what we're losing is not just the diversity part of biodiversity, but the bio part life in sheer quantity. And he said while I was writing this article scientists learned that one the world's largest king. Penguin colony shrank by eighty. Eighty eight percent in the last thirty five years more than ninety seven percent is almost one hundred percent extinction. Over ninety percent of blue fin tuna that once lived in the oceans are gone. Very interesting statistic that the number of toy giraffe sold in France in a single year is now nine times, the number of all giraffes that still live in Africa. And that a loss of even thirty percent of a species abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully numerically extinct.

New York Times California Knicks Europe Jarvis murder France Africa professor Wagner Connecticut Colorado Kerry Deng twenty twenty two twenty thirt Eighty eight percent ninety seven percent one hundred percent nine nine percent
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"I'll be torn away from Slater and Winterbourne. They'll say, hey, do TV and then Britain and Mike will say well what and I'll just be right next door. So that'll be handy. Who's the guy Nate silver the guy who predicted the Donald Trump wasn't gonna win? Last time says it's eighty eighty eight percent, sure. The Democrats take the house nineteen percent for the Senate. Why do we pay attention to him? Kay Tobin chain, author of divider and chief joins us former bigwig of the Republican party there that was set in your card right bigwigs Republican party in the Commonwealth of Virginia chief of staff to George Allen. And and our friend Kate. Hello, kate. And the woman on the Mark Larson show. I don't see I don't ever say. The woman on the headline. But I'm never gonna let you forget it. Okay. Well, you are a woman one of the women on my show. Yeah. May one. Yeah. I was talking to another friend of mine yesterday who happens to be of the female persuasion how many doing anyway? And and the word from her was, well, you know, some of the odds makers in Las Vegas are saying. Now, it's going to be a good night for Republicans. But in the metoo era now, it's going to be different. You get a lot of people who are getting in there, and they're voting for whomever, like anybody anti-trump, or if you're a woman, you must feel I guess the inherent need like inner drivers go up like I have to go against him. I'm envisioning the the Trump and Billy Bush stupid video on the access Hollywood thing from which came out before the last election. So I would say that if that did not happen in two thousand and sixteen. I don't think that's a really great bellwether to be using whether women are gonna vote out of disgust for Donald Trump. It didn't work van. I'm pretty sure it's not gonna work. Now. It's a shame Mark that the report that came out from the Senate Judiciary committee. I think yesterday got zero coverage from anybody other than FOX because it showed what a sham. Damn the Brad Kavanagh hearing thirty cues that was the one who is saying that it was a rape in the car. About the third accuser. It was awesome. Talking about the Christine Ford allegations. There were two people who have come forward that it detailed more information about the fact that they said they think it's a case of mistaken identity. They one of them were calls actually making out with her and somebody jumped on top of him one of his friends and the episode ended and he thinks that that could have been mistaken. But none of that stuff was brought out and some of these shocking revelations that a significant number of the allegations against Brett Kavanagh were made up whole cloth that report came out, and it was really important that it did it came out yesterday..

Donald Trump Brad Kavanagh Kate Mark Larson Republican party Nate silver Brett Kavanagh Trump Kay Tobin Britain Senate Judiciary committee Slater Las Vegas Senate Christine Ford Winterbourne chief of staff Mike George Allen Billy Bush
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Limb and i'm gonna say mostly catholic gonna say it mostly catholic and as of now mostly hungry so those are the nations that are on here so we'll see what happens it's going to be interesting to see what happens moving forward and i'm not quite sure i thought chad was taken over there mostly because chaz awesome but doesn't matter right at this moment of time trump got what he wanted was held and that's why i say never don't sell short how important the presidency is for the republicans in general even if trump doesn't get another pick could you imagine if trump gets another pick could you imagine if trump has the opportunity to have another person on the supreme court let's just say november comes and goes and everything kind of stayed the course it is right now the economy stays strong and the democrats maybe pick up a seat here there in the house but the senate it's a push and they still control everything and then at that time maybe kennedy says i want to try to stay on but then he says you know what i'm done and he steps away and trump has another opportunity to get another pick on there that really leaves the court in a situation where it's six to three and that is massive that is those are decades long these are jobs that come up all the time these people stay here or they die here right they'll retire only if they're in there some of them are in their eighties this is that kind of thing and so you're looking at somebody if you pick somebody who's fifty five let's say fifty you may have potentially three decades of that person on the court and in a situation that we see right now a six to three decision would change a lot and would give the breathing room i think for the republicans and so when we talk about the legacy of trump and there's potentially going to be his legacy is being written in two different ways the way that he became the president was one way on the other way the presidency itself the craziness that surrounds it russia the porn stars the insanity of the the witch hunt and the fighting with the media and potentially the stuff inside of that that is north korean immigration and obamacare and doing a bunch of these other things that potentially may do but the reality is if none of those things ever come to fruition and he's able to even get another person on the court the the republicans will sit back and say that there is a victory kids because the highest court in the land would be conservative and that's a win as far as they're concerned that's a win we shouldn't we should have no winners and losers in the court system it should be literally lady justice is blind but the reality is is the interpretation of the constitution of which they work off and law one side sees it as a conservative way the other side sees has a liberal way and that could change everything three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at chadbensonshow is your twitter you can tweet at me hope you're doing well we have a poll question today it's a pretty good one pretty simple one too i made it easy for you today i want to hear from you what do you think of the supreme court's ruling ford or against a good idea bad idea eighty eighty eight percent of you say it's a good idea twelve percent say no it's wrong it's wrong want to hear from.

eighty eighty eight percent twelve percent three decades
"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"eighty eighty eight percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And i'm gonna say mostly catholic gonna say it mostly catholic and as of now mostly hungry so those are the nations that are on here so we'll see what happens it's going to be interesting to see what happens moving forward and they're not quite sure i thought chad was taken over there mostly chad is awesome but doesn't matter right at this moment of time trump got what he wanted was up a health and that's why i say never don't sell short how important the presidency is for the republicans in general even if trump doesn't get another pick could you imagine if trump gets another pick could you imagine if trump has the opportunity to have another person on the supreme court let's just say november comes and goes and everything kind of stays the courses is right now the economy stay strong and the democrats maybe pick up a seat here there in the house but the senate it's a push and they still control everything and then at that time maybe kennedy says i want to try to stay on but then he says you know what i'm done and he steps away and trump has another opportunity to get another pick on there that really leaves the court in a situation where it's six to three and that is massive that is those are decades long these are jobs that come up all the time these people stay here or they die here right the they'll retire only if they're in there is some of them are in their eighties this is that kind of thing and so you're looking at somebody if you pick somebody who's fifty five let's say fifty you may have potentially three decades of that person on the court and in the situation that we see right now a six to three decision would change a lot and would give the breathing room i think for the republicans and so when we talk about the legacy of trump and there's potentially going to be his legacy is being written in two different ways the way that he became the president was one way and on the other way the presidency itself the craziness that surrounds it russia the the porn stars the insanity of the the witch hunt and the fighting with the media and potentially the stuff inside of that that is north korean immigration and and and care and doing a bunch of these other things that potentially may do but the reality is if none of those things ever come to fruition and he's able to even get another person on the court the republicans will sit back and say that there is a victory kids because the highest court in the land would be conservative and that's a win as far as they're concerned that's a win we shouldn't we should have no winners and losers in the court system it should be literally lady justice is blind but the reality is is the interpretation of the constitution of which they work off in law one side sees it as a conservative way the other side seizes the liberal way and that could change everything three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at chadbensonshow is your twitter you can tweet having hope you're doing well we have a poll question today it's a pretty good one pretty simple one too i made it easy for you today i want to hear from you what do you think of the supreme court's ruling you forder against it good idea bad idea eighty eighty eight percent of you say it's a good idea twelve percent say no it's wrong it's wrong want to hear.

eighty eighty eight percent twelve percent three decades