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"eastside vancouver" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

08:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"eastside vancouver" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Many are dying British. Columbia's chief coroner says pandemic isolation is helping to fuel a record number of overdose deaths in her province as government inaction money for nothing Ontario Securities Commission, says a bitcoin trading house that once seemed like the future of finance was little more than a plain old fraud that leaves our guest with little hope of recovering life savings in the zone protesters in Seattle have staked out and a ton of Zone that's operating largely without police, and if you believe protesters outside any top down civic structures well. Well as city councillor explains why they've got her support. As the pressure mounts to knock troubling statues off their pedestals, Scotland's first black professor tells us he's not in favor of the trend this stuff of dreams. Italian neurosurgeons operate on a patient. Meanwhile, the patient patiently works away crafting. Green Olives stuffed with ham and fried breadcrumbs and spitting distance from the archives interviews with people who fired things out of their mouths farther than you might think possible given their success. You'd have been smart to put your money where their mouths were. Not your body because some of them were spitting crickets as it happens. The Friday edition radio that expect to rates the unexpected. In British Colombia, one hundred sixty seven people have died of covid nineteen. The province has been praised for its handling of the outbreak, but on another public health crisis. The numbers aren't anywhere near as good. In the month of May alone, there were one hundred seventy suspected illicit drug deaths NBC. It's the highest monthly total recorded the overdose. Deaths statistics were released yesterday by the BBC coroners. Service Lisa. The point is the province's chief coroner. We reached her in Victoria. Point! How did the month of May become the worst ever for illicit drug deaths in your province? Well, it's tragic. The numbers are so disappointing so sad, and of course the numbers we saw a hundred and seventy deaths. Do listen substance he's in May represent one hundred and seventy people who were much loved by their families, and their friends, and their colleagues, and we don't lose sight of that. Because we as coroners, we work with those families, and we see those families every day, and the heartbreak that this province has experienced as a result of the. Overdose crisis has been immense. And? Can you just give us a better sense of who the people are? Who have died of these overdoses in British Columbia? Yes, so primarily it's men in their twenties, thirties forties primarily dying alone. That is one of the most significant factors so they are. found some time later by family or or a friend who are concerned about their welfare. We don't they come from. From all walks of life, so you know we we know there is a common misperception that it's only the downtown eastside Vancouver, but in fact we have people dying in all of our communities from the rural communities that urban communities from professional occupations to healthcare occupations to those labor fields and and the unemployed. It's just a cross section of people who are dying from this illness. Going to get a sense of what may have contributed to this end one of the things that you have cited is the the extreme concentrations of Feno that this toxic city of the drugs that you have fountain people systems. How do you account for that? Yes that's one of the things that we've noticed. Most recently is the fennel. certainly is more toxic and one of the reasons or speculating supply chain disruption, due to the pandemic of course in the closing of international borders and international travel, and we know that local supply has kicked in, and there is no shortage of sentinel available illicit Fenton I should add available, and the production of that of course is quite hit or miss not necessarily very scientific in and not in regulated labs of course. And there's no quality control in production of illicit substances, and so we feel that plays a significant role particularly. Spike in a community where four or five people dying within a short period of time, or we recently saw three deaths at the same time in the same location. But! We also feel that the you know the role of US social isolating of necessity to prevent a desk, due to Kobe nineteen has played a role where. People are alone and more and more people alone and using substances alone, so we feel that place a fairly significant role as well. What are the other reasons why the the way we're dealing with covid nineteen may have contributed to these deaths, some of the measures that were implemented to address the overdose crisis in NBC. So the provision of the lock zone, the overdose prevention centers supervised consumption sites. They've villa. Ability of those places has been diminished due to some of the impacts of the pandemic, so really for those. People who who need substances which are already dangerously difficult to get. It has really only exacerbated their situation. have any of the deaths happened at the the the safe consumption sites? No we have never had a death NBC and overdose. Prevention site are safe consumption site There are overdoses at those sites of course but. The the safety factor is that staff are there to immediately provide support call nine one one get folks medical assistance. So. Those certainly work and then the extensive availability of no lock zone in this province has also certainly worked but again during this time for those who need it not as easily accessed, you know shorter hours less staff at at at the place of Support which is understandable and again really comes down to safe supply. That's the PLIVA illicit substances is not safe and. We need to ensure safe supply for those folks who need stuff. You have said that you think that the federal government needs to step up and take very bold action in order to deal with is what does it. Did you want the federal government to do? So I can't help but draw the parallel. In BC, the overdose epidemic is a public health emergency was declared in two thousand sixteen, and of course, the covid nineteen pandemic is also a public health emergency and the The response is of course response to the pandemic with immediate compassionate certainly in this province for sure very compassionate, education testing providing healthcare for who need it and would be so wonderful if we saw the same response for those in our community who suffer with problematic since you star experience, problematic substance use they ability for widespread safe testing, compassionate response support where they need it. eliminating all of the stigma associated with criminalization so. Whether certainly a lot of compassion demonstrated by our leaders, the action that that needs to follow is decriminalizing these substances removing the stigma treating this as a medical issue, which it most certainly is. How do the deaths from the drug? Overdoses compare with deaths from covid nineteen in your comments. So absolutely far more I'd have due to substance use. This province has seen thousands.

NBC Overdose federal government Ontario Securities Commission Seattle professor Scotland Columbia BBC Victoria fraud British Columbia British Colombia Vancouver Lisa US BC PLIVA
"eastside vancouver" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

08:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"eastside vancouver" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Many are dying British Columbia's chief coroner says pandemic isolation is helping to fuel a record number of overdose deaths in her province as government inaction money for nothing. Ontario Securities Commission says a Bitcoin. Trading House that once seemed like the future of finance was little more than a plain old fraud that leaves our guest with little hope of recovering life savings in the zone. Protesters in Seattle have staked out and a ton of zone. That's operating largely without police, and if you believe protesters outside any top down civic structures well. Well as city councillor explains why they've got her support. As the pressure mounts to knock troubling statues off their pedestals Scotland's first black professor tells us he's not in favor of the trend this stuff of dreams. Italian neurosurgeons operate on a patient. Meanwhile, the patient patiently works away crafting green. Olives stuffed with Ham and fried breadcrumbs and spitting distance from the archives interviews with people who fired things out of their mouths farther than you might think possible given their success. You'd have been smart to put your money where their mouths were. Not your body because some of them were spitting crickets as it happens, the Friday edition radio that expect to rates the unexpected. In British Colombia one hundred sixty seven people have died of covid nineteen. The province has been praised for its handling of the outbreak, but on another public health crisis. The numbers aren't anywhere near as good in the month of May alone. There were one hundred seventy suspected illicit drug deaths. NBC. It's the highest monthly total ever recorded the overdose. Deaths statistics were released yesterday by the BBC coroners. Service Lisa the point is the province's chief coroner. We reached her in Victoria. Point. How did the month of May become the worst ever for illicit drug deaths in your province? Well It's tragic. The numbers are so disappointing so sad, and of course the numbers we saw a hundred and seventy deaths. Do listen substance. He's in May. represent one hundred and seventy people who were much loved by their families, and their friends, and their colleagues, and we don't lose sight of that. Because we as coroners, we work with those families, and we see those families every day, and the heartbreak that this province has experienced as a result of the. Overdose crisis has been immense. And can you just give us a better sense of who the people are? Who have died of these overdoses in British Columbia? Yes, so primarily. It's men in their twenties, thirties forties primarily dying alone. That is one of the most significant factors so they are. found some time later by family or or a friend who are concerned about their welfare. We don't they come from. From all walks of life, so you know we we know there is a common misperception that it's only the downtown eastside Vancouver, but in fact we have people dying in all of our communities from the rural communities that urban communities from professional occupations to healthcare occupations to those labor fields and and the unemployed. It's just a cross section of people who are dying from this illness. Going to get a sense of what may have contributed to this end, one of the things that you have cited is the the extreme concentrations of Feno this toxicology of the drugs that you have fountain people systems. How do you account for that? Yes that's one of the things that we've noticed. Most recently is the fennel. certainly is more toxic and one of the reasons or speculating supply chain disruption, due to the pandemic of course in the closing of international borders and international travel, and we know that local supply has kicked in, and there is no shortage of sentinel available illicit. Fenton I should add available and the production of that of course is quite hit or miss not necessarily very scientific in and not in regulated labs of course. There's no quality control in production of illicit substances, and so we feel that plays a significant role particularly. Spike in a community where four or five people dying within a short period of time, or we recently saw three deaths at the same time in the same location. But, we also feel that the you know the role of US social isolating of necessity to prevent a desk due to Kobe, nineteen has played a role where. People are alone and more and more people alone and using substances alone, so we feel that place a fairly significant role as well. What are the other reasons why the the way we're dealing with covid nineteen may have contributed to these deaths, some of the measures that were implemented to address the overdose crisis NBC so the provision of the lock zone, the overdose prevention centers supervised consumption sites. They've ability of those places has been diminished due to some of the impacts of the pandemic, so really for those. People who who need substances which are already dangerously difficult to get? It has really only exacerbated their situation. have any of the deaths happened at the the the safe consumption sites? No, we have never had a death. NBC and overdose prevention site are safe consumption site There are overdoses at those sites of course but. The the safety factor is that staff are there to immediately provide support call nine one one get folks medical assistance. So Those certainly work and then the extensive availability of no lock zone in this province has also certainly worked but again during this time for those who need it not as easily accessed, you know shorter hours less staff at at at the place of Support which is understandable and again really comes down to safe supply that supply of illicit substances is not safe and We need to ensure safe supply for those folks who need stuff. You have said that you think that the federal government needs to step up and take very bold action in order to deal with is what does it. Did you want the federal government to do? So I can't help but draw the parallel between in BC. The overdose epidemic is a public health emergency was declared in two thousand sixteen, and of course, the covid nineteen pandemic is also a public health emergency and the The response is of course response to the pandemic with immediate compassionate certainly in this province for sure very compassionate, education testing providing healthcare for who need it and would be wonderful if we saw the same response for those in our community who suffer with problematic since you star experience, problematic substance use the ability for widespread safe testing, compassionate response support where they need it. eliminating all of the stigma associated with criminalization so. Whether certainly a lot of compassion demonstrated by our leaders. The action that that needs to follow is decriminalizing these substances removing the stigma treating this as a medical issue, which it most certainly is. How do the deaths from the drug? Overdoses compare with deaths from covid nineteen in your comments. So absolutely far more I'd have due to substance use. This province has seen thousands.

British Columbia Overdose NBC federal government Ontario Securities Commission Seattle fraud Trading House professor Scotland BBC Victoria Vancouver Ham Colombia Lisa US
"eastside vancouver" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"eastside vancouver" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Many are dying British. Columbia's chief coroner says pandemic isolation is helping to fuel a record number of overdose deaths in her province as government inaction money for nothing Ontario Securities Commission says a Bitcoin Trading House that once seemed like the future of finance was little more than a plain old fraud that leaves our guest with little hope of recovering life savings in the zone, protesters in Seattle have staked out and a ton of Zone that's operating largely without police, and if you believe protesters outside any top down civic structures well. Well as city councillor explains why they've got her support. As the pressure mounts to knock troubling statues off their pedestals, Scotland's first black professor tells us he's not in favor of the trend. This stuff of dreams Italian neurosurgeons operate on a patient. Meanwhile, the patient patiently works away. Crafting Green Olives stuffed with ham and fried breadcrumbs and spitting distance from the archives interviews with people who fired things out of their mouths farther than you might think possible given their success. You'd have been smart to put your money where their mouths were. Not your body because some of them were spitting crickets as it happens, the Friday edition radio that expect to rates the unexpected. In British Colombia one hundred sixty seven people have died of covid nineteen. The province has been praised for its handling of the outbreak, but on another public health crisis. The numbers aren't anywhere near as good in the month of May alone, there were one hundred seventy suspected illicit drug deaths NBC. It's the highest monthly total ever recorded the overdose. Deaths statistics were released yesterday by the BBC Coroners Service Lisa, the point is the province's chief coroner. We reached her in Victoria. Point. How did the month of May become the worst ever for illicit drug deaths in your province? Well. It's tragic. The numbers are so disappointing so sad, and of course the numbers we saw a hundred and seventy deaths. Do listen substance. He's in May. represent one hundred and seventy people who were much loved by their families and their friends, and their colleagues, and we don't lose sight of that. Because we as coroners, we work with those families, and we see those families every day, and the heartbreak that this province has experienced as a result of the. Overdose crisis has been immense. And can you just give us a better sense of who the people are? Who have died of these overdoses in British Columbia? Yes, so primarily. It's men in their twenties, thirties forties primarily dying alone. That is one of the most significant factors so they are. found some time later by family or or a friend who are concerned about their welfare. We don't they come from. From all walks of life, so you know we we know there is a common misperception that it's only the downtown eastside Vancouver. But in fact we have people dying in all of our communities from the rural communities that urban communities from professional occupations to healthcare occupations to those labor fields and and the unemployed. It's just a cross section of people who are dying from this illness. Going to get a sense of what may have contributed to this end. One of the things that you have cited is the the extreme concentrations of Feno that this toxicology of the drugs that you have fountain people systems. How do you account for that? Yes, that's one of the things that we've noticed. Most recently is the fennel. certainly is more toxic and one of the reasons or speculating supply chain disruption, due to the pandemic of course in the closing of international borders and international travel, and we know that local supply has kicked in, and there is no shortage of sentinel available illicit Fenton I should add available and the production of that of course is quite hit or miss not necessarily very scientific in and not in regulated labs of course. And there's no quality control in production of illicit substances, and so we feel that plays a significant role particularly. Spike in a community where four or five people dying within a short period of time, or we recently saw three deaths at the same time in the same location. But. We also feel that the you know the role of US social isolating of necessity to prevent a desk due to Kobe. Nineteen has played a role where. People are alone and more and more people alone and using substances alone, so we feel that place a fairly significant role as well. What are the other reasons why the the way we're dealing with covid nineteen may have contributed to these deaths, some of the measures that were implemented to address the overdose crisis, NBC, so the provision of the lock zone. The overdose prevention centers supervised consumption sites. The ability of those places has been diminished due to some of the impacts of the pandemic, so really for those. People who who need substances which are already dangerously difficult to get? It has really only exacerbated their situation. have any of the deaths happened at the the the safe consumption sites? No we have never had a death. NBC and overdose prevention site are safe consumption site There are overdoses at those sites of course but. The the safety factor is that staff are there to immediately provide support call nine one one get folks medical assistance. So. Those certainly work, and then the extensive availability of no lock zone in this province has also certainly worked but again during this time for those who need it not as easily accessed, you know shorter hours less staff at at at the place of Support which is understandable and again really comes down to safe supply. That supply of illicit substances is not safe and. We need to ensure safe supply for those folks who need stuff. You have said that you think that the federal government needs to step up and take very bold action in order to deal with is what does it. Did you want the federal government to do? So I can't help but draw the parallel. In BC. The overdose epidemic is a public health.

Overdose NBC federal government Ontario Securities Commission BBC Coroners Seattle professor British Columbia Scotland Columbia Victoria fraud Bitcoin Colombia US eastside Vancouver Lisa
"eastside vancouver" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:43 min | 5 months ago

"eastside vancouver" Discussed on The Big Story

"To me probably many years earlier that that point I was actually already working with sex workers? Okay I organized with sex. I was inspired to start organizing with sex workers when I found out about the massacre on the downtown Eastside Vancouver. I was very moved by that. I was terrified by that. I grew up in a family and what I saw on those posters of the missing women was that all of them are in the sex trade. There were all street based they were all drug users and I really understood in a moment meant that if we as a community didn't come together collectively to fight and protect ourselves nobody was going to save us and it was horrifying to me. Because you know at the time my sister was a dancer she was a stripper in the downtown eastside. And you know it's very different than she lived there she was she lives. He was well she lived in the community. I mean I think you know. INDOOR STRIPPING IS DIFFERENT THAN STREET Bay sex work however not different enough for my comfort level. Because what if something went wrong you know. What if what if? Her mental health or substance abuse spiraled for some reason and she did become street based sex worker that that massacre just taught me that nobody was going to stop it. Nobody was going to protect us. We we're going to need to protect ourselves and you know she had started started dancing. You know Because she was nineteen she was a single mother and the father and the government were not helping her. She could not get a job that supported turn earn her son so she was very poor on welfare and she started stripping and within a few months she could afford safe housing for them. She could afford to defeat them she could. She had the time spent Her job was flexible enough. She can spend time with him so I really honored and respected her decision to do that. You know for me. See that's having the courage to live your own life and to save your own life you know to get out of poverty and we should really admire women who Who Society has done so little for and has put so much on their shoulders to raise children on their own with so little support and through sheer willpower? You know they do a difficult job. Sex workers a difficult job and pull themselves out of poverty and we should all be so thankful and be so impressed and provide them with as much support and respect as we can. Because if you don't have other alternatives for poor women men and poor single mothers then back off of the sex industry and let women do what they need to do in order to get out of poverty and respect them for it and so being like a massive exam. Yeah why you would do it. I mean you were making ten times. Did you say I made in my my wage my hourly wage now. It's not like I was working all day but I didn't have to. Yeah because my hourly wage. was you know a lot more than seventeen dollars. An hour and a lot of people would say okay. Yes sure I can see the economic advantages. But it's it's so dangerous. Why would you do it if it's so dangerous? But how did you feel about the safety situation or the you know. I went through this really this real emotional process around that when I became a worker when I became a sex worker and suddenly everyone was so concerned to my safety fifty and what I realized to my shock was that nobody had noticed that my life was not safer outside of the sex industry. I had been been in an abusive partnership. I'm a rape survivor. You know I was dealing with their kind of every day threats to my safety that pretty much every woman deals with you know. Watch your drinks every time you go out Be careful where you walk at night Hope you don't go on a date with a guy who turns out to be a stalker her and so I was already continually navigating violence against women research out of the US. You know there's been a real increased awareness about sexual violence else on campus and the research out coming out of the US now. Is that somewhere between thirty. Three to forty five percents of all women going into undergraduate programs in the US will be sexually assaulted experience some form of sexual harm. I can't remember if it's way too close to fifty percent from I know and so how could you tell me that. Making the best economic decision for myself is quote unquote putting myself in danger by going into the sex industry. Where am I not putting myself in danger? Did you learn anything about yourself or find some growth from from being sex worker. Oh Yeah Tons Swami about that you know. I think that some of the things that really jumped out for me are I really fell in love with sex workers. I fell in love with a group of women who just it didn't seem to care what anybody thought about them like. Wow I was like you are a group of women who have the courage to live your own lives no matter what anybody says the rest of the world wants you to shut up and be a good girl and close your legs make any money. Yeah Joe Making money people were her. Stay home stay in that crappy marriage and sex workers like not. I'm not doing that. I guess it was me to carry that into work working your life. Yeah yeah so I dumped the boyfriend and became a sex worker her and then I mean to be honest. I ended up meeting the love of my life. And here we we are and I'm still happily partner and and yeah and now you're talking about this issue and and you know and I want to just kind of end the conversation asking you about what you know what can change yes of how we talk about policy but also talk about this work in social conversations looking compassionate degree place to start. I mean what I would say is that I start from a commitment to women's lives and so even though you know I didn't know her I believe that women like Maryland Leveque was is worthy of protection respect and care and I want all of us to take that into our work. So how would that change how we are with sex workers right and some of the things that I I would suggest are first. We have to push back on the whole idea that the criminal legal system is a solution to this problem like that. It's a crime and punish shoe. We have a completely -pletely backwards. The criminal legal system is making everything worse in particular for the most marginalized women indigenous women migrant women's hall is he could use. Would you see like the name one. Yeah place the Star so a place to start would be. There's no question to repeal pecan to repeal the law criminalizing the sex industry street. That's the place to start because then from there you can develop labor regulations right that are led by sex workers and is there any action in that direction yet like in working. Focus on what I would say that. There's two things that are sort of more happening on the ground right now. One is that I work with a coalition butterfly in the migrant. Sex workers this project work together to push back against the Increase in anti-trafficking rates that and inspections that the city of Toronto. Okay so so pushing back being like doc. I don't know how are you in touch. Then with the the police services then to say like more with The city of Toronto okay. Yep So there's campaigns going on that people can support and recommend they go to the Butterfly Website Butterfly Asian migrant sex workers support network and check out that work. There's a petition they can sign. That's the you know I'm they can also make a financial contribution to butterfly to support. The work advocating butterflies doing incredible work. They've brought together over three hundred migrant women in massage lodge parlors to city hall to advocate for their rights. So you can't tell us anymore that migrant sex workers don't have a voice and shouldn't be in charge of making their organized they're out there. They know what they want. They're making demands. We'd love your support on the other thing I would love to see is if you're a part of a any kind of Feminist Organization Dan or an educational institution to make a statement in support of decriminalization. If you're part of a union to make a statement in support of sex workers labor rights to honor her to show respect for care for sex workers for their leadership Defending the rights of criminalized workers. I would love to see feminist organisations. This come out with not just a commitment to do criminalization but gratitude to sex workers for their feminist leadership. Sex Work can be terrible. It can be great it can be terrible. It's a business is a sector you know. It can be a lot of different things. It's not good for everyone. But sex workers are amazing people who deserve our respect and gratitude. Who'd they deserve our love? Thank you so much for coming in and talking with us..

US Eastside Vancouver Toronto city hall Maryland rape partner
"eastside vancouver" Discussed on Eric

Eric

12:03 min | 5 months ago

"eastside vancouver" Discussed on Eric

"Oh my God i comment that just reading stuff because just finding shit on the Internet on this where we're two hours in El Anyway. I'll save it for another night. We do more than two hours. Sure can't care slugged up so Yeah well we we. Yeah we got one more hour we can only go three hours live episode. I don't see anybody listening. Live for three hours if anyone's been out there that's been listening or has tuned in Send us a chat Texter full call six four six. I five nine six three zero. Send email rose. McGowan is stupid at outlook on. Tell me you listen to a whole three hour episode So that was big fucking. ABC News Uber is here. And it's staying deal with it The other news that I I'm GONNA say it Kinda I. I have very mixed feelings about this snooze because I never thought I would see the day but John Horgan has officially conceded that the Trans Mountain pipeline will go ahead and he has told a first nations groups to just respect that. And that's just what's happening now. That's pretty fucking monumental. Finally gave up thank God. He said he would try every tool in the toolbox fucking did none of them worked The thing that I thought was shitty was he came out and he was he. This is a direct quote he said this is a legitimate project that has massive benefits to be especially to indigenous communities. What the fuck that? You'RE GONNA take credit for it. You piece Lisa Shit against this entire time. Now he's taking credit now. It's a legitimate project with huge benefits to the province. If you'd know and why did you see that the wave you wasted the last two years of my life you fucking prick but the fact is they're they're not saying they support it but they're letting it happen so that should anything else now is up to two. He's got to do it or not do it. And and then we know it him now so I thought that was pretty fucking huge. Wow that is wow what what a deck and just to just like get behind it. I always thought it was a good project. Fuck you quit being such a fucking politician standby fucking shit. You piece of fucking fucking dirty underwear. While I must be tired. I would have more respect for him if you came out even like well. There's a AH there's nothing we can do but I hate it and it wasn't happening. That would have been cool. I'd be like all right. That's that's cool. Yeah now I hope you get theoretical Gerona virus medical. It's way worse. I in real girl in the Myers definitely would be Right I thought I was going to talk more about that. It's huge in my life. This whole we'll fucking show has been about the pipeline since long before you came I I had pipeline episodes that was like the majority of my episodes before before going joined I was pipeline pipeline pipeline. Because I was winning was huge news and I did a lot of episodes. You know what I did a lot of episodes on ironically the beginning of the show as well before Gordon came along. Megan markle taught Megan markle episodes because the big debate was whether she was Canadian or American. At time. Nobody really knew. No I remember that whole thing. There was a lot of Meghan markle on a lot of fucking pipeline and look how far we've come now not nobody it did not. Everybody hates her so I still I don't I don't like I don't get it. I don't give away. Everyone cares so much. I only royal watcher is a thing and people like the royals and they won. I don't give a shit really. Who cares let them go l.? Let them just be themselves and say Harry Die. You're fucking hair and get over it like if you really want to be off the grid. The lake. Take the artist formerly known as Terry and all day walking around. I don't want to get up the key where you go and look at me. I don't want the attention. Yeah you can't sit there and say I don't want the attention while you're standing in front of the media. Circus sang saying I don't want the attention exactly and your wife definitely wants the attention. She misses acting. What do you think if she wants to go to North America you guys can live anywhere anywhere in the free world? She wants to go to fucking downtown Eastside Vancouver. She picked out of anywhere in the world. That's because she wants to act. You're going to be stuck in Vancouver. La No matter what and we'll get some shady job. I get a guarantee every producer in the world's coming at her right now absolutely do I just. I've gotten ought to casting calls this weekend but you have to cover and I'm not fifty eight hundred bucks episode for this one fucking wedding show but you have to be marrying her. You paid a lot of money for reality ready for reality. TV which you have to audition for and they do like a casting call and they give you a script how is this reality TV. If I go out and find some woman who wants to a share fifteen hundred dollars a day with me then we go when we get this part. Is that reality. No the fakest fucking Shit on TV. The closest we've ever had to reality. TV Was Jersey shore if it wasn't the fact that those people don't actually exist and the on shore no we did have reality TV. We had our own fucking version of survivor and everyone got scurvy and they had to fucking cancel it. It was like real survivor but they didn't give even food supplements and stuff. 'cause go ahead anyway. Well the discovery channel did this show years ago. I I think I've talked about this before they did. They show where they tried to figure. Owed could people survive in a post apocalyptic style life if the world bucket sort of ended because of the disease so they took a group of ex many people separated them and they literally just said okay. Go you have only what you have on you. And they weren't allowed to bring anything with them so they literally have nothing and they gotta find food shelter security All all the medical and everything else on the only conditions at the group told us that anytime you meet somebody anytime you've run into somebody like that's on their own whatever. They have to be quarantined for twenty four hours. So you have to have a separate little quarantine thing to put them. In in case they show signs of the illness illness and the show was done so well that like literally while they were doing the show on their people would show up in masks and kidnap people. 'cause like that's the shit that would fuck happened in reality. If they see people somebody would get their kidnapping. Because that's what people suck. It was amazing. It was the greatest show ever Aukin loved it. I always like after humans. That's one and they're rerunning that now like what would happen if all the humans don't like how long would it take the earth to return to its natural state and they and they do actual models of like what would happen like I. The electrical grid would fail L. and then they'll like the the water systems would fail and that would that would stop. The water would start flowing naturally again and it was like within a couple of hundred ears. The Earth started really repairing itself. Wouldn't take that long with us. Not Upgrading our systems and taking care are them and stuff. It was a really. It's a fascinating show. I really need to see what would happen in the earth at their new humans around. It'd be fucking boring stupid stupid. That's what would happen. It'd be a Baltimore insects. That is true. And it's called. The colony recalled the call and he often check. That actually sounds fun. It was awesome as long as like anything. Like that is interesting to me until you bring. ZOMBIES ABE's into it and then I fucking tune right the fuck out. They didn't do that. And it's never gonNA have in and I don't even entertain the conversation ever And that's when I get bored as soon as you say Zombie. I'm like fuck it. Same thing I fucking hate all Zombie stuff. They're just they're fucking stupid. You can't happen it's a stupid but it's I just I hate. I don't know I don't some things that are so far fetched that that. I don't know why I just can't wrap my mind around them like because they're it just so too stupid and Zombie. I I don't know why became popular and I don't know why people believe it's possible or 'cause again it's smart people who subscribe to something idiotic. I don't get why they do because it's stupid and just just think about it. It's stupid that's my. I know that was very eloquent. You're getting tired I can tell. Yeah I haven't always tired doesn't stupid nipples me but I would like to see a world after like a Holocaust taught a holocaust like nuclear following. Whatever nuclear Holocaust looking for you? You don't get that word just doesn't cancel out now you can't just oh you can't say that we're no system. It's a legitimate fucking word. I don't like the Holocaust I mean. It's not like there could just be one holocaust and I'd say you're not allowed to use that word anymore. Nuclear Holocaust thing that you can say you can't just say yeah but that's stupid. Fuck you might words to say whatever I want dumb. Aided they just get get that word now fuck off no you don't you. Don't just get your word now. Yup nobody else's there's certain words. You can do that with all right so I don't want black people freak out on me. I know you have a word that I can't use I get it. Holocaust does not the same.

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"eastside vancouver" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"eastside vancouver" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are jobs at risk to automation and their jobs typically done by women are their jobs that women are more likely to do that are not at risk from automation yeah things like childcare caring for the elderly but those are really low paid jobs ariane hege vish is one of the authors of the study and this is what she had to say about that we really need to invest more in those care jobs because we can't have a society where everybody is the software engineer we need care but care work is dramatically underpaid i m hearing though alison that some countries like japan are experimenting with robots to take care of the elderly will this put some In their own neighborhood. But Saruman who founded the organization with her mom says that beekeeping in the city, it has some pushbacks. We were facing some comments offhand comments that people would make kind of questioning quality of our Honey Seren, her mom end up connecting with a friend of a friend who just so happens to be this geochemical researcher from ABC or university of British Columbia Dominic. Vice the researcher and her team were able to one second geochemical research. What does that have to do with all of this so dominant? Vice who's the lead researcher at UB? See she basically looked into what types of metals could be in this. Honey, they're looking at cadmium looking at zinc, they're looking into lead that turned into this bigger project of urban pollution to begin with. So that's where it all started from. Gotcha. Thanks for the explanation. All right. Carry on key questions ahead. Watts is the Honey produced by the community day clean. That's Dominique I still wanted. To know why why do they need to know? The Honey was clean. I kept thinking there might be some unheard of climate issue in Vancouver. But no Dominic said that Vancouver actually is one of the cleanest cities. So when I reached out to Sarah from highs for humanity. She said that the initial question was put out there to put rumors to rest often the perception is that something like delicious safe free of contamination urban Honey like couldn't come from this neighborhood. Highs for humanity is located in the Downtown Eastside Vancouver..

researcher Vancouver ariane hege software engineer Sarah Dominic Watts ABC university of British Columbia alison japan UB Dominique one second