39 Burst results for "editor"

Fresh "editor" from WBBM Afternoon News Update

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:37 min | 59 min ago

Fresh "editor" from WBBM Afternoon News Update

"Out of some of the forecast tonight Clear conditions Low 64 at O'Hare sixties Low sixties in the suburbs. And tomorrow times of clouds and sunshine with high of 88 maybe a chance for thunderstorms. Later in the evening alone. Tomorrow night, 72 were 83 at O'Hare midway 80 to the lakefront 75. The News Watch continues at 6 20 Our top story this hour is Governor Pritzker's new strategy for enforcing rules requiring people to wear mass as a way to slow the spread of Corona virus. He's filed proposed emergency rules that would give businesses the responsibility of enforcing mask mandates and could be in fines for repeated refusals. To do so would be beyond political editor Craig Del Amore will have much more on that story coming up at 6 31 Department. Police prevented a tragedy. Halos Park police officer happened upon an unoccupied vehicle near the payloads Park Woods and learned it was registered to a man in his twenties, The Naperville Police Department was searching for in collaboration with the Orland Park, Police Department and Cook County Sheriff's Office. They were able to find the man who explained his plans to end his life. They were ableto layout, a health plan and the victim is now receiving mental health treatment. Police chief Joe Miller said. If things had gone differently, the victim's family would have been planning a funeral instead of Recognizing the collective work to change a man's life. Rachel Pearson NewsRadio 105.9 local expert says the biggest media companies in the world are fighting over your television. The streaming wars are in full swing media giants like Disney, NBC, Comcast and Viacom. CBS were squaring off against Tech giants Apple, Netflix and Amazon. Tim Hanlon, founder and CEO of the Vert ear grew up in Chicago tells the doubly BBM noon business. Our that intellectual property and libraries of old TV shows and movies are the most powerful weapon in the streaming wars. Ah, lot of it comes down to number one. Library content right, So, especially in today's sort of more stay at home hunker home kind of thing. The library has become very good. It can be a comfort food. Disney announced this week that the Disney Plus Streaming service is now up to 60 million subscribers thanks to the release of Hamilton last month. Rob Hart, NewsRadio 105.9 FM, 6 22 Market news Coming up With the new iPhone SC for less than 100 bucks at Metro, You rule. It's the most affordable eyes bone on the number one Brandon Prepaid, whether you're studying online Hey, Mom, iPhone. Espy has all you.

Disney Naperville Police Department Governor Pritzker Rob Hart Craig Del Amore Halos Park Newsradio Park Woods Brandon Prepaid Orland Park Rachel Pearson Espy Tim Hanlon Political Editor Founder And Ceo Chicago Joe Miller
Game Scoop

Game Scoop!

04:57 min | 8 hrs ago

Game Scoop

"What's up everybody is you and skipping meals David Hatfield joining this week is Tina mini everybody just Davis. Scoop and friend and SAM clayborn. We've got a great show for you this week we're going to talk about. The crazy crazy crazy deal about spiderman being exclusive to playstation. In Marvel's AVENGERS WE'RE GONNA flip through the August nineteen ninety issue of video games and computer. Entertainment. But I. Really all you need to know right now is that spunky to is finally finally coming out, September fifteenth just over month away I couldn't be more excited listeners and my friends on the show have long long heard me talk about how much I love love love spunky. Maybe my favorite game of all time cheese maybe I don't know why does it need sequel? Doesn't necessarily need one, but the like I, I. You know spunky. So brilliant and they've spent so much time making the sequel like I'm really excited to see you know how do you with with this one and what? During their, how deep they're going to get maybe they'll go so that they a lava world. You, what do you want different in this game? Necessarily different but I mean just play spunky I can't believe. We're still talking about this. You don't want the game he don't own a to do extra. This is the problem is that people like you demand sequels and they should be made everything was fine. I was I was never demanding a sequel I've been excited for the sequel though it was announced we've had to edit these episodes several times to remove your demands they're getting increasingly. Violent. My demand for this game increases. If you're if you're an Egyptian prime subscriber, you dame, it's eighteen minute weekly rant on spunky to yeah they go to edit editor. Yup you can download them. Eric while you're excited for this game looks like it has more digging. Know. It's all about systems. Interacting with each other in in unexpected surprising things on your quest to reach the end of the game. So I'm just excited for all the new stuff that they're going to add to the game. Off many many different ways to unexpectedly die during a I love spunky and. I was just joking about all that before I think the cool thing about spunky is the thing I like about Mario Brothers Games where it's like. So focused on secret stuff and as people discovered all the secrets. That that probably alone gave me hope that this game would just be like just full of like crazy cool Meta difficult things to accomplish. That that's why I needed a sequel, you catch all the seeking discover all the secrets you need more secrets. To. Shoot up date. They're like we added a bunch of secret stuff. That's the patch notes like that's the patch. This passes a secret. Good candidate for guides him. It is it is although it's kind of a it's really hard to write guides for Rogue Lakes because I'm you can kind of like classify like eventually with speeding this game became really interesting spunky because. You know there was like a type of orientation of the first level that like made sense to not restart on I think. That's really cool. Right. People basically start breaking the game to figure that stuff out but otherwise, you just gotta be like. You might see a snake. Not If. You know there's there's like a shortcuts to people could take that are built into the game that aren't yet I don't break the game. Yeah. You can tell people never to pick up certain weapons and stuff like that I. Think there is a There's an element to that type of strategy guide writing, which is interesting because there's there's a there's a public out there that I know people don't don't expect this. But it's true that just read from start to finish a game skied while they play it and I did that when I when I was a kid rock Tynan skied and didn't lessen my enjoyment of the Game I. Love The indepth page by page look at all the stuff in this game aspect that guy and people like that. So that's different from like a spunky guide readers like here's some tips. Good luck. And then apparently also. The Sony State of play today it was announced at Alan wake is coming to control DLC. Correct, but we don't have more information than that. Yeah. Honestly. I had like a I haven't been able to watch state of play in its entirety myself, but it was narrated to be my friendly gears. He makes an appearance and it has been long speculated that the DNC in meant in question would be across over with Alan. Wake. So this kind of confirms it but apparently, the trailer did not divulge much more about like. Easter kind of character or is this going to be like a playable character or villain may be and I? I guess I didn't catch this while I was playing control but I suppose or maybe I don't remember but I suppose we're a lot of references to a writer. So that's why we're the relations coming

Alan Wake Sam Clayborn David Hatfield Davis Rogue Lakes Eric Editor DNC Writer Tynan Sony
Fresh update on "editor" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

01:06 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on All Things Considered

"Often been dismissed and denigrated for their spin on the art form, which is why NPR music has now published a canon of Southern hip hop. 130 songs and albums. The project is called The South Got Something to Say Editor Briana Younger and NPR Music's Rodney Carmichael are here to break it down for us. Thanks for being here. Thank you for having us, Briana tell me about this huge, ambitious project. I mean, how did you go about creating this cannon Figuring out who was out who is in Yeah, well, I mean, I knew that the south such a huge and diverse region and that I couldn't do it by myself, and that a lot of the ways in which southern rap had been characterized on mainstream platforms. Had been done by writers and critics who didn't necessarily come from or identify with the South. So I've found around 25 critics from all across the south, and we just kind of voted and discussed and discuss a more What this thing would look like. You know, when I was a kid, it was all about New York versus like East vs West. Why do you think it's taken so long for Southern rap to get its do? I mean, you know, old hatred dies hard, you know, and Forsman hating on the South so long, it's just in their blood. But the really big thing I think is the fact that you know the music industry has always been based on the coasts. A lot of that respect and just that understanding of how to translate was going on in the south to the rest of the world. Has been lacking, Briana, you know, it's certainly true that people everywhere have enjoyed Southern rap, and it is the dominant sound. But it's also true that it's not really respected. You know, as an art form, it's not necessarily always seen a sophisticated or skilful like big crit on Mount Olympus, which is one of the songs we included You.

Briana Younger Npr Music Mount Olympus Rodney Carmichael Forsman Editor New York West
Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

Exponent

04:59 min | 15 hrs ago

Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

"I James. I'm doing. Okay. How are you? Good thanks. All Things considered I'm busy. Tell You I've complainer this on multiple guess at this point. But what's another one I feel like? Because no one is traveling or going anywhere what is usually the slowest months? August is just insane like stuff happening constantly it started off where it got very slow in March. I was walked down people don't know what to do and were nervous. I was over whelming sense of doom and the weird thing. Is Obviously, it's not that stuff has changed that much but we talked about this on the last episode people have adapted, and now they're like making up for lost I but they're just like news coming out everywhere right a no more so than in the capital. That's right. So last week last Wednesday the editor subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee in the House had a hearing with the four tuxedos Apple Google facebook and Amazon Microsoft was notable by its absence, but it was clearly a. Focus on consumer tech. In the reason I say that this was clear is not just because such. Adele wasn't there but it became pretty clear through the questioning that Tim. Cook was only they're Kinda wanted to say that they got all of them because they were not prepared to ask him questions at all. It's clear that all the work of the committee has been mostly focused on I would say first and foremost Amazon they had the most detailed stuff there they were pretty detail. About Google, they were somewhat detailed about facebook, but you could see sort of the quality of questionings really starting to come down there, and then they didn't even know what the percentages were in the APP store. You is kind of embarrassing. They would ask cook a question and let him just talk because they didn't know what to ask next wherever else interrupt because they wanted that points to make et Cetera et Cetera and I've thought that difference in the quality of questioning per company. was pretty striking. Yeah. It's interesting. The New York Times ran a tally of the questions and I thought that in itself was interesting and it looked pretty evenly spaced and then apple was dislike fifty percent of the other three frustrating in a way because obviously I've been sort of fixated on the APP store for literally since the beginning of attack relate what am I I set of articles back in two thousand thirteen was trying to understand what how is doing such a crappy job. Imagine the APP store and one of my conclusions there was there. So scarred from their near death experience in the nineties when they had to beg adobe and Microsoft to continue supporting the Max can remain viable and I wrote this is back in two thousand thirteen that they would never allow themselves to be in that position again and well. So interesting about that is the way that has manifested is that again, this is a long running things that they've really had kept productivity APPS. In particular, it's hard to make money. You can't charge upgrades is really important sort of business mile away. It's worked on other platforms white the internet which Tim Cook Pretends doesn't exist also testimony they jumped straight from brick and mortar to the APP store. There's no intervening period there where you could buy stuff on the Internet. It's funny because when you read his testimony, you don't notice until someone points out she's like Oh my word. Yeah. You just kinda skipped fifteen years of distribution. So I didn't watch it old but I did watch part of it, and the only thing that I can remember is someone was questioning him around he has complete control of which APPs and he's like I'll well, if the native APPs that's true except Web apps so think he's not to the Internet was like little buttons that you create insofar which by the way are totally handicap progressive lobster totally handicap on IOS in wipes away all their cookies and settings after a week in. Where are the interesting things about this is because apple was held captive by productivity APPs in the nineties all of their sort of onerous APP store terms in my estimation have mostly affected would be productivity APPs in your abyss situation where you get no great innovator of APPs on these platforms in part because much risk like maybe you're going to build something in apple's not gonNA prove it or there's no business model it and it just doesn't make sense to make a new sort of productivity after the most difficult in-depth after build from a physical. API's on the device or perspective and what actually has come to dominate are. All these network based APPS that are mostly API driven and what's interesting is because apple is not a social company I message notwithstanding that they kind of weren't paying attention to that and what happened was we talked about this China where we chat actually became the exact sort of dominant APP that I think the APP store was designed to limit. But because they weren't sort of paying attention, they ended up the exact same situation as a nineties is the apple as a company is much stronger than back. Then it's not even remotely comparable but the fact that we chat is more important than your phone is definitely the case you. Like Oh we trade the same well then why is it? We have a mini APP store for on purposes and no one else has allowed it like one of the most obvious examples of APPs not being treated the same and it's not true the same because we chat as more important than the IPHONE.

Apple Tim Cook Facebook Amazon Microsoft Google Judiciary Committee The New York Times Adele Editor Adobe China
Fresh update on "editor" discussed on WBBM Afternoon News Update

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:53 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on WBBM Afternoon News Update

"This weekend's Cubs Cardinals season has been officially postponed because of the covert 19 results in one Cardinals Cubs will be back in action Tuesday against Cleveland WCBM business on the day. The Dow It's 47 points NASDAQ Lower by 97. All three of the main averages win the week I'm Alisa Parenti at Bloomberg, Passing the height of 84 85. Over here, midway 83 the lakefront 76. The News Watch continues at 5 31 Pritzker proposing new statewide rules aimed at tightening requirements that businesses, schools and other places require people to wear face coverings. His proposal comes on the same day. The state reported more than 2000 new Corona virus cases for the first time since late May. With the latest W BB on political editor Craig Del Amore Governor Pritzker's asking the Joint Commission on Administrative Rules to approve an escalating Siri's of actions against businesses that don't enforce the state's mass mandate. First, there'd be education next, a warning and finally a fine that could be a size $2500. Santoyo, head of the Illinois Restaurant Association, urged people to wear masks rather than put workers and their favorite dining spots at risk. We all need to listen to the advice of scientists and doctors to file the rules. Be smart and keep Illinois open. As we say. At Illinois Restaurant Association covered faces keep open places. The rules would exclude individuals from enforcement. The governor says he doesn't want people arrested Foran infraction. I've asked local authorities, including polices, including Local health authorities to remind people as frequently as they possibly can that they need to follow this masked man, Greg del Amore NewsRadio, 105.9 FM. Course to add Mayor Lewis PRESTA indicted for allegedly bribing an official misconduct..

Craig Del Amore Governor Pritz Greg Del Amore Newsradio Illinois Restaurant Associatio Cardinals Pritzker Alisa Parenti Lewis Presta Cleveland DOW Illinois Cubs Foran Joint Commission Bloomberg Political Editor Siri Santoyo Official
Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

Bookworm

04:36 min | 1 d ago

Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

"Today. I'm very pleased and excited. My favorite thing on bookworm is when I'm talking to a first novelist. And it someone whose work I have not previously known my guest on the show today is a booth wet more Beth wet more. Her book is called Valentine. It's published by Harper and it's novel. Beth. Wet more is fifty three years old and this is her first. Book, she's published many short stories in many of the best literary journals, the Kenyon, Review Colorado Review but this is her first time in hardcover. Tell me Beth what feel nights is finally see the book in hardcover. Well. It's all been a little unreal honestly. I worked on the book for a long time and I was ready to have the editor sort of wrestle out of my hands. Honestly I think if if she hadn't wrestled it out of my hands, I'd probably still be tinkering with it to tell you the truth and even now I occasionally spot a sentence or a paragraph that I think, Oh, I'd like to have a do over on that. But on the whole, it's been wonderful and surprising to me I think I. Expected The book to come out very quietly and and so it's been. Marvelous to see how many people have reacted to it in such a positive way and how meaningful it's been to some people. Yes the book has made its debut as number two when it came out on the New York Times bestseller list and it's set where Beth was born in West Texas in Odessa. Now, if you're me, you think Odessa that's near where my family come from in Russia this is Odessa in. West Texas how does it get its name? Well it depends on who you ask You know the they're part of Texas was settled pretty late in the early eighteen eighty s and depending on on what piece of local you believe it was it was named Odessa in part because of the sort of grasslands that that people said resembled the Odessa in Ukraine. And and and that's really been the most sort of certain story I've heard. No was Texas. is known for its. Economy. I'm sure most of my listeners will know this but what is an oil patch? Well. Odessa is in the Permian Basin which is about eighty, six, thousand square miles inside. So and and of course, West Texas and. is is even more vast right than the Permian basin and it's an oil and natural gas rich region of the country I read recently actually that actually until the until the pandemic, it was on pace to outpace Saudi Arabia for the biggest production in world in the next five years That's slow down and been derailed a little bit by the pandemic of course but it's so an oil patches you know a a part of the world where that is the single economy oil and natural gas. It's not a particularly pretty place in the world at least not by most people's standards I think it's beautiful. There's no other way to make a living out there other than working oil and natural gas and Odessa where I grew up on differs slightly from it sort of sister city, of Midland, which is about twenty three miles away in the sense that Odessa's a very working class town most of the people who live and work in Odessa do the. Blue collar work of the oil patch. So they work is the roughnecks and pipe lawler's and fitters and water haulers and That's still even today a pretty male dominated industry women in that part of the world tend to work in support roles as bartenders and waitresses preschool teachers, teachers, that sort of thing So that's where I grew up.

Odessa Beth West Texas Harper Ukraine Permian Basin Colorado Review Editor Valentine Lawler New York Times Midland Saudi Arabia Texas.
Fresh update on "editor" discussed on Paul and Jordana

Paul and Jordana

00:37 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on Paul and Jordana

"It's common knowledge that I will always love you was Dolly Parton song. In fact, she was on top of the country charts in 1974 way before Whitney Houston made the song a worldwide hit in 1992. It was featured in our movie, The Bodyguard. Another very popular artist expressed interest in it. Who was it? It was Elvis. She almost let him recording until Elvis's manager told her it was standard practice to hand over half the publishing rights and pardon refused. Profile Midland Big Land form in 2016 and Dripping Springs, Texas, After first meeting separately around Los Angeles, three members it interesting backgrounds. One was a music video editor and directing a video for Bruno Mars. One grew up on a farm in Oregon, and one was an actor, an underwear model. 2016 there at least five songs with their debut full length album Going in 2017. Their debut, single Drinking Problem Got.

Elvis Dolly Parton Whitney Houston Dripping Springs Bruno Mars Los Angeles Oregon Editor Texas
Episode 13  Becca Wicks  The Heathen King - burst 1

Discovered Wordsmiths

00:47 sec | 1 d ago

Episode 13 Becca Wicks The Heathen King - burst 1

"Do you have any last advice for new authors to get to where you're at. On Lot of a lot of the best advices, Yano don't Don't rush into things make sure your research Do. Do all of the best amount of homework. You can possibly do before you right because I mean you're always going to have errors. You're always gonNA find things that need to be revised in fixed but I mean the best thing to do is just to make sure that you know exactly what you're talking about and Jairo pub are hiring editor. Yourself. You're just GONNA. Get frustrated. Agree.

Yano Jairo Editor
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 1 d ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Best deals for laptops, headphones

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

Best deals for laptops, headphones

"Uncertainty about the upcoming school year and parents putting off their back to school shopping. Many retailers are extending their deals, says Samantha Gordon, deals editor, a consumer reports The deals will run probably through early to mid September, extra time to take advantage of steep discounts on technology, including laptops such as the 14 inch LG Graham. Usually $1200 now on sale at Amazon and be an age photo for under 9 50 This is one of the best laptops that we have tested and our labs at consumer reports for students, remote learning or parents working from home noise canceling headphones may come in handy. This wireless pair from Microsoft Surface is now marked down at best Buy for 350 bucks to under 200. They scored really comparably in terms of the noise cancellation to the higher end models from bows and Sony and is

Samantha Gordon LG Sony Microsoft Editor Amazon
Digging for the truth

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:57 min | 1 d ago

Digging for the truth

"The Welcome to kiss Miss Mystery signed your host. Kit crump night been receiving a usual amount of people wondering how I tracked down the facts refined the truth when I'm working on a story. So I'm going to run down the process I'd take when investigating and urban legend and try to give a couple of examples, I i. look for anyone that actually experienced the event if that individual doesn't want to talk to me, which is usually the case. Then, I attempt to track down a witness to the event. Often when there are someone that actually experienced a paranormal event, let's say they are often embarrassed or reluctant to speak to anyone for fear, they're going to be criticized or accused of making up the entire event in some cases that involve things political or the government I can utilize the freedom of information. Act But they usually take forty five days or more to respond if the event. Is something that was reoccurring. Then I can tap into police be I reports. However, they are often. So editor redacted with black lines disliked trying to figure out a code to best understand the process will recite a couple of examples I of flying saucer that crashed at Roswell keep in mind that I'm going to leave out a lot of detail and I'm only going to explain off the flying saucer itself no alien bodies involved in this first. Trace the image of a saucer back to nineteen forty seven in horten brothers who created both a saucer and flying wing both brothers were brought back to the United States with two hundred and fifty other scientists at the end of the war in something that was called project paper clip. You may have heard of this where in the United States could the Horton's and other scientists work well, area fifty one of course at what became area fifty one. I continue this option that they would continue work on the flying wing or flying saucer I. Now Research Project Rainbow is a program using some of Tesla's science in an effort to move a battleship from point a to point b you might know this as a Philadelphia experiment. The idea was not to make anything invisible simply to move it from one place to. Another and the military failure they had made a small battleship both vanish and move from one point to another. Now, they bring that science to the Horton saucer and it becomes up flying saucer. The problem is that they can't control the Horton's flying saucer any better than the L. Ridge which was the battleship they tried it out on initially with line saucer vanishes and. then. Reappears eight hundred miles away word crashes at Roswell New Mexico this. You'd give you a very rough idea of the thinking connecting process. Keep in mind that if I have a strange unexplained event, I don't want to go to the authorities or police wrath be I with whatever because they are not equipped for accurate reports on things that go bump in the. Night that leads me to my second example a while back I got a book did explained away dozens and dozens of urban legends is a hundred percent boss. But when I opened the book to the first one, the author said, it could possibly be happening yet. I know for a fact, kidney harvesting does happen and is going on in the United States right now. The book explained away the notion that people are having their kidneys harvest it well, here's what I know. Twenty years ago I was in a restaurant with my editor. The booking question was my book body parts a story I had written about the sale of block market body parts as I was explaining the research a waitress came over and told us how some of her friends had gone to New Orleans and one of them strayed from the group in hoax. So picking up a woman for the night, they had all been. Showing an apartment and she said he would join them in the morning. If he simply ended up closing down a few bars long story short when he didn't show up, they manage to track him down to a flop house where they found him in a bathtub filled with ice less one kidney. So they get into a local hospital at an after examination. The doctor tells them that the surgery necessary to remove that kidney without killing the patient had been carried out in a surgical unit with a team of surgeons trained to. Remove a kidney. This waitress didn't know either my editor or myself. She said her friend who lost a kidney lives in Ashland Oregon but I never tried to contact him but you could see from this second example, how many urban legends are often just dismissed out of hand. The author of that book I was mentioning dismissed the kidney harvesting only consulted police in several doctors. Of course, neither of his sources would have anything to do with kidney harvesting for a lot of different reasons not to mention that harvesting any Oregon is. A federal offense

Horton Editor United States Oregon Kit Crump Horten Ashland New Mexico Tesla Roswell New Orleans Philadelphia L. Ridge
Anthony Davis Has Room to Grow

The NBA Show

06:11 min | 2 d ago

Anthony Davis Has Room to Grow

"GonNa Focus on the Lakers, which as an editor is near and dear to my heart because sharks picked the biggest red meat team on on on the table here. But they've been really impressive with us are there to one and Anthony Davis looks like probably the best player in the bubble thus far chunks. Why don't you leaders us through some of the things that have been happening with Lakers why think for the record this is called the impossibly good-looking persons corner just clarify. For. Their how dare sir? Okay so we're looking at the Lakers thing to me that's jumped out in the first three games is how they're playing when Anthony Davis playing without Lebron on. So that was been their biggest problem. All season is those non Lebron ad minutes because he idea was. Okay. If you have a D- then Lebron can rest he can get. His breaking it as time off, and they'll still be fine. But before the restart when eighty was out of the Ron, he was minus three and five, hundred, six, hundred minutes as those are important minutes Lakers have to win in the restart I mean obviously is a very small sample size but who cares where we're doing podcasts in the restart their plus night. Eighties playing without Lebron. That's just a massive flip on their whole situation and to me watching those minutes was set out to me I think number one. Not Having region Rondo. I think that really kind of low key killed their team because when rondos playing he has to have the ball right like Rondo can't play off the ball Swiss hole in the ball he's not really a threat to score someone's really guarding him and then on defense that giving you much either so like Alex the numbers when ad and Rondo without Lebron it was minus five and without Rondo they're playing Caruso and waiters with a d the floor is spread and the thing. Anthony. Davis. You don't need a traditional point guard Anthony, Davis give eighty the ball in the mid postals kill people right? He gets the ball then it kicks shooter instead of the Rondo. So it's like ADP without Rondo back great and the other thing too is eighty at the five. So they're going eighty Kuzma than like Greener Casey Caruso waiters whatever. Eighty s numbers at the five the year are insane. They're absolutely ridiculous. So cab. Looking at that with no Devellano Dwight Eighty has a usage of twenty eight shooting of Sixty six point six. Now base that means in English as eighties in the ball, like he's hardener Jaanus and he's been the most efficient player in the league. So if looking at those two numbers, there's only been one player in NBA history that had to be that efficient at that. High usage not staff like five years ago. So basically, when eighties at the five, he does a established about shooting threes he's basically scoring at will every single time I think long story short eighty more room to grow I. Think we're seeing that right now like leading a d. plan space given him the ball he's got levels still the go to get into them right now. Yeah I. So the biggest thing off of that, which was great I just wonder if their margin for error is too thin right now obviously the Lakers have been incredible. So let's get that caveat out of the way I think probably favorite if not among the favorites for the title. People like to remind us on the group Chat specifically Chris Because I don't think sharks was. One I remember that yeah. Where we pretty much we troll the Lakers after their first loss of the season and. Venture like the succeed but clearly, they've they've far exceeded those expectations. Great. Please don't ask me. But I do wonder as bad as Rondo has been at times. As much as Bradley is the fifth most important guy on that starting lineup at times I do wonder if the margin for error is a little bit more thin and you are relying on the cruise of the world on the Casey Visa, the world more than you would like to my wrong rob now I mean I'm I'm pretty compelled by this whole situation that sharks laid out like the idea of shifting some of those pieces around and unlocking ad in a different way like makes logical sense to me given his skill set this is. The Guy, who can you know Kevin O'Connor talked in in the restart this week about how? Bam. Out of Bio Converts Defenses Ad in the mid post has a similar effect where if you clear out, you give him space and a straight line drive past almost any big in the league like that's such a powerful thing that there should be a way to orient pieces around that. Make Sense I. Think I get skeptical is in that margin for error and it's in, you know if you look at kind of the core of these lineups. AD and CAL Kuzma, and Alice Caruso or kind of the three man anchor of it and in around that, there's a revolving door of guards. You got some Danny Green minutes you get some dion waiters minutes he gets JR Smith gets in Casey ep you got whoever they cobbled together in that minute in the rotation at those guys scare the hell out of me a little bit and I think you know when you flashback to eighty as a Pelican and where he was some of where they fell apart without drew. Holiday on the floor without kind of more traditional point guards on the floor which just not having competent entry passers not having guys who could get a d. the ball in positions to score, which is it seems like such an easy thing. But the thing I don't trust dion waiters to do but it is a thing. Maybe I do trust Danny Green to do it. You know like some of these more professional veteran level guys like that distinction I think is an important one and probably the difference between bubble seating. Games bubble playoff games, right where you're getting Jr's and the demons at least lower in the pecking order if not out of the rotation on a regular basis entirely, and then you're looking at these minutes where it's you know, Danny Green Casey P. and those guys and cannot work I. Think I. Think there's a chance that it does but I do get a little bit suspect just in the sense that once playoff defenses are really keying in on what this lineup look like and how it works what does that? Mean deep because you know Jaanus has had that scrutiny in terms of a big who handles the ball who's creating for space lineups like we know what that looks like in defense is know what that looks like defensive kind of just been dealing with these Lakers lineups without Lebron floor all year haven't had a lot of trouble with them, but they haven't hammered them either in terms of the the mechanics of how they work. If this starts working, then you invite that level of

Lakers Rondo Lebron Anthony Davis Sharks Dwight Eighty Casey Caruso Danny Green Alice Caruso Editor NBA Dion Kevin O'connor ADP Jr Smith Casey Visa RON Jaanus Cal Kuzma
US private employers add 167,000 jobs in July, sharply missing expectations

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

US private employers add 167,000 jobs in July, sharply missing expectations

"Were added to the economy last month. But W W. J Business editor Marie Feldman says it is a disappointing number. Economists expected to see a 1,000,000 new jobs created last month, so 167,000 falls far short of that. An indication perhaps, that the spread of the Corona viruses, forcing businesses in some parts of the country to scale back and or shut down in some cases, laying off workers again. Job losses came last month and financial services construction lost 8000 jobs Cos they're dealing with information technology also cut workers. Much of last month's hiring, though, took place at smaller companies, 63,000 jobs were gained their from coast to coast. 45,000 jobs added it very small companies those with under 20 workers. The report was compiled by the payroll company ADP Murray, Feltman. W. W. J. NewsRadio, 9 50

Adp Murray Marie Feldman Business Editor W. W. J. Newsradio Feltman
CPS will begin school year with students learning at home

WBBM Late Morning News

01:01 min | 2 d ago

CPS will begin school year with students learning at home

"City and school leaders say it was a tough decision, but students will not be in the classroom even part time to start the academic year. W BBM political editor Craig Del Amore has the latest with new Corona virus cases hovering around 300 today. Chicago Public schools CEO Janice Jackson says consultations with health officials Faculty and parents led them to decide There won't be time in the classrooms in September, we will begin the new school year learning at home and continue learning remotely for the first quarter, which ends on November 6. Aldermen Michael Scott, who chairs the City Council's education committee, was one relieved Parent. My Children were very excited about the hybrid model As a parent, I was You really scared? It's in my child back to school, and I know that there are a lot of parents. A lot of teachers were also afraid of kind of what was going to happen. I think this gives us the opportunity to reset ourselves. School officials say there will be a full day of learning online each day. Craig Della More news Radio, 105.9

Craig Del Amore Craig Della Chicago Public Schools Janice Jackson Political Editor City Council Michael Scott CEO
Pete Hamill, Legendary New York Columnist, Has Died

Mark Simone

00:29 sec | 2 d ago

Pete Hamill, Legendary New York Columnist, Has Died

"News and legendary New York City journalist Pete Hamill is dead at 85. Hammel fell last weekend and underwent surgery for a broken hip of Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, but died Tuesday morning. Hamel rope for three city tabloids over 40 years, including his editor of the New York Post and the Daily News, He wrote several novels and a best selling memoir, drinking Life and was found of the Prix. Digital New York He grew up in complete with stickball games, typewriters and smoke filled rooms. I'm Lisa G

New York New York Post Pete Hamill Brooklyn Methodist Hospital Hammel Hamel Lisa G Daily News Editor
Pete Hamill, Legendary New York Newspaper Columnist, Dies At 85

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 2 d ago

Pete Hamill, Legendary New York Newspaper Columnist, Dies At 85

"Journalist and novelist Pete Hammel has died. He was 85. He spent four decades as a newspaper columnist serving his editor for both the Daily News and The New York Post. He was also the author of more than 20 novels. Dealing is reports. He fractured his right hip over the weekend and his heart failed while he was in I c u at New York Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, Pete Hamill gone at 85.

Pete Hammel New York Presbyterian Brooklyn Pete Hamill The New York Post Daily News Editor
Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist, has died

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

01:36 min | 2 d ago

Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist, has died

"I have some sad news as well being informed that apparently legendary New York Post and Daily News columnist Pete Hammel has passed away. Unfortunately, at the age of 85 so he was a longtime editor. For the New York Post and a longtime columnist for the both The post and the News rush. You and I spoke with his brother, Dennis family, also a terrific columnist of mine. And, You know, people who know their history may remember this. But Pete Hamill was a pretty close friend of Robert Kennedy and Hammel helped persuade Robert Kennedy to run for president back in 1968. He worked on Kennedy's campaign. Then he covered it as a journalist, and he was one of four men who actually disarmed, sir. Hand, sir. Hand you know, removed his gun in the aftermath of that Kennedy assassination is a pretty good documentary series about that Kennedy assassination on Netflix. He's one of you know, when you talk about family you're talking about him and Jimmy Breslin. I mean those air, the legendary people. I'm saying Steve Dunleavy. I'm so sad about that, because he's really and you know, I gotta call Dennis the minute we get off the he Not only, though, would Bobby Kennedy, but he was quite The man on his earlier days dating Jackie Ah Onassis Onassis. Linda Ron's that Shirley Maclaine. I mean, he got around. I want you to know that. Well, see, we're even. We're mourning his death even more. If that's the case.

Robert Kennedy Pete Hammel New York Post Jackie Ah Onassis Onassis Dennis Family Pete Hamill Steve Dunleavy Daily News Jimmy Breslin Shirley Maclaine Netflix Linda Ron Dennis President Trump
White Nationalist vs. David C. Smalley

Dogma Debate

06:24 min | 2 d ago

White Nationalist vs. David C. Smalley

"Further ado join me in welcoming Gordon. Call? To The podcast Gordon thanks for joining me today men. Thank you for having me on. So you have a podcast, I can't pronounce it. I don't know why. To just sorry, go ahead. Yeah. Yeah. Tell you the name of myself? Yeah. Yeah. It's totally the name your podcast and and your your your reason for coming on today. So. I'm Gordon Call I'm the editor of American her dot Org. It's a blog website I host the podcast tune Americana which acting is you know the German word for attention right and then America Connor is a term that some people on. If you WANNA call what I am the right or the dissident right have used to refer to white Americans right It's based on the term for white South Africans Afrikaner. And the idea was to we needed a word to represent the unique white ethnicity of America, right because you know. I. My background I'm German and Irish right I'm a midwestern Mutt but I'm not German and I'm not Irish right. I if I went to either of those countries, I would not culturally fit in there. I am a unique. Example of my background and nation. But Our podcast acting Americana is kind of A. Talk Show I guess we go over different topics and news stories focused primarily on the Midwest and fly over country and we kind of examined them from a white nationalist or distant right pursue. Okay. So do you consider yourself a white supremacist? No. And it would probably depend on what your definition of white supremacist is I've a lot of times people throw that word around to me. What white supremacist connotes is this idea that you want white people to like rule over other races like I don't know like the antebellum south or something like to enslave black people or whatever. I have no interest in that quite frankly if I had my way, I would not live near anybody like I mean I have no desire to rule over other peoples I want to. But quite frankly, I want my people to have the right of self-determination and to be left alone. Okay. So in that in that situation, this is where. I think the the lines will be blurred is, let's say, let's say you had your way and let's say there is a section of America. Let's say thirteen states or fifteen states or whatever that is dedicated just a whites-only. When that became overpopulated and that white part of America wanted to. Expand. Its borders. What would happen I mean? You wouldn't just say well I respect that that's the line. That's the because we're segregated I'm not GonNa Cross it, and we wouldn't you try. Then at that point to take the land of people who weren't like you. I mean isn't that what's happening to Europe and America? Now I mean considering the huge population boom and Africa and the massive population and say China right white white people of European, descent and if you want to get into the what is white debate I'm not really interested in that everyone knows what a white person is. But white people make up like ten percent of the world's population. Total. And the only countries that are being flooded with immigrants of a different race are white countries. You don't see massive populations of Europeans going into say tenure, for example, that is viewed as colonization, which is viewed as an evil act by the left. But when it is done in white countries, it's viewed as progressive and diversity. Okay. So back to my point there's no. Okay. So if you want to ask like what like first of all this whole like ethno state thing I know that that was something that Richard Spencer brought up when he first came on the scene. Like. My thing is this. I whatever idea of an ethno state or whatever people have. You'RE NOT GONNA get that in the foreseeable future for one thing politicians don't even talk about white people in a positive light in America today. So the idea that you're going to have like a political platform of okay we're going to split the states up based on race is ridiculous because you know Donald trump the supposed-, White Supremacist Fascist Nazi president that we have or whatever. Right who all of his children are married to. Jews. Which you know somehow makes him a Nazi. I guess. Like even he the most he said about white people was believe early on in his campaign he mentioned the farm murders in South Africa and then I think like a few weeks ago on an interview he mentioned that white people are killed more often by police than black who which is statistically true obviously their arguments about per capita or whatever yeah which is which Is the entire point not something we could just brush off. I. Mean that is the entire point there. There are far more white people in the country which goes without saying that you know but the percentages are much higher if you're black for you to be shot. So that's why that's problematic is it states something that's a technical fact but missing the entire point of the movement. I mean I guess but I also like I gotta be honest there are tons and tons of political. Groups, NGOs advocacy organizations five Oh, one C. threes what have you dedicated to blacks and black interests just like there are plenty of them dedicated to Jews and Jewish interests. Or Indians right both like native American American Indians right and you know Hindu Indians Arabs what you there are no organizations at all that advocate for the interests of white. Americans.

America Gordon America Connor Midwest Donald Trump Africa South Africa Editor China Europe Richard Spencer President Trump
Shenanigans Again

Your Brain on Facts

04:38 min | 3 d ago

Shenanigans Again

"In two, thousand, three Oprah Winfrey used her massive daytime television platform to warn millions of people that teenage girls were attending parties, wearing wild shades of lipstick and performing oral sex on boys. The boy with the most colors of lipstick smudges would win the accolade of his peers. These were called Rainbow Parties. The story was picked up by newspapers television stations across the country parents were panicking. There was one small detail that Oprah missed though. There had not been a single verifiable instance of a Rainbow Party F-. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Parents are naturally worried for their children and it doesn't seem to take much to send them into a tizzy. and. It's not just parents. We as people are pretty prone to overreacting to the first piece of information we receive. Modern media makes the spreading of these new urban legends basically effortless. But false panics and hoaxes are far from a new invention. Always. been with us. Most people know the story surrounding Orson Welles radio play the war of the worlds by H. G. Wells. No relation it was presented in the form of a newscast detailing the invasion of earth by beings from another world clearly bent on our destruction. Listeners thought the broadcast was real. There was mayhem in the streets as as many as a million people fled their homes or armed themselves and made ready to fight off the alien hordes. We know all about the panic that this radio play cost it was in all the papers. Therein lies the problem. Newspapers of the day greatly exaggerated the situation. To begin with not that many people were tuned in to the Mercury Theatre on the air that evening only two percent of households with radios even heard the play. which repeatedly identified itself as such during the performance. Some CBS radio affiliates even cut away from the broadcast in favor of local programming further shrinking the potential audience. Most people were listening instead to the ratings, Juggernaut, ventriloquist at Gergen. I still fail to understand how a ventriloquist act really worked on the radio. If it makes you happy. So. Why then if so few people. and. Fewer still were confused by it did newspapers separately and independently make the situation sound much worse than it was. They were motivated by fear not of aliens but of the radio. The wireless radio was the first real threat to the superiority of the newspaper as the public's primary source of information. Reporters and editors saw this as an opportunity to prove to advertisers and regulators that radio was dangerous irresponsible and not to be trusted. A similar thing happened in. England. Twelve years earlier with a fictitious report that an angry mob of unemployed workers were running amok in London looting and destroying everything in sight. The National Gallery had been ransacked the Savoy hotel blown up. The houses of parliament were being attacked with trench mortars and the Big Ben. Clock, tower had been raised to the ground. Like any good radio play? The narration was accompanied by sound effects. Of Fear Few people did take to the streets, even fleeing past the famous buildings that had been reportedly destroyed while others desperately clogged police phone lines. The BBC tried to ease tensions by reminding people that the report was a comedy skit entitled broadcasting in the barricades. anding their message with London is safe Big Ben is still chiming and all his well. You can't trust the BBC at least we can still rely on armed forces, radio. People fought until nineteen, forty seven. When in May W v TR in Tokyo began to issue a series of bulletins about a twenty foot high monster that had risen from the sea to lay waste to the area. Bullets were useless against this dragon like creature listeners could hear terrified shrieks, people shouting orders over bullhorns, heavy weapons and Massu vehicles rolling

Oprah Winfrey London BBC Rainbow Parties Orson Welles CBS Gergen H. G. Wells England Mercury Theatre Tokyo National Gallery
(Anti)Trust issues and the OnePlus Nord (with Nick Gray of Phandroid)

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

06:09 min | 4 d ago

(Anti)Trust issues and the OnePlus Nord (with Nick Gray of Phandroid)

"Hello everybody and welcome to the pocket weekly podcast hosted by yours truly. Regarded what's going on? This week, we have nick great editor in chief of Android back on the show and the two of US talk about a couple of the main stories to come out outside of devices in the first half of this episode. Mainly, the fact that the four big tech giant their CEO's basically put on trial in front of Congress, and we just give some speculation behind all of the antitrust issues that were brought up. But of course given when this episode was recorded in one, it is coming out. One of our main stories is going to be around the oneplus Nord the next couple of weeks are going to be. Really. Crazy. So if you are listening to this right now and you're not following the pocket now weekly podcast in your favorite podcasting APP, make sure you hit that follow button because a lot of stuff is coming up pretty soon Samsung unpacked is next week and as I'm recording this intro, the Pixel for a has been made official. We don't quite have our units yet We're still working on that, but you can rest assured that both pocket and myself over on my channel we'll have content coming up very soon on the new affordable pixel device. But for now enjoyed this episode between me and Nick Graha Fan droid. I don't understand how you haven't had this setup already for podcasting and whatnot. We've had you on the show a bunch and you only just today to do this. Well I mean we have been podcasting over instagram live so it's not like it's the best setup anyways because you're using a smartphone to record. So have the real camera out now and yes, I don't know if you can hear it in the background, but my laptop is. On overdrive because I have the camera software transmitting to Ob yes, and then s transmitting to are streaming platform now. So my laptop, the fans are like. which which laptop is it just my own curiosity. Why make book thirteen pro Okay hopefully it doesn't like. Yeah. It's you seem fine right now but I've tried doing oh bs on facebook pros before and honestly in just in laptops in general and I've had mixed results. So yeah, I mean this one's the year and a half old. It's the laptop that I do all my four K. video editing on. So we handle four K. video editing I'm hoping it will keep up with this but yeah, it is. Turning away, keeping those fans boosted up not to the Max about middle. I feel like. Since you just. Go. No. Okay. I thought I. saw that my over here stopped going. But I think. Okay. Cool. A little bit of a background thing and this is kind of on a personal note I'm actually really excited because. Half, because of the opportunity that pocket now has provided me but also because I've just been making the effort to move into other categories. You just mentioned laptops. I'm really excited because it looks like all doing some pretty awesome laptops coming up and can't wait because. It's nice to get away from smartphones once in. Awhile. It is it is I. Mean I've done. I haven't done that many laptops. I've done a handful of chromebooks. Pixel. Book. And I have an MSI laptop here that I need to review once we get through this. Wave of smartphones and I have some extra time because as you know there, there is no extra time right now with all the devices that are coming out. Speaking of that. This is not one of our main topics for the show. It's part of our low check in here. I sent you that link right that Google's using the hell out of everybody right now. What is rolling everybody? Yeah. What exactly is this like? That's Latin. Right. That's on the page. Well, it's it's the usual filler text that you have on a dummy website. The our Laura them. And they essentially created a dummy page for an upcoming smartphone but they tweaked the wording just a little bit because there are words that seemed to imply smartphone type. Things like just the in the title there's The low light. Low Light Teneh Cap Kerem megapixel lum long lasting. Is that Vaccari, up yeah. So like in in the link description, you sent me here in Telegram I. If you read that out, that's in the page description. So like they they played a little bit around with it just to. Make It look like they've done a little bit extra effort than just slapping some some fake words in there as dummy place holders but because I. Think, of Pixel for a is coming sometime soon who knows we've been saying that from what? Since quarantine four months since? I I actually wrote an article about two three weeks before. Google before it was cancelled. Saying Google might actually launch it before I o based off of some of the leaks that we were we were seeing and that one turned out to be wrong the Oh, the Hubris of the publication. Gosh. All my gosh. That's why as the one of the reasons why I'm happy where I, I am in my little pocket of Youtube because. I. I don't have to do the rumors and whatnot I know that that's a common portion of Tech U2 is to be like Oh what are we going to look forward to I'm like what the thing is nothing is confirmed. Why would I talk about? What's an unconfirmed? Deals with that on the daily does all members and all that. So I mean I may covers it really well with the pocket now daily and honestly I'm like. Didn't you just cover this yesterday? You've done it like four days in a row. But Hey, there was leaks and news stories for days in a row about features and specifications that are coming up on a new device and on. After awhile you know writing for publication and writing tech media for years now I am so tired about writing leaks and. Rumors and speculation articles because. It's just a repeat of the same story last week with one extra

Google Nick Graha Oneplus Nord Samsung United States CEO Instagram Facebook Congress Editor In Chief Official Youtube Vaccari
Of a Certain Age, with Jim Metzendorf

Mac Power Users

05:02 min | 5 d ago

Of a Certain Age, with Jim Metzendorf

"L. Everyone. This is David sparks joined by my pal and yours Mr Stephen Hackett how's it going Stephen? It's good David it is. It is good. I have to say. That, our guest today really has on my toes. which will get reasons of like it's kind of like when you show up at work like the boss's boss's they're like and you feel like you can't goof off her do anything I'm going to be on my best behavior is what I'm saying that. Well, you know, well, why don't we just welcome to the show Jim Medicine Dorf Jim Nice to have you on the Mac power users summer of fun. The. Show it was so great hanging out with you guys last month that DUB DUB and San Jose. Wrong universe. Hey, guys, thanks for having me I. appreciate it. So for those who who may not know I, need to give a little back story to. With Jim a lot of you probably know Jim he's part of the sort of apple audio community online but when I came on the show now what a year and a half ago I over the editing that was kind of one of the one of my. Sticking points today was like I'll do it but I when I went the edit and I edited it for quite a long time and over time needed to hand it off to somebody else and. Jim is that somebody else will get into this but Jim at, it's a lot of podcast including a lot on relay FM and I'll tell you honestly we didn't get a single comment the week you took over because you are you're better editor than I am first of all, but it was so seamless and you're so good to work with and. That's all great. But you're also like this big MAC nurse we're GONNA get into that today. So that's when I say. I'm on my toes. So I take notes during the show via maybe places where we talk over each other we need to fix something and now gyms just here he here's all that anyways because he edits the show but now he's going to hear them in real time just how bad we are at the sometimes. Yeah. Jim. Is The all hearing ear of the relay network and I was joking with him earlier because when we record the show and I make a mistake, I can't help myself I say sorry Jim every time and we write it down. So there's probably a super cut of MEESANE. Sorry Jam like fifteen minutes long if you put it all together but the other thing that's where it is Jim here's all our shows before they released. So sometimes Jemele text me about something that happened on focus and say how's that going Wait anyway. But Jim is a pro audio engineer and Mac Nerd we talk about audio workflows and video workflows. Today Jim also has some of the things that he does a lot He's got a small business and we're GONNA, talk about that and he's a musician and we Jim and I got on the phone yesterday and we kind of worked out all of our jazz talk. So we knew ca Stephen is going to. Go crazy if I spend the whole episode talking about it but but Jim uses APPs and technology for some of his music too. So we got a lot to cover today. Jim, are you ready strapped in for this? I'm ready. Let's do it. All right. Well, give us a little background Jim, how did you get all this knowledge and get to where you right now? Oh my gosh. Well, I. The first thing to say is I'm. A person of a certain age I'm forty five to be exact. So wait wait wait. person of age. Forty five. Yeah. I used to catch myself doing that I'm not that old why? Why are we doing this to ourselves Jim? You're good. It works for some of us. Just remember what Indiana Jones says though it's not the years it's the mileage. Yeah exactly. So you know I say I'm forty five because I have been using the MAC for an awful long time. Now, at this point I got my first machine in Nineteen ninety-four. Was a quadra eight, forty, eight V. I'll try to go through the the life history of Jim as quickly as I can. So we can get to the stuff that's of use to will listeners hopefully, but I was exposed to audio and video and photography from birth more or less My Dad was a professional photographer. And he was also the recording engineer for a regional symphony where I grew up. Here in Ohio. and. So really at a at a young age, I would go with him to concerts. And by the time I was ten or twelve years old I was helping him. Rap Microphone Cables and. kind of learning. Some of the very, very basics of audio. Through through Osmosis of. Spending time with him while he was doing his thing.

JIM Jim Medicine Dorf Mr Stephen Hackett Engineer David Sparks San Jose MAC Ohio. Indiana Jones Editor Apple
Everybody Do Less

The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

03:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Everybody Do Less

"Rachel Wilkerson Miller, welcome to the struggle bus. Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here I am so thrilled You are a friend of the show. You are one of my best friends in Hawaii. World and you're here to guest co host. Catherine has the week off. And so before we get into it I'm GonNa tell our audience a little bit about you. You know her. You love her Rachel Carson Miller is the deputy editor vice life and the author of two books, DOT journaling a practical guide, which was published in twenty, seventeen and her most recent book, the art of showing up how to be there for yourself and your people which came out in May. And, a big Fan. I'm a big Fan of your writing big Fan of the art of showing up I feel like I've learned a lot about what what it even means to show up. and. We're GonNa talk about that today. but Rachel before we get into the show and I didn't tell you I was going to do this. I didn't know I was going to some very sorry about but. Can you just like talk for a second about like what what is showing up like? How? How do you think about it? How do you define it? and just like. Maybe you're a quick like elevator pitch for like why it's important to think about. Yeah, definitely so I. Say this right mantra that it's one of those things that can be a little bit hard to describe you know when you see it. to me, it starts. Starts really with the active Barron witness to something, and this applies to showing up for other people are showing up for yourself so being an active observer to what's happening around you and like really taking it in, and then naming what you're saying, so running it through the lens of your past experiences in your own life with this person everything you know naming it kind of giving it a sort of starting to make sense of it I think naming his really powerful, and and then reacting accordingly, so if it's a friend, it might means sang them Oh my gosh. I'm so sorry that happened to you. or how are you feeling? If it's something you're going through, it might be a little bit more of like. How am I feeling about this thing that just happened. Which I've now realize wasn't great so some kind of response and the response sometimes is just the. The naming it's realizing a bad thing happened, I just need to sit with that other times. The response is going to be doing some kind of self care or taking action in some way. spent kind of the basics, but I think we kind of recognizing people are showing up for us when they're fully present fully there and I think we know when we're showing up for ourselves to and and when we're not showing up for ourselves. Okay? Well I think that was the episode. Anyone for tuning in. That was awesome. That was such a beautiful elegant, like explanation of what it means to show up, and also like I gotta say man like I. Feel like the struggle bus. Is You know we describe it? As like mental health shown advice show we, we sometimes like struggle with like exactly how to describe it, but I think that like what you just described about talking about how to show for yourself and other people is like kind of the mission of the show and Sal I, Yeah, so I'm. Very excited that you're here. I'm very excited to I. Feel like you get showing up on a deep level. You always have that I. Think is why we're so close in large part so this show the show gets it. The audience gets it. I'm excited.

Rachel Wilkerson Miller Rachel Catherine Rachel Carson Miller Sal I Hawaii Deputy Editor Barron
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

01:33 min | 3 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"It's Monday the fourth of May twenty twenty. I'm lane green. The economists language columnist. Welcome to editor's picks where you can hear three of our favorite articles from the paper. This week they read aloud so you can listen wherever you are. Our cover story looks at what to expect from life after lockdowns and what we're calling a ninety percent economy since China began to ease up. Its factories have become busier and streets are no longer empty but it is missing large chunks of everyday activity across the post lockdown rich world. Life will be tough at least until a vaccine or treatment is found the longer the world has to endure the ninety percent economy. The less likely it is snap back after the pandemic could this radicalize politics faster than ever next a bus stop in Brazil. Where the Justice Minister storms out can cause President Bolster? Nado scofflaw and finally solitude is both a blessing and a curse to timely books. Explore this dichotomy. These stories are just a sample of what's on offer in the economist. This week with a subscription you can read or listen to all of our content to get twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds goto economist dot com slash.

Nado scofflaw Justice Minister editor Brazil China President
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

01:53 min | 4 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"It's Monday the thirtieth of March twenty twenty. I'm Zanny Minton betters. The Economist Editor in chief. Welcome to edit his picks where you can hit three highlights from the paper. This week. They are read aloud so you can listen on the go for the first time. In one hundred and seventy six years we. The economist have been producing the entire newspaper remotely. Throughout the nineteen pandemic our team of journalists remains dedicated to bring you the highest quality news and analysis from around the world. I will cover in Britain and America. This week explains how the role of government has expanded to deal with the virus. It's the most dramatic extension of the state since the Second World War yet. For believers in limited government and open markets Pov- nineteen poses a problem. The state does not always give up all the ground it takes during crises. Our cover in the rest of the world looks at the damage. The disease will due to poor countries where healthcare systems are in no position to comb. It is in rich countries interest to think globally if covy nineteen is left to ravage the emerging world. It will soon spread back to the rich one and finally Corona Vars lockdowns have driven professional and social life out of the physical world and into the Virtual Realm. Videoconferencing will require a whole new etiquette. The stories you are about to hear our justice sample of what's on offer in the paper with a subscription. You can read or listen to all of what we do. So please subscribe go to economists Dot Com Slash Radio. Autho to get your first twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve.

Editor in chief Zanny Minton Corona Vars Britain Autho America
"editor" Discussed on Smart Kitchen Show

Smart Kitchen Show

05:09 min | 4 months ago

"editor" Discussed on Smart Kitchen Show

"To do and I left the house for five for whatever the half hour to go. Get IT AND COME BACK. And it was easy and would do again And you know but this is bigger right like it's in the way a WHO's GonNa go to. What's it going to be going to crowded bars over the next year or you know hugging people are shaking hands? Like everything is just so different and what I want to. I think it's really important to note you know as editor the spoon that we're kind changing things up as well here like we're trying to adapt. I mean I wonder if you could talk a little bit about how we're sort of how the spoon and smart kitchen summit is adapting. You know in the face of all of this. Yeah I mean we're trying to exercise our our muscles around doing online events we had For lack of better word a a a a Webinar last week on the city of cloud kitchens but We are actually trying to do an online event for our Kobe. Nineteen called Kobe. Nineteen virtual summit basically to try and bring people together online and come up with strategies for dealing with all this and so we wanNA help out I think Christie wrote a post last week basis as. We're trying to figure out how to help people and one of the things we think we can do. Is Maybe convene people online and bring experts together. So we're like everyone we're trying to figure it out. We're while we're trying to bring the news. They're also trying to figure out our own business going forward so That I mean I think this may there's actually a lot of speculation whether or not people will get together as much trouble as much business wise and I wonder if some of this this change will be permanent so One of the things. We're trying to figure out. Yeah I mean it's we're we're all trying to do we at the spoon. Just want to be of use to people. We really want to help them. Navigate the news. provide information. That is actionable for them. To figure out how to navigate their business if they are in the food tech world and we want to hear from people. Like how are you doing? What are you doing? What have you changed up if you run a restaurant or a software company or a restaurant company or something? Let us know how you're adapting in what you're doing these are really interesting questions and For other reasons interesting times or what you need like what one of the things that Jenner and I have been well all of us. But we're going to be writing about is like how people are like. Here's how you can support your restaurants. You can buy gift cards. You can take out. You can donate to these relief organizations and it's like okay but say I'm a person with a limited budget which we all are and I don't eat out that often anyway where my dollars be put to the best use So talking to different people to hear their opinions on that and try to figure out like as a restaurant or a Bar. What do you actually need the most? What would be the most helpful I was just GONNA say? I'll echo that with an with a focus on tech. I mean I think and this is not to depreciate anybody's efforts because the the rally the food tech Community is made in response to a lot of this is inspiring truly yes That being said I think in terms of like all the different tech solutions being pushed and free installations and waved fees and things like that It's a lot and I. I think. Businesses restaurants bars Maybe even grocery store is a little bit need to you. Know need really think about what they need in terms of tech stack. They're going to get a lot of stuff thrown at them. Not all of it's going to be beneficial. Some of it will be greatly beneficial and I think it's about helping folks find the solutions that are going to work for their business kind of cut through the noise if you will yes well and I think it's important for people who read the spoon to know that we aren't turning we're pivoting to become the Cova did site but obviously it is the global story right now and it is having a big impact up and down the food stack so that will be driving a lot of our coverage but we were always looking for innovation no matter and not related to the Kobe at all. We'll still be operating that but I think together after this of interest is like how innovation in tech is helping US solve some the current problems. I think those are the stories. We we really wanNA tell and also we're going to continue to write about I actually have three or four stories that have. I've interviewed people for their about new products. I just haven't written yet because it's so busy so I think some of those stories. Those stories will keep coming as well. So but that's really it for today. I want to thank you guys for trying this new platform. It's we'll get some good just workout But it's been a lot of fun senior as faces as we talk and those year listening. I encourage you to go to the spoon dot tech and check out Look for the Koby summoned to sign up for that. That's April sixth event and that'll be a lot of fun It'll be interesting hearing from people who are really smart about doing interesting things out there to try and solve their new. Our new worlds or traversing. So but thanks for getting together and it's been a lot of fun. Yup Yup good all right bye guys but..

Kobe food tech Community editor US Christie Koby Jenner Cova
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

05:36 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"And finally looking through the eyes of options traders. Every stone knows or has board you silly about the third I. It is the imaginary oracular organ. You develop as a side effect of taking hallucinogens. The data from hazy late night discussions in college dorms in the nineteen sixties. Quite clear on this the straitlaced to middle of the road to grasp what is really going on in the world. The third eye allows you to see what they simply cannot. Every investor could use third. I bought there is one who can claim to need it. The most options traders. They have to keep one eye on the most outcome and one eye on each of the best and worst scenarios a lot of the time the middle outcome the average the midpoint. The most common is a good predictor but for some things some of the time the middle lies on shaky ground this is the world in which having options or the right to buy or sell assets at a predetermined price is most valuable. The action that matters is not in the mental but at the fringes to understand. Why imagine you had to bet on the high to the next man to walk into the coffee shop? You are sitting in a good guess would be one point seven five meters. That's five foot nine inches. Which is the average height of an adult male in America? It is likely that you would be wrong but not by a whole lot. Many of the men who could walk in will be close to average height. Very many will be an inch or two below or above it and only very few will be a lot shorter or taller. The middle the average is a good predictor of how something entirely random will turn out a throw of. Two dice is similar. There are thirty six possible pairs of numbers. Some throws more likely than others. There are six ways to throw a seven but only one way to through either a two or a twelve. If you display each possible throw by how often it occurs. It will follow the outline of a special kind of bell curve known as a normal distribution a lot of very different kinds of measures. Iq Exam Scores Height. Also look like this feature is that the values deviate from the average in an ordered way. Two thirds of dice throws twenty four to thirty six within one standard deviation of the average throw I e within a range of five to nine in a normal distribution sixty eight percent about comes within one standard deviation of the average and ninety five percent a with into the standard deviation volatility is a key concept in options trading the vix or volatility index is the best known gauge for it it is the level of volatility derived from the price of options on the S. and P. Five hundred share index put options confer on a buyer the right to sell the index at a specified strike. Price call options confer the right to buy it key. Inputs to the value of an option or expected volatility and the gap between the strike price and the index price. The more violently prices move the more likely the gap between the two will be bridged in which case the opposition pays off if the vix says that implied volatility is fourteen as it does now traders expect an annual standard deviation of fourteen percent in equity prices the level of implied volatility depends on the way to buyers and centers vol sellers in effect supply. Insurance they are betting on the middle that the world will stay regular normal or become more so people active in the options market describe all investment strategies as if they were options trades to buy corporate bonds with low spreads for instance is like selling volatility. You get a low premium and cross your fingers. It doesn't default Vul- buyers in contrast seek insurance. They don't believe the middle they think the world will become more disordered. And sometimes they're right. Asset price is not distributed in his ordered away. As Heidi's extreme events Sanchez market crashes a more frequent. The normal distribution suggest volatility has been remarkably low in stocks bonds and currencies viruses populism trade wars paypal applications and royal bus stops. Nothing seems to move the needle match that no one can sure how long the age of plasticity will last people with squeegee clean. Third is insisted volt must eventually go up. They blame central banks which have relaxed monetary policy whenever markets panic for suppressing volatility. The central bankers have been free to do so because inflation. Their main obsession has gone missing. A revival in inflation will one day force them to stop managing the markets and his the big bet of options buyers. In the meantime the standard investor will keep his too is firmly on the middle. Thanks for listening to editor's to read or listen to the whole of this week's edition. Goto ECONOMY DOT com slash radio offer? I'm Edward McBride in London. This is the economist..

Edward McBride America editor Heidi London
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

04:46 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"And finally what should lawmakers around the world do about puberty blockers. A rising number of God's wish to be boys and boys wish to be gauze and a rising number of them are taking drugs to block puberty. In Britain cases of children being treated for gender dysphoric by the National Health Service remain rare but in the past decade they have climbed at rate of fifty eighty percent year on year in America the number of gender clinic streaming children has increased from just one into thousand seven to perhaps fifty today day this has bothered lawmakers in America several states swan to ban giving puberty blocking drugs to children. In Britain the High Court take considering the judicial review of the clinic which complainants believe has been handing out puberty blockers to freely the use of such drugs. Eggs raises thorny questions about who decides what can happen to a child's body and why put aside the culture wars. If you can Dan this debate. Should we settled in the interests of the child yet. Those can be very hard to discern puberty blockers prevent adolescence from uh-huh developing secondary sexual characteristics like breasts or a bid. They almost always set off a cascade of interventions that involve of cross sex hormones and later may also include gender reassignment surgery. The main purpose of puberty blockers is to bring comfort to people with gender the dysphoric by spanning them the experience of say becoming more like a woman if a girl who wishes to be a boy the also make most future surgery surgery less severe however the combination of puberty blockers in cross sex hormones also leads to irreversible changes which if they start early in puberty includes steadily about a dozen studies of gender dysphoric children who did not take puberty blockers have found that most most of them if supported by counseling are happy with their sex once they emerged from puberty share often cited these eighty five percent and many of them turn out to be gay. One sign that something is wrong. Is that more. People are D- transitioning re identifying with their biological logical sex most of them are gauze who wanted to be boys when they were in their teens. If they took puberty blockers then then cross sex hormones early they would be sterile for life even if they did not have hysterectomies as of now there is no way to distinguish the fifteen percent or so of children children who will transition successfully from the eighty five percent who might have been happy with the gender of their but if they had received counseling alone some claim aimed withholding puberty blockers and to the burden on while notable children with gender dysphoric and may lead to higher rates of suicide. Choosing whom home to treat is a judgment of Solomon. The decision to intervene is made harder. My reckless disregard for data the academic studies purporting to shoulder higher suicide risk. Among Trans Children are unconvincing clinics. Do not publish enough studies on the effects of various treatments on their patients. Too Two little research compares children who have had treatment with those who have not the field needs a better understanding of the long term effects of puberty blockers and cross sex hormones. Every child who is treated should be enrolled in a long term. Follow up study. This should be with that informed consent. Send but sore. Should the treatment itself today. Children and parents are not always fully informed about the potentially grave consequences of starting on puberty. He blockers defects are often described as largely reversible and the effects of cross sex hormones that are almost always taken with them are not to ban puberty blockers in all circumstances would be unjustified. Not only would it be harsh on some children but it would also leave the issue permanently obscured skewered for lack of new research. However today's rush into treatment smacks of a fad? Many adolescence feel unhappy with the way they were made. Transitioning positioning will be solace for some but for others. It will be a dreadful mistake. Thanks for listening to editor's picks to read or listen into the whole of this week's edition go to economists dot com slash radio. I'm Jay Z.. Delap and in London this is the economist..

Britain America High Court Jay Z Solomon swan Dan editor National Health Service Delap London
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"It's a better place <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Next week on the show <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the reason <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this is called <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the catch and kill <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> untangle the alliance dance <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> between the National <Speech_Music_Male> Enquirer <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Donald Trump. <Speech_Music_Female> You know he <Speech_Female> was starstruck and <Speech_Female> he loved celebrities <Speech_Female> so of course trump <Speech_Female> is going to meet <Speech_Female> someone like <Speech_Female> Pecker who is is <Speech_Music_Female> desperate <SpeakerChange> for celebrity <Speech_Music_Female> and fame <Speech_Music_Female> and power. <Speech_Female> And it's you know it's <Speech_Female> a bromance maiden <Speech_Female> hell <Speech_Music_Female> heaven <SpeakerChange> whatever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the catch and kill. PODCAST <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production of Pineapple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Street studios <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and meet <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ronan Farrow. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's produced <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Sophie. Bridges <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sharona on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Geno Pifer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and generally <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our senior your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producer. Is Eric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Mental <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editing by Joel Level <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and excellent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ski <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pineapples Executive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Producers Genoa's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Berman and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Max Linski <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> music in this episode search <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for a blue dot <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sessions. I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> calm and marmoset <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special takes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this week to read <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> black at Vinegar Hill. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sound in Brooklyn <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and John <Speech_Male> Covari at <Music> <Advertisement> Literati audio. You <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all based on reporting. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I did for my book <Speech_Music_Male> catch and kill <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> available where you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> buy your books <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and as an audiobook. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for listening <Speech_Music_Male> We'll be <SpeakerChange> back next <Music> week

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

06:22 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Eventually we'd learn just how far Weinstein had gone to try to stop the disclosure of the allegations against him including hiring private spies from an Israeli firm called black cube to track journalists and sources black at cube. I mean you gotta be kidding I it sounds like something invented by Ian Fleming which on the cabaret that was another holy shit moment. I was Astonished that it went that far and again in the early stages of that reporting there was was a question of like really. Do we really have this. Is this for real. Initially sources close to the Black Cube operation tried to deny that the most intrusive of the activity including the use of agents with false identities had happened then. Documents from an unnamed source started rolling in including signed contracts confirming firming. It was all true. I mean it was really exciting. Suddenly this spy thriller where it wasn't before I think we all had to take some deep breaths every now and then because because these were explosive it's And we had to maintain a skepticism about. Are they real are we being played. Is this part of the whole game. You start to get paranoid and appropriately paranoid but you. You don't know if someone's feeding you documents that are intentionally misleading in order to trick you into tip publishing something that later turns out to be incorrect. It was another challenge for Ferguson. The fact checking department we used a forensic firm to analyze the documents eventually the parties involved including the attorney who had signed them confirmed their authenticity when we were able to verify them. That was quite extraordinary ordinary thing. I remember you having told me when you were doing the reporting on the Weinstein story that you were nervous that there were guys waiting outside in your apartment and then after the fact realizing Holy Shit that was really real it was actually real was there was they actually sent somebody to and to Stalk Ronin And again that's when I get you know A defensive and angry and you know tightness in the chest thinking what the fuck don't like. WHO's doing this? And why would you do this to my reporter with unbelievable. The whole thing was unbelievable And and but it it it made Those precautions that we'd taken seem even much too minor and much too small. What made clear that there were sort of no lengths to which he or the people working for him wouldn't go in a lot of ways as this story? The extreme tactics used to suppress it the years and years it stayed buried. It's all a sobering reminder of the obstacles else arrayed against the free press but it's also a reminder of the people who stand up to defend the truth the lawyer who didn't kill the story. I've never been asked to do something unethical. I'd like to believe I would walk out if someone asked me to do something I thought was unethical. I believe I would as is a lawyer. You should be willing always to walk out the door and I just hope as people look at this story they'll realize that Lawyers were instrumental in and burying the Truth and shutting people up and intimidating people and they were also when I say I really mean Fabio Bertoni instrumental and making sure that the truth could see the light of day. Yeah and again. I can only do that because there we do in the. US have a robust First Amendment and we have a lot of case law that provides protections for the president invent any of that. I'm just here to make use of it. But it's the First Amendment there for if you're not gonNA use music and the fact checkers who we need more of everywhere I think actually about fact checking being something that can come out the idea of fake news A UH of distrust of the media. I just wanted to shout out. Fact checking in the context of this larger project that is making a magazine and all of the I I feel fact. Checkers have gotten more attention. In the trump era for obvious reasons. But you know. Copy Editors Art Directors Session People Right the social media language. All of those steps are so that was Angela and making a story like this work. And of course the editors people have the have the worst. It's image of journalists. You know in a long time. I I think it's fair to say that. The the popularity ratings of journalism in general Enron not exactly soaring. Maybe they don't even reach the the numbers of members of Congress. I think this is an essential the moment a really important moment. Investigative reporting in this period in the trump period has shown itself to be incredibly healthy and incredibly essential essential to all kinds of realms of life takes a lot of time and it takes a lot of guts to come out with a story very like this and unfortunately there as journalism is you know dwindling in the way of profession. There aren't that many outlets that have have those things that have the resources the time and the guts to do that. And that's a really sorry thing for our society as a whole you recently had a daughter. What will you tell her someday about all of this? Gosh I don't know I'm just excited for her to speak in full sentences be patient. You know we're several years out from the beginning of Me Too for more than three years out from when this story broke and I feel that our conversation conversation around all of these issues is still evolving And I'll be curious to see sort of where we are in in fifteen years when and I'm talking to her about it and I'm not sure what that conversation will be like because I think it will depend where the world is then and I hope.

Weinstein Ian Fleming Enron Fabio Bertoni US Ferguson reporter attorney Congress Angela president
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"At ten forty seven. AM We publish. I think we really weren't weren't sure how the world was going to react. The New Yorker releasing its ten month long investigation which includes an audio recording of an encounter between model Umbra Gutierrez and Weinstein spent a lot of the day. Just trying to sort of monitor the reaction and see what readers thought and and you know hear from you how the women who are in reacted and I was just amazed at both how positive visited the reactions of the services. Were and how quickly it sort of blew up. People around the world are coming forward on social media. Yeah to share their stories of sexual abuse their inspired by the many women who have accused movie mogul Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and worse. Dominos started good at falling of of other women. Coming forward of people who had had stated Thailand condemning. Weinstein coming out and saying this is off off. But what's really chilling is to read further down. Where more than a dozen staff members say they need a witness these incidents or knew of them of you know criminal precedings Our investigations launching that it blossomed into something much much bigger much faster than I think we ever could have. Expected said it was surreal. What Ronan Farrow has written for the New Yorker pushes the story even further and makes the open secret nature of this alleged behavior? All the more unfathomable. I was feeling very amped up about what it is to exist as a woman in this particular moment. What do you remember about publication day relief relief?.

Harvey Weinstein Ronan Farrow Umbra Gutierrez Dominos Thailand harassment
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:47 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Do you guys remember the night before the story published We still had to do in the morning so we didn't. I feel like it was in the morning. We push the button hopefully in the morning. We've we've got a few times that the grim task of counting up the different different kinds of sexual assault and how we go the numbers right in there any of them overlapping and we counting. Anyone twice right you were double and triple checking things all through saying go away Liba Selena on till then that's probably right. Still checking the day we published I stayed at the office until three or four. Am and then. And I came back before dawn and watch on sort of come up over the Statue of Liberty and the tip of Lower Manhattan which I could see for my office and just was waiting for the final copy at it to come back before we pressed publish. It was a sort of calm before the storm. They're reporting never really stopped about an hour before we plan to publish one more source agreed to go on the record at about ten forty five. We all gathered around a computer. You're I know there was this moment where they were about to push the button to publish it on the web and you wanted to have everyone over at a group shot you and the checkers checkers and maybe diaspora got together for a little snapshot. Whatever the hell it's called for your car and your phone now picture? Quick fact check. It's it's called a selfie and I kind of broke it up and I said No no no not doing that. No no congratulated relation. No no high fives.

Liba Selena Statue of Liberty Lower Manhattan assault
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

08:34 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"I was super calm. Yeah you were really nervous you. You're nervous and floating out in nowheres Ville with a story and you could tell that you were you. Were really pitching hard. And and the relentlessness in your desire to to get the facts out there and tell all this everything that was in there and to make sure that we were absorbing it sound exhausting you a little exotic and of course yes I remember you playing us the recording And outlining the reporting that you had which seemed significant. That's the recording of Weinstein Weinstein appearing to admit to a sexual assault during a twenty fifteen police sting operation. You've heard it a few times on the show I had played the tape at NBC. You were executive. Seemed at best ambivalent about it Deirdre had a different reaction. I felt you know how it would be to be in a hallway alone with him not in contact with the police who were supposed to be you know intervening When it got to this point and how scared she must have been and then on of course? There was the admission but I felt at the whole tape was really powerful. I thought that it was a story that needed to get out and there was material material. They're already. That was strong enough that the world should see at the time. I was still fighting to get the story on Air Right. NBC David made it clear that if I lost that fight he was interested The the notion that you didn't have a story coming through the doors nonsense but he. He didn't make any commitments. That day. I left the New Yorkers offices with a maybe an an offer to stay in touch with Deirdre and you are in a sensitive position at that point because we hadn't during let the story so you weren't under contract. It was an uncertain time for the reporting soon after that meeting. NBC finally Said said. They didn't want to be associated with the story in any way and Weinstein and his intermediaries were beginning to threaten legal action saying they knew I no longer have the protection of news organization. Do you weren't yet one of our writers officially so you Weren't kind of under the magazines legal cover yet And and I think that that left you very Alone in the world more women were still going on the record and I didn't know whether to cancel those interviews to. I had a news outlet. That would protect me. I call Deirdre News that up that one interview and you weren't sure whether to go out and do it and I told you not to cancel let to go out and do it then. She did something unusual. I wasn't associated with the magazine yet. But she called the New Yorkers General Counsel Anyway to see if talk to me that would be Fabio. BERTONI got a call from an editor at the New Yorker. Who Says Ronin GONNA call you in a minute? He needs some help I wanted to be a journalist and I went to Journalism school and I did a dual degree with the law school. Because I thought the law would help my journalism. When I was still a law student I did some clinics where it represented people in Housing Court and I stopped someone from getting addicted did had sort of that immediate instant gratification and it was sort of like a mainline drug like I did this thing in the world and it mattered in someone's life and And that really for me was the power being a lawyer. You wanted to help and I want to well. I wanted to to help people But they don't want to make myself out to be a sane it was. I'll do that for us. Worry about it after law. School Phobia worked did a few firms and then add American lawyer magazine articles. The bulk of my job is reading articles prior to publication in determining if there are legal legal risks and how best to support the journalism to make sure that We don't expose ourselves to unnecessary legal risk if we get sued. What would be our defenses of course in August twenty seventeen? It wasn't Fabio's responsibility to do any of that analysis for the Weinstein Story. He called me anyway. I made it clear you in that conversation. I don't represent you at this point. I'm looking for the magazine and Not your lawyer but If I were this these are the issues that I would advise you to be concerned about and these are the issues that are advising to worry so much about and it made such a huge difference in my life and in the life of the story that you agreed to get on the phone because I was paralyzed by the pressures pressures of all of these legal threats coming at me. I'm glad to hear that you were in this position. Where you didn't have an institution behind you and and there's a lot of reporters that don't and and if if I'm an institution as a lawyer and I'm able to use use the power that institution to protect journalist? Who's doing important work? Then you know what else is the institution for but to but to do that. Fabio you said he thought going ahead with the pending interviews was worth the risk people threaten prior to publication but they're unlikely to sue prior to publication because a lawsuit would republic and they would be publicizing the very facts that they want to keep confidential. You know I felt strongly that they're not going to sue you and expose this whole story. I had sat in rooms with these NBC executives. And even the lawyers Sue Kim Harrison Susan Weiner and heard them repair Eric Weinstein's argument on this. You know if you're interviewing people who have nondisclosure agreements that could expose a stall of this legal jeopardy I mean I thought then that it Selena Lina thing. If it's proven to be a silly argument both Fabio and Deirdre had the same message you never stop reporting and Weinstein acting the way he was acting going through all these intermediaries In this threatening manner only made it clearer that there was fire there was all this smoke And that he was he was scared of what you had. I did keep reporting and staying super. Chill with Deirdre. I've never had a reporter call me as many times a day as you did. I apologize for that. It was an intense time. It wasn't tenth on August twenty fifth. I sent in a draft version of the story and on September v I went to the New Yorker offices to hear their final decision. You came in and you did seem a little desperate the word you were pitching you were pitching a story And you were pitching us at a facts and you were making making a case for your journalism. There was nothing that that was going to be able to talk you. Out of your completely understandable nervous state. He puts you at ease while at the same time. Asking really tough questions and there were questions I wanted. We know the answers to to. We have grilled you on a on a bunch of those issues. What are the foundational elements? Here what are the facts. What do we have have? What what do we know for sure in you? Had there's been a lot of public discussion about what I had when the New Yorker took on the story. NBC has repeatedly claimed that no women were willing to go on the record that that only happened after the magazine came on board. I was very aware uh of the on the record off the record issue because when Ken Oletta tried to do the story In two thousand fifteen. We didn't have people on the record so When you walked in the door with people on the record I felt like okay? Let's go this is this is it from the Gecko the Gecko from day one with the New Yorker This was a story that that was defensible. What do you make of media outlet pushing the the narrative that there were no names in that story when you saw the there were? I can't fathom it I don't know I don't know I. I don't know.

Deirdre News NBC Eric Weinstein Weinstein Weinstein Fabio Weinstein Story nowheres Ville American lawyer magazine assault executive Sue Kim Harrison Susan Weiner Ken Oletta Housing Court BERTONI David General Counsel
"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"What would the boss do? Either way boss would choose Hilton hotels and resorts to get down to business and the little pleasure checkout Hilton hotels and resorts and travel like the boss. This is Recode media from the vox media podcast network. I'm Lydia poll green in for Peter Kafka. I'm the editor in chief of huffpost, but I'm here at the vox media studios today in New York City because this is Peter show. I will tell you what he always says. Tell someone else about this show tweet about it or post about it on Facebook or just tell someone in person today. I'm really excited to be in the studio with Redick Jones. The editor in chief of Vanity. Fair for Deka. Welcome to Recode media. Thank you. Lydia. It's great to be here. So you have been the editor of Vanity Fair for how long now? It's been about nine months, nine months, long enough to make a baby. Does it feel like a baby has been born? I almost wish you could go into hiding for nine months and then come out with the baby. That thing about the thing about Vanity Fair is we're, you know, we're publishing hourly and republishing monthly, and you know how it is. So all of. The baby making is done, kind of, you know, every moment, but it has been great to start to cycle through this first year and kind of get an understanding. We cover so many with these core areas of coverage, Washington, Silicon Valley, Hollywood and Wall Street and celebrity culture also in general. And so I feel like over the course of the year just because of certain events like the Oscars, and also just because of the natural ebbs and flows of the news cycle, not that the f. so much anymore. You know you, you start to get a feel for the rhythms of the job. And so nine months in is a lot better than six months in which is love better than three months. So you took over this job from a one of the best known magazine editors out there? Graydon Carter a celebrity in his own, right? What's it like stepping into a role as yourself following someone who's a larger than life personality? Not that I personally have any experience with this having followed Arianna huffing. Even at at a huffpost. I think the thing that I try to be very clear about in my own mind from the beginning was that there was no way that I could replace Graydon Carter. He is still walking among us for one for one thing, and he's an incredibly iconic and creative and innovative editor. And I think that with these jobs, you have to just have confidence that you make the job your own. The brand has existed for a long time. Tina Brown was the editor before grading, and she too was icon. And so I thought a lot about tina's vanity Farren and I spent time looking at the archives and thinking about wh- what is the vendor Graham between the editor sensibility and the identity of the brand? And I think that's really the challenge for me is not, you know, do I imitate, Tina? Do I imitate Graydon? I could try to do those things for very long time and I would fail utterly because because imitating is not how you succeed in these roles. So for me, it was more about trying to figure out. What I could add to this brand to make it special in my own way. You mentioned Tina Brown. And I think I read that that you read her diaries, which I think was one of the most delicious reads, I devoured it basically in one sitting on a flight to India and one of the things that struck me in reading that book was just how different the media world is. Now, are you going to those kinds of parties that she goes to? Are you running the business in this kind of big ticket way that she was running in sort of women in the arena. I loved reading that book and I had an early copy because I was the New York Times..

Tina Brown Graydon Carter huffpost Vanity Fair editor in chief vox media Peter Kafka Lydia vox media studios Hilton Facebook New York City Redick Jones New York Times Deka editor Washington Arianna India Farren
"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Whatever about x. can you make these things theoretically key arm's length distance from it, or you actually say, we would like to create something. Can our people go out and find a sponsor for we won't make it if that happens, it's a newer version of that, or do you do either of those the ladder? For sure. I mean, I think that's like a normal sold built if sold and just making sponsor bowl products to me. That's. What it is and on the events side. Obviously with the vents, it's it's a little bit different, but not that much different. So let's pull back. You went to digital may seven and a half ago. I almost cut the math right prior to that you were at at week had wake you as a reporter. Yeah, I was digital editor, but that was I didn't edit anyone. So I, I've covered the industry for, you know, a long time, I guess. And I was at ad week for about six years. I think it was and I was looking for something new to do. Have you done anything that wasn't covering the business of digital media? I was a researcher for speechwriting firm in Washington DC for two unhappy years. Directly out of your link, did it says White House something, but it today you worked at the White House now? It didn't, but we really enough one time because of that Omarosa added me on Lincoln. She thought I, I think, worked at the White House. Have you tried any treadmills? No, I went back to find it and I think she like, I don't know what you unframed someone a Lincoln. I just I just got us Frank request from the woman who sings the song about Havana. It's a little rant. I don't what's whatever the, that's all. I think your name is Maria something and I assumed it was a BS thing, but I looked at it actually is her account. I don't know why that's linked in, but I know that was Facebook how Facebook, sorry, so well, that can be face. She went from ad week to digitally as I recall digital was, I mean, we polite a second or third to your industry trade well was mostly an events company, right? I mean, so Nick freeze our founder started digital about ten years ago, no funding just zone savings. And I think he took an early withdrawal and a 401K not to be recommended, but he started it with events because you know, as you know, to build media from from scratch is really hard because you need an audience before you can get advertising events is are difficult, but it's it's easier on the business side. You can, you know, he filled a room with about fifty publishers. I think it was who were trying to figure out how to make money. She, I find a lot of people look at vents and go. That looks great that they take a look at it go, oh, this is way horror the digital publishing digital publishing. I put something on the web or wherever the canvas is, and I. Made it once and then I can resell it as many times I want and sell ads against. My costs are super fixed and my, you know, I can't get into too much trouble. Whereas at the very basics rate, renting a room. Guy, right? You're already in the whole bunch and maybe no one shows up. It's a disaster. I think a lot of media companies are finding that now as they've sort of pivoted to events since advertising has become less attractive as the main part of your revenue model. And actually I joined Nick and I talked about about, you know, he always wanted to build it into a media brand, but you know, events were the basis of, and I thought it was really attractive actually to use the events as the basis of immediate company rather than usually it's the opposite right around and actually that was because of all things day, because what do we, what do we do? Well, no, because I think what what you guys were doing within within News Corp at the time was really interesting in that the events were a platform that was being used to power the brand, you know. And so not only is a really good economic model, but I think it pr-..

White House Omarosa Nick Facebook News Corp reporter editor Washington researcher Maria Lincoln Havana Frank founder six years ten years 401K
"editor" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"I love it you've been spree lately for your hawaii of shanon okay i read an article about why women don't write letters to the editor oh just men do now tons and tons of men gosh write letters to the editor have you ever written a letter to the editor of anything yes the crossword book member when i thought errors that is so yes i have right and they never respond career they pass this along pass it along to the people editing to no one has to put it in our very important file trash can labelled very important filed six where they put it did you when you did that did you feel like i'm doing a good thing here no i felt like i'm definitely going to get a free crossword puzzle that's right imagine something all that i'm doing basically your job you should have said specifically and i would like if i were man i would've right i know so what are they saying in their letters to the editor okay this is what's great so file this under duh in terms of like wise women don't write letters editor they call it the confidence gap we all know about this where they did a study where you were given a science quiz and before the quiz you were supposed to assess how good you are in that subject matter and women consistently said they were worse than the ended up actually being and menton they either did it correctly or overstated their proficiency in scientists refers.

editor
"editor" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Do you become a good writer first and then a good editor do you have or or can you do it the other way around for for people who want to develop an eye for editing suppose which is also very very closely related to rewriting juvenille recommendations there any any books or classes or writers you would pay attention to perhaps to people who are listening to say you know what i really want to develop a keener eye as a writer slash editor yeah so a couple of things that i think are useful are for okay i to how to be like get a better sense of style and structure so one of the things that i was really important to me is that i found the writers i really loved and i just read their stuff out loud like that's sort of forces a low concentration attention pros i remember of go through the pieces of this writer katherine boo hoo new yorker my thought was maybe the best around and i would just read her pieces out loud what was her name again what you katherine boo how do you spell them the o other yom and a lot of pieces about poverty her last book was about india she doesn't right ton but which he writes extraordinaire but you can also do it with california or you can go back and do it with john mcphee could go and do it with from louis whoever your favorite your favorite writer or stylist or even just a piece that you loved you know we've had all kinds of teachers in wire.

writer editor california john mcphee katherine
"editor" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Do you become a good writer first and then a good editor do you have or or can you do it the other way around for for people who want to develop an eye for editing suppose which is also very very closely related to rewriting juvenille recommendations there any any books or classes or writers you would pay attention to perhaps to people who are listening to say you know what i really want to develop a keener eye as a writer slash editor yeah so a couple of things that i think are useful are for okay i to how to be like get a better sense of style and structure so one of the things that i was really important to me is that i found the writers i really loved and i just read their stuff out loud like that's sort of forces a low concentration attention pros i remember of go through the pieces of this writer katherine boo hoo new yorker my thought was maybe the best around and i would just read her pieces out loud what was her name again what you katherine boo how do you spell them the o other yom and a lot of pieces about poverty her last book was about india she doesn't right ton but which he writes extraordinaire but you can also do it with california or you can go back and do it with john mcphee could go and do it with from louis whoever your favorite your favorite writer or stylist or even just a piece that you loved you know we've had all kinds of teachers in wire.

writer editor california john mcphee katherine
"editor" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Copy editor or two were actually reading the documents uh making up their mind uh what story to run what story could they get into shape to run that night and in the other room we had the lawyers and the representatives of the owners and uh a couple of uh editor's uh from the editorial page and i shall shuttled between the two will trying to make up uh a my mind and and learn the content and then trying to steer the conversation uh to the verdict i wanted there was no point in trying to say we've got to do it and threatening to quit because then if you even if you won that you'd win it uh would leaving a great scars and wounds in in uh personal relationship so we have to do it uh sort of gently listened to everybody and listen to their arguments and a try to understand them and then try to counter them he said the decision to publish the pentagon papers made all other difficult decisions easy at the washington post how well because we turned out to have been right mmhmm and the supreme court agreed with us that we had the right to publish um and um i think uh uh i mean i'm speaking for for katharine graham but i think she felt that uh we had given a good advice we'd asked her to do what turned out to be the right thing uh and uh so to publish are not to publish never became an issue she trusted our judgment in these things and made sometimes you may have held our breath but uh she thought that uh these people are really serious about journalism serious about a principle and not reckless it the thrive on making these complicated decisions over these like meelak's moments for you d reaching medicine chest that region for the medicine is wonderful equality of journalism it if you make a mistake it's out there for everybody to see he added stays there and you know it goes right bang into the history books in its a there are no no no no no device that you can race a daily newspaper.

Copy editor editor supreme court katharine graham meelak daily newspaper pentagon washington
"editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

Mag Heroes

01:31 min | 6 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

"Um but you as as i said before it's it's nice to be able to just jump in an an editor things having said that the the prince you know the the the the full met the prince format is is nice because it is so permanent and so now i look at my shelving this almost ten issues on my shelf and there's little things that are wrong with within this little little mistakes made but it is what it is and i'm i'm sort of proud of low on at least have something to look back on on with all the stuff that have done over the last ten uses weapons on there's not much left sir on really look at stuff that i've of than ten years ago unless you know there's a sorry of official file that i can open if it if it other than visual because there's another ten vision come out since then um yeah it's it's it's nice you just have have something uh have a record of what you thought of you stand even if it is perfect with khan really there's also notice no one point where it is perfect authorities it is done on you know it's ever it's every ending so whatever if you work in a team if you do website for a klein that has the internal work design will ripped evolving team you deliberate design and two weeks later overlooks different end two months later might be completely different to what you design because they changed it according to what the use of steps use us that some the the the athletics tools on tell them.

klein editor official khan athletics two months ten years two weeks