17 Burst results for "dr seema"

"dr seema" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:04 min | 9 months ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Welcome Back to the second hour of the show. You know, many of You have probably had conversations with someone. Maybe they don't believe in vaccines. Maybe they think Saturn's will kill you. Maybe They think right. Drinking diet soda is work is linked to Alzheimer's disease. Well, Dr Seema Jasmine has heard all of these things and decided to write a book about it. Viral Bs, medical myths and why we fall for them. Dr. Yasmin, welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me happy to talk to you today. Well, first of all what inspired this book for you? Oh, just the amount of misinformation and disinformation that's out there on the fact that it can cause people to get very sick. And it could even result in death. So you know, I just used to be a hospital Doctor. I moved to America 10 years ago from England. You served as an officer in the epidemic Intelligence service anyone to watch the movie contagion. That's the job that Kate Winslet's character plays on. So I would get sent by the CDC to one hot zone to another epidemic. My job was to stop the spread of disease, but I saw really early on that. It was never just disease spreading alone. It was always spreading with hoaxes and medical mess and all kinds of Bs. And so I thought, this doesn't make sense that in public health, we're not dealing with the contagion. Nature of the misinformation, the disinformation so I should take a little fight Step went to journalism school to study communication on then I had a newspaper column where people would send me all kinds of questions. Many of them made it into this book, and I added some more. But that's really how this came to be. What are some of what would you have a kind of favorite myth or most shocking myth? Or the one that you felt really was like, kind of the big one that everybody needed here in this book? There are so many and you know, depending on like who you are, what your background is? I think someone hit you differently. Definitely was kind of disturbed by the whole placenta eating. Think about you know, I'd heard about people having placenta parties and you know percent is an organ that you grow to nourish your baby when it's inside of you. And then you deliver the baby. You deliver the placenta, and that should be the end of the story. But then there was celebrity saying No, you should put your purse entering a smoothie. Here's a recipe for placenta. Lasagna. If you have a sweet tooth is a recipe for placenta. Truffles must like what is happening here on on the one side, you could say, Well, you know, no harm, whatever. But it's not going to cure your postpartum depression. Is that what it's supposed to do? I always I mean, I know that animals eat the placenta. They do, But I think we can just go get a snack from the vending machine. You know, I think hospitals have pretty decent vending machines. But also I talked to some animal scientists who said a lot of animals eat the placenta. Because in the wild if you didn't eat, it would attract predators on. I just don't think there are predators in the maternity, You know, I mean, I found just mental now. I shouldn't say that. But the reason is that there have been a lot of celebrities and others saying always ate my placenta and I bounce back. I ate my placenta and I didn't get postpartum depression, but that kind of stuff. It doesn't have any evidence behind it. And it could result in women not getting the real help. They need right for that post partum depression But also and I talk about this in detail. In the book. There have been cases of women who eat the placenta. Not realizing there's an infection in it on day themselves. Don't get sick because their immune system fights it that they have passed on the infection through that breast milk to their newborns on newborns could die from this infection. Some have gotten very, very sick. So don't your percent of I think what surprised me about that was kind of people finding justify to me. Well, I do it because wild monkeys do it. And I was like, Okay, also throw their own poo. We're not going to throw our own poo, You know? Don't let that be a thing now, Mandy, don't No, no, no. Oh, yeah. Let me kind of jumped to the back of the book a little bit because I kind of I skip to the back because I saw chapter 46 does debunking a myth. Help it spread. And this chapter kind of actually addresses why we buy into these things in the first place. So let's talk about that psychology a little bit. Yeah, we humans also. We had operations a kind of funky and interesting because you would think, Okay. Hey, friend. You believe something? This B s. He has the facts. Now you will believe the truth right? And it totally doesn't work that way, And in fact, it can backfire. There's even this thing called the backfire effect where Say you believe something, Mandy and I'm like your wrong Mandy. Here's the fax. What can happen is you can actually dig your heels in deeper on kind of hold on to your pre existing beliefs, even though it's wrong. There was this famous studied in a few years ago by these political scientists. They gave people a newspaper article that said weapons of mass destruction were found in Iraq, and then they said to them. Oh, here's another article on the article said. What you just said was wrong. No weapons of mass destruction, my friend. People did not want to have their belief corrected. The scientists said. You know what? It's easier to fool humans than it is to convince humans that we have been fold. And that's why I have this chapter in the book because, you know the mistake we make as doctors and scientists is, Oh, there's a conspiracy theory spreading. I'll just give you a pamphlet with the fact and I'm like, no, That's not how our brains work. Facts are dry. The thing that spreads the conspiracy theories of these viral YouTube videos are full of emotion that tell a story. There's a Mom who's crying and convincing. You have little kid a total of became autistic after the vaccine. You can't just like that theory that conspiracy theory or misinformation with the dry facts are brains don't work that way. You talk about autism and vaccines. You talk about vitamin D supplements. You talk about one of the most interesting ones that I actually popped two was r E cigarettes, helpful or harmful. One of the things I like about this book, Dr Yasmin is that you kind of just present all of the information. And let it speak for itself. I don't feel like I am getting Dr Yasmin's agenda here, and that's because through this research and through the studying I've been doing I've learned that it's much better to give people the information. Let them decide as opposed to his what I think you should do, which is what doctors do too often on. Actually, I think you condemned of eloping relationship better, and you can kind of have like a Good communication around something. The e cigarette thing. My goodness. Look, I'm British. I live in America now by trained in medicine in England. The UK starts on this is the E cigarettes are one of the best things out there for helping people quit nicotine. The UK government thinks this to the point that you can have your doctor in England. Prescribe you e cigarettes. That's crazy. That's crazy. I live in the Bay Area of California. Complete opposite of San Francisco was one of the first cities. It's not the first to ban the sale off E cigarettes, So it's like, okay, where does this leave people in the middle who are like should I shouldn't I? So I tried to present this information and also this information about terrible outbreak that happened in Washington, Oregon, other states in the U. S as well a few years ago. People, mostly young men, Vaping who got really, really bad lung disease, and it turns out there are particular chemicals, especially vitamin E acid Tate that sometimes added to the Vape pens to the cartridges of the thickening agent. If you're smoking weed actually increases the hit you get from the THC. That's why people add it. That could be lethal. But even that aside, they think kind of new, you know, So even if you're saying what it's safer than cigarettes, cigarettes contain so many carcinogens. There are some chemicals in regular e cigarettes that scientists say hold on a SEC. We need to study more. What happens when you smoke and inhale these? So that's the information on presenting so that you know, you read it..

Dr. Yasmin Mandy America Dr Seema Jasmine Alzheimer's disease UK Kate Winslet CDC Bay Area England YouTube officer epidemic Intelligence lung disease California San Francisco
"dr seema" Discussed on WDUN AM550

WDUN AM550

06:47 min | 9 months ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WDUN AM550

"Minutes away from nine o'clock moving into this brand New morning 29 degrees at the moment 50 later on today. Partly sunny skies. Some point we're gonna see some sunshine anyway. That's what they're telling us not to believe him. What else do we believe? Do we have to believe everything we hear now we should be somewhat skeptical of many of the things we hear. But the question is, why is bad science sometimes more believable and contagious than the fax? How do we cut through the viral Bs? With the answer? That question is viral Bs. It's a brand new book written by Dr Seema Yasmin. She's with us this morning and glad to have you with us to cut through some of this clutter. How are you today, Dr. I do very well and I'm happy to be here talking to you, Bill. I have been having so much fun reading through this book. Just some of the things that you're touching on here, and I think I want to throw a couple of questions that you in just a second about some of the actual Things that you busted in the Miss. You busted in the book, But I want to ask you what set you down this path to be able to try to cut through all the B s. It was other people kind of bombarding me with questions about cholesterol lowering clause about safety of vaccines about cleanses and detox is that made me realize that there is so much information out there on for the layperson. It could get so confusing and complicated, knowing should I believe this or should I believe, miss? And how is it that there is conflicting information about some of these things? That's why I was really passionate about writing a book that kind of put the information in people's hands, and it goes to 40 odd, different mixed and fruits about health and science. But really, it's teaching people beyond that. What the right questions you can ask. How can you get fatty about knowing what health information is accurate? This is what is inaccurate. Okay, So I've got it. I got to just start with a story, though, that someone in the introduction of the book of my jaw hit the floor. Uh, it kind of sets you on this path of one particular question. A woman brings a child and she wants to have the child inoculated for Ebola. There is no vaccine. But she argues with what was the outcome of that? So this is a story that a pediatrician friend told me that happen in Texas A few years ago, everyone remembers of the evil The epidemic was happening at the time. I was a public health professor and a journalist in Texas on so we had a couple of cases of Ebola in Texas. But Texas in general, we're not at risk of getting Ebola. But this month, takes her kid into the pediatrician's office and says, I'm really worried about the Ebola epidemic. Give my kid the evil of shot and the doctor says Sorry, man, We don't even have any ball a shot yet. And even if I did have one, I wouldn't get that. Your kid here in Central Southern Texas, Right? You're not at risk for that. However you're here really Glad you're here. It's flu season. Let me give you a flu shot in the month of I don't believe in those things. If you just kind of like, what is it about humans way often don't wait. Risk very well. We're really worried about evil of thousands of miles away. But we said isn't even a vaccine that flu which kills tens of thousands of Americans. Every year. We're kind of like, Yeah, that only the solution is that I'm really interested in well, they're a lot of things that were covered in this book and was gonna read a few of the air out here Do vaccines cause autism Can autism be cured our Children being paralyzed by the common cold virus. On Ben, You also have one. How long can you eat? Leftovers now had a survey released this morning, saying that we have at least five bad leftovers in our refrigerator any one time. So how long can we eat leftovers? It depends on the type of food and how you stored it. And so I kind of go into this in the chapter make this point that many Americans get very sick from food poisoning every year, So we need to pay attention to it. And I give a website where you could literally like, check the kind of food you're thinking off. Is it Turkey You've got left over is that milk is achieved on the Web site will tell you. How long did they say for But also this is a bit confusing because the kind of dates that you might see stamp on the food on a container isn't necessarily the exact day that you need. To carry out. So that's why it's good to have this information to happen. All right, I'm gonna this is this is one before you let you go. This is one that has caused a lot of discussion. And we've done some interviews about this before. Do vaccines cause autism. There's so much information on both sides of that story. What is the truth? I will tell you. The truth is the vaccines do not cause autism that has been sadly cordial in medical studies that made these claims. The studies were later retracted. But by that point it was too late. This false information was out there, and it's spread on so many people fell for it. The issue is that everyone who's a parent will know there's a period in your kid's life where you are taking them to the clinic so often to get shots. The different childhood diseases that Am when kids getting those back sees is usually the most common time when they're also being reviewed on potentially diagnosed with autism on just that time, correlation can make somebody think, but the kid got the shot a month ago, and now you're diagnosing them with autism. It must be the shock. However, we bought massive studies of millions of kids that showed these vaccines don't do anything in regards to autism, that they're safe. They protect kids from these diseases so you could Just see how damning it is when you have false information out there and sadly help believable that can be and how many kids have gone stick because parents have fallen to the anti vaccine messaging. Lucky Azman. What's the one question that we need to ask when we're trying to tell us something is true or not? Is there one way better than another to get to the bottom of something? One good thing that we should all do is just poor for a few seconds because the instinct can be very quickly. Let me hit the retweet butter. Let me forward this in the what's up group? Let me just share this on my Facebook. That makes all of us part of the problem because we have, like, trigger fingers on social media. We start sharing things before we take it to the first thing. Just pours that alone can undo a lot of damage. The next quick thing you can do check whether what you're seeing is coming from a credible force. Check his other credible sources, A sharing the same news. Often false information goes viral because it feels very you very novel, very like world gives you that world feeling that makes you want to share is anything you get that feeling That's a red flag for something that could be false. So do your due diligence before you believe it on before you share. Right viral Bs, the name of the book, Medical myths and why we fall for them, Doctor seemingly asthma He has been. Where can we get it? Usual suspects, bookstores, Amazon those things. It's available everywhere that you find books and also on my website, Seema Yasmin dot com. Thank you much, doctor. I appreciate you being with us. And thanks for the book. This is fascinating.

Texas Ebola flu Dr Seema Yasmin Yasmin Bill Facebook Amazon Ben professor
"dr seema" Discussed on WDUN AM550

WDUN AM550

07:09 min | 9 months ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WDUN AM550

"We're going to give you a chance to qualify coming up later this morning and later this morning before we get out of here, we're going to announce the winner to get all that barbecue $200 worth feeds up to 20 folks here, so enjoy your celebration, and we're gonna Check out what you're telling us. You have to have on your table for celebrating the Super Bowl. We're doing that on a Facebook fan page and take a look at some of those responses in just a second. But first I've got to get this off my chest. Just got to get this off my chest. I don't understand why in the national media The only it seems like the other only two Democrats in Congress. That would be Nancy Pelosi. And AOC. Why this they get more face time than anybody else. Hey, I'm not being partisan here. I'm just saying why, from the Democrat Party White. Why is that the case? And why do we continue to center? Our lives around AOC. And I just I don't get it. The latest thing to come out of Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez. She's wondering out loud, whether it Capitol police officer who barged into office to direct her to safe safe location during the January 26 riot, their capital, was actually trying to protect her or not. Really which you would like to be just left in your office. Quote, Like so many other communities in this country. Just that presence doesn't give me a clear signal. If you're safer, not so the situation did not feel okay. Again, which you like to be left alone in your office. So you could have complained about how the Capitol police purposely ignored you because of who you are. She has for weeks, thought about this day and said she thought she was going to die. That day. She said the officer had quote, anger and hostility in his eyes. Or maybe it was a very chaotic situation, and his adrenaline was flowing, just like everybody else is. She questioned whether or not he had been trying to put her in a vulnerable situation. Still, she said she wasn't sure was trying not to pass judgment. But you just did. You just did. Yeah, darned if you do darned if you don't Darn it. 16 minutes after seven when we got other things Later this morning. I'm excited about this coming up in the eight o'clock hour and we're talking with Dr Seema Yasmin. Now, Doctor. See me. Jasmine is not only a doctor Epidemiologists but also a journalist who has been writing health articles for a good little While. That's come out of this book, it's called viral Bs, medical myths and why we fall for them. And in this book, she busts, some 2023 myths or whatever it is in here, all sorts of things like flat tummy detox tease she talks about Do my birth control pills actually made me depressed is their lead in my lipstick. Can your cats poop make you better at business? Yeah, so a lot of lot of things in here and why does it go viral and what's the science? It's really is a quick, easy read, and it is in a lightning raid. We're going to talk with her coming up and in that same category. One thing leads me to another. As you know this this stream of consciousness radio. If you're not familiar with it, put on your life jacket and get ready to paddle that boat, Dr Oz. Has been known to make some interesting medical claims. You may be a doctor, Oz fan. I am not going one way or the other. I have don't know that much about Dr Oz. But I'll take a look at this article. And there are some people are upset with Dr Oz. Because he has been attacked is one of the upcoming guests owes on jeopardy. And it's rubbed some people the wrong way. Some of the social media comments include Jeopardy celebrates knowledge and facts, and Dr Oz has largely broken from that in his medical advice. Don't know. Not super interested in Dr Oz hosting a show about correct information. Huh? Oh, my goodness. Says Dr rises going to learn so much from the actual medical facts category. People don't like this guy. A lot of people do. I've never really watched him. I watched him some. I didn't realize that. There. We wish that detested. Oh, my goodness. Okay. I've thought people just loved him. Well, I probably a lot right now. Remember these air social media posts, So usually they're more trolls than there are trophies out there. So well, True just saying this. So anyway, I would think you might do a good job doing that is just as a presenter, right? Um He's very personable and speaks clearly. Yeah. Is interested in the people on the other side of the microphone. Well, I guess I'm just so out of touch. I didn't realize people didn't like him. Sorry. Doctor needs to have a show on self esteem now. Well, I'm sure it doesn't bother him. He's been doing it a long time. You know, Anytime you put yourself out there, you get a lot of criticism that people like you don't say a whole lot about it. There's one thing I'm talking about the Super Bowl celebrations. Yeah, Dinneen says she's getting some folks over for the Super Bowl. All family members celebrating a milestone birthday set up so much watching the game, but I will make this is what I marvel at. I will make deviled eggs. Probably 18 eggs. So meaning 36 devil eggs, half pieces and we'll all be gone before the evening is over. I love Double X. Oh, I do, too. I always think of them as a summer. Yeah, I did say whatever I like for a picnic or whatever, but my niece loves him at Thanksgiving. So go figure. You know, we have the same thing. And I got some friends coming over for the Super Bowl. Our Sunday night, Uh, supper folks, and they're bringing deviled eggs. Okay, I'll look for Jack. I loved of legs. Really? Eyes. This is it. I have made chicken wings in the past for friends who came to celebrate. But this year I noticed they were getting really expensive. So I gave up on that idea. Poor Caleb. Yes, he is a wings fan. So because they cost a little bit more. They're harder to get. That's one of our stories this morning. Kind of in short supply. Yeah. Yes, we can. We can do that story again at 7 30 like Well, we need folks need to know you gotta make your plans alternative. Now. Kim says his his must have Super Bowl food Is wings all flats. See now Here's somebody else is using the terminology drum. It's versus flats. I'm sure there's another term for drum. It's that we don't know about the aficionados. We'll come up with. Well, chicken legs. That's that's not a thing. I like those. I like me Drum. It's as you say, There's more meat on. It just means you get to meet off right for me. I'm I'm a lazy person, messy kind of little things. Let's see. I like him too. But, yeah, they're kind of embarrassing to eat. We always have them on election night here, but You really have to work at it to be able to have enough. I think to say you've consumed enough food 20 minutes after seven W D What's.

Dr Oz Nancy Pelosi Facebook officer Dr Seema Yasmin Oz Democrat Party White Alexandria Congress Capitol police Dr Ocasio Cortez Jasmine Dinneen Caleb Jack
"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 9 months ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Transplant, even if you are immuno suppressed the flip side to that is that the vaccine may not work as well in you because your immune system may not billed as good of a response as we'd like to the vaccination, But that's even more reason to get vaccinated because you would be one of those people that is most vulnerable and that we really worry about in terms of getting severe infection. Again. We're talking with Dr Seema Yasmin, epidemiologist and clinical assistant professor of medicine at Stanford, a former officer in the epidemic Intelligence service at the CDC. Her new book is Bible Bs, Medical myths. And while when why we fall for them? One of the things when I think about medical myths was. There was a lot of anger at a protest over the weekend in Los Angeles, which shut down the Dodger Stadium vaccine side, one of the largest sites in the country. And while it was just for an hour, I think there was a lot of frustration that people's beliefs in these conspiracy theories about the vaccine and various other things were actually contributing to two delaying, you know, a very important, uh Medical procedure getting a vaccine for people who for whom it could be life saving, and I know in your book, you talk about the experience of view yourself growing up in believing pretty far out conspiracy theories, like for example, that the royal family maybe reptiles in human form thinks like that. What? What can that What did that teach you about the stickiness of this kind of information and what can be done to really try to? I don't know You can't get rid of it, but just keep it in check to the extent where it doesn't disrupt other people's lives. Right. So as a professional debunker and someone who directs the place here at Stanford, where we study this, the spread of misinformation and disinformation on how I thought I can't write a book about medical myths and health hoaxes and conspiracy theories without kind of confessing that I myself was a girl that even as a teenager believed in all sorts of ridiculous conspiracy theories. What that has taught me. Of course, I don't believe in the mouth, anyone listening and judging me, But what that taught me with how easy it is to sometimes fall into group think, but also How easy it is to believe things that seem absurd and our falls when quite absurd, egregious, terrible, exploitative things that sound too weird to be true. Actually have happened. The really bad things that actually happened really strange things that you wouldn't believe those things. Having actually happened can make it easier for us to just believe things that are absurd but really are false. And I go into more detail of this in that first chapter of the book and kind of explain how that is. How it translates into my work. Now I do a lot of work teaching positions and nurses and health care workers. How to have good conversations with people who come in. And like, I don't believe in Marshall. I don't believe in Cove it either is it has to start with empathy, and that's really hard. You're talking about people turning up without masks. Basically Blocking older, vulnerable Californians from getting an essential service. So I'm not saying necessarily have empathy with them in the context of that particular protest. But when we are sitting one on one and talking to people who hold these conspiracy theories, it can very easily become a polarized, extremely polarized conversation on this evidence that pouring facts onto a polarized conversation is like pouring kerosene onto a fire. That's counterintuitive to scientists and epidemiologists like me who love data. Because what the social scientist on the social psychologist.

Stanford Dr Seema Yasmin Marshall clinical assistant professor o Dodger Stadium Los Angeles epidemic Intelligence CDC officer scientist
"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:20 min | 9 months ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"KQED Public Radio in San Francisco. I mean a Kim as the crowd a virus mutates quickly, medical experts are calling for stricter adherence to masking and social distancing rules and faster vaccinations. California announced plans last week to move to an age based system to speed up vaccinations, which has drawn backlash from people who are immuno compromised. And some essential workers Frustrated over delays. Delays made worse this past weekend when anti vaccine protesters managed to temporarily shut down a major L, A vaccination site. We'll talk about the latest coronavirus news and the power of medical myths with Dr Seema Yasmin, next on foreign Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens. The White House has announced a $230 million deal to boost manufacturing the Corona virus test that could be used at home as NPR's Selena Simmons, Duffin reports. It'll be the first such test available without a prescription. The test is made by an Australian company called a Loom. It uses a nasal swab and a digital analysis tool that sends test results to a smartphone in about 15 minutes. It was authorized by FDA in December, but has yet to hit the market in the US The test is currently about $30, but White House official Andy Slavitt said in a press briefing. He hopes the price will come down as manufacturing scales up. And we know there are efforts to create even lower cost and more innovative approaches. And we welcome those. Even with tens of millions of tests available. That balloon test won't be numerous or cheap enough to be able to screen all students every day before school, for example. Selena Simmons Duffin. NPR News Fiza Madonna each need to deliver 100 million doses of their cove in 19 vaccines to the federal government by the end of March. NPR's Sidney Lumpkin reports that Madonna is showing signs that its production is increasing. Last week, Fizer and modern eye each released 4.3 million doses of vaccine to the federal government this week. Madonna is pulling ahead and releasing 5.8 million doses. Meanwhile, Fizer is lagging behind at about 4.4 million doses. That's according to allocation data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These doses will eventually be shipped to states. Andy Slavitt, a senior adviser for the White House Covert 19 response team, spoke about vaccine supply at a briefing. Fizer and Madonna are committed to delivering a total of 200 million doses. By the end of March, with much of it coming at the end of the quarter. So will accelerate. Officials say they're confident these companies will fulfill their commitments. Sidney Lumpkin, NPR news parts of the nation's northeast, embracing firm, or near blizzard conditions through Wednesday, with up to 2 Ft of snow in some parts of the region. New York governor Andrew Cuomo says that residents should heed warnings to stay off the streets. And not just so that crews can clear them. Yes, we've had snow storms before. Yes, we've been through it before. But this this is a dangerous life threatening situation. New York City Sanitation commissioner says the city has more than 2000 plows but still cannot keep up with the amount of snow that's been falling. Your congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez posted an instagram live video Monday, chastising colleagues who say it's time to move on from the January 6th insurrection against the U. S. Capitol. Concept of Cortez describes hiding behind the door and feeling she would die at the hands of an angry mob shouting outside her office. She says that that experience has compounded ah, past trauma. This is NPR news. Lease in Rochester, New York. Say officers Lease in Rochester, New York of release body cam images of officers restraining a nine year old girl using handcuffs and pepper spray. The officers were responding to a domestic call. They've been suspended pending an investigation. Friday's incident came less than a year after Rochester was rocked by protests over the suffocation. Over black man in police custody. Latest annual report by the Southern Poverty Law Center shows a decline an act of hate groups as NPR's Hannah Allam reports. The report shows that part of the reason is that those groups or organizing online where it's hard to keep track of them. The SPL sees new report identifies 838 active hate groups that operated across the country in 2020. That's down from 940 the previous year, the record high more than 1000 was in 2018, the civil rights group cautions that the annual count of active groups is just one tool for gauging levels of hate and bigotry nationwide. Researchers say the drop in the number of active groups shows the evolution and they're organizing. Increasingly, white supremacists and you Nazis are meeting online without formal group membership or structure. The groups also lose members to infighting and splintering. In addition, the Corona virus pandemic was an obstacle to in person organizing last year. Hannah Allam NPR News Wall Street stocks close higher Monday to recover some of last week's losses. The Dow gained 229 points. The NASDAQ Road 332 in after hours trading. U. S futures are higher. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation for more than 90 years, supporting efforts to promote it just equitable and sustainable society. Maura and my dad adored and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. This is for my Meena Kim vaccine makers air trying to adapt their formulas and doses to a rapidly mutating coronavirus, while state officials scramble to speed up a rocky vaccine rollout. To stop the more transmissible variants from taking hold. Over the weekend, a group of massless anti vaccine protesters managed to shut down a major vaccine side of Dr Stadium in L. A for nearly an hour, angering seniors who'd already been waiting hours to get their shots. Stanford professor medical doctor epidemiologist and journalists seem of yes, men. Has been studying how the pandemic has been made worse by disinformation. Her new book is viral Bs, medical myths and why we fall for them. She'll also take your questions about the latest coronavirus developments, including California's vaccine rollout and concern over virus variants. Doctor Gassman. Welcome to Forum. Hi. Thanks for having me. You know, these virus mutations are showing up everywhere. And there are several to talk about, including the variant that.

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin Rochester White House Madonna California New York Andy Slavitt Meena Kim Sidney Lumpkin Hannah Allam Centers for Disease Control an Fizer Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Dr Seema Yasmin federal government
"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:35 min | 9 months ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome back to Forum. I mean a Kim we're talking with Dr Seema Gassman, epidemiologist and clinical assistant professor of Medicine has Stanford University, a former officer in the Epidemic Intelligence service at the CDC. She's also an Emmy Award winning journalist and author of the book Viral Bs. Medical myths and why we fall for them. What? Do your questions for Dr Yasmin? Give us a call 8667336786 Get in touch on Twitter or Facebook at KQED Forum. Email US Forum at kqed dot org's and Let me go to Eileen in fulsome. Hi, Eileen. Hello. Good morning. Thank you for taking my call. I'm an RN, A nursing supervisor in the 350 best hospital here in the area were kind of a regional Corbett hospital. Um, we have the managing these covered patients. Burke since it started, and I've noticed the management has changed, but more importantly, Patients come in. Um and they get sick very quickly, and they're dying very quickly, and it was very unlike, um, the initial pandemic and even the 2nd 3rd. This group of patient seems to be younger. And, um, like, for example, last night, we literally had four cardiac arrests and young patients who had just arrived in the hospital. And I wonder if you could speak to that. Thank you, Eileen. What do you think is driving this doctor? Yes, man. Oh, firstly, thank you, Eileen. So much for the work that you're doing on the front lines and risking your own health and life to care for the California This has been the topic of debate for a while now, because I've heard it from other people on a swell is from Eileen. Right now, there's been this question That is the newer B. 1426, California variant responsible for perhaps more severe infections, but also for an increasing number of large outbreaks in California towards the end of last year on a doubling in the California coded death rate. We saw him like November and December. When things got really bad. It goes that photo. One of your earlier questions Nina and we feel like it's too soon to say on and even if you look at what happened in the UK initially, when we first talked about that B 117 of area we said, Well, just look like it kills people more doesn't look like it causes more severe infection that it is more transmissible. Well, even that alone could result in perhaps more death and perhaps more severe disease because, for example, if we're saying it's 70% more transmissible than the R number goes from 1 to 1.7 for, say, one person may infect 10 people with the older version off the coronavirus. Now they're infecting 17 on those 17 are infecting 17 more and then another seven. You see how these outweighs could quickly become a lot bigger when you have a more transmissible version off the Corona virus, And among those much bigger outbreaks, you're going to see people who get a much more severe version of the disease on perhaps also more likely to die Now, Of course, I would say in the last four or five days, there's been mounting evidence that not only is that variant Not just more contagious, but also does cause more severe disease. Something intrinsic in the virus that makes it makes us more sick. If we're infected, But with the California variant, it could be implicated in the more severe cases the island's talking about in the higher number of cases we saw late last year. It's too soon to say Well, given the things that you're talking about, I mean, we were hearing Dr Anthony Fauci, saying if ever there was a reason to vaccinate as many people as quickly as possible with the vaccine that we have right now. Now is the time but you know, as As we were alluding to earlier with the vaccine rollout. I mean, there have been a lot of changes to the eligibility criteria recently, which gets into a whole bunch of things that I know you address, one of them being people feeling like the way California governor Newsome say. Officials have been talking. They feel misled by the way that The state had been talking about how they were going to do the vaccine, roll out initially with health workers, some seniors, some essential workers and then moving on towards other essential workers and people with, you know, Compromised immune systems, Disability and so on. And now, as of last week we're hearing no. In fact, we're gonna push that group down and move toe age based eligibility system. Can you talk a little bit about What the state needs to do here to try to get this vaccine rollout back on track and in a way that feels equitable. Clear and be transparent because right now there's an incredible amount of confusion. I think it was January 13th that the governor said Californians over the age of 65 now eligible for vaccination while there, you need to make that politics policy guidance actionable because you are suddenly saying that close to six million Californians on now eligible for the vaccine. What happened then was people over the age of 65 or their kids calling up County Health Department saying how Could my parent get the vaccine, the county saying call the state the state saying, Call your health provider The health of Arctic saying Call your insurance on the insurance thing. No, call the county That was an absolute mess. What we saw was public. Sourced data on websites created by members of the public to say, Hey, let's between as band together you call 10 clinics are called 10 state or local entities to try and figure out what the heck is going on here, But it hasn't been transparent. And even as you say, we're told the guidance will change. I think the wording was something like mostly age based We're still not sure what's happening within that. We know that in the group one, eh? There was your health care workers on your residents of long term care facilities on then it was frontline workers and people over the age of 65. It's very unclear who's going to be in group one. See, for example, on, of course, disability advocates on disabled people are saying Are you just gonna factor in age like what is the mostly refer to on if you're going for speed in terms of the vaccination program? Are you going to Prioritize speed at the expense off equity because that can't happen..

Eileen California Emmy Award Dr Yasmin Dr Seema Gassman Corbett hospital Dr Anthony Fauci Stanford University clinical assistant professor o US Kim Twitter CDC officer supervisor Burke Epidemic Intelligence County Health Department UK
"dr seema" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WTOP

"Mid March. And calm reports, its daily downloads have doubled, Experts say meditation can introduce mindfulness, It's paying attention on purpose. In the present moment, Psychiatrist Dr Seema Desai says it can help counter the negative effects of stress. It can have an effect on her immune system. Our blood pressure heart rate meditation could look like many different things from a seated practice mindfulness being incorporated into daily activities, even house Little chores. So we're washing the dishes. What is the water temperature? Feel life right now. What issue? Can you smell the soap? Can you actually pay attention to these things? And when we're Doing that It's often helping a stay center stay focused. That kind of focus brings calm and that CBS News correspondent Nancy Chan next in money News. One day gains for the Markets Cove in 19 means Mohr jobs for a Maryland company, Jeff Global, 6 54. They were chosen to work for us fight for us represent us. We trusted Conley to keep our family safe. Our freedom secure. Jerry Conley failed. Instead of helping passed bipartisan covert relief. Jerry Connelly does nothing. Instead of working together in a time of crisis, Conley would rather fail and cast blame. Conley idly stands by his our economy collapses, our community's suffer. We must do better. Let's say no to ineffective Conley, a career politician. Va. 11 needs change. Let's take a chance with manga on and top Matlock, a wife and mother, her son serving proudly in the U. S. Navy, a first generation American and legal immigrant working to keep America safe at the Department of Defense and Homeland Security for our families for our safety for our country. Vote for better vote for manga on in top, Mulla Mulla and I approved this message People by hunger for Congress, You decided to upgrade your outdoor deck. So you ordered the essentials, a power washer, a set of patio chairs and a shiny new grow. You use your Bank of America. Cash rewards.

Jerry Conley Mulla Mulla Dr Seema Desai Jerry Connelly Department of Defense and Home CBS News Bank of America Markets Cove Nancy Chan Congress Maryland Mohr Jeff Global Matlock U. S. Navy America Va.
"dr seema" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Strike tomorrow over social distant thing. Concerns in school Jessica Winder Hsu Bo, the head of the Brookline Educators, union, tells me that Sunday night teachers voted overwhelmingly to go on strike on Tuesday. She says it's because the school committee refuses to mandate 6 FT. Social distancing in the schools were not a gated community member. Klein were part of a greater Boston We have 500 Teachers that live in the city of Boston, a red zone and they are bringing coming from their neighborhoods in the city interpret lining going back every day, but when they're brought in school, But the Brooklyn school superintendent tells me there are no plans to reduce the social distancing requirement in the schools. However, if things improve in the future, he would like the flexibility to do just that. Carl Stevens. W B C. Boston's news radio in New York The mayor, Bill de Blasio, says the state needs to keep an eye on its covert 19 case number new reported cases on a seven day average threshold of 550 cases. Today's report 593. As I've said before. That is an area concerned. Some of that comes from just a lot more testing and a lot more testing is a good thing. I want to keep encouraging people to get tested on a very high level, but we are watching that number carefully. Vlasios Comments come of international spike in Corona virus cases the election tomorrow, as you know, and a new study finds more than half of Americans expect tomorrow to be the most tense day of their life. With younger people experiencing the most stress mediation. Meditation app, sir is seeing a spike in usage. More Americans looking for ways to cope. Doctors say the health benefits of a little quiet time are enormous. Now that sounds like hocus focus. Now is that going to help for 31 year old Katie Richmond, sitting in silence seemed like the worst thing ever for her anxiety. But since June she's been meditating every day for 10 minutes and says it's changed her life. I've been able to sleep better feel like I'm able to handle the daily stressors better begin by taking a big, deep meditation app. Headspace says It's downloads are up about 20% since mid March. And calm reports, its daily downloads have doubled, Experts say meditation can introduce mindfulness. It's paying attention on purpose. In the present moment, Psychiatrist Dr Seema Desai says it can health counter the negative effects of stress. It can have an effect on her immune system. Our blood pressure heart rate. Father. Wait. It is time to get a check on Wall Street. Andrew O'Day is at Bloomberg. And in the end despite some bobbling around, we ended up with a good day. Yeah, There was a little stress involving the NASDAQ, But it was a good finish as the new month begins, with gains for stocks, contrasting with the end of the old month, camping off the worst week for the market since March, now jumped 443. NASDAQ. After moving around, finished up 46 S and P 500, added 40. The pandemic, which has slammed the traditional store business has done great things for e commerce, not only online merchants but online payment systems. After the closing bell pay power reports higher than forecast earnings for the just finished quarter, which included.

Jessica Winder Hsu Bo Boston Klein Brookline Educators Katie Richmond Dr Seema Desai Bill de Blasio Carl Stevens New York Brooklyn school superintendent Andrew O'Day Bloomberg
"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Listen to consider this from NPR. And as you start your day area morning clouds, Then some sun some fog hanging around, Not a lot, but watch out for some patches of it. Sixties seventies Coast and bay Upper eighties inland again today. And Sonny and hazy around the Sacramento Sacramento Valley. Also again today, Sacramento's high about 86 degrees. It should clear up tonight with lows in the Valley, 52 to 60. On K Q. B D Good morning the time 5 51 Good morning. This is the California report. Soul Gonzalez in Los Angeles. Although more than 15,000 of our fellow Californians have died from the Corona virus, the state's cove in 19 numbers like it's seven day positivity rate and hospitalization rates continue to drop, says Governor Gavin Newsom. And he says the state continues to expand testing with 124,000 average daily tests over the last week. We are committed to increasing testing in the state of California. We're not retreating. From our testing responsibilities. Quite the contrary. The governor says he expects to see the number of tests will increase once the state opens a new testing lab and he wants to see test results come back quickly within 24 hours. All of this is vital, Newsom says. If California is going to continue to reopen parts of its economy and its schools and what the heck is happening at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, when it comes to the Corona virus information it's providing to the public. On Friday, the CDC issued new guidelines for how Corona virus spreads. Saying aerosol transmission might mean the virus could travel more than 6 ft through the air that on Monday, the CDC removed that information, saying it was posted an error. Cooties Peter are cootie reports on what some California researchers are saying about this. UCSF infectious disease specialist Dr Peter Chen, Hong says the medical community has been aware of potential aerosol spread since early in the pandemic and at the CDs, he's update was overdue. They wouldn't say anything to you at all but the main importance of them, saying it was really about optics and for the fact that they took it seriously chain on worries that removing the guidance since mixed messages to the public About the risk of catching or spreading the virus. The CDC said in an e Mail that the update on airborne transmission was posted without sufficient technical review. Dr Seema Yasmin is an epidemiologist and science communicator at Stanford. She says the CDC is decision may be based more on politics you have to wonder. Is this based on science or is what we've seen happen before repeating yourself here, where people who are not expert in epidemiology interfering Yasmin sites, media reports alleging the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services influence the CDC. Published guidance last month that asymptomatic people with Corona virus exposure didn't need to get tested. Federal officials get contradictory claims about who reviewed the guideline, which has since been removed for the California report. I'm Peter Arco, let's turn from the Corona virus to shelter the governor has announced a second round of funding for the state's project home. Key $236 million will be spent turning hotels, motels and vacant apartment buildings into housing for homeless individuals. It's an example of how California continues to struggle with housing and homelessness, even as it battles the pandemic that struggle to create more housing is explored in a new cake city podcast. Siri's called sold out. It's hosted by reporters Aaron Baldessari in Mali. Solomon and Molly joins us now, Molly not so long ago. Housing and homelessness were the biggest problems facing the state, and then the Corona virus came along. How is the pandemic? Change the conversation about housing in the state? Yeah. I mean, I think that everything that we've been going through with the past few months of the pandemic with recent protests over racial justice across the country. I mean, if anything, housing is still at the forefront and has a lot to do with all of these things that have been happening. I mean, I think that what we've seen with Corona virus in particular is, you know, we hear this phrase that This pandemic has really laid bare a lot of the inequalities, and I think that's really true, especially when it comes to housing. I got to say, though I mean, we were searching for solutions before the pandemic, and then the virus comes along. It doesn't not only complicate things I mean, at the very least, there's less attention being paid housing and homelessness and there may be a lot fewer resource is to spend on solving the problem of creating more housing and reducing homelessness. You know, I think something that stood out to us is that it feels like finally there is actually some political will to do some things and you're not going to give away all of our solutions here. But in our first episode that's sort of what started to drive. This whole conversation. And the direction of the podcast is that we saw, you know, homelessness has just really reached this emergency level of crisis. And what happened after the Corona virus pandemic hit was that there was this movement really? To move people inside of hotels into house, Paul? Most people inside hotels really, really fast, and I think for us on the housing team, we saw that as you know. I don't think we've ever seen something like that happened before, and especially on the scale that we're seeing it what we're really seeing 15% of the state's homeless population. Get housing. And so I think there is something about this moment that is pushing pushing the needle of it..

California CDC Governor Gavin Newsom Sacramento Sacramento Sacramento Valley Dr Peter Chen Sonny Dr Seema Yasmin bay Upper NPR UCSF Los Angeles Peter Arco Yasmin Soul Gonzalez asymptomatic U. S. Department of Health and Stanford Aaron Baldessari Molly
"dr seema" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Calling number 4 10 9226680, and we will be right back with more of all about realestate. Enjoy the sunshine today, right ahead for the start of the workweek. Mix of clouds and sunshine Force today like West Northwest Seasonably warm, mid eighties expected files increasing tonight. Temperatures drop down into 16 lots of clouds Monday afternoon showers cooler to upper seventies. More showers. Even a few rumbles of thunder. Monday night Tuesday testing seventies. Body is back to the eighties. Wednesday. Can't boot at the Weather Channel for talk Radio six wcbm texting enrolled you into recurring automated text messages. Mr. Data Rates may apply. Imagine Ah heart supplements so effective it could replace five other supplements and guarantee your best checkup ever introducing Omega que plus Max, the super supplement that features a unique combination of clinically studied ingredients to promote healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, inflammatory response, blood, sugar, blood flow, even brain and I health and Now you can get a complimentary sample of Max just by texting heart to 4 to 4 to four. But talk is cheap. So we'll put our money where our mouth is. I'm Dr Seema Sinatra and I spent over two years developing backs. I am so sure you'll experience the difference. I guarantee your best checkup ever. That's right. Some of your best blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and increased energy or your money back. Get your complimentary sample of Max by texting heart to 4 to 4 to four plus text now and you'll also receive Bottle of Dr Sinatra's magnesium, absolutely free text 8 to 4 to 4 to 4. Whether buying or selling Let Margaret Rome broker and owner of home were Realty Make your real estate transaction. One of the most pleasant experience is you might have with 24 years experience in real estate market knows how to make every transaction as smooth as possible. A real estate author with her 2008 publication. Realestate the runway. Ah book that landed on the number nine spot on truly is list off top 10 real estate books in 2008 real Estate. The runway is the ultimate guide book for anyone involved in a real estate transaction, including new agents and seasoned professionals. Margaret Rome knows real estate and has built a solid reputation as one of the top real tours in the Baltimore area. Listen to our weekly live program all about real estate. Noon Sundays on talk radio 6 80 Wcbm View listings at home room dot com. Reader daily Blood or call for 10 530 2404 10 530 2400 area learning. They're my friends circle. Somebody raised their hand with an answer. We'd like one school should be up for their mental health for their wealth. What is better for the Children of America? We'll know First you'll know first re opening our schools. I missed the kids going.

Dr Seema Sinatra Margaret Rome Mr. Data Rates America Baltimore
"dr seema" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Harvick regained the Cup Siri's victory lead with his seventh dominating yesterday at Dover International Speedway. Martin Truex Jr was second and Jimmy Johnson delivers career winner with 11 was third. Your Weather Channel forecast is next texting and rolls you into recurring onto me to text messages. Mr. Data rates may apply. Imagine Ah heart supplements so effective it could replace five other supplements and guarantee your best checkup ever introducing Omega Que plus Max, the super supplement that features a unique combination of clinically studied in Radiance to promote healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, inflammatory response, blood, sugar, blood flow, even brain and I health. And right now you can get a complimentary sample of Max just by texting heart to 4 to 4 to four. But talk is cheap. So we'll put our money where our mouth is. I'm Dr Seema Sinatra and I spent over two years developing backs. I am so sure you'll experience the difference. I guarantee your best checkup ever. That's right. Some of your best blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and increased energy or your money back. Get your complimentary sample of Max by texting heart to 4 to 4 to four claws text now and you'll also receive a bottle of Dr Sinatra's magnesium, Absolutely free text, Artie to 4 to 4 to four. Your exclusive Wcbm Weather Channel forecast the morning hours have been fairly quiet, but as the temperatures Continue to heat up. Those showers and thunderstorms will begin to develop Scattered thunderstorms This afternoon. 90 the high a few thundershowers around during the evening hours than a quiet night. Not much rain tomorrow. Only a slight chance of a thunderstorm even warmer Tomorrow. 93 Wednesdays just slightly cooler, sunny, dry 88 Wednesday My meteorologist Terry Smith, from the weather Channel for talk radio. 6 80 WCBS. It's 89 degrees in downtown Baltimore. Reporting a 12 06.

Dr Seema Sinatra Harvick Martin Truex Jr Dover International Speedway Omega Que Baltimore Jimmy Johnson Terry Smith Mr. Data Artie
"dr seema" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Baltimore circulation Center of VCs all the way up into Canada and leaving the country and cooler air trying to work its way in lower humidity for the overnight tonight Sixties in the Panhandle in 70 degrees here in town, isolated shower for Thursday Friday with temps in the low to mid eighties, some upper eighties lower nineties advertised to show back up for the weekend had With McGee seventies for nighttime attempt. I'm scout Larrimore, The weather Channel on talk Radio, 6 80 WCBM CBN studios are brought to you by safe Retirement Solutions. Call our friend Rod Borowy at 4 10 to 66 to 11 20 on the Web. It's safer time in solutions dot com. Texting rules you into recurring on text messages. Mr. Data Rates may apply. Imagine Ah heart supplements so effective it could replace five other supplements and guarantee your best checkup ever introducing Omega Que plus Max. Super supplement that features a unique combination of clinically studied ingredients to promote healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, inflammatory response, blood, sugar, blood flow, even brain and I health. And right now you can get a complimentary sample of Max just by texting heart to 4 to 4 to four. But talk is cheap. So we'll put our money where our mouth is. I'm Dr Seema Sinatra and I spent over two years developing backs. I am so sure you'll experience the difference. I guarantee your best checkup ever. That's right. Some of your best blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and increased energy or your money back. Get your complimentary sample of Max by texting heart to 4 to 4 to four claws text now and you'll also receive a bottle of Dr Sinatra's magnesium Absolutely free Text 8 to 4 to 4 to 4. With your hearing coast to coast Am with George Noory live from somewhere deep below the Earth on premiere networks. What We talk a lot about the life of the American.

Dr Seema Sinatra safe Retirement Solutions WCBM CBN Omega Que George Noory Rod Borowy Panhandle Baltimore McGee Canada Mr. Data Rates
"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hospitals already overrun with Corona virus patients and partially destroyed were flooded with the bloodied bodies of the walking wounded and those carried by others. Okay, I got to my apartment, which was recognizable in your car. Beginning to gases underlay on Megan. How pressure Dr. Seema Jelani is an emergency room doctor from Texas. Working in Beirut. She spent the hospital reid singing to comfort four year old daughter. I did guess And today Wass on a scale that is not More. My serious on something like this years are still raining. Lebanese security officials have said nearly 3000 tonnes of the fertilizer ammonium nitrate was stored in the port. It's highly explosive and can be used for making improvised bombs. It had been there for six years after being confiscated from a ship a level of mismanagement hard to comprehend. Today. Lebanese President Michelle Own visited the blast site in a speech later in the day own promised justice sometime we are determined to investigate and reveal what happened as soon as possible to hand out punishment to those responsible. The port is a lifeline for a city and a country already in the grip of an economic collapse. The result of years of corrupt leadership. Large white buildings here have.

Lebanese President Michelle Ow Dr. Seema Jelani Wass Beirut Megan reid Texas
"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here and now, Over the past few years, we've seen significant progress in the global fight against HIV, malaria and tuberculosis. But medical workers and organizations have had to turn their attention to fighting. Koven, 19 and these other infectious diseases are now on the rise. For more on this. We're joined by Dr Seema Jasmine, Medical doctor and professor of primary care and public health at Stanford University. Welcome back. Thanks for having me So first tuberculosis were reading claims an astounding 1.5 1,000,000 lives a year. Can you give us a sense? Of the worldwide numbers of malaria and HIV and what inroads have been made up until now to lower those infections. So these are really big public health problems. As you said every year we lose 1.5 1,000,000 people from TV last year, more than half a 1,000,000 people. Died from AIDS related illnesses. But there's some good news there and that we have been making progress against TB, HIV AIDS and malaria. In fact, if you look at how many people died from these diseases over the last decade, the death toll had actually reached a low point in 2018. So we were kind of doing well in our fight against thes three big killers. And then we're now faced with this global pandemic that's doing what I feared. What happened, which is just diverting resources away from these long standing problems to deal with this acute crisis. There's also the supply chain problem. I mean, it's been greatly impacted by covert 19 with ease. Imposed lockdowns and strange pp and other medical supply chains. What are you seeing on that front? We've seen ready high demand pp. And that's having a knock on effect on other diseases. So everyone everywhere once pp right now, at the same time, and once it urgently, and what's that that has done is disrupted the supply chain for other health products on ingredients things as essential medicines to treat HIV. Things as essential as insecticide treated mosquito nets that prevent malaria. So in India, for example, production of those nets has been disrupted. Then, as you mentioned you have the additional burden of lockdowns, which really essential in lowering the spread off the new Corona virus, But that hinders the community health workers who go door to door in some villages, delivering those insecticide treated mosquito nets. Two people who are at risk of malaria. So that's what we're facing. Right now. I want to ask you about hydroxy Claure Quinn, which has been used T treat malaria. We now know it well because it has also been used to manage covert 19. What populations are hardest hit by those disruptions to that supply chain. So this is an old medicine. It's been around for about six decades. It's been tested in studies to see if it works against Cove. It 19 and very sadly, it doesn't help but because there's been so much misinformation about the efficacy of hydroxy People have been panic buying it. People have been hoarding it. And so then you talk to people even in the states who live with Lucas, who rely on this medicine to treat their arthritis, and they say it's been harder and harder to get ahold of this very essential treatment for them. I want to ask you about testing. We see that the numbers of TV diagnoses has actually gone down. Then we're saying also that testing centers normally designed for HIV testing in Russia, for example, have now become covert 19 testing centers. What are the consequences of not getting enough testing done on these other diseases that we're talking about? So this is exactly what we worry about it. We even have a name for it. We call it exceptionalism, where all the focus and all the resources Goto one particular usually new problem at the expense of other long standing problems. Look over 19 came along, and it's not like HIV, TB and malaria magically disappeared. We need to continue our fight against those. And as you say, the diagnoses of some of these diseases like to be an HIV. Have dropped really significantly, especially in parts of sub Saharan Africa and in parts of India and other parts of Asia as well. The concern there is that people who are risk of HIV people who are risk of malaria and TB will not get diagnosed will suffer the illness without being aware of it, and they'll miss out on treatment. So we worry that we're dealing with very much focused on this new crisis. But at what cost? At what expense to those people who were either already living with those other diseases or risk of becoming infected. I mean, what? What? We're really learning from this conversation. Seema is just how Interconnected global health outcomes really are. I mean, what? What are you looking out for concerned about moving forward as we we continue this battle against Cove in 19 while also thinking about Working down the numbers of those other diseases. What can be done by say, like the World Health Organization or countries to really get ahead of. What really is, is another crisis. Sure, so I worry that we keep making the same mistakes with every new global health crisis. In fact, there's researchers at Imperial College. London have said that if we continue to divert resources from the other areas to covert 19 that we should expect to see a 10% increase in HIV death. 20% increase in TV death on about 36% increase in desperate malaria. So what we need to do is yes. Keep our eye on covert 19 but not at the expense of these other long standing problems. And, honestly, one thing that rich countries, especially Khun do is throw money at this problem. That's Dr Seema Jasmine, Medical doctor and professor of primary care and public health at Stanford University. Thank you. Thank you. The U. S relies on more than two million seasonal farm workers to cultivate and.

malaria HIV Dr Seema Jasmine Stanford University professor India AIDS Koven World Health Organization London Seema Claure Quinn Khun U. S Saharan Africa Asia Lucas
"dr seema" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Here we got another hour together before ten o'clock in the WGN TV news broadcast we started off the show by asking them if you've been out of bound if you went on actually dined outside alfresco somewhere if you got a hair cut if you went to the barbershop also if you had one word to describe twenty twenty what word would you use you do have to make sure that it's clean though because we don't want to have to be pure so there you go if you had one word to describe twenty twenty what word would you use and the number here is three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred mentioned how this month is national cancer survivors month and joining us is we're very lucky to have with us Dr Seema Khan she is a breast surgeon at northwestern medicine for with the northwestern medicine how are you doctor con I'm very well thank you how are you doing very well thanks so much for being with us I'm sure you're gonna and remind us that we all still need to keep washing your hands right washing hands is an excellent habit send them these days doing it every couple of hours is a really good idea and also for women and I'm guessing also meant to we need to make sure that we're still doing breast exams self exams so so for exams action B. as the regular heavy mulch to those to be terribly effective in finding breast cancer early or in saving lives so we've actually gone away a little bit from the idea that everyone must check their breasts once a month as P. as we used to say what what we recommend though is mammography obviously very important and and in the in developed countries where breast cancer rates tend to be higher the starting age is generally considered to be around forty at least in the United States citizens in other countries it's a little a little older than forty Bucks a regular mammography is probably still the most proven way to of find breast cancer early and soldiers breast self awareness is is for we S. does not also most women are pretty familiar with the way the press deal their own breasts and where the lumpy bumpy areas are young women they tend to be more phone so the idea is just become familiar with your own breath both of them the topography of the address and if something changes get it checked out but a monthly self exams is not as useful as it was once thought to be and how often should you get a mammography the protection it needs for younger women forty to fifty five or soul or recommended every year because the press some more tension younger women and so that annual mammography use is more useful than less than that your mum all goofy but when you get into the mid fifties to sixties or so it is possible to do it every other year and it's probably just as effective so that the American cancer society guideline at the moment is to do it every year starting at four forty five actually is the American cancer society guideline although many other organizations recommend starting at fourteen somewhere between forty and forty five dollars annually and then the in the mid fifties to sixty if you want to you can scale back to every other year Dr Seema Khan she is a breast surgeon at northwestern medicine and of course June is national cancer survivors month and you're doing something special there of course you had to pivot the celebration but hearing that this is been going on for twenty seven years that's right this is the twenty seventh year of the cancer survivors walk at the robot issue the cancer center of Northwestern University it's become a real events that we all look forward to it's a celibate to celebrate the event for cancer survivors and their families it's an opportunity for people whose near and dear ones have experienced Castro to celebrate their lives or remember their lives because obviously there are some who have passed away as well but but for people who have been treated for cancer or have friends or relatives to be treated for cancer or who just want to celebrate with with their communities it's a great opportunity to be together to be active obviously if this year is all life events in right and nobody's gathering and ground pork is as we normally do so it's a virtual event this year but but people can sign up you don't have to be treated at northwestern in order to be part of this how could anyone who wants to celebrate cancer survivorship can sign up that can set up north west cancer apps northwestern dot EDU and registration is open until noon tomorrow and which registration columns T. shirts and and some materials that you can download a posters and badges as online streaming events with entertainment we're encouraging people to be ocean approach and to get some activity and exercise with friends with themselves while they talk to friends on the phone however you want to do it be with with the people you want to be where and you know one across the street both these are mostly fences your your companion apartment doesn't have to be right next to you they can be a couple of cities over or even across the ocean so a real connected there all for a good cause to to give the website where time doctor website is cancer at northwestern dot EDU okay thank you so much for being with us that was Dr Seema Khan breast surgeon at northwestern.

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Governor declared a state of emergency and the state of California and the next morning sandy either kill and went to work she's a nurse at a bay area hospital for first patient that morning a ninety two year old man with a fever struggling to breathe the potential case of code nineteen honestly I was really surprised surprised because she didn't feel prepared to care for a potential coronavirus patient she says she and her colleagues that morning hadn't had any training yet with the corona virus are they really just reviewed a few things and huddled for a few minutes and they asked us to watch a video the emergency room buzz with confusion they decided to test them the doctor handed sandy a few test tubes and a handful of paperwork to fill out no one knew how to get the samples to the county lab we ended up not knowing exactly how to handle that who did were we supposed to call the career how were the sample supposed to be handled sandy continued to work not knowing for several days whether she's been exposed to the virus a few days later she found out luckily no but with more suspected cases showing up in the region workers in some hospitals were sent home the self quarantine testing was too slow to figure out who was actually infected the testing has been such a debacle and it feels like such an unnecessary diabolical Dr Seema Yasmin is a public health specialist and epidemiologist at Stanford University a so called disease detective I've investigated outbreaks of flesh eating bacteria of botulinum toxin of whooping cough measles mumps all of that regular stuff as well she's been watching coronavirus management at the national level it was really unfortunate she says that in early February just as the outbreak has started to spread beyond China the CDC released faulty test kits so you think okay were you making in a rush these things happen that's fine but we need to quickly iterate but the agency lad in sending improve tasks out to local public health departments in sciences outside the government have a lot of trouble getting authorization to develop their own tests another issue is that by the time the CDC was sending out its testing kits to some labs across the state the World Health Organization had sent out tests to dozens of countries who by that point had done hundreds and thousands of tests Dr Stephen read from the CDC publicly defended the U. S. approach there's a process of developing test when there's a new disease we follow that procedure and there was no need to follow the W. H. I. test some countries develop their own tests by mid March South Korea had done more than.

California fever Dr Seema Yasmin Stanford University China CDC World Health Organization Dr Stephen South Korea sandy
"dr seema" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"dr seema" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Tuesday just a little more than a week off we will defeat the most dangerous president in the modern history of this country Jennifer the panel of our CBS news polling unit has been checking on voters expectations about that when we look at potential all head to head matchups pitting the major democratic candidates against president trump we see a tight race no matter who the democratic nominee might be no more than three percentage points separate the democratic candidates from trump Sanders currently has a three point edge over trump fall Biden leads the president by two points when Bloomberg is matched up against trump the president currently edges him out by three point select actual primaries on Saturday in South Carolina buying hopes to re energize his campaign there CBS news update on top political Massachusetts is one of more than a dozen states that will send voters to the polls on super Tuesday one week from tomorrow which will be March third but W. B. C.'s Laurie Kirby tells us we're not gonna have to wait that long good morning Lori good morning Jeff and you probably won't have to wait in line either if you skip primary election day all together how can you do that early voting secretary of state bill Galvan bowl for a primary traditionally of the last two times the federal you holding it for a November election so of first beginning today and every city and town will have at least one location Jeff open to cast an early ballot it's not that early voting will get older voters out of may find it tough to stand in long lines or maybe someone with work and child care challenges but whatever the case early voting locations will be staffed every day this week so good news all right Laurie Kirby thank you six thirty six you trying to get a great night's sleep these days it's a reason that many of us don't the trying portion researchers are looking into this only to find that technology is getting the best of us even during downtime insomnia sleep expert Dr Seema consulars says it's happening because when some people use the increasingly popular sleep tracker device they end up worrying too much about getting a perfect night's sleep and that keeps them awake there are some people also driven by this data they make a lot of value and what the data is telling them without necessarily understanding accuracy says it's better to measure sleep by how you feel in the morning rather than by some device Stephan Kaufman CBS news no need to lose sleep or your mind for that matter over a lack of knowledge we've got the solution and it's just.

president trump Sanders Biden Bloomberg South Carolina Massachusetts W. B. C. Laurie Kirby Jeff CBS Lori bill Galvan Dr Seema consulars Stephan Kaufman