18 Burst results for "dr toby"

"dr toby" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:27 min | 6 months ago

"dr toby" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It was a 3000 year old civilization when Julius Caesar came along, so it had great antiquity that seemed to stretch back almost the color of time of creation itself on DIT had Architectural and artistic. And impressive nous. Like really, nobody else. I mean that the sheer size of ancient Egyptian temples the sheer beauty of best statues. These were superlative that the Romans couldn't help to be overawed by and Back combined with the the antiquity of civilization, But for the Romans, it just kind of had everything it has, You know, the sheer majesty of over really impressive culture. And it had. This is ancient history dating even way back to almost the very beginning, and and that combination was just irresistible. Yeah, they they work. God's still kind of concurrent cultures, although not the obviously not the ancient Egypt, but there was a modern Egypt that was concurrent with With Rome and with the season we know that obviously from the you know the famous romances of market duty, and Cleopatra and On the fact that they were installing. I mean Cleopatra was originally Greek. Correct that you are Macedonian or what was her origin. He walked in northern Greece. Yeah. Family work. Right, and so the you know, But did the words were the Romans of their day? Were they able to read the higher a glib fix in the way that gets lost for a period of time before it is rediscovered? It's a good question, and by the time the Romans come along, really horribly, sticks have become the preserve off the priesthood. So if you were a specialist priest working in a temple in Egypt You were still able to read and write characteristics. But if you are ordinary man or woman out there a Zafar more or is a trader, you would have written spoken a form of Greek onboard. You might have spoken, uh, Egyptian in the home, but you certainly would have been altered to read and write ancient Egyptians. So it becomes a very specialist undertaking, reading and writing horrible ethics and And because it confined to the temples when the when the temples get get shut up close because Christianity has reached Egypt, so hard looking, dies, dies with him. Yeah, uh, that that's an interesting parallel, because a zoo, you know, not everybody does, but that at the time of the Roman Empire Latin was the official language. But Greek was the language or variations of Greek with the language that was spoken and written. That's what most people would have understood if they were trying to converse. Over a large part of the Roman Empire and much in the same way that Hebrew was not spoken that street Hebrew not like It is in Israel today, but it was pretty much left up to the priestly class. On day two. The fairest sees toe understand Hebrew. Aramaic was the language that most people would have spoken or a version of Greek again. And that's that's interesting because we kind of associate hire a glib fix. As mean or at least that we do in America because we don't know enough about these sorts of things, but that higher Olympics where that was still active and still developing and still Something which would have been understood more easily. But it gets lost for how many years before we rediscover that, through the Rosetta Stone and other law conscription ever written was written in 394 80. So On bit was destroyed but again in in 18 22. So that's what 1500 over 1400 years without anybody being able to read a single heart. Wow, that's really amazing about that. It's about the time of the Nicene Creed in Christianity. Uh, On then the and show that these walls he's beautiful walls. At what point do does that do the pyramid start to disappear under the sands with that, where it's not just the culture and the language that gets lost? It's lost. What do you know? It doesn't take a whole lot of time. I mean, anybody who's worked in Egypt knows that you get sandstorms on d even one sandstorm that last a couple of hours can leave a layer of sand. Oh, I don't know, half inch thick all over everything. So it doesn't take many years before an accumulation of sandstorms on D monuments being deserted and on no longer in use. They really start to stand up quite quickly, And even by the time of off some of the late Roman historians, we know that some Egyptian monuments already half buried in sand on Ben throughout the kind of dark ages and the early Middle Ages. Pretty much disappeared fully under understand, and so by the time the first European start visiting Egypt The 18th century. There were people living on the on the roof of Temple not because they climbed all the way up because the ground level is up to the roof of the ancient temple. Both It really doesn't take many centuries of the fans to reclaim million with monuments of Egypt was there. No interest by the Coptic Christians was there. No interest by the Egyptians, you know. Of the I guess would have been the 17th leading up to the 17th and 18th century the 19th century where there know it was there no interest to know the old culture and to find the old monuments on their own. Well, you know the interesting thing about both the Coptic Egyptians and the Islamic Egyptian. Is that for them be the pagan temples. Their pagan tunes. Um And they don't fit with the with the religious, um, convictions of either the Coptic Christians away the Islamic Egyptians and On that seem to be Something that they don't really want. O get to know too much. But if it was regarded as a little bit black from the pagan monuments, and so that pretty much left There are a few Islamic scholars in the 12th of certain centuries. But right about the pyramids that right a little bit about ancient Egypt, but they don't seem that interested in in that aspect of their passes. As the Europeans are when they come along after the enlightenment, so it's kind of considered sort of backward. Itwas Yeah. Quick little bit suspect again. Yeah, they But the this wouldn't I guess. I guess it was sort of parallel. Maybe how Christianity of Britain felt about Stonehenge. Or some of those money, right? Yeah, that's exactly a good power. Okay. So again, we're talking with Dr Toby Wilkinson. The new book is called a world Beneath the sands. The golden age of Egyptology and it it talks about the You know, this is sort of the race this this the all of these cultures that were coming together These imperialistic Interests to to uncover what was underneath. And and I want to ask Maura about what that impetus was like, Why was it? How did it just start to Well, why did they suddenly almost simultaneously? Did people start toe head to descend scientific expeditions into the Into the desert. They were still Christian cultures, at least nominally. I mean, what? Why were why did suddenly they go? Yeah, Let's let's go Dig that up. Well, you know, the person we have to thank for. That. Really is Napoleon Napoleon Bonaparte, who sees himself very much of the inheritor of ancient Rome. I mean, he has himself. Painted wearing a toga and a lonely.

Egypt Temple Julius Caesar Cleopatra Napoleon Napoleon Bonaparte Coptic Egyptians Greece Roman Empire Latin Israel Rome Islamic Egyptian Dr Toby Wilkinson Zafar Rosetta Stone America Olympics official Maura
"dr toby" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Celebrates Boston's gay lesbian and transgender community, but bear Marty Walsh says he hopes the straight pride parade. Never materializes. I really don't wanna give them much attention. I think it's kind of. Is not needed and unnecessary. They did file a permit looking for a parade permit in the city they have to work with some safety plans and things like that. So we'll see what happens by wall says the city can't deny parade permit based on the sponsor's values. He says he's focused on making this weekend's Boston pride parade a successful event, not just for the gay community. But for the entire city, Mike Macklin WBZ Boston's NewsRadio the state is another big step closer to having a hands free law on the books. The state Senate unanimously passed a Bill yesterday that would make it illegal to use a phone while driving without any hands free technology, but the change in the law could be difficult for some WBZ's KENDALL Buhl explains while people's weird relations to their phones artificially classified as a Dixon's Mass General psychologist, Dr Toby says it's not much different from substance dependency. And the solution is similar. Two. We talk about it. It's kind of burning bridges to using. And so anything you can do to just, you know, put it out of sight. It'll come out of your mind, so drive with that phone where you can't put your hands on it, and like what addiction battles accountability is key of those around you call you on it. If you're fiddling with the phone while driving KENDALL, Buhl WBZ, Boston's NewsRadio, how would you like to get some cash back on your electric Bill eversource.

Boston KENDALL Buhl Buhl WBZ Marty Walsh Bill eversource wall Mike Macklin Senate Dr Toby
"dr toby" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"You understand why people thought that I mean, here, you have him come out the first time we really hear his voice, and one of the few things that he uses these precious minutes to say is physically. Please don't make me come back here, guys coupled together with the fact that he has this four hundred plus page document that includes all of his findings and him saying, this would be my testimony, so you could see why a lot of people would say, well, look, he has this document. He doesn't want to do it. Let's give the guy a pass that being said, as I think, many people have pointed out, there's a huge difference between hearing alive witness testified about something and reading a report hearing Muller testify even if honestly. It is just him detailing things that are already in. That report would be so much of a better way for people to actually digest. What's in the in the report would be a much better way to get that information out there? So I think there is still value of him testifying. Even if it's just simply reading that report as a prosecutor. I know you respect him. You think his feelings just don't care the day. Yeah, I mean, I always get what you want in this situation. So he can say he doesn't wanna come, I think he ultimately will come if asked he certainly would come if subpoenaed. So I understand what he doesn't want to. Nobody wants to testify if they don't have to. But I think ultimately if congress decides they want to hear from him, he'll certainly make himself available in Brittany out. I don't wanna get too hot minded over here, but giving press conferences in writing reports where you control. Everything is different than being questioned lawyers and prosecutors. And journalists know that better than than some. We tend to ask a lot of questions. Yeah. And so part of what molars saying is I defined it this way. And that's where I wanna leave it. And I would say for the congress, which has a different role. Yeah, it's very different. And I say that not only for maybe some who are critical of Trump and wanted to explore things that weren't pursued more aggressively, but also obviously, for the Republicans on the committee who wanna finally press him on the things they thought were overreach. Yeah, you know, I think there's two things here that really matter, one of the things that the Republicans have prevailed in on in the last ten years is the political theater of it all. So this was the repealing ObamaCare over and over and over again, even every time that it failed it gave their base that they were doing something that they were fighting Democrats have got to get into the political theater of this, and they have got to communicate that they are fighting that they are turning over every stone. They're making sure that there is deep integrity to this process, the base needs it, because we had a Blue Wave in November because we wanted to see real change. The other thing is my friend. Dr Toby standards made a really important point about Muller. He talks about the fact that Muller. Is has a deep sense of integrity. Right. He respects the rule of law. He's conservative. He wants to toe the line, but integrity is not the same thing as courage now. We need some political courage, and that means that Muller needs to speak up, what Donald Trump has done is his helped through a series of terrible practices to erode. Democratic norms Muller is trying to restore the integrity of those norms of I following the law to the teeth and not conceding anything and not wanting to violate anything. But at some point, you've got to say we someone has to come in and save the day. He's the man with all the information who else is going to do it. Let's dig it. Dig it on that little bit. If you would. Yeah, how do you distinguish between integrity and courage in this context is courage being willing to take actions that are necessary, but might cut against your own standing, your reputation courage is the willingness to risk something for the thing that you say that you love and you care about right now. Muller is playing it safe. He wants he punted to bar. A man who he knows has no integrity. He has sort of using restraint as the way to sort of shore..

Muller Donald Trump congress prosecutor Brittany Dr Toby ten years
"dr toby" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on WLAC

"And they found that a current and former smokers. Or one point five to one point six times more likely to have advanced cancer, the nonsmokers heavy smoking smoking for a long period of time and smoking more was associated with advanced renal cell carcinoma kicking the habit reduce the risk of having advanced disease by nine percent for every ten years that a former smoker was smoke-free the investigators down and the findings were slated for presentation Sunday at a special press conference at the American your logical association's annual meeting in Washington DC. Another study scheduled for presentation at the same time briefing found the rates of bladder cancer did not fail along or did not fall along with the lower rates of smoking in the United States. Researchers examined the national database and found that lung cancer rates declined along with decreasing per capita consumption of cigarettes between one thousand nine hundred seventy three two thousand seven but the same type of consistent. Decline was not seen in bladder cancer rates. So there may have been a decrease in bladder cancer due to smoking, but that increase or decrease. Was offset by other factors contributing in a rise of bladder cancer in the last decades last few decades. So these studies shed new insight they say into the role that smoking might have for two important urological cancers, the news conference moderator, Dr Toby Koehler said in a news release for kidney cancer. It is true that kidney tumors are more often being detected these days when they're smaller. However smoking seems to confer a much greater risk than that cancer. May be more aggressive cessation of smoking seems to lower the risk. Well, quitting smoking is going to lower the risk for a lot of issues within the body. I mean, I think all physicians would agree getting patients to quit smoking would be half the battle that and and drinking alcohol and being sedentary and over eating you cut that out in our lifestyle in America. And you would our health improved greatly. So it's it's about motivating and encouraging people to break through these. Habits and going to the next level in their health and with their life, triple eight two eight three seventy two seventy two also sign up for a weekly Email newsletter. It goes out to each and every week. And it will great information. Also, other experts that we bring on to interview as well. Let's go to Jim. Hi, jim. Welcome to the show. My wife. And she has a lot of pain with arthritis. She's been getting progressively worse. For the last four years. It's rheumatoid because her fingers are going.

kidney cancer Washington DC Jim United States Dr Toby Koehler America nine percent four years ten years
"dr toby" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Pharmacy. I'm Dr Mark Hyman. And this is pharmacy with FA R Y A place for conversations that matter in today's conversation, really matters to all of us because my guest today is Dr Toby Cosgrove, who's my boss, or I guess he was my boss. It's retire was. And who's an extraordinary visionary healthcare leader who's gonna talk to us today about healthcare because it is one of the seminal issues of our time that determined so much about what's happening in the world today. And it's often something that people really misunderstanding. Toby is the former CEO and president Cleveland Clinic he served from two thousand and four to two thousand seventeen this eight billion dollar organization that all sorts of amazing things in terms of leading the organisation building new medical school and healthcare campus, building extensions and Dhabi and now in London, Florida and Canada and Los Vegas. He's reorganising tire clinic to be more collaborative. He's really inspired innovation is really a quite unusual guy went to Williams College university of Virginia school of medicine worked at Mass General in Vietnam as a surgeon and has done some extraordinary things with his life. And now is I would say retired. But not exactly because I don't know. He's he's he's I'm gonna say all the is. But he's a lot. Older than he looks. And he's going hard as ever transforming healthcare and keeping the mission going, so welcome to doctors pharmacy. Toby? I'm delighted here. Thank you very much opportunity. So, you know, you're kind of unusual guy we met a number of years ago. I was speaking at the World Economic Forum, and I think maybe your wife, you probably know who I was invited me to dinner at a small group of people and joking. It was very provocative. And I went up to say, hey, Toby, what if I could empty half, your hospitals and cut your angioplasties and bypasses in half. And this is the number one hospital in the world. And like that'd be a good idea. I said we're gonna you're gonna pay the bills is we'll figure it out. And then after that we began a conversation about how we need to rethink our poached, a chronic disease. But you know, you're a heart surgeon you've done twenty thousand heart operations you've pioneered fifty patents. You've done extremely career. And if led this organization away that has made it one of the best in the world, if probably not the best in most categories. So what what was it that sort of shifted you from the traditional medical paradigm to actually? Being visionary and innovative in your thinking about health and healthcare. Well, really at the end of the day, we wanna keep people healthy, and you know, while lot of the problems that we deal with every day are secondary to help people to leave their lives smoking.

Dr Toby Cosgrove Dr Mark Hyman Williams College university of Cleveland Clinic Los Vegas Florida Vietnam CEO London Canada president eight billion dollar
"dr toby" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Which documented spot of the things they're district dot com, which documents of the activities that you're doing an as as land before pictures of people walking the dogs that you box aging and other sources as well days. Decision that your the boulevard lands for control the organization, and and I think a lot of people that I interested in playing a major role to making this possible. Oh my goodness. Well, we gotta check out all those resources because I feel like you. And I have literally just scratched the surface of all of the different unique nuances about this rabies elimination goal and the fight against rabies transmission. But we've got limited time, but we will have to do we'll have to do a part to an apart- three. Would you mind? If we did a part tuna three would you mind joining me again out love to Jane again and to have your listeners as well. Listen Toco position, I really enjoyed it. Thank you. Oh, excellent. Well, thank you again. Dr Toby we absolutely enjoyed our conversation. And and I can't wait to have another one take care, and I'm gonna wish you the best of luck in the rabies elimination. Fight many thanks and best of luck to archaic. Thank you so much. All right, folks, wa- that was incredible directly from Kenya. We had Dr thune be who's I mean, the knowledge base than it has in terms of this topic is so expansive, and he had so many in-depth details about logistically, how do you fight rabies? How do you continue the fight to eliminate this? Hopefully, we identified different pathways whether p nutritional pathways socio economic pathways, and of course, zoonotic ways where the domestic dog he's directly in contact with people and more importantly in Africa. The majority of dogs are owned, and so we do after avoid the misconceptions that we had a chance to talk about. Specifically, the fact that you know, it's a small public health problem. It's not it's over sixty thousand people a year die over two thousand people a year die in Kenya alone. So just in our thirty minute conversation nine people have died from rabies stray dogs being really important. That's a misconception. And because the majority of dogs are owned. And so I think that identifying those misconceptions is really really important. And then of course, you know, understanding that the misconception that wildlife plays an important factor. And it doesn't not as strong a factor particularly in Africa Indian Asia where this diseases spreading. So if we want to know more if we want to learn more about how to join the fight in in achieving the goal in twenty thirty. That's the goal Dr articulated twenty thirty not having a single person die from rabies, and I'm super excited because that means in our lifetime will be able to see that check out Washington state university checkout world. Health Organization, and of course, you know, looking into rabies-free Kenya. Paul g Allen global school for animal. How direct yourself to all these resources? So that you can learn more about how to help the fighting the force donations. They're always open for donations as well. So absolutely incredible conversation. We broken a new frontiers today on the Dr Courtney show and just join me for more.

Kenya rabies Dr Toby Africa Dr Courtney Dr thune Jane wa Paul g Allen global school Health Organization Washington state university thirty minute
"dr toby" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on This American Life

"Ninety five ninety eight ninety nine even the ones of us who were gay. This is John friar. John lives in Pennsylvania now in an aging. Philadelphia mansion with two enormous dogs and rooms filled with elaborately scrawled furniture. This house is a very great distance. Both psychologically and physically from the Kentucky farmer. John grew up. John graduated from his Kentucky high school when he was only fifteen years old and by nineteen he'd been accepted to Vanderbilt University medical school. He was one of the youngest students to be trained in psychiatry in school's history. He was also a homosexual now technically, it was forbidden for homosexuals to practice psychiatry and John knew that he had after all read, the literature he'd seen the research, and he had certainly sat through lectures. So from the very beginning. I learned that it was pathology. And. It was very difficult to get over that difficult to get over even years later after he became a practicing psychiatrist difficult to get over even after he joined the APA amid a number of other gay psychiatrists so many in fact that informally they began to meet each year during APA conventions a loose underground group, which they jokingly titled the gay PA. These were men who like John had made it through medical school without detection and continued to hide their sexual preference except to one another these remain who despite their association with the gay PA never thought to question, even among themselves traditional psychiatric ideas about homosexuality in a way. Didn't come up to my knowledge because of our own internalized, homophobia. Those Steph is probably agreed that it was okay to be a disease. did that homosexuality was a form of insanity began in the nineteenth century, and at least at the time its designation as a mental illness was actually seen by homosexuals as a step forward for the previous two thousand or so years, the Christian world saw being gay as a crime against the will of God, the book of Leviticus declares if a man lies with another man as he would a woman both have committed abomination they shall be put to death their blood shall be upon them. Then along came the head doctors. And suddenly, it wasn't the homosexuals fault. He was just another victim of faulty wiring or possibly overbearing mother. The shrinks weren't. Sure exactly what the problem was. But there was research a whole bunch of research from Freud on down. But by the late sixties when the status of homosexuals became an issue of public debate. The field was really dominated by two New York Psychoanalyst's the I was a man named Charles Socrates. I'll talk about him later. The second was Dr Irving Bieber. An analyst New York. Who at least originally had no interest in the problem of homosexuality only became interested after he went to work as a psychiatrist in the second World, War Irving bieber's now deceased, but his wife, Dr Toby beeper agreed to talk to me they would arrest homosexuals in the army. This was in India and Egypt where he was in the theater. They would arrested them and this judge dishonorably and the others would be hospitalized something like that. So he got interested in the problem because he would be the psychiatrist who had who would examine these people. Toby Bieber says that during the war her husband defended homosexuals protested whenever a gay soldier was arrested or discharged, arguing he deserved treatment. Not dishonor. He got into trouble actually a bit in the army. My husband went into the captain. And he came out after four years. He was in the army for four years came out as a captain, and he didn't he wasn't promoted laws -ly because of his defensive homosexuals in the army. So he saw himself as somebody who was helping homosexuals. No question about it..

John friar Dr Irving Bieber Vanderbilt University medical Toby Bieber Kentucky army John Philadelphia mansion New York APA Pennsylvania Charles Socrates Steph Freud analyst Dr Toby Leviticus India Egypt four years
"dr toby" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

09:52 min | 2 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Brain doesn't get enough blood, and you lose consciousness temporarily it's often brought on by an emotional triggers such as being upset or excited brain says, look you don't have to be so excited. Let's slow down to heart rate. Let's lower down the blood pressure. So with that reflects sometimes goes overboard and the patient ends up with low blood pressure or low heart rate, the combination of the two leads to insufficient blood supply to the head while most fainting spells are benign cardiologists. Dr wind Chen says there are times when fainting is more concerning that includes people with known, heart conditions and somebody has chest pain palpitations fainting. That's important and usually would pay a lot of attention to if a person has a fainting spell doing exercise. Any of those instances would be reason to see your doctor? For more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org. With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute. I'm Joel street. Benign prostatic, hyperplasia or BPH is an enlargement of the prostate. Gland situated between the bladder and the Aretha, and I like to describe it to patients as a Donut then UP through the Donut hole treatments. Seek to basically increase the size that Donut hole a relaxed pressure around the Donut hole, so men can urinate better urologist, Dr Toby Koehler says there are lots of treatments for medications to surgery, but it's a relatively new approach that can be done right in the doctor's office that has him excited. We put a little tiny needle any hit a button nine seconds machine goes paying, and then you form a two centimeter steam ball in the prostate everything that's team ball touches, essentially dies. And that's a good thing. Because after a few months, there's going to be a giant crater there, and you're gonna be able to urinate, a lot better doctor. Koehler says it's very effective with little in the way of side effects. For more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org. Contribution. So that is definitely a factor. Let's get Paul on the line in mobile, Alabama. Paul welcome to money talk. Oh. Due to the popularity of index funds. I is it possible to have a index fund bobble. And how would we identify? Well, you would identify that through the market because index funds invest in the market if you have an S and P five hundred or a total stock market index fund or a Russell three thousand or whatever. That represents the market. And so you would see that by what is happening in the market. And if you saw if you saw metrics in the market, the told you it was a bubble. Then that would mean you had a bubble index funds because they are the market. Paul. I appreciate the call. Irwin is in Skokie Irwin welcomed to money talk. No listening to you. Since the early nineteen nineties wanted to get your opinion on the convertible, bonds and convertible bond funds. Well, convertible convertible bonds and convertible bond funds are hybrids. They they they pay you generally, a relatively low rate of interest, certainly a lower rate of interest than you would get on a straight bond from the issuer, and they also depending on the convertible feature. They also give you what's called an equity kicker in Wall Street, which is the ability to experience either appreciation or depression, depending on what the underlying equity does. And generally speaking, what will happen is a company will issue a convertible bond, and they'll make a convertible into the common stock at a higher price on the date of issuance than the stock trades at and the whole idea is that as the as the bond can catch up to that price or is the stock rather can catch up to that price your bond can appreciated value, but it can go the other way if the stock goes down. Except for the fact that if the company is stable and the company is dollar good and not going into bankruptcy. Then there's a bit of a floor there because you do have some interest rate provided on the bond in the form of the coupon. Thank you. I appreciate the call. We head out to the great w Waie a FM Atlanta. Dennis welcome to money talk. Bob, what a pleasure to speak to you. I've been waiting awhile. And I'm very appreciative to have this opportunity. I value your thoughts and your guidance. So look I've got I made a boo-boo about three or four years ago. And the master limited partnership whole oil industry was so hot. And I took about ten thousand dollars if my Roth IRA money and bought 'em PI thinking, oh, this thing's going to keep going up up up put my Roth. So I don't pay taxes on it. And we know what happened to the MFL PI field, basically from a total of about twelve grand. Chris I made a couple of thousand on the original ten I'm down to about eight thousand seven seven thousand eight or nine hundred so looked sitting on a four thousand dollar loss. Bottom line. My question for you. You see this coming back? Would you sit tight? Or would you get it out of there? It's a very very small percentage of my entire portfolio. So it's not money that I need. My question is should I grab the cash and reallocated in my Roth. Or would you just let it sit thinking? Maybe it's gonna come back. I I don't know what to do. Well, what about the income that you've earned over the last few years owning this? Yeah. I know that's a very good question. And I did where where is that income whereas that income reinvesting my give it ends with vanguard. I mean, this is in my vanguard wrong. And I just chose to reinvest all the dividends. So I kept buying back. More shares in this MLP K N. So actually what you're saying. Is that the total amount of money that you invested in? This train wreck is twelve thousand dollars is that right? Correct. Correct after and you're and you're saying, and you're saying that you've held it for about four years, and you have reinvested you didn't take anything out you. Reinvested all of the earnings the company has paid out in additional shares. So that all the money has stayed in the account. It's a it's a total return account. Right. Correct. So you've lost about a third of your total return value. No, your market value. In other words, your total return has been about over four years has been about negative thirty five percent. I guess that's correct. Yeah. Well, that that definitely in this kind of a market. That's definitely a train wreck. I'm delighted to hear it represents only a tiny percentage of your assets. I would have to say to you that I cannot make a recommendation on it because I don't follow it. Well, the other frustrating thing is you didn't even get the opportunity to take tax loss. Exactly. Exactly NBA, Bob. I'm kicking myself. But sometimes I don't I don't what percent what percentage of your net worth is in this investment. Oh. I would say well when you say networking, including real estate, my home or just money invested. Real estate is the pile of money. You would put on the table if you were to liquidate. Okay. So I have about an eight hundred fifty thousand dollar home. I've got equity of about seven and a quarter seven fifty. So I've got pretty good equity in the home. Good value on the home. And then vanguard I've got about a million and a quarter of a very small Pyotr already. You're already down. You're already down to well. Under one percent of your net worth. So we're not going to beat ourselves up too badly. Foreign investment that's lost about a third of its value over four years that represents well under one percent of our net worth. But dennis. I do appreciate you sharing. Because I think maybe people can learn from hearing your story. Thank you very much for sharing. Your story guy is on the line listening to the great K K O B radio Albuquerque guy is in Los Alamos. Hello guy. Hello, bob. Thanks for taking my call and longtime listener subscriber and critical critical mass dweller, and I've often heard you talk about investing in CDs. And I'm doing just that. I have a couple of questions related ways to do that our local banks seem to be low. Of course, I don't understand why there's such a disparity in the local banks. But then you also you see online ads for much higher than that. Do you have any commentary on whether those are safe or where where to get CDs? Well, I think if you are dealing with a brokerage firm like a vanguard or fidelity or one of the large brokerage firms, you you might be able to get them to get you offerings on CDs. Have you tried that? I have talked to them about it. It seems like a lot of trouble to go hang them. But okay, well way, it is yellow thing would be to. Check out the CD rates that are offered by major banks.

Bob Paul Dr Toby Koehler Dennis Mayo Clinic Dr wind Chen Aretha Alabama Irwin Skokie Irwin NBA Atlanta Chris I Russell
Steam treatment for BPH: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Steam treatment for BPH: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute. I'm Joel street benign, prostatic hyperplasia or h is an enlargement of the prostate gland, situated between the bladder and the Aretha and I like to describe it to patients as a Donut, then UP through the Donut, hole treatments seek to basically increase the size that Donut hole a relaxed, the pressure around the Donut hole. So men can urinate better. Urologist, Dr. Toby Koehler says there are lots of treatments for medications surgery, but it's a relatively new approach that can be done right in the doctor's office that has him excited. We put a little tiny needle any hit a button, nine seconds. Machine goes paying. And then you form two centimeter steamboat in the prostate. Everything that's team ball touches essentially dies. And that's a good thing. Because after a few months, there's gonna be a giant crater there and you're gonna be able to urinate a lot better. Doctor Koehler says it's very effective with little in the way of side effects for more information. Talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

Donut Hole Dr. Toby Koehler Prostatic Hyperplasia Mayo Clinic Aretha Two Centimeter Nine Seconds
"dr toby" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Back to our toyota outoftown scoreboard i two one picks here it is the posey swinging to live drive on the left field line that's gonna fall hannibal helped backlogged dr toby rob i would go back one out single built with minneapolis in the night inning seattle's really wanted nothing milwaukee arizona tied to two of the seven angels astros one to one in anaheim the game in the sixth belt belted a long fly ball that was caught by hamilton left centerfield singled in the third stevens at the belt of the bitch one at all colorado three san diego to that game a pet goat also the fifth atlanta beat the cubs today at wrigley six five the pitch to belt call strike you've started to go but held up that win for the braves are not ten games over five hundred tampa beat kansas city in kansas city two to one here's the one what the bill digs inside two balls strike the troy beat cleveland at home six three and the as beat the red sox swollen donald little bit six five due balls to strike develop and the pitch built high again it's three and one are now twenty and twenty one the red sox are twenty eight and thirteen.

atlanta donald cleveland tampa san diego milwaukee kansas city braves wrigley cubs toyota colorado stevens hamilton anaheim astros arizona seattle minneapolis dr toby rob
"dr toby" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Your fifty w f t l traffic chris farrell four cbs news tracking just a few showers on this friday through the afternoon storms are likely numerous strong and heavy lightning storms this friday after lasting until the early evening dr toby very wet and stormy late this afternoon was friday evening but we can whether it's nice mostly sunny saturday sunday highs near eighty two lows near sixty eight we're monitoring the white house to see if the president and angela merkel the german prime minister pushy called the german prime minister should not the president france is the president don't purchase prime minister whatever she is her and president trump will be out at one fifty apparently and they will be making statements as well as taking some questions so we will keep monitoring that if we're able to we will join them if it's interesting because i you know i've i've come to the conclusion and thank goodness so has my program director that often times there's tremendous takeaways from these press conferences and sometimes not so much so you you guys will have to just trust me on this chancellor chancellor i didn't even know they really use that when i was that was prime minister to be honest i was a newsman in new york when i was growing up whose name was john chancellor i don't know how i made that relevant but the only other time i've used the word chancellor i'm guessing the now we got a new a new controversy as if there wasn't enough controversy and that is the the the house chaplain listen to this story house speaker paul ryan has told fellow republicans that he fired the house chaplain after complaints from members that he wasn't doing a very good job not because of pressure over the reverend patrick conroy's political leanings lawmakers exiting a gop meeting on friday ryan told them that congress was that conroy was forced after lawmakers complained that he had been had not been adequately tending to the pastoral needs of lawmakers he had a number of complaints that the chaplain was not meeting the pastoral needs of the members in general what does that mean he was sleeping maybe.

paul ryan gop john chancellor trump dr toby congress patrick conroy chris farrell new york chancellor program director president france prime minister angela merkel fifty w
"dr toby" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Got there he was left in a bed it for thirty days largely unattended his infections got so bad they nearly killed him for wounds got severe and it ashley muscle tissue and it left it open wounds oh at this point bronner who's in his early 50s with a tidy beard and thoughtful glasses pauses he picks up his phone and then he thumbs through the photos air oh to show me one of a wound on his backside oh my god so you know now you've got a good idea would on balance rafferty this real francis bronner is no longer in inmate he was released from angola prison in two thousand and fifteen his story was crucial in understanding what goes on behind the gates at the prison we tried for months to get permission to get in sourced any affront it's louisiana state penitentiary rat basically the gate to get in or not get in and we were denied access and today we are not getting in one person who has wrangled regular visitation rights is nick trente kosta he's a lawyer who represents deathpenalty cases a couple of years ago he went to see francis bronner when i went to visit him this last time he was paralyzed the new hospital the two had known each other for years even though trente kosta has been going to the prison practically every month for the past three decades he didn't recall ever seeing the hospital were before and he was shocked i opened shower door was mold mildew in nobody women there were open garbage containers fly tape hanging from the ceiling awad dead flies on over man's beds who had open bedsores the number of complaints kept going up in two thousand and fifteen a class action lawsuit was filed accusing angola prison of causing needless pain and suffering and late last month a court said the lawsuit could precede the prisons lawyers would not comment so to understand how the hospital ward works from the inside i contacted people who used to work there like sandy netherland roberts medical wise budgetary wise the place gives awesome care she was a paramedic and then later ran the prison hospice do i feel that there is better healthcare there then some people get in the outside world world one hundred percent dr toby moma who work there for a year said there.

francis bronner trente kosta awad dr toby moma angola louisiana state penitentiary one hundred percent three decades thirty days
"dr toby" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The prison we tried for months to get permission to get in sourced any affront it's louisiana state penitentiary rat basically the gate to get in or not get in and we were denied access and today we are not getting in one person who has wrangled regular visitation rights is nick trente kosta he's a lawyer who represents deathpenalty cases a couple of years ago he went to see francis bronner when i went to visit him this last time he was paralyzed than in the hospital the two had known each other for years even though tried to kosta has been going to the prison practically every month for the past three decades he didn't recall ever seen the hospital were before and he was shocked i open the shower door was mold mildew nobody women there were open garbage containers fly tape hanging from the ceiling a lot of dead flies on over man's beds who had open bedsores the number of complaints kept going up in two thousand and fifteen a class action lawsuit was filed accusing angola prison of causing needless pain and suffering and late last month a court said the lawsuit could proceed the prisons lawyers would not comment so to understand how the hospital ward works from the inside i contacted people who used to work there like sandy netherland roberts medical wise budgetary wise the place gives awesome care she was a paramedic and then later ran the prison hospice do i feel that there is better healthcare there then some people get in the outside world world one hundred percent dr toby moma who work there for a year said there are some inevitable challenges like treating prisoners serving long sentences for forty fifty years and they're gonna though catha highpotential wt so every time they have a need that is outside the scope of us five doctors have to leave the side and that is really expensive and it's costing the prison even more since louisiana overhauled at safety net hospital system.

kosta dr toby moma louisiana state penitentiary francis bronner angola louisiana one hundred percent forty fifty years three decades
"dr toby" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The hospital the two had known each other for years even though trente kosta has been going to the prison practically every month for the past three decades he didn't recall ever seeing the hospital were before and he was shocked i opened shower door was mold mildew in nobody women there were open garbage containers fly tape hanging from the ceiling a of dead flies on it over man's beds who had open bedsores the number of complaints kept going up in two thousand and fifteen a class action lawsuit was filed accusing angola prison of causing needless pain and suffering and late last month a court said the lawsuit could proceed the prisons lawyers would not comment so to understand how the hospital ward works from the inside i contacted people who used to work there like sandy netherland roberts medical wise budgetary wise the place gives awesome care she was a paramedic and then later ran the prison hospice do i feel that there is better healthcare there than some people get in the outside world world one hundred percent dr toby moma who work there for a year said there are some inevitable challenges like treating prisoners serving long sentences they're going to be there for forty fifty years a little catha hypertension diabetes so every time to have habit need that is outside the scope of us five doctors have to leave the side and that is really expensive and it's costing the prison even more since louisiana overhauled that safety net hospital system dr momma says given all of these financial constraints the medical staff was doing their best to care for the prison's six thousand plus inmates on the circle akis look worth on though the circumstances i asked the lawyer nick trend to kosta what he thought of dr moments assessment he felt like they were giving the best care they can give given the circumstances well i don't know what he means by the circumstances if by the circumstances means we don't have proper medication we don't have proper equipment but we do the best we can.

trente kosta dr toby moma dr momma nick trend angola louisiana one hundred percent forty fifty years three decades
"dr toby" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The ceiling a lot of dead flies on over man's beds who had open bedsores the number of complaints kept going up in two thousand and fifteen a class action lawsuit was filed accusing angola prison of causing needless pain and suffering and late last month a court said the lawsuit could precede the prisons lawyers would not comment so to understand how the hospital ward works from the inside i contacted people who used to work there like sandy netherland roberts medical wise budgetary wise the place gives also impair she was a paramedic and then later ran the prison hospice do i feel that there is better healthcare there than some people get in the outside world world one hundred percent dr toby moma who worked there for a year said there are some inevitable challenges like treating prisoners serving long sentences they are going to be the forty fifty years cancer hypertension diabetes so every time they have a need that is outside the scope of of five doctors they have to leave the side and that is really expensive and it's causing the prison even more since louisiana overhaul that safety net hospital system dr momma says given all of these financial constraints the medical staff was doing their best to care for the prison's six thousand plus inmates on the circle were on the circumstances i asked the lawyer nick turned to kosta what he thought of dr moments assessment he felt like they were giving the best care they could give given the circumstances well i don't know what he means by the circumstances if by the circumstances means we don't have proper medication we don't have proper equipment but we do the best we can it's like talking like a mass unit as resources have dried up the prison is struggling to provide even basic care the lawsuit demands more oversight reforms and a bigger budget for medical care now you feeling which i feel but i still can't mo mo age today francis bronner uses a wheelchair to get around the medical facility where he's lived since leaving angola prison he says that most of the men he was with on the chronic care ward have passed away and he's lucky a i'ma sentenced to death as bottle is that the he's grateful to have finished serving his time and after you years of.

dr toby moma dr momma nick angola louisiana kosta francis bronner one hundred percent forty fifty years
"dr toby" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on WTVN

"Tens ninety three suicide nearly investigators say the bodies of sixty three year old brenda in sixty five year old charles crime were discovered inside a home unstable thirty six months of center berg is sherif said officers initially responded to the home on columbus road on the welfare check when one of the cone still to appear at an event crime scene investigator say it appeared both suffered gunshot wounds and knocked county prosecutor's office confirmed the couple was going through either a divorce story dissolution state troopers are investigating a fatal multi vehicle crash that happened on us 35 saturday morning near pleasant valley road one person was pronounced dead at the scene and one person was flown to an area hospital and investigation is underway into a fatal crash that shutdown i six 74 two hours saturday morning it crash happened around six and eastbound lanes just west of i 270 police say the driver of a black ford fusion had gone off the road and hit a guard rail 26yearold charles green of columbus was pronounced dead at the scene the ceo of the cleveland clinic says the grand kim city healthcare bill is going to threaten the financial viability of a lot of hospitals in ohio and across the country what this means is that so mean somewhere between four and nine billion dollars and reduction and medicaid support across the state of ohio that will certainly affect the the cleveland clinic and the large number medicaid patients which when you're seeing from the financial standpoint dr toby cosgrove on cnbc the senate republicans have until september 30th to pass the healthcare bill and this this child passenger.

berg investigator prosecutor ford fusion columbus ceo cleveland clinic ohio dr toby cosgrove republicans charles sherif cnbc senate nine billion dollars thirty six months six 74 two hours sixty three year sixty five year
"dr toby" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The coal mine whether it's a turn in valuations are media turnin technicals um you know i don't think politics are pumping somewhat of a wildcard um we've been able to discount it because he at least the agenda out of the us has been a little bit convoluted in terms of what might or might not happen um if the congress administration can get some sort of large tax package can't get them so respect ding type bill you can see that affect rate tom it it did last year when people thought it was more of a chance and you know we certainly will look around that armed and a lot of these kind of political appliqued whether they're on the korean peninsula difficult huan i'll come out of lenin were not not necessarily on modeling them now marvin gaye marvin lo he senior global market strategist effect of new york mellon we're looking against across the asiapacific this tuesday morning this is bloomberg because is the bloomberg's small business report more evidence of a percolating small business economy the federal reserve's regional survey the beige book the adp employment report and the nf ib jobs report all shows small business hiring activity jumping and bloomberg economist carl riccadonna says that means if you're a small business owner you're going to have to start to pay up other appears to be a continuing theme of employers facing a scarcity of available labour but the catch is it says scarcity of labour at the current going rate which means that that we may finally be on the cusp of higher wage pressures in the us economy in the latest in a thigh be survey thirty four percent of owners of job openings when it came to finding qualified workers fifty one percent of small firms said they came across fuel ordinanza the latest adp report showed small companies payrolls those firms with fewer than fifty workers climbing by eighty three thousand and that's the bloomberg small business report dawn on the linkage of inflation and wage growth john silvia of wells fargo on the future of health care in the united states dr toby cosgrove the.

lenin bloomberg carl riccadonna business owner united states congress global market new york dr toby cosgrove thirty four percent fifty one percent
"dr toby" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"dr toby" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is the one occasion i get to where my mac and act phil samak had on air yeah it's it's incredible conference in in terms of who comes here it started out as a small conference center gone media it's grown much bigger a sense and you look at the themes each year and see what the conversations are going to be like there's a big focus on foreign policy we saw a retired general david betray us arrive at yesterday general stanley mcchrystal is going to be here investor richard haass of course friend of surveillance will be here speaking as well others a focus on a is this year really going to be here david kenny who heads up watson for ibm a big focus on health care a something of course it's important to the participants here and everyone in the in the us congress continues to debate what's going to happen the healthcare policy a lot of insurance it's company ceos here the heads of some major hospitals as well i sat down with dr toby cosgrove the cleveland clinic yesterday he's here to convene a panel on the opioid crisis in the us we started off by talking about what he thinks about the republican healthcare bill in the senate here's what he had to say here's that conversation we've seen the back and forth here among legislators over there july fourth resist come back to washington mitch mcconnell says gonna be belong on thursday how often mystic to call that's going to lead to changing healthcare in this country first of all i don't think the bill passed legislators worn out the hurdle off from their constituents across the country being very upset about the possibility of have having a number of people in the future what are you worried about when it comes to healthcare he has through access to care and affordable insurance but one of the big issues that you're you're concerned with right now for one of the big issues that i think we have the talk of others the health of the country as a whole we have an obesity crisis were a third of the country knows of these accounts for ten percent of the.

foreign policy stanley mcchrystal richard haass david kenny us cleveland clinic senate mitch mcconnell phil samak ibm congress dr toby cosgrove washington ten percent