18 Episode results for "dr barry"

Episode 378 - Dr. Barry Fox

Probably Science

1:07:41 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 378 - Dr. Barry Fox

"Randomly Hey Everyone. Welcome to quarantine probably science again. I'm cushion here. We are here we are. We're still recording via skype. So when we get onto the actual main guest the audio quality will be a little bit patchy than we used to. We working out ways around right now to do three way skype. Kohl's that are recorded each individually at each end and Clara So you get better sound quality but in the meantime this is a bit of a makeshift system. Hope you're with us. Our guest for this episode is professor. Barry See Fox. Md He is both a medical doctor and a professor of infectious diseases and we found him because he is one of the course lecturers at courses plus one of the things I did. When this whole thing started was to look on great coaches and find out what they have in the way of infectious diseases courses and he the guy who teaches the class on this And so we reached out to our friends at the great closest plus the people who set up the sponsorship that they do with US said. Hey you could get in touch with this professor and see if he'd be willing to come onto the show and he said yes. So that's what we have and I hope you enjoy this corona virus. Special this episode with Dr Barry Fox. Yeah and I think we'll try to put more frequent episodes especially if they can be topical in this way because obviously everything's changing day to day so we'll get this out quickly and since everyone's skyping as well we love and all of our various comedy friends or a home as well. It's easy to organized logistics. We just I hate you. Fast hopping on skype right now and doing an episode with us. So hopefully we'll be a few more with our friends who normally too busy and successful to easily access levels level. The playing field a little bit. Didn't it would kinda got. It is all of our friends at currently sitting there looking for things to do. So we're going to hopefully bring us more episodes. Give you some stuff to listen to and enjoy well. You are also setting on your respective houses in your respective homes If you've got We'll do some regular episodes as well just recovering known corona virus stories And we're going to try and do some special episodes where we go into the specifics with various experts and people who have direct knowledge or information So this is one of those. This is Dr Barry Fox who is a professor of infectious diseases and and a practicing doctor and one of the lectures on the greatest plus And if you want to listen to any of the old watch any of the other. Great coaches pluses courses including Dr Fox's you can't go to the great causes plus slash probably and you will get a month's free thirty day. Thank you so much for joining us stuff to Fox so just just to reduce you to listen as you are both a clinical professor of infectious diseases at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and public health. So this is you teach this research this but also you. You're also a practicing doctor your urine into your doctor of internal medicine right internal medicine with a specialty in infectious diseases. So you are kind of the perfect person to be talking to at exactly this Mary. Strange moments thank you for taking time away from actually treating people to be a talking to Alice Obviously I want. We're GONNA mostly be focusing this on the whole corona virus thing but can we also just talk for a little bit about what our infectious diseases and what the differences between the different kinds of infectious diseases between bacterial viral and fungal tick-borne and insect bone Sure well I guess I wasn't quite prepared for that. The general oversight but sorry. That's what the that's the great courses infectious disease courses intended to give people an opportunity to see that the spectrum of organisms here so I mean infectious diseases are medical conditions caused by micro organisms of various shapes sizes and derivatives. And again as you alluded to here. We have you know bacterial. We have a viral fungal. And then there's a variety of organisms that I call in my course Kinda somewhere between a bacteria and somewhere between a virus. The the a couple of things that you mentioned here like ticks. Mosquitos and things like that are what we call. Vectors of diseases they carry viruses. They carry bacteria. They may carry parasites including for example malaria. Which is still the number one cause of death in the world but You know there's there's a whole spectrum or array of microorganisms that can cause infectious diseases. And interestingly you know just because you have an organism on your skin or in your intestines or have a virus in your intestines or on your body doesn't mean that you're actually going to be infected. There are certain characteristics of the of the germ and certain characteristics of the person and their host immune system that would lead to whether the German stays in a state where it doesn't harm a human or whether it might might harm human so that's called what we call pathogenicity and we talk a little bit more about that also in the course as well. So so I I had a chance to watch some of the costs and it's remarkably prescient because you start off by talking about outbreaks like the abode outbreak. And then you end by. The final lecture is actually sort of predicting what might be the next outbreak. Obviously this was recorded and produced quite a bit before. What's happening right now and use it to go through narrowing it down. The the only miss is that you you end up leaning more towards flew as being a bit more likely than solids type outbreak. But you're you're basically dead on the key. Can we talk about what's making this current outbreak so dangerous and and how it has become so prevalent so incredibly quickly and even what is it sure? So we're we're dealing with a viral Ah Pandemic from what's called a corona virus and it gets. Its name kind of what it looks like. Under the electron microscope listeners. Might be a amazed to know that we didn't know what a virus was until the early twentieth century Bacteria were only discovered in the eighteen eighty s and we knew that they were viruses out there. Although some smaller than bacteria they didn't call them viruses and it took the development of electro microscope can't remember exactly what year around nineteen twenty or so to know that there were such a a an organism that could cause disease so when the in nineteen eighteen flu pandemic of one hundred years ago was there. They actually didn't know they do what they didn't know that it was really a virus As a as a life form so that's kind of amazing to think about but anyway getting back to your question that the corona virus gets its name from the shape that it looks like under the electron microscope with a variety of different projections from the surface of the virus and that's how it gets his name And there are now. I believe seven known corona viruses that have the potential to affect humans. We've always known that there were four types. It caused a just a cold or rhinovirus cold type of illness that so so is the common. The common head cold the common cold just. Is that a type of Brenner. Said well if you use the slang word cold then the answer is a corona virus could be one of the things that causes a cold more. Typically what we posed by what's Rano viruses again. But it'd be hard to distinguish between the Rhino viruses and the the four but benign forms of corona virus. What I was a leading up to is that there's four of benign corona viruses and then We we heard about the SARS coronavirus which was in two thousand and two in two thousand and three and then another one called Moorer's or Middle East Respiratory Syndrome which took too cold a little bit later and is still also evident in certain parts of the Middle Eastern parts of the country. Now so what? Most people don't know that there are still small cases of Burns M E R S. That are out there. But anyway this this New New form of the corona virus. I we didn't know that it was a corner virus. We we had a pretty good guess after this first emerged in China a few months ago and then it was identified and relatively quickly based on the epidemiology and indeed they because we know a little bit about the molecular biology of the of the virus. We were able to actually able to pin down kind of a fingerprinting for the virus relatively early so take take us back to our question here So the current virus is the is the cause for the current current delicious? And the reason that this has been a relatively problematic and that's not necessarily predicted as the final outcome for my chorus is because the other corona viruses that were merged and SARS which had a mortality rates somewhere between fifteen and thirty percent Had a a an incubation period? That was somewhere between five to fourteen days and also it did not appear that individuals that had the virus but were not sick could actually spread the virus to other humans so with the identification of SARS and mirrors and with the initiation of implementation of social isolation but specifically quarantine for a number of days. The SARS outbreak in particular was able to be brought under control because it did not have those other conditions meaning. It was not transmitted before someone knew that they actually have the virus in the eight quote as symptomatic state and secondly because the incubation period tend to be a little bit longer in the five or fourteen days and this virus current virus seemed people can become symptomatic within a couple of days although the median duration of symptoms onset is still at five days. And sorry. Sorry I cut you off piece. There's one more factor that that's that's important to this particular virus again. This is being studied now. And we'll be studying for a long time to come. But the virus seems to have receptors that make it ideal to not only infect nose and the back of the throat but also seems to have receptors. That are a little bit more Able to navigate into the lungs so a variety of the symptoms that are associated with this particular corona virus are more likely to be cough and shortness of breath than necessarily a runny or stuffy. Nose that you might have with a typical cold just to clarify some terms from earlier incubation period refers to the time between contracting and being symptomatic or between contracting and being able to retransmit yeah it's usually referred to as the time between contraction and being symptomatic. Yes okay so this is something that you you've talked about. You talked about in the cool in terms of making a perfect epidemic. It needs to hit the sweet spot. Spits Wayne incubation period but also the fatality rate interestingly for it to be a really dangerous pandemic it can't be too high in to meet you talk about one of the reasons why Boa took wasn't as widespread and dangerous is because people die of it too quickly so it doesn't get passed onto as many people that's correct. That is true that we talk about the course and that is Again there's a there's a virus sweet spot involve several variables Including this incubation period the actual virulence itself but having a a death rate that is somewhere between influenza which is somewhere between a tenth of a percent and a half of a percent although in the nineteen eighteen influenza outbreak. It was. It was likely much higher than that. But having a mortality rate that hovers Under five percent allows the virus to spread and actually favors the transmission of the virus. I I've never quite understood. So what exactly is a virus in because it sort of seemingly less than a Criterium in that. It's it's not. It's sort of semi living. Not really living. It has to share living elements with the host. Okay so virus is a relatively primitive life form but yet primitive but deadly It has genetic material. That's on the inside. That's either deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA or aren. A and we won't get into the technical details of that but then often it's surrounded by an envelope which has a variety of a characteristics which kinda keeps the nucleic acid and the genetic content in the middle and then some viruses have a cap. A capsule in some viruses. Don't again the details of that are not important but we do believe that. The Corona virus is an enveloped virus and hence one of the reasons said alcohol hand gels for example in bleaches are relatively effective on the on the virus. I don't WanNa get too far off the subject here of what you're asking so a virus itself can't really go anywhere by itself. What it has to do is I'd tach to human or other cells and then it is able to gain entry into the cells via a variety of a physiologic things once the surface receptors are triggered. And then it goes into the host human cell and then it tricks the host human cell into feeling that it it's it represents its own DNA Aurigny and it turns on the host Cell Machinery and this leads to actually a reproduction of the virus. And not anything. That's that's beneficial to the to the human host. And then when it's when it's done replicating inside the cell it kind of knocks on the door and it has certain receptors that allows it to to get out into the blood and to spread. So it's really a perfect. It is a parasite if you think of a term parasite see movies with with something. That's called a parasite on a on a macroscopic base. Where you can visually see it or people seen worms and things like that. But this is a microscopic parasite is totally dependent upon what we call the host and the human doesn't have to be human host machinery of the cells to To survive and to propagate you touch to this. I'm more than happy with diversions. We go on diversions all the time on this show you talking about because it's an envelope It's thought to be an envelope Virus that does mean that these alcohol hand gels and I it seems to be relatively easy to kill albeit extremely hard to avoid the spread. So this thing sticking a virus can be spread multiple ways right through droplets through contact G. Do we know. Do we know how much we know so far about how it can be spread in house prevents? It's a good question here. So we know that it to their courses well about transmissibility as another important what we call virulence factor for causing a pandemic so Microorganisms are transmitted by direct contact by touching either one another or touching surfaces. Or what we talk about quite a bit in the courses something called the the fecal oral route and that sounds a bit disgusting but it just basically means that you're touching your own mouth and you may end up introducing something into your intestine and then when you're you know defecating the organism or microorganism can be picked up again as you're as you're doing that. I mean this is on a microscopic basis but Is a holiday is when a cholera is transmitted that way right? Cholera is transmitted that way. Yes yeah and and also a number of bacterial well cholera bacteria but other other things like Salmonella and Shigella and other Back a bacterial intestinal diseases are also transmitted by the fecal oral but there are viruses like hepatitis. A which is also transmitted by the fecal oral route. And but I don't like get off on the fecal route because that's not the major means of this virus spread it is is a direct contact and the contact can also be not directly. Because if there's a well let me get to the second mode of transmission here which is by droplets. So when even when I'm speaking on this podcast now I'm trying to generate my voice and I'm likely generating a small aerosol of very small particles that are traveling on the average a distance of three to the most six feet before these particles will drop and fall to the ground or fall to a table or fall to its surface so if if people are congregating within that six foot radius then they have a potential not by contact but actually to breathe in that aerosol directly into the nose and the back of the throat and the lungs and and and get the virus. If you're talking about a contact I should elaborate that the contact with one another or with a very surfaces. You have to actually touch your eyes or your touch your nose touch your mouth. And what we call inoculate the mucous membranes of the eyes nose mouth in order for the virus to get into the body so the virus is not going to say burrow through intact skin. Just because you touch something to get into the body and this is again why the the common sense of ice has been. Don't touch your face. Don't touch your nose. Don't touch your mouth. Which unfortunately as human beings we are prone to doing because humans touch their touch their face and touch their their their touch their face somewhere between six to twelve times per hour when people have done observational studies regarding this here so it's it's a hard habit to kick so that's spread is by the Aerosol route. The spread is by direct contact or the spread is by contact with a surface which then is touched and then inoculated into one of these the mucous membranes of the of the body again. The eyes the nose or the mouth now. One of the questions that might come up for from listeners is how long can the virus actually survive on inanimate surfaces? How long can survive on a table? How long can it survive on the floor? How long could survive on a grocery box delivered from the Grocery Store? And you know there. There is some information on that although and again this was actually published in the New England Journal medicine the last forty hours but the conditions by which they did the experiments where we're actually experimental so the exact answer is not out there but the the point is the virus likely can survive for somewhere between twenty four hours to five to seven days depending upon what surface it lands on depending on what the temperature is in the room depending upon whether there's any moisture that's on the surface and so so the virus can be transmitted by intermediary a type of objects and. Henson going to point out one that I think is is a pitfall that Fedex and united parcel services have picked up on in that all of our in our electric agents signing for pen signing for for groceries and on these electric boards now Those pens are perfect of vector for one touch another time picking up these things and then people touching their faces amounts. This is not the only one. But this is one of these hidden electronic devices which unfortunately I got a push email from Fedex and talked by. Ups driver today and they're they're not requesting signatures anymore but anyway the pot is a third a third a inanimate object is a way to transmit the corona virus. Now unfortunately I just signed one of those documents ten minutes before we started recording. Wash your hands off to his anti dumping is I felt the social pressure not to make a service guy coming out to service this propane tank and I was watching your course like to Fox and he came in and also felt guilty that I was that he might have been hearing these things that seem to walk into so that I did want to stay on top of what you just heard. I also don't want to touch your computer. You are scientists led. You gave me so I signed it and then wash hands right away. But that's not the best remarkable those social pressures like I. I think we have to do us at of recalculating the last just last week before. We were fully quarantined. I I I was in the bay area and I had a show and everyone was being very careful. You know had washing and hand sanitizer everywhere. But it's still like you know a a someone came up and pet to the dog of my dog and her husband had been coughing and he was like wanted to drag the dog away before before she had to chose dependent but it does this huge social pressures. Don't like don't touch my dog or shouted a woman in her sixties. Just it's it's very hard not to do that. But this then you will be in there so it'll be like find different polite ways to go. I'm GonNa declined to do what used to be a polite social interaction right and I happened to be in Washington about a four weeks ago when the outbreak in Washington DC. At the time. But I met with the Wisconsin representative my local house of Representative Person for talking about Antibiotic Resistance. And you know. I started pumping elbows as he offered his hand to me. And I said this is going to be the new norm so you should get used to it so yes particularly in Washington that was it was as you know and you can see on. Tv It was not the new norm till about a week ago right. That really is a case. Where you sort of you need your leaders to lead by example and you know and they should be. They should ideally be taking their cue from someone like yourself and then passing that message to the population exactly when it comes to these transmissibility factors. Is there? Nothing? That's that's consistent across all corona viruses as far as whether they can be transmitted like how long they stay in the air would be about the same size and therefore fall similarly or is there a big range in this family of viruses and how they would behave in terms of while they would all behave the same way among the current viruses. Although I will mention and it's a little hard to go into right now it is thought it was thought at the time that when When SARS first came out that that there was the potential to be transmitted in what we call an airborne manner. Okay and I'm not sure we've completely excluded that for the current current viruses well and what that means is that the virus can spread and be suspended in particles that will not fall to the ground within that six foot radius and hence to have the potential to be transmitted beyond that six foot six with distance and that was one that was also another factor for causing a pandemics so the more common and known virus that does is is measles and measles can be airborne. Chicken pox can be airborne and and that's the reason why if one person has measles the average number of measles cases that happens after a measles exposure is somewhere between sixteen to twenty okay and this the corona virus. Now if one person has it the what's called the are not which is the a mathematical term for how many people that this could be transmitted to is running somewhere between two point five to two point seven but I don't WanNa get off topic here. It's just that we're not entirely sure that the current events cannot be spread by the airborne route and the there were outbreaks of the SARS outbreak in for example the Metropole Hotel. I believe it was in Hong Kong. Where hundreds of people came down with the virus and they were on different floors in the hotel. Okay and it was thought that and there's publications on this that the air handling system of the of the hotel has something to do with so many people getting sick in the same hotel and right now it was just coming through the vents. They think possibly well yes and You know literally now if we have if we have the option and if we have the availability within the hospitals. Because we're not. We don't know everything about this virus yet. We are trying to put patients that are hospitalized into what's called the negative airflow room and what that means is that when the doors of the rumor opened. Okay the air is contained within the room. And there's the air is set to a pressure that's lower than the outside pressure for the room. The doors outside and everything that's in the room stays in the room. Okay and that's not being absolutely mandated if there are space problems with a number of hospital beds because any typical hospital may only have maybe a dozen of the rooms or two dozen rooms at the most depending upon what type of hospital it is that have this negative airflow. So it's not it's not a mandate it's more of an ideal circumstance for hospitalized patients obviously in physician in doctors offices and clinics and things like that there's also a limited number of these negative airflow rooms if there are any so we have to do our best to to have the appropriate personal protective equipment so to try to reduce the spread. Is there anything that can be studied about the virus itself to determine these features or is it only once we get epidemiological data that we decide? Oh yes it has gone. Airborne is transmissible in this way. We can't just look at the virus closely and then say oh because of this size I of their feature that it would have that would indicate these things without having to wait to see how it how it works in the real world that those are great questions. I don't know the answer those questions. I'm sorry you mentioned measles Obviously the measles is top of people's mind because of the fact that the vaccine does exist for it which is not being as universally uptaken as it should be because of Sutton People with bad intense and other people fulling stupid things with this cove in nineteen Novel Coronavirus Walk. I know they're sort of tr. They rushing the process to try and get vaccines out there. They're already at the stage where they are starting to test some things in the in some humans and skipping. Animal Trials Chick can you? Can you talk a bit about what the processes for this and how how vaccines are even sort of developed and then rolled out? Well I'll do my best here. There is a lecture that we have on unpack the nation's immunizations and the reasons for vaccinations in the musicians and In in my lecture we also talk about the the anti VACs Reasons and and try to handle that in a diplomatic Fashion but the actual development and manufacturing a vaccine is a little beyond my technical a knowledge in terms of biology. I mean I I know that they were able to look at the sequence of the virus right away and they had done some work on the SARS vaccine back in two thousand to two thousand three not knowing that the source was going to be able to be contained with mostly with mostly the isolation mekhmet methods but some of the preliminary work that was done there The the company or the molecular biologist substituted the new molecular sequences into the other work that had been done with the SARS vaccine and now this is what they're they're working with here now. Most vaccines are actually are actually grown in egg based okay at least typically influenza vaccines are the most And and other vaccines are done as well and and that enhances because the egg serve as the as the host for the virus life cycle that we went through at the beginning of this podcast here. So it's a efficient way to make large numbers of virus particles and large number of vaccine but the actual technical aspects of bringing the vaccine actually multiplying and make vaccine and getting the vaccine into trials. I'm sorry is beyond my my technical expertise at this time. That's completely fine. Let's let's get back into your area of technical expertise because obviously as well as a professor and the The university you and teacher you are a. You are a practicing medical doctor so well. What is your process if you if a patient of yours has suspected symptoms. I know there are tests wondering short supply and as a Sudden Matt. Triaging happened to happen right now. Sure so a lot of this is happening on the on the primary care side of things. Now we as infectious disease experts are. I wouldn't say we're not on the front line but we're not seeing you know patients Directly except for patients that might be in the hospital and be ill enough where we have to kind of generate what we call it differential diagnosis for their illness. And one of them certainly now is the is the new Corona Virus. But there are a lot of other a respiratory microorganisms. That can cause illness here so we can have common bacterial pneumonia. There can be. There's lots of influenza. That's going on in the community. There's other organisms called mycoplasma and Columbia. Which are kind of halfway between the viruses and bacteria that we talked about in my course that can also cause respiratory ailments so as an infectious disease. That practicing doctor now. We're more likely to try to help. The doctors Taking care of patients in the hospital sort through this what. We call differential diagnosis. For what the what the patient might have. And certainly. We're also a senator disease control and the State Department's Health departments have been trying to to send out information for the Journal public regarding what other symptoms of the new corona virus? One of the symptoms of the flu. One of the symptoms of rhinovirus or common cold and there are some small differentiating factors. That can help people try to figure out what type of element they have if they don't if they don't feel well so we're trying to help with that education process as well as infectious disease doctors. So what what are the main sort of different show? All the main differences in terms of symptoms that people should look out for to know if they have a cold all possible curve in nineteen or just all standards right so so the colds themselves typically have a relatively slow origin. They they come on over a span of say three to five days and if you have a cold if you you probably don't even have a technical fever which is defined as one hundred point four degrees you may have one of these ninety nine plus or one hundred point two type of temperatures. That's Going on there and then typically again with rhinovirus coal viruses nasal congestion runny nose. Okay and Cough. That might be associated with large volumes of production of nasal secretions are the common aspects of things for coughing but generally people are not sure too breath because the lung. The lungs are not affected by the typical Rhino viruses. That cause cause coal Influenza the there's a lot of symptoms that are very similar between influenza and the new corona virus and those include fever and again real fever that might be one hundred one to one hundred three degrees. The flu tends to come on more relatively abruptly over a span of twenty four hours Hence the French term The La- grip and my French is not great here but people are were kind of knocked knocked down relatively abruptly and felt fever and chills their muscles eight significantly they would also with the flu have some nasal congestion but not as much as a typical cold they would also have a sore throat And and and both a sore throat and rhinovirus can have a sore throat and so does the corona virus but And coffin be there but again usually related to the respiratory nasal secretions and not necessarily invasion to lung now. There are a small percentage of individuals. And there's probably about one percent so that can develop influenza pneumonia where these shortness of breath and persistent cough may persist but the muscle aches of influenza are really very characteristic and they tend to last for two or three days so turning to the corona virus there may be muscle aches and small percentage of of of individuals but they tend to be relatively transient. And maybe only lasts for about twenty four hours The CORONA VIRUS. Illness tends to be right in between the flu. And the and the rhinovirus in terms of its Beginnings here so the symptoms come on Hispaniola somewhere between twenty four to seventy two hours. If you'RE GONNA develop clinical illness what's missing often is yet. There is off. There's a sore throat. But what's missing? Is these decree of nasal runny runny nose type of characteristics and there's more of a propensity to have a a dry cough again because the virus tends to have a little bit more of a propensity to be in the loans and invade the loans So is this invasion of the lung. Something that makes it more contagious. 'cause you're more likely to then converts into this. Aerosol Spreadable Arizo. Well that's a good question. That's a good question. I'm not sure I can tell you with quantitative certainty that that's a truism because if if you're if you're sneezing and you have a rhinovirus and you're sneezing you have the rights and you're GonNa you're gonNA generate enough of a contagion base spread. Hypothetically if you're coughing and you have influenza in the lungs are not involved in the same is true for rhinovirus that you might be potentially less contagious but this is the involvement of the lungs is is is really the reason that the metality rate from the corona virus is somewhere between ten to twenty five times that of a influenza. Because as I Lou. Very few people get influenza. Pneumonia and the death rate from influenza again is somewhere between a tenth to a half of one percent but the death rate from the corona virus The new corona virus is going to be somewhere between two to three percent. And we're not going to know exactly what that death-ray is completely because until we see what the how the United States healthcare system really responds to the challenge of early diagnosis and management of this here but again across the world. Now the numbers are somewhere between a two to three percent and those numbers all sorts of very by the the health status of the individual. So the younger you are the more like your immune system is likely to be able to manage the illness again on. Unfortunately sixty doesn't seem to be very elderly these days but sixteen above and eighty and above the mortality rates tend to be higher again partially. Because as you get older there are other what we call co Morbidity so people have heart disease can't handle the infection people have underlying lung disease like chronic obstructive lung disease emphysema and they have less reserve and then they're more like the more likely to die. Starting it for and I was just GonNa say I've I've heard that. They're pretty vast differences in the fatality rates in the Chinese population. Because of things like smoking. What other exacerbating factors have you heard about this? Well see smoking will not be in your favor. That that's for sure and the reason for that is just just a general The smoke so in the lungs And we actually talk about this in my course and I think we actually illustrate this in the what's what's called respiratory epithelium and they have there are are hairs. Ha Irs stand up in the linings of the lungs others also the hairs in the linings of the nose. But what happens is when germs get into the lungs the This these these hairs act together. Like a like a broom to try to sweep out microorganisms. And get them out of out of the lungs and if you're if you're smoker Again people have different degrees of smoking. But there's more likely to be a non coordination of these hairs and there's more likely to be a small amounts of damage in the functioning of these sweeping hairs to get out of the lungs and that's that's one reason why smoking Smoking is a additive risk factor for death but also in China people people really smoke. For long periods of time they develop what's called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema which actually destroys the number of air exchange sacks sac chaos in the lung and then also reduces the ability of an individual to handle of a virus or any type of infection. Along this comb abilities an interesting thing because I I know there is not yet in any kind of antiviral treatment for this either but I did read that are giving some patients with this Antibiotics which seems counter intuitive Don't work against viruses. They only look against bacteria. But it's to Avoi- it's to mitigate these secondary infections or these these other things that go along with it right. Yeah well that's actually So that that's interesting even before. The outbreak of the Corona Corona virus for the first time ever the Infectious Disease Society of America recommended in the guidelines for pneumonia earlier. This fall that patients that are that are diagnosed with hospitalized. Influenza should even though we know it's a virus and we actually have antiviral viral medications to give to patients that are hospitalized with influenza. But they also concomitantly should be given antibacterial therapy and the reason for that is because there is somewhere between ten to twenty percent risk that the virus influenza virus. Does what cigarette smoking does it? Destroys this these hair cells and they functioning capacities of the lung to clear clear germs? And it's more likely that bacteria will actually get trapped inside the lungs and cause a secondary bacterial infection. In fact it's thought and nobody knows the exact numbers that maybe up to fifty percent of all the mortality from the one thousand nine hundred eighteen in great influenza pandemic was due to secondary bacterial infections. And not necessarily due to violence of the virus itself. There's no doubt that the virus was a a stronger flavor of influenza virus and people have studied that are continuing to study that but the secondary bacterial. You gotta remember not only do we not know it was a virus but we knew about bacteria but we didn't have antibiotics in one thousand nine eighteen so if you if you develop the secondary bacterial infection you were you. Were going to die so getting back to the original question is that yes indeed. So I think what what's happening. Now is these practitioners and practitioners are extrapolating from the recommendations now from influenza that if you have the new corona virus that we want to reduce the risk of any secondary infection here. So it's not. We don't know what the numbers are compared to influenza but if somebody's getting antibiotics antibacterial -biotics. That would be the reason for giving them that makes sense Another thing I read. Sorry just sort of use you as fact checking But is in his right to get to talk to an expert The one of the routes that looking at to develop a treatment involves taking antibodies from recovered. All recovering patients is that. Is that a common procedure or is this something. That's a relatively new method a lot. So so we talk about this in the in the lecturer on infection and immunity on the immune system so antibodies are Specific proteins that are produced by the body by US white blood cells that are circulating in the in the blood and also that are in the the spleen and lymph nodes and these proteins are produced specifically for the invader Here so hence the corona virus. And so if you if you have these proteins that can kind of what they do. Is they kind of the analogy? Would be they. They glue down the virus and make it easier for our own. Immune system to target a removing the virus from the lungs moving the virus from the from the mucous membranes. Zimmer removing the virus from potentially even while it's trans transferring if it goes into the blood so getting back to your question here yes. This is a hypothetical means of trying to improve the outcomes for this. This would be likely targeted for severely ill patients in the intensive care unit. That are on ventilators where we're actually pulling out several different modes of treatment to try to try to save individuals. This is not really a completely new concept. This is called passive immunization and this concept actually dates back to the pre antibiotic era before we had penicillin because the most common cause of death from pneumonia was will call pneumococcal bacteria pneumonia and since we didn't have antibiotics they were trying to take serum from individuals who survived pneumonia and give it to patients to to try to save them from pneumonia before antibiotics but again jumping back again Several years to to to my course in in Africa when Ebola was Was RAVAGING THE LARGEST BOLA outbreak Again there were survivors from Bola and they harvested blood from survivors. And then try to try to give it to the sickest of individuals for for treatment purposes. So there's not not really new concept. It goes back nearly eighty years. But it is one of the means passive passive amid immunization. Is something that that still may play a role. In trying to mitigate this pandemic the guy. I'd love to talk a bit about sort of you. Know those sort of social distancing corentin and what we're doing right now right now. Andy and I are in different cities as a you. Of course we're recording over the Internet phones. But how much of a difference do these practices? Make Him. What's what should everyone be doing right now? Sure so there certainly is a lot on the on the Internet now regarding in mathematical models of what could be apocalypse. Doomed say or the possibility of really You know good outcomes from social distancing and cocooning so so. The goal of this whole process of social distancing is to reduce that number of infections or to spread out the infections over time. So there's something called. The doubling time of the virus mentioned that the virus typically would transmit it to somewhere between two or three hundred individuals but the doubling time for the For the virus it went unchecked. If you went from one person to another person to another person to another person you had a susceptible human is going to be somewhere between two to three days but if you can separate those with the virus and not allow it to get into other humans in a longer period of time or not at all then the if you if you do if you do the math and you do the arithmetic than the number of people that would be infected would be less or if not the number of people that would be less again. This is what you hearing a bit on the news about flattening the curb. So what we don't want to see is a an an exponential rise in the number of cases because that's going to bring on an exponential rise in the number of people that need to be hospitalized an exponential increase in the number of people that will have to be in intensive care units potentially fighting for their life and fighting for ventilators. And this is not you know. The situation is kind of playing out in in Italy in track. Tragically in in Italy right now. So we're trying to learn a little bit from the lessons of that that dynamic so the goal is to if people are going to be infected is to to spread out the need for hospitalization so spread out the need for hospital care to spread out the need for intensive care units and possibly ventilators. It may not come to that. I mean we're in. We're actually doing a social experiment right now but again in certain areas in in the in the Seattle Area. This scenario is beginning to play out. And we're I'm I'm hopeful that the situation is not coulda could play out in in many American cities Or Not may not play out at all but this is the reason that the social distance this is also. An people may not understand that. It's the reason that schools daycare centers are closed. It's not because children are going to be sick because we actually surprisingly this particular virus does not children can get sick but they don't get sick like adults do and but they still could have the virus. They can still spread the virus even though they either have minor symptoms or no symptoms at all. So children are the perfect What we call vectors for transmitting. The illness among many adult adult people here. So while the adults are practicing social distancing taking the kids away from socialization and allowing it to spread in ASEM dramatic fashion in the Child. A child education population is also another reason that the schools are closed. Right now right. I can't think of a mall. Perfect way of spreading this virus than schools. Where a Kid? A kid showing almost no little two zero symptoms can take viruses from that house to twenty other children who then take it back to their house full of battles people. It's yes it's and and again it. You know it was really you know it. It's a big decision because obviously people are struggling for for getting childcare and and the concert home and it's having a tremendous effect on the workforce things like that but it was. I'm sure it was disgusted at very high levels and very well thought out To to be part of the social distancing as well written where I'm from his own. Kiosk nells closing at schools On Friday and it it took the entire family including my doctor cousin. Four days of haranguing to persuade my sixty. Something Mum who is a teacher to stop going into work because that is also again playing against those sort of social conventions. Why she's like no I. This is my job and I have to do. You are in the danger zone and you are. Potentially you're being exposed to this virus every day. It's sort of flies in the face of most of the advice we get in these kinds of moments. Like POST. Nine eleven was all. Just get back out there and shop if you aren't shopping the terrorists win and there's no equivalent thing. I think that that's a lot of the problem right because people do have to sort of Typically people from an older generation have this sort of stoicism. And we'll just walk on and we'll get through this and we won't let ourselves full victim to this. There's this is the opposite of that is what we should be doing. That's right Well said and and that's because we're we're dealing with with science and biology and and you know it's not it's it's not social behavior social behavioral issues. I mean certainly. That's part of it but Biology wins an expert as an expert in this. What were the last two months of Your Life? Like were you sounding alarms to your immediate friends and Family. Much earlier exasperated. Or what was your mood like said well as I mentioned as I mentioned when I was in Washington. Dc about a month ago. I know concern because and again this is interesting I hope I don't see anything wrong here but China you know this outbreak broken China but as a communist society and people are going to be told what they can do and you know they had to do what they had to do or they had to face the consequences. My big concern when I was in Washington about four weeks ago was the virus was getting out into Western societies okay and had just made sway to Europe cases in the UK and and and and such here and obviously these are societies. That are not used to people for people being told what to do. And how to do it? And there's GonNa be a lot of resistance for things like social distancing and behavioral issues so my concern was. Actually that wants this. Fires got out into Western societies. That we would not have the means to contain it like the Chinese have contained. Contain things now and you know this has has played out in in in various places in Europe and right at that time the virus was kind of landing on our shores in in various places. Not necessarily maybe a little bit from China before the borders were. The borders were closed But also from traveller returning travellers from Europe so yes my fears were yes the the contagion that has been seated from China but mostly Europeans assures was going to end up with the situation that we're in now so yeah it's been it's been very worrisome. Seems to be sort of a gradual reframing in people's minds in terms of like not the government is ordering us to do this and scree the government but hey we're all in this together and we need to help each by following these steps and doing this for the good while we're I'm hoping that most people are abiding by that by that philosophy. I think there's certainly enough on social media that there's certain certain segments of our society that are not really doing that writes. Uh Spring break comes to mind is the. I saw the footage coming from Florida Yesterday there was a student for my hometown was on National Public Radio yesterday and they they were having a good time but but they did say well when I get back. Okay I'm going to isolate myself for two weeks. So I guess that's a that's kind of a consolation prize. What is the GO-TO source that you're recommending the CDC for up to the minute information? Well Yeah I mean the. Cdc's got a good sign. I think the New York Times has a good site. I think the Washington at the The Wall Street Journal has a good site in terms of three You know well I'm newspapers and then In the city. So yeah I would say almost all the questions can be answered from the from the CDC website but a both the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times have interesting articles like the Wall Street. Journal had one yesterday about you know. Can I trust home deliveries okay Food Okay and what? What are the implications of that? So so there's some little quirky stuff on each of those sites that that relate to human relations stories that people questions are asked that the CDC wouldn't necessarily have a definitive answer on right willing to all those sure before we go. We talk just a little bit about home treatment because I know obviously the most. The more serious cases a told to Gospel in be treated by In hospitals but because of limited resources a large number of people take the younger people on unlikely to have less dangerous symptoms than being told if they show symptoms just self isolate and treat themselves. I seen conflicting information comes through. About what medication you can. And can't take won't may mitigate it the simpsons won't make the symptoms worse like a possibly ibuprofen might be a bad idea to take. It seems do. Do you know where the research currently stands in terms of what you should do if you're these symptoms and but not to a dangerous level well while sure. This is certainly an evolving evolving process. Here right now so. Ib program went from the hot seat to the cold seat. Within twenty four hours there was some preliminary information that came out of I think it was actually from China. That Ibuprofen may be something that maids condition worse. But when people examine the data the World Health Organization said today reverse that and said No. There's no reason that you shouldn't take Ibuprofen. If you need to take Ibuprofen now one point I wanNA make before. I'll I'll answer the question but is that just because someone has a fever of one hundred one degrees. Does it mean they need to take? Ibuprofen or see the medicine. So fever is actually physiologic. And we talk about this. My course we have a whole discussion about fever. The mechanisms fever. And if you have a fever and you don't know it or you have a fever and you're just feeling not too bad then. You don't have to suppress the fever because fever was put into our bodies over over time here to actually help with the process. Now that doesn't mean that if you have one hundred hundred fever and you have this terrible headache and you feel lousy that you can't take something for it But ideally you should let itself play out if you're not if you're not really a very symptomatic from from the fever but with respect to other home home remedies here. There's there's nothing that really stands out that people can actually do for symptomatic relief from their cough. I mean you can still take coffee. Congestions and things like that. For reducing a coughing and being getting a chance to sleep tylenol or see the manufacturers for for sore throat or ibuprofen Paracetamol for the Brits the Brits but they there is nothing kind of in the home. You know over the shelf Drugstore type of thing. Now that that can be aside from symptomatic control aspects that you would do the same for influenza or a cold. That would be recommended at at home right now. I sort of nasal rinses useful or said new troll general hydration. I I would not. I would not recommend anyone with the current or stew nasal treatments particularly because for for a couple of reasons number one the degree of nasal and involvement and upper mucous membrane involvement and symptomatic symptom symptomatic wise. It's probably not going to benefit that and number two. If they're not careful they do have the potential to end up with more spread of the virus. Okay so I would not really recommend that as a as a routine for for anyone for the condition it. We've covered a lot but is there anything else that you think we should know is useful to know both about the virus itself or about sort of human behavior surrounding the viruses? Or what might happen in the future? Well I I guess it's tough to tackle in the last few minutes here. Specifically President Trump was on television today with some of his associates. Talking about some potential Medications that might be used in the hospital setting and some them are investigational. Some of them are currently available. And we're trying to sort through that information right now. Because there's there's not necessarily going to be any magic bullet that is put forth in the next two to four weeks and but I mean one of the things that again makes this outbreak stand out compared to influenza people. Keep saying well you know we have a lot of influence going around by the way we do have a lot of influence. That's still going around. That can still land people in the hospital and can still kill people but we do have an anti viral medication for influenza which is given to all patients that are hospitalized with influenza and if in the outpatient setting if you get to medical attention before forty eight hours you can. There's an antiviral. Medication would which mitigates symptoms of influenza. So that that's is that cool Tamiflu. Is that the well. That's the trade name. But but the generic name is called Oat cell temp ozil Tama beer and it's available in generic generic forum and so Anyway we have that in that in that that helps us with employees and and help can reduce can reduce in patients hospitalized patients seriously. Ill need security. It can reduce the chances of death. So we'd like to be able to find something to be able to help us with this corona virus to help. Newt move that needle on the death ray back back somewhat here so people are looking. People are are working on this right now but. I'm not sure there's a magic bullet that is on the horizon in the next in the next week or two. Sorry did you have a final question are but my question is is in the final one but just. I'm just sort of flabbergasted by the by the numbers and how they don't seem to line up and I'm just curious if you think that the global case reportings are just extremely low because of lack of testing like the fact that so many celebrities have it and we're still saying it's late two hundred thousand worldwide. That just doesn't match. It seems like more they were able to get tested and the number is actually much higher. Is that your entree now or not. Well I think it depends upon what country you're from also depends upon what you know what? Abacus you're playing on The Chinese cheese their definition several times of the cases here and there are other countries like South Korea have test kits and can be accurate in terms of their their their number of cases here We're not as we're not as fortunate so far in the United States that that needs to change it is changing Hopefully will be completely different. five to seven days from now. I was saying that last week but here we are But again there's probably under reporting because there's under testing in the United States but I think you have to look at the numbers from every every country and see how good the testing has been in terms of trying to figure out what the counselor I would say that. In general the number worldwide cases is probably underestimated. But I just don't know what the magnitude of that underestimation is right now right right. So what's next? What are you doing next day to day? What are you what is your current as an infectious diseases specialists What what do you do? Well we're doing a lot of planning right now because At least Wisconsin. The number of cases is a little over one hundred in the local community. We have. There's a somewhere around. I think the latest number thirty five cases in our county. We're trying to prepare for the worst by having specific protocols for hospitalized patients to make sure that we have all healthcare providers are prepared for taking care of patients that they are able to use the appropriate personal protective equipment and they have the appropriate shields and mass and and things to prevent them from getting sick while caring for the sick. We're trying to prior to rise for these negative airflow rooms in the hospital. Were trying to count intensive care unit. Beds we're trying to. They're trying to reduce the number of people there in the hospital by canceling elective surgeries. I mean there's a whole central command that's ongoing in the community here. That's part of A. It's not quite military setup but it's modeled after the military control system and the systems are in existence here in our local community to try to against ahead of what what might be. We're hoping for the best but we're planning for the worst. I would say the the right to not be. Don't get hugs again. Thank thank you for taking time out of the planning and everything to talk through this as we said before as the top of the show you can also go to the grossest plus and watch a series of lectures that take you through all infectious diseases. The history the treatments and feature reductions including the remarkably prescient final lecture recorded substantially before today. you find out about the possible culprits. I'm possible spread of future. Pandemics sure and and there may I don't want to say any final word on this year but there may be some Announcements coming from the great courses about the availability of course in the near future which. I'm sure you'll be. If it's official you'll make public with the with the podcast here. We can actually do that so we still have our thirty day. Free trial for any of our listeners. so if you go to the greatest plus slash probably you can watch all of. Dr. Fox's like just plus a you know you learn a language Do LEARN ABOUT. Why are agriculture oil poets? That you wish to discover. We've got time but in the meantime Again wants more. Thank you Dr. Barry for Professor Belt. Affair ended for joining us and taking us through this. Okay thank you. Thank you for asking me to dismay.

influenza Illness Washington DC China US persistent cough Dr Barry Fox professor SARS Pneumonia pandemics skype Barry See Fox cholera
April 16: Delayed reaction

As It Happens from CBC Radio

49:56 min | 1 year ago

April 16: Delayed reaction

"Hi I'm Leah and I'm Falen you know us as the host of the podcast. The secret life of Canada. And we've got an exciting better news for you. We do. We want to go to school with you. That's right. We are now part of the curriculum in a way. We've teamed up with educators from across the country to create teaching guys that go along with some of our best episodes. We've got teaching guides for indigenous history. Caribbean Canadian Migration Black History Asian history. It's very exciting. But is very exciting. And so each guard comes with ad free audio transcripts lesson plan slide shows and a whole bunch of other stuff. Yeah just had to. Cbc DOT CA Slash Teaching Guides for more info. And it's free it's free this is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm out of Paradise sitting in for Carol off and I'm Chris Bowden. This is as it happens. The podcast edition delayed reaction conservative. Mp has some questions for the WHO about its handling of the Kovic nineteen pandemic such as whether or not it acted as quickly as it could have questions. He had planned to ask a committee meeting. That's just been canceled. She knew it would be rough but she didn't know it would be this rough which took in with the Maryland nurse who answered. New York's call for help so long. A marine scientist in Australia has stumbled across an organism. That is likely the lengthiest creature ever seen and quite possibly the strangest to test case. The Ontario government says it's expanding its corona virus testing. One doctor at a Long-term Care Center says while he managed to get a special exemption for the testing his patients and staff need other homes. Aren't so lucky. Driven to distraction while everyone else has been staying. Put a bureaucratic. Snafu forced a Canadian snowbird to drive across several provinces to find a place to stay and then drive all the way back again. And we've tried to catch a lot of fish stories and tonight we've got to the didn't get away both of which set a new gold fish standard as it happens the Thursday edition radio whose guests are forthcoming even if their pets are a little coy. Justin Trudeau says the world needs to get along during a pandemic and the World Health Organization can help us do that. The Prime Minister stopped short of criticizing. Us President Donald Trump's controversial decision to freeze who funding yesterday. President trump has accused the organization of mismanaging the threat of covert nineteen and of blindly following China's lead and some Canadian conservative. Mp's have questions on that subject as well. A parliamentary health committee invited senior Canadian. Who Dr Bruce Aylward to answer tough questions about the organization's handling of the virus this week but on Tuesday Dr Aylward cancelled his appearance. Matt General is the Tory M P. Who Sent Dr the invite? We reached him in Ottawa. Mr Through what answers were you hoping to get from Dr Bruce Aylward from the? Who this week. Yes so I think if you if you look back into early January the JOE was recommending. That there was no clear evidence that human to human transmission then ten later. The decision was well there. There was evidence of of that which has no fair but again want to ask. Mr Awarded. Y. The Y. Those decisions Were were made again. The closing of the borders. So I want to ask the questions to July. The decision to recommend the borders stay open And then eventually. The decision was made to close them in other countries where closing the borders masks. We just saw last week a decision. That's now masks are being. I recommended to wear out in public places. I think a lot of those questions are are reasonable. Questions that Canadians. How right now gets mattress? Let me just ask you about a couple of those things. Because the scientific evidence was is changing all the time the WHO and public health agency said. They're always working off the best evidence of the time and that things might change. So when you bring up you've questions about human to human transmission The WHO's answered me. Well at the time we're working on the best evidence we had absolutely. That's that's fair. I WanNa hear Mr Word Provide that evidence to committee when there was evidence. That's the time from other countries that were saying. Well it is Human to human transmission. So you know. It's a fair question to ask them are where he may have a tremendous response For that but again without having method committee. It's difficult to to to really know. Some of the concerns you have raised are common to concerns. Us President Donald Trump laid out this week when he froze American funding to the World Health Organization. What do you think of the American Presidents Decision? Yes certainly don't want to to confuse this of our tendency to come in and have questions asked An answer to committee and I think questions that Canadians are asking Certainly are going as far as Requesting the withdrawal of funding. You know it's I guess they're the presence progress there. The the number one contributor to who to these questions As well but For from our perspective. Certainly want to want to get Get behind some of the decisions that were made by Dr Town and and others windfall and the advice from the the WHOL Canada should consider freezing funds to the World Health Organization. We're we're up significantly down the the the chain of funding where there's a number of other countries ahead of us I certainly think there's a benefit to having organization like the whol but I think it's also equal benefits having transparency related to that. And that's that's why we're trying to get Mr L. Root to our committee to the awesome of those those questions. You know there's a number of foundations like Bill Melinda Gates Foundation as fun significantly more than than any country in Canada does. So you know it's it's A question again of of this advice that was being followed by physicians here in Canada. And we want to understand some of the decisions. We made that whol Sawai Y De Devices being getting. Who had been sounded the alarm about covert nineteen? Before Chinese officials had even started publicising it. They sounded more alarms more frequently and earlier than any national government did. What more do you think the whol could have done to stem the tide of cove nineteen? That's probably written questions for me right there. That's certainly there's there's a role for for whol and you know the timing of when they called us a global pandemic. I believe it was was march tenth. Eleventh were curious as to to the timing of that as well I I think. Again having some of these These questions answered in in terms of that. Timing specifically will be important because our committee was struck with the sole purpose. Nonpartisan Committee struck with the sole purpose of receiving evidence concerning matters related to the government's response to the Kobe nineteen pandemic We want to find the answers in in real time. Now but also prepare for for any potential pandemics and also prepare for life after Endemic which we we all know significantly a different one of the areas that has been criticized in terms of the W. H. O. Is it's data. That data comes directly from individual countries. So should we blaming the? Who for that or rather the countries that provided the data? Yeah and I know you've you've hit On on something that has had a lot of concerns things that we've heard as when it comes to date on the transparency of data and I go and. Who WHIFF. They probably two or three times a day just looking at the updated data and rely on it and and Wanting to make sure that that's correct I think is a fair and reasonable thing. Not just for Canadians. Book for for everyone to understand You know the one thing that jumps out at me. You look at a country like China and they loop in the data with With Taiwan and we know that they've had two different very different courses in terms of how many cases how many deaths have occurred and just approaches that of half in there so wondering why Taiwan separated from from China and. I'm hoping this will be able to shed some light on that was US pulling back on funding and concerns about China perhaps playing to large role. Is this an opportunity for Canada for our country to fill that vacuum at the WHO? I would argue absolutely. I think there's a again the. Who Does have a role to play? And I think it's it's that coordinating role in that leadership role. I think there have also been lots of questions. Raised though about The funding partners I contrary to popular opinion China. Isn't that the number one hundred? They're actually also quite far. Down does the list and in terms of of countries if you add up the assessed contributions and the voluntary contributions. But thinking that there's there's probably a good Good Role for Canada. Play if even it's just on on increasing their transparency of of some of this information and we're hopeful after this will will be able to provide some recommendations I committee and Mr Words Able to join us. So hopefully he can shed some light on some of that okay. Mr General will leave it there. Thank you very much for joining us today. Appreciate it appreciate it. Stay well and then Steve Safe you. Matt who is the Conservative Party's health critic? We reached him in Ottawa. And you can find more on this story on our webpage at CBC DOT CA Slash A. H. Doug Ford says his province is catching up as we told you last week on. -Tario has been slower than other provinces to ramp up the testing necessary to identify and isolate cases of Cova nineteen. Now there are outbreaks underway in one hundred and four Ontario. Care homes this afternoon. Premier Ford gave the following update. I promised by today. We'd be testing eight thousand people a day. Well today. We're at over nine thousand cove Ed. Nineteen test will continue to expand testing testing more people and priority groups. We've expanded our testing guidelines. We're making sure we're testing the people who need our support the most. We'll be testing at homeless shelters. In women's shelters homes for people with disabilities. We'll be testing women who are pregnant in newborns people who are undergoing chemotherapy dialysis or requiring transplants. Because my top priority is making sure no one in this province is left behind that was on -Tario Premier Doug Ford but the new guidelines still restricts testing to patients and staff of hospitals and care homes who are showing symptoms of Kobe. Nineteen when we spoke to Dr Barry Roth last week. He was frustrated by the lack of testing for his residents and staff. He's the medical director of three long-term care homes in southern Ontario. We reached Dr. Barry Roth Intel Somberg Ontario Dr Roth Premier Ford says that under the province's new guidelines. They're testing the people who need it. The most are you satisfied with what's going on where you are. I'm very satisfied with our home now. We got there and I can't explain to you how we got there But it's interesting the last week when I spoke to carol she said to me. There's a big shadow that falls between with the Primer. Says and what actually happens in reality and last week she was absolutely right Premature expanded Testing last week and we were hopeful that that meant the symptomatic and the staff in in our Long Term Care homes when in fact it didn't that's not what transpired last week. We were granted. The right to swab new admissions. That were a symptomatic either from the community or from from home or from hospitals. But we're a minority Amongst long term care facilities that are doing that. And so all the residents in in the facilities where you work at all of the staff whether they have symptoms or not are being tested for covert nineteen. As of today. Starting Tuesday we started testing every resident. Swabbing every resident and every staff member in by next week. We'll have everybody don't and as you said you are an exception so to speak. And why is that? That's an excellent question. I think that Again like I mean. Dealing with public health was difficult. They have issues. I don't know if it's a capacity issue it wasn't until our CEO of our county and our administrator got involved insane to other Catholic that we need this Did we get action? We were limited the number of swaps. We could use so. I don't even have the answer to whether it's capacity is the issue or what they would say to me that we need to focus swabbing where the concern is my argument. The concern is nursing homes. Have you had an outbreak or any cases of copay nineteen In the in the places where you work we have A. There's three long term care homes medical director and no we have not had a case. Have you had anyone in the last couple of days that you that you've been worried about that hadn't been tested that you think should have Yes yeah and these. Typically though are prior to Tuesday when we now can swap everybody as him or not prior to that. If we had somebody that was a symptomatic who was a contact of somebody that we were suspicious. Even Swab we would not be allowed to swap them but now we have swapped. We've gone from unit to unit and of swabbed everybody. The province maintains that it is not a smart use of limited resources to test staff and patients who were showing no signs of infection. How do you respond so my argument would be globally? We have recognized evidence that the as symptomatic and pre-symptomatic transmitter is perpetuating this pandemic we know how did they how to covert nineteen. Get into these cut into these homes by somebody. That's carried it in whether it was prior to our lockdown or whether it's staff bringing it in our lockdown now has been in effect for weeks we were one of the first homes to passive leave inactivity screen people to have the staff where mass to mandate that staff can't work other than in one facility so we know the virus gets in. Its gotta get in from the outside so we need to test. We need to test to make sure people are there. Don't have and we need to test to make sure the people are that are coming in. Don't have it otherwise we're just we're playing catch up and we're we're at We're in the dark and so as it today. Given what the premier has announced. Are You satisfied that the level of testing that needs to happen is happening? Or are there still gaps that you see? Well there's colleagues. I have medical directors from other nursing homes. That are not doing what I'm doing and not doing what we're doing with him for lunch so I think they obviously that's going to ramp up testing more. I hope they're allowed to do it. I don't see why they wouldn't but at that certainly GonNa put a burden on the system and is that something the system can take. I'm not the one that can answer that and not to sound offensive but you were sort of the squeaky wheel that that got the grease right. They said Yeah. We'll test all all your residents and all your staff and so this isn't happening. Every is that what it's going to take for other medical directors to be squeaky wheels. Yeah I don't know Good question I hope we're not at what for and Woodstock and Oxford County not trying to be offensive. We just feel we're the best people in the best position to determine what's the best way to protect the residents we cherish and the staff that we cherries. We need to protect each other family there so I think it is important that that politicians public health recognize that were the best resource to decide. What's the best approach? Somebody needs. Ask US and so if you could say one. Thing Tonto. Health Minister the premier. At this point what would it be? Well I think you know I pick up the paper every day and online and read. What's happening in nursing homes and it's it's frightening I think that we need to focus. Where the frontline has changed. I have colleagues in hospitals. I I go to the hospital. I see this is not this. Pandemic has not turned out the way that we were predicting it was going to. We now see where the focus. The problem has focused and it's on nursing homes and we need to focus resources there. Dr Roth I appreciate you joining this program once again. Thank you very much for your time. Okay thank you. Bye-bye Dr Barry. Roth is the medical director of three long-term care homes in southern Ontario. We reached him until Sandberg nowadays. Most of us aren't getting out of the house much. Meanwhile Berry Humber stone can't seem to get off the road. The Canadian snowbird recently traveled from Florida to northport. Pi where he moved last year. But when Mr Hunterston reached the confederation bridge was turned away because of cove nineteen restrictions officials wouldn't let him cross because his driver's license car registration and health card are all still from Ontario. So Mr Hunterston headed west to Antero to quarantine with relatives there yesterday. Barry Humber Stone spoke with the CBC's Sara Frazer from his car. My girlfriend lives in Florida and I stay there. In the winter we stayed. I bought this place in Pe last. May Now the girl. I bought it off. She lived there all year round before. I got there but my thing is i. I've been a snowbird. I've been living in Florida for the last eight winters and I come to Canada for six months and stay six months in America. They say well. That's a cottage. Well it's not a cottage for me because that's my that's my principal residence. I bought a truck there too. I also have a truck with Pi plates on it. How did that end up when you insisted that you are a PA resident now? They said I have no way of proving it and and there's nothing they could do for me they made me go back to New Brunswick so they they asked you to turn the car around. Yeah and then I did and then when I got to New Brunswick they pulled me in there and they told me that if I stayed at night in New Brunswick I would have to stay. Fourteen nights I'm been in my car for two days now and I had everything set up at my house. I had enough food for two weeks. I had the heat and I had the water on. It was all ready to go. That's Berry Humber Stone. Speaking to the CBC on his way to Ontario yesterday the Prince Edward Island man was turned away at the Confederation Bridge for not having sufficient proof of residence. Mr Hammerstein made it to Kingston Ontario. Since then he's been able to obtain the proper documentation so by now should be on his way home finally to northport Pi. I if you're not a marine biologist. Let me introduce you to Siphon offers a word meaning pelagics hydrogens made up of polyps less clear. What those words mean. But I'm assuming in really hoping our guest will be able to explain because she was part of a group of scientists in Western Australia. Who discovered never before seen siphon four in a protected bio region off the coast of that continent and they say it is the longest animal on earth. Narrative Wilson is the manager of the Molecular Systematics Unit at the Western Australian Museum and she was the lead researcher on the expedition. We reached her in Perth Narrative. First off just describe this strange creature for us it sort of is a strange spiral spiral with a few lines running across it. So it's just an enormous spiral floating in the water column. Okay and how long was this? Spiral species string the one that scientists found that you found a lot of conjecture about how long it really is. We were only able will. The Arab pilot took a an estimate of the outer ring of the spiral and it seemed to be around forty seven meters long process. Yeah quite big. But we're in the process of trying to measure it more accurately and we'll we'll try and update the world when we get the final word on that and how on earth or under water I should say did scientists even find this thing how. How did the discovery go down? Ya like most interesting things completely. By accident we were carrying out some surveys on the the animals that live on the seafloor in the deep sea there but of course to bring the remotely operated vehicle up to the surface again. You have to commute through the water column for a couple of hours and so we tend to have at least one or two scientists watching on the camera because you never know what you might stumble across and this particular day. It was the amazing iphone or full. So help me understand this creature a little more. I I've got a visual in my head going on but what is for. And how do they even get so long? They're really strange animals They're actually colonial animal so they made up of lots. And Lots of little clones. That all work together to kind of form one organism so you'll have a little group of clones that somehow communicate with each other and decide will wag in a Taiko via the the role of feeding and another group of coins will take over the role of reproduction and they all kind of work together. So it kind of act like little organs. I guess in a normal animal but I will work together to just kind of be one thing and is that how they get so long. It's at the more and more clones are joining up so to speak. Yeah I'm not really sure How they decide the large size could be constraints when it comes to just holding yourself together or all kinds of different pressures that we don't really understand. Do we understand its role in the world? Well I think like most animals it leaves it feeds at reproduces philosophical. About why things existence a whole different whole different ballgame. Okay thinking about sea creatures that I would recognize her. Most people recognize. What would you like in them to Siphon afford that people might be more familiar with would be a Portuguese man of war or we call it an Australian blue bottle? They have a float on top and tentacles and stink people which is what people care about them. Yeah they the LEICA. Jellyfish Jellyfish. True Sea jellies not colonial. That's probably the similar. They are closely related to corals in an enemies but the sea jellies a probably a thing that you would liken them to the most and as you say there will be some more measurements to figure out exactly how long this this string. Animal is but right. Now you're going with about forty seven meters about one hundred fifty feet. That's three times the length of like humpback whale or something like that isn't it. Yeah estimate was just for the outer ring of the spot. Also hadn't measured any of the element of the spiral. Okay and so when you realize. This thing is very very long. What's the reaction? Well when we I stumbled across it you know as I said. Most people had already left the control room. But because there are cameras up throughout the vessel showing what you can see on that camera people sore it and started streaming into the control room. And we're very excited so it was It was a really incredible moment to see it. I think the the spiral nature of just sitting in the water column was just very unusual. Normally they just kinda hang like a piece of string so I think we all knew it was saying something pretty special It is not the only thing you found on this expedition. What else did you and your colleagues discover when you were down in the deep seas. Yes well animals close to my heart live on the bottom of the ocean but we did find some actually amazing sea cucumbers. That have. We'd long tells they look a bit like a squirrel so we need them see squirrels. We also saw incredible giant hydroids so kind of hard to explain but it's just like a single poll up of an animal but it standing about a major also of the surface just absolutely stunning animals mazing deep sea fish and just all kinds of incredible creatures and so now in addition to doing some measurements of this Safafa four is there more research into the specific animal. Yeah absolutely so one of the tools that taxonomic issues to identify and describe species. We're often looking at the shape of different cells and alot sorts of things but we also often now use DNA. And so that's kind of my major contribution is to help. People use that daughter as best as possible to identify all of the animals that we found so on a trip like this. We have a long period of planning. And then we have a month long expedition where we intensively samples and then we spend the next few years identifying species. And if if they're new species Doing those descriptions so that's a very long process at the end of that. Well we look forward to finding out more about this creature as your research goes on. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you so much. Narrow Wilson is the manager of the Molecular Systematics Unit at Western Australian Museum and she was the lead researcher on that expedition. We reached our in Perth Halio. Hey Fallon and hey listeners. Out We are. The hosts of podcast called the secret life of Canada. We are a history podcast. Yeah and we've covered topics things like the gold rush or the bay blanket. Yes kind of unconventional stories. Though that you might have missed in your Canadian history class so we're here to uncover those secrets. That's right Czechoslo. Wherever you get your podcasts Bailey. Saw was answering a call for help. The last time we spoke with the Maryland nurse. She told us about her plan to commute to New York for a few days a week to work at a hospital there she was responding to a plea from Governor Andrew Cuomo for healthcare workers to come to his state as part of the fight against the corona virus pandemic since that interview. Bailey saw has worked four shifts at a hospital in Queens. We reached her today in Hanover Maryland. Maley how are you holding up so far after your first shifts I'm holding up pretty good. I'm really exhausted but I'm trying my best. I think the thing I have going for me is that since I am critical care prior to this happening. I have a pretty good skill at separating my work life in my personal life so I'm trying not to let the to cross too much when you were last on this program You said your whole family. Your Dad Your Mom. Your husband all supportive of your of your decision to go but your dad. Your Military Dad said to you at that time that you probably didn't know what you're walking into and it was likely to be a lot more serious than you could imagine so you don't have to imagine. Anymore Bailey. You're living the reality of being a new New York City hospital. What is it like am he was definitely right. I definitely didn't know what I was walking into. It is very chaotic up there Instead of just having critically ill ventilated patients in critical care. Unit like normal. These patients are now spread out throughout the hospital They don't have enough equipment especially the medication pumps. So we're having to do with the old school way of. Just kind of opening the clamp and estimating so that is a really big shocker for me Another thing is that a lot of people are dying and they're dying very quickly. And what kind of toll is this all taking on you all honestly? I try very hard to separate my emotions and my work and just focus on the task at hand and do what I need to but if you start to think about it too much I start to think that this is someone's mom someone's child Someone's family than it really does become emotional. And it's heartbreaking. These people are fine. One Minute dying the next minute. No family around In my heart breaks for the family as well that has so many questions and are calling for updates and want to be there. But can't you've been talking to families? Who have people in the hospital yes? There's been several that of called a lot throughout the shift to try and get updates. What do you say to them? I try to be honest. I know the last week I had a patient new. I thought was doing fairly well although sick but stable he's sick and so I had told the family that was my thought on what was going on and unfortunately that patient passed away after he left and so that kind of that's hard it makes me feel guilty because I said these positive things to family and then the outcome was something else. It sounds incredibly difficult. Both physically and mentally. It is and so also when we spoke last time. You said you're not GonNa do this just something I gotTa do. I WANNA do this. Do you still stand by that even more so now that I'm up there and I see the chaos and the overwhelming amount of patients that are there and I hear that nurses are getting sick There aren't enough nurses to go round. I really do feel that I need to be there and that I am helping to make a difference and you get are you getting the protections that you need to do your job. We have heard of course about the shortages of equipment and P. P. E. What what has your experience been I do feel that. I've been protected. We were giving goggles. We have a face shield. We have vowed to wear and then we were given the end. Ninety five mask as well as surgical masks In a normal day to day life when there's not a pinned Mbeki would ultimately throw away. These Max can get a new one. Every time we're being asked to reuse it for five shifts wore until it soiled which is an optimal but again with the whole world needing the same supplies. You kind of have to make do with what you can You answered the call By the governor of New York For healthcare workers to come to his. State. Are there a lot of other who have also Answered that call a lot of nurses like you from out of state who've come to help hostile at it seems that there are several agency nurses and I've met some from Florida's from Alaska The military is also there from out of state so a lot of people have shown up to help. You wanted to kind of get out the door and get working When we spoke But it but it took a longer time for you to get approved for two to work at this hospital. Didn't it it did. Yeah sorry unfortunately. It ended up taking about two weeks to go through. What was it layabout I think the delay is that the hospitals are so overwhelmed with trying to get agency nurses in there and having to deal with their own staff shortages that it just took a while longer to get everything straightened now and so now. You've completed for shifts and I should remind our listeners. That you this is what you're doing you're quote unquote spare tiny. You have not only a husband back in Maryland But a fulltime job. So how long do you plan on continuing to do this All my four week contract will be up in three more weeks and then I am trying to extend it a little bit longer. Well you want to keep doing this work. Do I feel that it's needed? And what about your your parents and your husband My husband has been extremely supportive. His job is closed right now so he has been driving me so that. I can rest while we're going up there And the rest of my family has also been extremely supportive. They're very worried and very proud. I imagine yes you also said When we spoke few weeks ago that it wasn't a matter of if you would get the corona virus but a matter of when do you still feel that way? I do the whole hospital. Almost everyone has corona virus and everyone is going around the hospital. The germs are everywhere. There's just no way it can all be cleaned so even though you be careful. Careful when you wear a mask and everything. They're still such a high risk and seeing People get very very ill from this From Cova Nineteen. How does that make you feel about your your own potential experience getting this virus? It's it's worrisome. There's several nurses doctors healthcare workers in the news that are Dong in otherwise healthy and they have gotten critically ill from this than some have even died so I definitely do think about that by like I said. I just really feel that I needed. There's some GONNA keep helping. Keep up the good work stay healthy. Bailey and thank you for the work that you're doing there and helping out your fellow citizens in your country and it's deeply appreciated. I'm sure thank you. Thank you so much Bailey. Saw is a critical care nurse. Who's been traveling to New York to help? We reached her in Hanover Maryland Some young people in Manitoba's criminal justice system aren't just in self isolation right now. They're in solitary confinement in adult facilities in an effort to keep covert nineteen out of provincial. Jails officials have been isolating everyone who comes into custody for up to fourteen days that includes youth some of whom have been held in segregation in adult cells at the Winnipeg Remand Centre. But now the provincial government has changed its policy after lawyers in the province raised concerns about treatment of young people in detention who are awaiting bail. Here's Hillary Tash a legal aid lawyer who has three youth clients being held in adult detention. I am being told that. The user spending twenty three hours a day Locked in a room. They are allowed out for one hour day during that hour they shower and they may spend a bit of time at Some tables that are sort of in a center common area But again spending that time alone many of them have incredibly complex needs and come to the system with complex TRAUMAS and they're being offered no support as far as mental health Visiting with elders or just having adults to talk to in general and I can't help but think that from the firsthand experiences that we're seeing in these early days they are housing youth in ostensibly the same conditions as adults. Would we as a society be okay with Twelve or thirteen or fourteen year old spending two weeks alone in an empty room for twenty three hours a day with no adults to speak to a no mental health support. And I can't help but think that a lot of people are at home right now with teens due to the cove in nineteen crisis and how would their kid's fair not just without Internet but without books without stimulation for two weeks being allowed out of their rooms for maybe an hour to shower? I fear that this would do irreparable harm to the strongest of our young people let alone children who are struggling. Hillary Tasha's lawyer with Regency Community Law Center. A branch of Legal Aid. Manitoba Three for clients are young people who are being held in segregation in adult cells at the Winnipeg Remand Centre. It's an effort to reduce the spread of Cova nineteen. Today the province said it will no longer send young people into that adults center instead in a memo obtained by the CBC. The Assistant Deputy Attorney General says youth who are admitted will be isolated in a separate cottage at the Manitoba Youth Center as we went to air however Ms Tash believes her. Young clients were still in adult remand I don't know about you. I can't concentrate on much right now. It seems like the perfect time to read say Anna Karenina or something but these days I lose focus about three quarters of the way through a tweet. I have the attention span of a goldfish but also the attention span for a Goldfish to Goldfish. In fact both of them from the as it happens archives starting with the story requested by Mary Hurley from Toronto. As I mentioned yesterday she asked to hear guest. Host Lyndon mcentire's nineteen ninety-three interview with Jesse Rainer of Portsmouth England. Her pet fish may have been inexpensive but MS Rainer didn't believe it's life was cheap. May I call you Jesse? Tell me tell me what happened to your goldfish. Well and when I went to clean the bowl freshwater watering and clean bowl as I noticed that grumpy is ninety grumpy the Goldfish with lying on his salad at the bottom of the boat and also ask straight away that he was dead them for and he's skill was motionless he sends was badly moving even freezing and immediately that I wanted to go fish too late because I have another gold and if grumpy adult then probably the other goldfish would to eighty degree. And what did you do then Jesse on at the moment I simply giving him? The kids of life are talking to the bow getting in the palm of my and and they may face I in Maui. I guess blue gently into his mess up a tall and then gently squeeze my fingers to get the compensation though and again put him on his own in a bowl and put him under the cold water tap that the cold water around and the buoyancy of the Walker Plaza from soluble at spread and an accident But then hop now three quotations back to life is mandated to do this. Now we're just come to me. Have you ever given the kiss of life before never to nothing animal? Yuban nothing to do and I guess gone down what. Why do you think grumpy keeled over in the first place? Well I've been telling sing at various different that They don't get their own opinions. That grumpy were show about on that or at something load. Denise Gilles Anything like that but they did say that it was dangerous to take him to the bowl and I would think so at what are killing the water and I did nuclear with me. Put an expert in the water. The wrong thing to do. How has he been? Since this? Near death experience a baton on a critic of the other facial ran the bowl. Has This changed him in a way? Yes because before even not very friendly and the both fish at different they have different characters Wanted the faithful come out to the trump. Put me single on top of the water down. Would why would come to the sound of the bone and I'll put me single and saw the other one. Would grandparents wonder woman ill below? The water went to the other side of the bowl but name he does the same as the other one. How can you tell when the fish is grumpy about? The attitude attitude wasn't very friendly every time the alright near the bowl econ to the other sound like and all that's changed now all right. Well I hope you and grumpy have a long and happy life together. Thank you very much. Thank you thank you for talking to us. From archives guest host Linden Macintyre speaking with Jesse Rainer of Portsmouth England in August nineteen ninety-three Hector. The goldfish was a little hardier than grumpy. When Michael Enright spoke with Hector's owner Duncan Baird of Saint? John's Newfoundland and Labrador. The fish had just turned. Nineteen Ish to Mr Baird's apparent confusion and possibly even disappointment. Here's that interview from March. Seventh one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. Hello is to bear many happy returns to hector. How did this story get the people? We have our ways Mr Berg. How is hector feeling? Today on his birthday seems to be quite good and he's all of nineteen years old. Well we're not going to nineteen or twenty we I got him when I was eleven or twelve for not positive. Isn't it fantastic? Most of us you know who grow to a pet store and buy a fish. We can't keep it alive for more than a week and a half. That's the same way we are with molecular pets but this just seems to live and live secret. Well I haven't done anything Especially with them Just feeding them twice a day and he just seems to keep on going now unfortunately in the last few months he doesn't swim anymore and we have to feed them by hand. We put some fish food in your fingers and you put it in the tank with him and he said of your hand all the parole guys slowing down a bit. Do you give you put him in special water at all or no Just regular tap water. I suppose I know from water has something to be said for it. Yeah well we've known that for a long time. How did you start hand feeding them? What what prompted you to start About six months ago tell Ya Trophy Status. Floating like he was about to die so we started putting our hand in and feeding them by hand was floating on the top of the water started to one day when we went home. That was September and since we started feeding by handy seems to be almost back to normal again now. Is there any? Can you explain what was what happened to was he? He just feeling poorly. I guess well to Veggies Manasian. He's gotten a bit of a Kink in his tail and I think it's just the way to studying to catch up to him. He did his tail tail. We call it scoliosis or scale. Llosa's maybe what what so his tales a little bent is in. Does he look like an old fish. Although I don't know what the heck an fish looks like but I mean it doesn't it whiskers but can you tell kind of an old guy. Yeah I suppose you can tell from his His Scales and Where he does have the Cancan tail makes them look a little bit older. How how big is is hector actors about with his tail about six inches long six six and a half inches la does do fish have an equivalency in years like dogs. I mean other fish years. Well not that I know of that with. My brother is a veterinarian and he'd never mentioned anything like that so these kind of Goldfish are expected to live no. I don't have an idea you know. I've never heard of one living this long. You know my friends and things wonder how it's live this long. I'd never heard one either. I don't know what the life expectancy three or four years. Maybe or well you know from from what I hear from other people you know three or four years is pushing even sure. Hector is maybe twenty years old probably around twenty years old and just keep living you know and it's not like he's been treated super well you know. Sometimes he almost has to wear sneakers in the tank. Is that little water in there and you know at you know our cat swipes at it just like anybody else's cat you know and You know he's been dropped on the floor. He's done everything that any other fishes done that he just seems to keep living. What are you GonNa do anything special today for him now? We don't have any plans for them. As as far as any special is concerned we just Just a regular workday for well. That's great. Give them our best. Okay then thanks for talking to us. By for March Seventh Nineteen eighty-eight. That's Michael Enright. Speaking with Duncan Baird of Saint. John's the bemused owner of Hector. The nineteen or twenty year old. Goldfish as we learned from both interviews. The key to staying alive as a Goldfish is to doing one fairly simple thing swimming. You've been listening to the as it happens. Podcast our show can be heard Monday to Friday on. Cbc Radio One and on Sirius Xm following the world at six. You can also listen to the whole show on the CBC listen APP. Download it for free from the APP store or Google play. Thanks for listening. I'm Pat I and I'm Chris. How for more? Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

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Understanding AMPSAs Part 1 [Splintember]  PDP041

Protrusive Dental Podcast

27:10 min | 8 months ago

Understanding AMPSAs Part 1 [Splintember] PDP041

"As dentists we don't primarily treat headaches, but we can manage the power function. Now you'd be amazed about how many patients have stopped taking allergies. It's after a prescribed these sorts of appliances. Welcome to the protrusive dental podcast the forward-thinking podcast for dental professionals. Join us as we discuss hot topics and Dentistry clinical continuing education and adding value to your life and career with your host jazz gulati. Hello everyone. Welcome to episode 41 of the Patricia that the podcast this is the fourth one. I think for September. We've already covered home which is the best dental Appliance. So that was like the G Spoon Theory. We also covered some basic T and the anatomy in the weakest link Theory. I talked the last episode about why Michigan students are totally overrated and now this episode we're going to focus on anterior only appliances. Now if I didn't piss enough dentists off already from my last episode about Michigan appliances being overrated off. This is bound to lose me some more fans I guess but hey, the truth must come out because anterior appliances are ones that dental school taught me never to go near like these are evil evil appliances download make interior only appliances because catastrophic things will happen and you will get sued and you will lose your license and you'll be begging on the streets forever and ever so this song Episode I hope will restore your faith in and your own appliances when correctly prescribed and this part one just really is the the basic overview what the functions are what the mechanics are off and what records you need to make an anterior only Appliance. There are lots of different types of these appliances on the market some by type of design. Some are branded. For example, most common ones are such a beast blend anti or SEI or MCI same thing different branding. There's also called The Foster flexi or products pin which pretty cool the bite soft and a splint and took a Eubanks Linda Dawson base plan, which is pretty much a baseline a do large version of these and the list goes on and on and on there's many different types, but the umbrella term that all these appliances beige interior. Only segmental client is Commander is called an anterior midpoint. Stop Appliance. So how about if it's okay with you? I'm going to call these appliances answers. So if I say I am Is you now know what I mean? So we're going to talk about answers. Now. This is actually the appliance that I wear every night and it's for me. It's a protective and palliative Appliance. Like I feel better. I feel more relaxed and it also protects my teeth against the force of the power function. So for that's the role it has to me, I guess what I want to say before we Dive Right In is this episode? I want to talk about each individual phone lines, but I'm going to save that for the next episode because it will just flow better. But if you're looking for photos like a lot of you are listening to me right now while you're driving or what your gardening and you'll you'll get visuals that will eventually show. So what am I do is all the different splints I discussed. I'm going to show you what they look like and how they work. I hope they'll see a few videos on as well on the protrusive dental Community Facebook group, which is a private group. It's my way of making sure that no members of the public and patients come in just dentist only and especially those who listen to podcasts and went went to join that if you're not really part of it. You'll see all the dead. Spence I talked about so so that's where I'll be posting all the videos and and images of different splints. If you haven't already listen to episode 8, please listen to episode 8, it is called do a month cause a oby's so do these anterior points drop clients has do they cause anterior open bites and that was with one of my mentors. Dr. Barry Glassman. It's really insightful episode all about this. Basically we did some myth-busting. I guess I'll have to cuz if you haven't this do I'll have to summarize it very briefly in this episode, but it's well worth a listen, especially if you want to get deeper and deeper into these appliances the Patricia. Paul today will make more sense. If you listen to the last episode where I talked a little bit about the lateral pterygoid muscle. So the Apollo want to give you is any patient who has a history of joint issues. Let's call it. So something else perhaps intra-articular clicking joints and you're going to be doing some restorative care or even extractions anything that all involve them opening their mouth for a long time. It is really really important job. Give them a mouth prop on the on the adjacent side or the controller for a side because the function of the lateral pterygoid is to keep your mouth open. Now, a lot of these patients you'll realize who are power functional when you're doing work on them. You realize that they start closing and you're like when you can you please open up again and they keep closing and you keep nudging them. Can you please open up again? These very annoying patience and basically because their muscles are already in a state of being tired, you know, they're already overworked at night the power functional and they struggle to keep open and their jaw gets tired and start getting pain and especially the lateral pterygoid hurts because it's already so knackered right? So what can you do to give them a mouth prop? It allows them to relax. They're no longer have to stretch open the whole time. They can relax. In fact, it gives an opportunity to for the lateral pterygoid to have a break and it also prevents the muscle going and spasm because what happens if if it goes into spasm it will pull them. This even more forward and then they might have a lockjaw as an a closed lock and that's not a nice situation to be in straight after dental procedure. Maybe this has happened to you before after root canal took a long procedure that your patience and unable to sort of once they close together. They're unable to open again because they're all they're feeling a lot of tenderness or pain on one side off. So it's a great thing to do for anyone with a history of internal derangement to give them a mouth prop because it will help the lateral pterygoid. So that's the very relevant petrusa Dental Pearl I help you today. So back to answers this Appliance is actually condemned by some dentists because they believe and this is very principally fundamentally what they believe it's basically wage cuz it's an anterior only Appliance. They believe that it will act as a dial Appliance, whereby it will cause the posterior teeth to over rupt or perhaps wage. Degree of dental alveolar compensation and therefore your patient will get an anterior open bite. So that's a the main sort of those people who are against anterior appliances. That's their main argument that yes, it causes a o b s and we want none of it. So that's their main argument. But really I'm going to do a bit of myth-busting following on from episode 8 that actually that's not quite accurate page isn't one is that your patients who you give an anterior midpoint? Stop Appliance to they only wear it in their sleep. Now, if a patient's are only supposed to touch their teeth for 17 minutes a day and maybe about a in a bit minutes at night time only on average based on studies. Then really the only really missing out on three minutes of teeth concept per day for the non-power functional patient the power function page. It's a godsend this Appliance because their teeth are no longer rubbing together, but because they're only wearing it for maximum, you know, eight nine hours a night time then really that's not enough time. For a dial effect to take place and number two is that this sort of dial affect it actually requires Boney deposition i e you the the body needs to lay down some alveolar bone to allow the possibility to solve oviraptor or compensate and really this this needs more time. You can't achieve this in eight hours per night ask any orthodontist. So this is a fundamentally flawed concept that you get a dollar type effect and its really false. And if you're if you can afraid of this Appliance for that reason then don't be but you can still get an AO be not from the dial affect. That's why I was very careful to say you don't get no be from the dial of it, but you can get an arrow be in any Appliance. You can get an AO be from a Michigan appliance one of my patients believe it or not. She came to me with the posterior only appliance which should in theory cause posterior intrusion and a prestige. Of my but she came to me with an anterior open bite. You can definitely get a o b s in any sort of Appliance and the mechanism for that is nothing to do with a dial effect. It's called, Larry positioning and that's the most common theory. I'm going to go into that a little bit now. So remember back to the last episode where I talked about the lateral pterygoid muscle deprogramming imagine. We deprogrammed your lateral pterygoid muscle this poor little stressed out position of muscles be super muscles or tired the whole time keeping your condyle in the correct place. So you don't keep crashing into your central contact point and also during power functions working really hard and now we managed to deprogram. Let's say we give you an appliance any Appliance and this D programs will not too terribly now how long what happens is that when you remove the appliance? The lateral pterygoid forgets how you used to bite together and because it forgot how used to fight together and it really likes this new situation. It doesn't miss the tension and the stress of the old position is now relaxed and you know what it's happy that forgot the the old position and now the muscles are suddenly relaxed and the consequence is that actually you forgotten how to buy it together and because you forgot how to buy it together, it's just bite together on your back teeth and maybe now you have an anterior open bite. This is a real gross simplification of the process, but essentially the best way to remember it is that your muscles forget how you bite together and this is called deprogramming or an anterior open might do to condylar repositioning. There are a few more theories about how this actually works and a few other accessory theories about the other boxes of bees with respect to splint but let's just go with this one because the most simple one and it's the most common one actually so you essentially forget how you bite together. You can actually predict which patients are lights off. Or a higher risk of getting an error whenever I'm prescribing these anterior only appliances in my notes. I'm writing where the my patient in front of me is low risk or high risk of an aop in the summer traits. For example, if you got someone with a ridiculously deep overbite, they're not the ones you know, who's going to come in with an AO be just accept it because if you couldn't suddenly miraculously treat all these very sick patients non-surgically and suddenly taken from here to an A O B. You're a miracle worker. It's not going to happen. Right? So there's certain includes was traits. There's certain features of their Dental Anatomy wage, which will mean that they're more likely to have an arrow be and you can predict it and then you can write in your roots in your notes low-risk or high-risk and I'll go into that in the next episode the best way to figure out how interior only applies to work is you know, the last episode where I talked about interior guidance and the benefits of anterior guidance i e being furthest away from TMJ hinge and switching off the muscles. That's essentially how long Only appliances work. That's how amps as work. They switch off the anterior temporize muscles from proprioception. And also they're far away from the TMJ. Hinge was actually mean. Well, let's do a little test system if y'all hopefully not driving and you're able to do this if you can get yourself a clean covid-19 pencil or something like that or if you're in the clinic get some cotton rolls get a couple to change your back teeth basically, so you put your pencil in your front teeth or around about your incisors or the cotton roll at your own sizes. And I want you to put your fingers by your anterior temporalis and try to squeeze together with the pencil or the controls in place and feel the contraction feel the contraction of your muscles. Now do the same thing without the pencil or without the thought was there and notice the difference you'll notice that your interior Temperance muscle can contract significantly harder when you're back either touching and that's essentially how the Appliance Works the muscles can switch off. And if your back teeth are no longer crashing against each other then they're going to be happy. The pdl's going to be happy. You may actually get Improvement and sensitivity if that was also due to some powerful issues. You're not going to be breaking Restorations anymore. Because the teeth on touching anymore, sometimes I've had patients with headaches tension type headaches and I and I gave an appliance like this month for for muscle reasons and perhaps protective reasons and they come back and they tell me how their headaches have improved and they're taking far less analgesics and ibuprofen because of this Appliance now, they're no longer getting their headaches or it's significantly reduced which is which is great to hear. But remember guys, we as dentists cannot treat and should not treat headaches, right? I always tell my patients. I am not someone who has headaches I treat power function and even then I don't treat it you still power function. I just manage the forces so that they're now directed somewhere which is safer and better and not damaging your job. Point or not damaging your muscles. So that's the idea and some of these patients will actually get a secondary benefit are either headaches will get better. In fact, the funny thing is there's a website called Soldier my headache.com and this is not a website for some analgesics or a massage therapy program. It's actually for a splint. It's a splint. I quite commonly used. It's called the force Appliance fos flexi thought explained and it's it's the sort of the patient-facing website marketing the force which only a dentist can prescribe so it's not like they can buy themselves, but it's it's a great concept, you know, they found out that these sorts of appliances your STIs nti's mci's Force appliances. They really helped a lot of patience with their tension headaches. But as tempting as it is you shouldn't promise your patience anything to do with headaches. Don't even go don't even go there. Just tell them all the headaches that they need to get an official diagnosis from the GP you are going to treat the problem that you see in front of you which is dead. 1 teeth power functional myofacial pain, you're not there specifically treat headaches, but you might get a positive benefit. The other way to think about these appliances is you thought patient where you want to check their guidance, right? You want to check our they canine guided or they group function what's going on and you tell them can you please try and to the right and they tell you yes. I'm trying and they're really just they're locked in position and the mandible can't move because the interlocking of their teeth is so good is so well meshed together, the the inclines of the costs are so steep. They just can't move and and and you think how is this possible? They're clearly power functioning and going into those movements at night time because their canines are really warm. So you think what's going on here they're locked in now. What locking in does is that increases resistance in your muscles there for when you give an anterior only Appliance and they're able to skate around freely you suck. Reduce resistance. You've actually really help these muscles in a way that an analogy I can give you is imagine. You're lifting some really heavy weights. Right and your muscles are a working wage overdriving the working really hard to lift these weights and are suddenly you decrease these weights by about 75% those next few reps. They're going to be really easy. It's going to be like as if all the resistance has been removed and you can imagine your muscles would be in a happier position. So that's another way to think about how these muscles do work and how beneficial they can be for your patience with those are the mechanisms of actions and really the indications for this answer type of appliances. When you have a myofacial or muscular diagnosis, you got these tension headaches, which you don't not treating because the tension headaches but you're retreating the signs of power function and you want to protect them from further where you may have a situation where you have a tooth that's hurting or you get home. Sensitivity and you just can't explain it and you think could it be because their power functioning and that's the cause of it now by giving an anterior only Appliance if the pain goes away, then you can talk to some degree of confidence agree that perhaps it was the appliance or the change or the existing inclusion or the including scheme. That was a cause of the paying the first place so it can be used diagnostic fee. Of course interior. Only appliances are fantastic D program is far better than Michigan appliances or Tanner's so definitely a strong indication for an anterior and appliances anytime you doing a rehabilitation and you want to deprogram them. It's a great Appliance to give them to just reset all the muscles get everything relaxed so you can get a predictable Centric relation recording. So those are the song General types of indications. I guess a contraindication will be joint issues and what I mean by joint issues is someone who can't bear load. On their joints someone who's got severe pain and really if you give someone an anterior on your Appliance when they bite really hard together. Yes, the the splint at the front page absorbing some load and therefore the PDL at the front is absorbing some load, but all the other load if you like is is being directed to this is the theory by the way to The The J and if you have got an unhealthy symptomatic area with lots of inflammation wear your condom may be impinging on what we call retro disco tissue. I'm sorry if I'm getting a bit too deep into this but really if it's a primary joint issue, then this is not the ideal Appliance. However, some of our mentors will disagree with that and they say, you know what you can get away a lot and very few patients have true joint issues that they will not be able to accept and anterior only Appliance. But if you're starting out this Appliance try and stay away from home. Joint related issues and try and Target patience with more of the muscular symptoms which actually is 90% of our quote-unquote tmb patients, right how many patients? Like I said if she had to go come in with the Raging TMJ pain very few primarily with managing asymptomatic patients. Thankfully now having said that if it could be a diagnostic event for you, if you give someone an anterior only Appliance and they come back with raging pain from the The temporomandibular Joint which by the way has never happened to me but that's supposed to be pathognomonic for someone who's got a primary issue and perhaps you need to change your Appliance to give them some quote-unquote joint support now again, some dentist feel very strongly against what I'm saying here, but I'm just giving you the theory them and of course you can also use amps as protective appliances, but really there are some other appliances which is cheaper and easier and simpler appliances, which that you may wish to use as a protective Appliance. I'll go off. In a little bit more of that into part two. So now we know what answers do and when they're indicated and potentially when they're contraindicated and now you know that they don't cause a oby's due to the dial effect, but you can get to be from any Appliance in certain patients who have certain traits, right? So I'm going to go into that a little bit more detail next episode hopefully and throughout September where I can and on the producers of the community but not know all that let's just talked about before we before we go about the records you need for this type of Appliance now ideally if you're starting out you should be taking gold standard records eight as yet. So the office record I take is the following. This is something that was talked to you about one of my mentors. Dr. Michael milkers, right? It's when you use a leaf gauge and I'll probably be playing a video this as I'm saying this to home understand this I'm using a leaf gauge at the front and I'll be dialing it down to find the first point of contact with in central relations. So that centralization contact point and essentially this song As me that if this program if this patient was to deprogram what would their exclusion look like? And if their muscles were to forget how to get back into a normal bike again? What would they potentially look like? So would they end up with an arrow be would they not how this look with the patient even realized and what you do is you take a photo of the patient with the leaf Cajun place at the position where the first point of contact is now if it's only a couple of leaves and they've got enough of an overbite then really they're low-risk but they got a shallow over by quite worn teeth and quite a big slide and then more likely there for to get an arrow be from any appliance that you do then. That's the one you want to take a photo for and show them as part of your consent. Then you basically have to figure out is your why big enough to continue with this Appliance to the patient understand the consequences they will they understand that they may not be able to bite into them. Other tape again that they may miss the ham from the sandwiches and is the juice worth the squeeze because for a lot of these patients who are suffering a lot they don't care about this bike change. They want a solution and at least you've predicted it and you told them ahead of time, but I can reassure you now that these patients are not too common and I don't want to scare you but it'd be irresponsible for me not to tell you this way. So that's the first thing I do and that's a hat tip to talk of my co-workers who taught me to do this. Now, of course, you know already what dr. Michael markers doesn't know about exclusion and splint is frankly not worth knowing and as you know, he is supposed to come to London in May for occlusion twenty-twenty and of course due to covid-19 do that to November now a massive update our Maps give you is that the Iraq is still happening, but we're turning the event completely virtual. It's going to be a clusion twenty-twenty live online 2 Days full access. Dr. Michael markers full immersion a.m. Two full mouth rehab from single tooth building up the full month rehab and splints. So if you want to see these protocols and slides and cases and a lot more depth join us for this online version log in the comfort of your own living room or office or bedroom or in your pjs or whatever like before I was describing this event as a clusion and lamb chops. And now I guess I have no option but say occlusion and PJs, right? So I join us for Clues and PJs. I've reduced the price to three hundred eighty-nine pounds because we're no longer having a venue now that fee of 389 pounds is a massive massive steel compared to the main point five k that I paid when I won't see, dr. Michael milk is in in Stockholm in 2018. So join us for two days full and in to All Things occlusion anything that was promised at occlusion twenty-twenty, but now in the comfort of your own home because frankly covid-19. Email is a message little time. So we're still hoping to run a really educational two days. So come and join us. You can go to a conclusion twenty20.com to sign up by the time this episode comes out. I probably would have made it sells live again. The date once more is 27th and 28th and November 2020 live online 2 days with dr. Michael Marcus. Let's get back on track now. So with that was basically what Michael milk was told me which was the The Bite record of if your patient was to get an arrow be with that happened. What were they look like and then show your patient that photo that's the first record. It's a good screening thing to do to see if the page view is high or low risk of getting an arrow be after your anterior only Appliance. The second record I take is to measure the lateral excursions petrusev and protrusive. And the reason I do this is Medico legally. It's a good thing to do before you give any Appliance so that if in the future the patient says, oh, I I'm no longer able to move my jaw left and right. Whereas actually you probably dead. Moved their function and you've improve their ability to move left and right but if you have some measurements, you can objectively back that up. Right? So what I use is a perio probe like a Williams probe and I measure from the upper-mid line to the lower midline and I get the patient to grind all the way to one side and measure the sort of a distance and then you either add or subtract based on if they have a midline wage. They have a midline deviation. Obviously, you need to add or remove a couple of millimeters depending on which side they're going to essentially you make a note of this in the patient's records and you can send that as part of your lab work as well. So lab is what their range of of a movement is the next thing of course is a record of the patients jaw. So I eat impression or some digital scans. Ideally, if you're taking Impressions take previously purchased about the quality and less chance of distortion of the alginate for example, just be mindful of getting these drags technicians. I hate these drugs that you can get. So make sure your impression technique is good so long Want to send some Impressions you want to send the measurements you want to screen the patient? Like I said for a potential aob you don't need a Facebook, you know, you don't need the Facebook because at the end of the day, it's just biting in the front. So really these appliances are quite easy to adjust and a Facebook is just not necessary. You don't even need a central position might because when the patient might together, they'll eventually get Centric off easily, they'll deprogram very efficiently so you don't need any fancy bite records very few scenarios, you might and we might touch upon that next episode, but generally that's all you need. So hope you found part one very useful that I just gave you took indications and which records you need and a bit of background about answers and why they're potentially frowned upon and why these dentists who frowned upon them, maybe I don't have the best argument because I really can't cause an error be due to a dial effect now in part to I'm going to cover some of these appliances and put them up against each other. Like why would you choose one type of answer over another which is the birth? I'm so perhaps you can cover that. I'm going to talk about decisions you have to make in Upper Arch vs. Lower Arch vs. Do large so you can get do large amps as well in and when would that be indicated? I'll showed you how many of my patients have developed aerobeez which splints were responsible for those and how I manage those patients and I'll even tell you when an answer may be Overkill and may be there may be simpler appliances like a soft by God. Can you believe I just said that and we'll talk about that in the next episode. So thanks so much for listening all the way to the end and join me in part two of understanding answers. I'm hoping you enjoying spent Ember like so much for tuning in fact.

headaches Michigan MCI Facebook protrusive dental Community Fa Linda Dawson Commander Dr. Barry Glassman Spence overbite lockjaw Paul Boney TMJ dr. Michael markers dr. Michael milk Larry Williams Iraq Dr. Michael milkers
Physician, Test Thyself

Your Brain on Facts

34:25 min | 2 years ago

Physician, Test Thyself

"When you want something done, right. You have to do it yourself. This philosophy is okay. When it comes to loading the dishwasher, but maybe not so much when you're trying to find the cure for of an aerial disease. No one told that to Dr John hunter medical types in the eighteenth century believed gonorrhea and syphilis were caused by the same pathogen Dr hunter injected himself with gonorrhea to test. The theory he contracted gonorrhea and syphilis probably from using the same needle to extract samples. My name's moxy. And this is your brain on facts. We're talking today about medical experimentation much of which took place before we had a solid handle on germ theory and things like good hygiene. So before warrant that it's gonna get itchy and there will be some talk of body parts. Whereas it going to be talking about the relaunch and special offer on our patriot page patriot dot com slash your brain on facts. But I promise I'll try not to turn it into a PBS pledge drive. Today's list is in the time honored tradition of random order. I copied the names into Google docs. But let's start with the oh, gee, Isaac Newton. Newton had many areas of interest. Not just fruit based physics Newton voluntarily stuck a needle in his eye in the name of science. The experiment was designed to test optics and color perception, he thought that if he slid a long needle called a Botkin behind his eyeball between the I. In the eye socket and started poking his vision, which Inge lo and behold, it did he noticed that? He saw different perceptions of color and light as small colorful dots that appeared when he applied pressure. It's the same thing that happens if you press on your eyes Newton also stared at the sun in mirror repeatedly until the image of the son stayed even when he closed his eyes it stayed for months. He had to spend three days in a darkened room until it faded enough for him to go on with his daily life. While at the medical pneumatic institute of Bristol in the seventeen ninety s Humphry Davy studied gases studied by inhaling. The today's theme was still in any way. Unclear Davey would set up chemical reactions, and then inhale the resulting gas one guess gave him a Pleasanton -sation and the impulse to laugh at everything he had discovered. Nitrous oxide, though, his initial attempts were meant to reproduce, the pleasurable effects of opium. Menachem all Davey would ultimately recommend the use of nitrous oxide as an anesthetic your dentist gives you a blend of fifty percent nitrous and fifty percent oxygen. But Davey was huffing. One hundred percent nitrous oxide, which is probably why he enjoyed it enough to start hosting parties. Where friends would inhale it from silk bags. When it came time to test his polio. Vaccine Dr Jonas Salk decided to avoid the long drawn out human clinical trial process. The only suitable tests subject was himself and his family in nineteen forty seven salt was working on a vaccine for the crippling disease while at the university of Pittsburgh. He needed a healthy. Volunteer to test it and administered it to himself, his wife and their three sons it worked and was soon implemented in a nationwide test that showed dramatic results in two years. Polio cases, decreased from twenty nine thousand to less than six thousand sulk didn't patent the vaccine in the system that it should remain free and available to everyone saying could you patent the sun as a result? He's often remembered as one of history's great humanitarian 's. Dr Livia Mia. San was brilliant cardiologists with his own practice in the second half of the twentieth century when he developed a life hindering addiction to alcohol fearing for his life, he immersed himself in a rehab therapy. But nothing worked so he did the only thing he felt he could he took his treatments into his own hands searching for a cure. He happened upon back. Laffin a muscle relaxant that had been used for years. But it shown promising results in studies with laboratory animals addicted to a variety of substances Dr innocent prescribed himself the drug and experimented with increasingly higher doses. Until he finally reached a level that left him free of any craving for alcohol. He published his results in two thousand and four which team of Italian scientists tested with promising results in two thousand eight. Werner Forsman was a German urologist who during his surgical training in nineteen twenty one pioneered the technique of cardiac catheterization, the inserting of a catheter into the heart to measure, the pressure inside and decide whether a patient need surgery building on the work of scientists who has successfully catheterization a horse in eighteen sixty one force was inspired to try to replicate that work in humans. But couldn't get permission for human trials of such dangerous sounding experiment undeterred. He asked an operating room nurse to procure the necessary equipment. She agreed but only on the noble condition that he experiment on her rather than trying to do it to himself. No sooner was she prepped on the table than Foresman anesthetized his own arm and made a cut inserting the catheter twelve inches or thirty centimeters into his thing. He then casually climbed to flights of stairs. There's to the X Ray sweet before threading it all the way into his heart and having an x Ray done to check the placement. He was later forced to resign from that hospital then hired back and fired again. In the early thirties doctors Herbert Willard and Edward Carmichael noticed that when an internal organ was damaged patient sometimes felt pain in unconnected parts of their body. They decided to deliberately damage one of their own internal organs to study the effects, but what internal organ did they have that was both non critical and easily damaged maybe one or a pair of ones that's affecting on the outside of the body for easy access. Yep. They chose to experiment with their gentlemen's bits to study pain. In their notes Willard in Carmichael recorded that the testes was drawn forward and placed under a pan that could hold weights though, they recorded neither whose testes nor who did the drawing forward. Weights were added to the pan and the resulting sensations were recorded. The pair performed the experiment multiple times. Sometimes injecting various sections of the testicles with local anesthetic to numb the pain. After sufficient experimentation, they concluded that to stick your pain often came with generalized, torso pain. If only one testicle was harmed only one side of the torso would feel the effect was their bravery worth it. Dr still note, the referred pain that comes along with two stickier trauma. So they helped advance medical knowledge in their own small way is this why when a man gets kicked in the coin Percy sometimes dry, heaves that's the sort of question that would make a great bonus mini episode for members of our patriots since the inception of patriot dot com slash your brain on facts. Last fall members of the five dollar a month level or higher. Get a bonus mini episode for everyone who signs up or upgrades between today and our one year anniversary on February twelfth you will get to vote many episodes every month. That's like getting twenty five percent more your brain on facts than non. Previous Minnie's have included surprisingly childish weapons of World War Two like itching powder in condoms and the Welsh town of Clinton appropriate Govienda and Sylvia Gogel. And yes, that's all one word clever for wing EKO Gada controllable Sicilia cocoa, fifty eight letters including four L's in a row. The only way to get to monthly bonus mini episodes is to join our patriots before February twelfth. And that's just the first of the three parts of our patriotic overhaul and special offer. Chemist Albert Hoffman. I synthesize lysergic acid diethylamide that are known as LSD in nineteen thirty eight while studying the grain fungus ergot, but he had no idea of its loosener genyk powers until he accidentally ingested a small amount in nineteen forty three. He went home and quote sank into a not unpleasant condition. Realizing is discovery. He did what any good. Scientists would do and began experimenting on himself. Now little by little I could begin to enjoy the unprecedented colors, and please shapes that persisted behind my closed eyes. He wrote of the experience kaleidoscopic fantastic images. Surged in on me alternating, very gated opening and closing themselves in circles and spirals exploding in colored fountains rearranging and hybrid ising themselves in constant flux. It was particularly remarkable how every acoustic perception such as the sound of a door handle or passing automobile became transformed into optical perceptions. Every sound generated vividly changing image with its own consistent form and color reminds me of one of my husband's favorite lines. I once in a Sesia so bad, I can taste it. His first purposeful acid trip was on April nineteenth nineteen forty three. When he famously rode his bicycle home while under the influence of the drug he deliberately took a dose that he believed to be light. But which led to intense effects while riding home and at the so that became notorious in recreational pharmaceutical circles as bicycle day. While the chemical has seen some use in psychiatry. It's impacted eight has been more cultural than medical often wasn't alone and testing out psychedelic drugs on himself US chemist Alexander shoeing, ingested, many chemicals, including MDM a or ecstasy leading to its use in psychotherapy and parv psychologist. Timothy turn on tune in drop out Leary who experimented with LSD on himself to test among other things whether it could be used to treat alcoholism, he lost his professional position long. Before he could figure that one out. What would it take for you to willingly put parasitic hookworms against your skin? So that they would burrow through it and live in your intestines and feed off your blood, immunologist and biologists David Pritchard. Did just that in two thousand four hookworms seem to be able to modify the body's immune response in ways that would be useful in treating immune system disorders, such as asthma and Crohn's disease such disorders are comparatively rare in places where the hookworm is common was that though correlation or causation Pritchard had a hypothesis that hookworm infection reduced allergy asthma symptoms and needed tested on human subjects in order to. Appease his ethics committee. He agreed to be the Guinea pig. Other numbers of portraits lab also infected themselves with hookworms which can survive for up to a decade in the body, but are easy to kill off with certain drugs. They it quite a bit. When they go through the skin said Pritchard, but become really troublesome only when they reached his stomach causing pain diarrhea. Fifty worms turned out to be way. Too. Many ten was a safer number for the test. The experiment later allowed for wider testing on humans who reported miraculous relief of allergy symptoms trials are continuing to evaluate the treatment including test to see if the hookworm could help with multiple sclerosis. In eighteen ninety eight German surge in August, bier figured that a dose of cocaine injected into spinal fluid would serve as an effective anesthetic in order to prove this. He had his assistant Augusta's Hildebrandt attempt to inject him. But Hildebrandt messed it up and beer ended up leaking spinal fluid out of a hole in his neck, rather than abandoned the experiment. The two men switch places and beer injected Hildebrandt with the cocaine the injection went correctly this time beer, then proceeded to hit hammer stab and even burn his assistant. He also told Hildebrandt pubic hair and squashed his testicles. Was that in the spirit of thoroughness? I sure hope so. The pair subsequently went out for a boozy dinner perhaps in an effort to forget the day's events. And once the cocaine worn off though, both suffered terribly in days to come. But while beer took it, easy to recover. Hildebrandt had to cover for him at work wraps on. Surprisingly, they subsequently fell out with Hildebrandt becoming one of beers fiercest. Critics and denying his discovery of spinal anesthesia, even as it rapidly caught on in June of nineteen o three physicist Pierre Curie husband of two Nobel prize winner Marie ruled up his sleeve revealed burn like wound on his arm to a packed audience at the Royal Institute in the UK the wound had been caused by a sample of radium salts which he had taped to the skin of his arm for ten hours more than fifty days earlier during the course of his demonstration corre- drop some radium on the desk, the resulting in. The nation was still detectable and in need of cleanup half a century later Korean his wife hoped that radium burning affect might prove useful in the treatment of cancer. Ironically, the radiation was actually having a catastrophic effect on their health both Pierre and Marie were constantly ill tired and in pain. But their experiments did pave the way for the use of radium in medicine. As you may have gathered not everyone on today's list gets a shiny metal in surprise money for their work. Some of them merely got maimed or killed, sir. David Brewster was a Scottish inventor scientist and writer his field of interest was optics and light polarization a field that requires good eyesight. Unfortunately, for Sir, David he performed a chemical experiment in eighteen thirty one that nearly blinded him while his vision did eventually return. He was plagued with troubles until his death. His legacy envision takes the form of his invention. The kaleidoscope a toy that has brought joy to millions of children through the years. Also in these sacrificing site for science club. Robert Bunsen is probably best known for giving his name to the Bunsen burner, which he helped popularize and one of the least appreciated Muppets. He started out his scientific career in organic chemistry. But nearly died twice from arsenic poisoning. Shortly after this near death experience. He lost the sight in his right eye after an explosion Koto cyanide. These being excellent reasons to change fields. He moved into inorganic chemistry and went on to develop the field of spectroscopy which measures and examines light and radiation. Elizabeth Fleischmann ashlin married her doctor, Dr wolf shortly after her mother died wolf was very interested in the new discovery of Wilhelm Conrad round gin xrays his new wife became equally interested and gave up her job as a bookkeeper to undertake studies in electrical science. Eventually she bought an x-ray Ray machine, which she moved into her husband's office. The very first x Ray lab in San Francisco, she and her husband spent some years, experimenting with the machine using themselves as the subjects, unfortunately, they didn't realize the consequences of their lack of protection and Elizabeth died of an extremely widespread. Cancer in eighteen eighty five Daniel carrying a young Peruvian medical student was trying to establish the early symptoms of Ruge disease and infectious disease, rare outside of South America. But in Denic in parts of Peru as part of this investigation, he was inoculated with fluid from of a Ruge lesion from a patient with a chronic form of the disease he recorded his symptoms as they developed, including fever Malays lethargy vomiting anemia, and it became apparent that. He had developed the acute form of illness known as Arroyo fever. He got a few weeks later on October fifth curious considered a martyr of Peruvian medicine and October fifth has been designated Peruvian medicine day in his honor. Alexander Bogdanov was a Russian physician philosopher economist science fiction writer and revolutionary in nineteen twenty four he began experimenting with blood transfusions possibly in search of eternal youth because that's what most early transfusions were four and some still are it's an industry that pops up every now and again, please don't buy into it. After eleven transfusions performed by himself on himself. He declared that his bolting had stopped and his eyesight had improved. Unfortunately for Bogdonoff. He was not one to test to the health of the blood. He was using leading to a transfusion of blood infected with malaria and to Berkeley campus shortly after which he died. Screening blood is very important only slightly more important than the types of membership. At patriot dot com slash your brain on facts. Speaking of segues all numbers, regardless of tier are memorialized on episode. Get to vote on one episode topic a month and receive a fabulous your brain on fact, sticker suitable for learn it, laptops, and brilliant bumpers as you. Go up in tier you can get one or two bonus many episodes early access to the weekly episodes and the exclusive right to submit a fact of your own or question for me to answer guaranteed on the show once a month, provided it's not vulgar or classified. But wait, there's more get accustom your brain on facts, acrylic Breen keychain, what makes it. So custom my long. Suffering husband is making them himself with his recently acquired laser cutters certification. You are name or a name of your choosing will be etched on the back. And we're only making the exact number of keychains as there are people who sign up at patriot dot com slash your brain on facts between now and February twelfth there's no other way to get one. All the very best dressed keys will be wearing it this season. A special place in science heaven must be reserved for Stubbins Firth who as a medical student conducted a series of potentially lifesaving. But absolutely revolting experiments to prove that yellow fever was not contagious yellow fever is a viral disease that causes fever chills loss of appetite nausea and muscle pains, particularly in the back as well as headaches and can be fatal at the time. Doctors believe yellow fever passed from person to person like the flu but Firth disagreed. He started by pouring. Fresh lack vomit from yellow fever patient into cuts on his arm. He didn't develop yellow fever emboldened by this. I collected a patient's vomit and put it in his eyes. He smeared himself with all manner of sorted bodily. Fluid collected from yellow fever patients. Including blood spit, sweat and urine. He even wants sat in a vomit sauna full of heated vapors of regurgitation which caused him quote, great pain in the head but left him in otherwise good health. Finally, he took to actually ingesting the vomit I in pill form, then straight from a patient's mouth, I told you it was going to get a key in his two no four book a treaties on the lignin fever with an attempt to prove its non-contagious nature. He declared yellow fever, not contagious. In fact, yellow fever is contagious. But only through blood transmission via something like a mosquito bite that was proven by another self experimenter US army surgeon Jesse leisure who allowed himself to be bitten by yellow fever infected mosquitoes in the early nineteen hundreds ironically later. Would die of mosquito borne illness? But not from the -squitoes, he bred for the experiment. But rather a wild one who just happened by. Just as Firth swam against the tide of yellow fever contagion. Dr Barry Marshall, was sure that the medical establishment was wrong about the cause of stomach ulcers the accepted. Wisdom was that. They were caused by lifestyle factors, primarily stress, but Marshall and pathologist, Robin. Warren were sure it was bacteria, specifically, the heliotrope actor pylori. To prove their hypothesis. They needed to examine how the bacteria affected, a healthy, human, volunteer. But as Marshall explained to new scientists in two thousand six I was the only person informed enough to consent Marshall didn't tell the hospital's ethics committee. What he had in mind for fear of being turned down. He also didn't tell his wife until after he had swallowed the bacteria. He was fine for about three days then began vomiting his wife complained that he had putrid breath biopsy taken ten days later confirmed the bacteria had infected his stomach, and he had guests rightous, which leads to Alzheimer's, it's still took another eight years for Marshall warns theory to be widely accepted, but their work would eventually win them the Nobel prize for physiology were medicine. Another self experimental whose work had long term personal consequences was the polymath JV s hounding hell in wanted to build on the work done by his father, John Scott. How Dane on the physiology of navy divers in the early twentieth century, but we're as hell Dane senior restricted himself to observation and measurement junior. Took a more direct approach repeatedly putting himself into a decompression chamber to investigate the physiological effects of various levels of gases. How Dane was concerned with the welfare of sailors into sable submarines and his work led to have greatly improved understanding of nitrogen Narko sus as well as the safe use of various gasses in breeding equipment, but he paid a high price oxygen poisoning ironic is that sounds resulted in numerous seizures one of which was so violent that it left him with crushed vertebrae. He also suffered from burst eardrums, but he found a silver lining in that the drum generally heals up he said, adding if a hole remains, although one is somewhat deaf one can blow tobacco smoke out of the Iran question, which is a social accomplishment. So he's got that going for him, which is nice. On the topic of water safety, a certain species of jellyfish was suspected at least by one doctor of causing a strange illness that appeared in Australia in the mid twentieth century, it was characterized by severe muscle aches, nausea, and pain. So intense that strong opioids were needed as well as a truly bizarre. Symptom patients would experience levels of anxiety so severe that. Some of them reportedly asked their doctors to kill them. The cause was unknown. But it seemed to come from the sea as most patients had been swimming prior to the appearance of their symptoms. Jack Barnes, a Queensland physician. Eventually narrowed down the suspects to a species of tiny nearly transparent box jellyfish to see if he was right? The intrepid Dr jabbed himself with the tentacle a Carinthia barn Assey and settled into weight, but he wasn't alone. Probably losing his shot at father of the year. He also stunned his nine year old son as well as a young lifeguard. Nowhere in my research. Could I find what the relationship was between the doctor and the life guard or what sales pitch he used to talk lifeguard into it. Not too long after being stunned all three began to experience excruciating pain, and we're eventually taken to hospital for treatment Barnes's work would uncover the cause of mysterious symptoms now called ru Kanji syndrome, all three went on to recover. No word is to how this affected their father son dynamic. Speaking of dynamic a lot of dynamic people. Start patriots for their various arts expecting to be able to make a living out of it. That's not what I'm hoping for my goal is simply not losing money as improve an expand in podcasting, including launching second podcast and YouTube channel science with savannah age seven later this spring. This brings us to the unique third part of the patriot dot com slash your brain on facts, relaunch, the Bearman and on I need to break. Even is fifty dollars a month. If membership tops seventy five dollars before our special offer period ends on February twelfth half of the amount over fifty dollars will go to artists who provide free or low cost resources for podcasters and other creators like Kevin McLeod who composes ninety percent of the music you've heard on the show, including the opening and ending theme, which he just puts out into the world for free for anyone to use. So supporting one creator could actually support several. If membership gets above one hundred dollars all of the money from one hundred dollars up we'll go to charity a different apolitical, secular charity will be chosen each month from patrons gestures. So support one creator support many creators support various charities get bonus content and get exclusive swag for pennies a day. Remember all the best of happens when you sign up before our one year anniversary on February the twelfth. If you've been feeling smart because these silly olden time people experimented on themselves. You can kiss your smug sense of superiority goodbye. Scientists still sometimes deliberately infect themselves with pathogens they're studying and totally brew cov is a Russian research. Scientist specializing in permafrost H. You Kreil gist who thought it would be a keen idea to inject himself with bacteria? That's estimated to be re and a half million years old Dr brew coffee, I discovered this ancient bacteria bacillus f in two thousand nine frozen deep in the permafrost on a mountain in Siberia's Yakuts region, even deeper in the permafrost, then woolly mammoth remains have been found Dr brew coffee estimated it was over three million years old, but despite its advanced age it was still alive. Such ancient viruses are incredibly complex with hundreds upon hundreds of protein encoding genes. Modern influenza A has eight. But there is so much more that we don't know about them. According to brew cov, the syllabus f has a mechanism that enables it to survive for so long beneath the ice and at that same mechanism could be used to extend life read fountain of youth. See also lead transfusions from people younger than you. In tests. Brucke off says the bacteria of female mice to reproduce at age is far older than typical mice fruit flies. He told the Siberian times also experienced a positive impact on quote from exposure to the 'Bacterial the problem is he still didn't know what exactly that mechanism is. But that didn't stop brew Cobb from starting human trials or trial. When interview two years later he claimed to have seen no ill-effects from bacteria. He hadn't had a cold or flu since and said, he felt more energetic. Needless to say, his work is. Is considered French? And if he doesn't turn into a giant round sloth, or at least like a wear yeti. I am going to feel very cheated. If you've ever been stung by a bee you would probably label that painful if you've ever been bitten by a bulletin. You might call it. Pure intense brilliant pain like walking over flaming charcoal with three inch nail in your heel. Thankfully, you don't need to be bitten by a bullet ant because by all adjusts Justin Schmidt already has in fact, he's been bitten or stung close with thousand times by a wide variety of painful creatures all while making careful notes along the way. He created the Schmidt sting pain index. A way of measuring and describing the relative pain that insects inflict on humans and other animals, which is both elucidating and entertaining in a shot and for the kind of way Schmidt ranks each insect sting on a scale of one to four four being the most painful, he also describes each sting with vodka tive, even poetic language, the sweat bee, for example, which ranks as one on the pain scale feels light and federal almost fruity a tiny spark has singed single hair on your arm. It almost sounds like a pretentious person describing wine garnering score of to a yellow jacket sting is described as hot and smoky almost a reverent. Imagine WC fields extinguishing cigar on your tongue at three on the scale the sting of the Maricopa. Harvester ant is. -scribed as after eight unrelenting hours of drilling that ingrown toenail you find the drill wedged into the toe. The description of the warrior wasp sting, which is category. Four shows Schmitz realization of the lunacy of his bodily sacrifice. Torture. You are chained in the flow of an active volcano. Why did I start this list? Really puts that splinter you had last week into perspective. My personal favourite though is the tarantula hawk widely regarded as the most painful sting yet discovered by man blinding. Fierce shockingly electric, a running hairdryer has been dropped into your bubble bath a bolt out of the heavens lie down and scream. And that's where we run out of ideas. At least for today. The annals of medical misadventure aren't limited to experimentation though. There are numerous accounts of doctors having to perform surgery on themselves such as Dr Jerry Nielsen who found a lump in her breast while stationed in an aunt Arctic research station in nineteen ninety nine planes can only land the station four months out of the year. So she was isolated from any potential cancer treatment Nielsen trained carpenter and welder to assist her and cut the lump from her own breast to perform a biopsy on it. She then began taking a course of self administered chemotherapy dropped off by military supply plane until the weather calmed enough to fly in another doctor take that Humphry Davy with your nitrous oxide parties, thanks for spending part of your day with me, and whether or not you choose to support our patriot. I'm glad that you're here. Ear.

fever Hildebrandt Cancer Scientist Davey Dr Barry Marshall Humphry Davy Isaac Newton nitrous oxide cocaine Nobel prize Ray influenza Nitrous oxide Alexander Bogdanov LSD Dr Jonas Salk Justin Schmidt Dr John hunter Inge lo
The Importance of Deuterium Depletion with Dr. T Que Collins

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

37:00 min | 10 months ago

The Importance of Deuterium Depletion with Dr. T Que Collins

"Welcome to the Breast Cancer Concord podcast that features wellness warriors who've had a powerful impact in the world of health and happiness. Hi I'm your host Dr Barry Nick designee better known as Dr v and founder of Breast Cancer Conqueror Dot Com and the seventy central system I'm thrilled and honored to have you with me today. My goal for creating this podcast is to provide you with information about various healing modality and facets of creating vibrant help so that you can make an informed decision about your body and your health. My Passion is to empower women around the globe to live their best life through feeling of body mind and spirit. My team and I are so honored to have reached women in forty countries and counting. I'm excited about her lineup of guests and a powerful information that they will be sharing with you. If you'd like what you hear please subscribe to the podcast and share this with your friends and family. Welcome everybody to another amazing episode of Wellness Warriors on Dr Guarany Zone Zony. Better known as Dr v and today I have Dr Hugh Collins He is a leading scientist in developing and applying attrition men metabolic therapies to treat cancer. Yes. A speech day in clinical immunology his MS in a therapeutics is Ma in business and health policy and is BS in poverty healthcare and Cancer Epidemiology PD meteorology. What he's doing now is he is co founder and principal investigator at the Center for deterioration depletion, and if you don't know what deterioration is, you'll find out in this podcast. I would deteriorate was until about a month ago and it just blew my mind and I'm very excited to be able to share this information with you because especially, if you're on a healing journey, this can be very key for you. Another thing that intrigued me about you Dr Collins is that your co founder and? Former principal investigator of the Kito pet sanctuary. If fifty, three Acre ranch outside of Austin that uses Ketogenic Diet and metabolic therapies to help dogs with cancer how fun is that? So welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for taking the time. I know you're here busy doctor. Well. Thank you Dr. And thank you for inviting me because I said I just love what you do I. Truly want you to know that that is the truth. So is great and plus you only use one name when letter new name like me so. He's So all right, though I always like to start off our podcast podcast with the story behind the story you know what was the pain that triggered the passion lead you to where you are today. Well, let's let's start. This is a very securities route I. as you said, I originally got my PhD in clinical immunology. My first grade was actually a PhD of Metaphysics, which is the. Philosophy of nature, the philosophy of science, and so then by clinical. Might clinical immunology. While, I was waiting to be a pro football player I picked up a PhD. Stab. Up All the time and all these other things that had to do with understanding. medicine and health as an really from the poverty side of things and African American the things always seeing. In the community that wasn't being addressed back in the. Wasn't being addressed back in the eighties and still isn't being addressed appropriately. Now as a matter of fact that was the funniest thing was the first black. The first african-american to get a PhD at. The university I went to, which is the oldest cancer institute in the world. So that tells you know took a hundred years to get one of his through salary. Anyway. Either changed since then. So but so I was in this field for a long time have worked for major pharmaceutical companies and executive management built hospitals and dawn done all those things and so I am working at the gay tonight a had a very very As people say very satisfying career in going and understanding these things in appreciate it. And having great connections at the NIH Dr Foul. Even Rosenberg and Dr. Collins. These are all you know back in the day. We were those are the guys they look a lot older didn't have to realize I look a lot older to. See. Tony on on on on TV it's like wow are what is air was black But it's just so amazing but to make a long story short along the way. I lost my daughter and my wife to cancer Oh. Wow in my wife to brain cancer. which were shocking and you can imagine being a. Once they had noted scientists scientist to new every who noted people and none of my friends could help under the people I work for could help. especially. When he came to it was shocking enough to lose my daughter but. Then I having it happened to my wife is just The moralizing and when you understand about brain cancer, it's it is it is one of the worst Kansas it is. The worst cancer can get when Soglo Glass Dome There's no cure. Therapy treatments of very brutal and from the time you're diagnosed to your lifespan is about anywhere from eight to fourteen months at most. and. So what I had done here was to. My wife I would like to tell the story my wife came was in. Virginia at the time wife came to my desk and say, Hey, I hurt read about the stink on a Ketogenic Diet we should try and of course Oh, honey no doctor Internet doesn't make any sense I know everything there is no about cancer so to my friend so don't worry about that silly stuff and we saw More and more that there wasn't anything out there for. And so she. Found up all of the she went to the library bound up all the papers. She note newbies very well remember thirty five years. Bound up all the papers put them together dropped him on my desk and said read them jerk. Approve you watch your papers there to go and it was great. I kept reading and going. Oh. This does molecular on. What this not. From. DNA. I don't understand what do you mean cancer's not a DNA thing from some metabolic they didn't teach me this. It can't be true. I went through went through finally I. Got An end up at night called. A guy named Tom Siegfried. And he he was just starting out we get on the phone and he call be back right away and we started talking he sent me a copy of his book to review before it put it out and it was amazing. Gave me a lot of time from their issues dominant. A snow what we did there was. I took everything that everybody was doing in their labs agent checks, lab ruins, lab bodies, things, and I put them into tested him. I opened a lab imaging called the pet cancer trial and I took all those things. Sin Of the People's dogs had cancer and from there if it worked those dogs, it went into my wife. So we develop things like Keitel's I. really started developing the Keita Genetic Diet as a way to treat cancer and was one of the first people to really do that. And understanding how would have to work for people and always tell people who the great story about that as as a man, my wife took care me out with lucky is I don't know what you know I really was we were and we were been to give us sixteen years old. So we grew up together and so. As winter I had to learn to cook and what was great about the Kitchenette Diet Is that it's very scientific. You know so many grams this so many grams of that a lot of fat. I can do that. So I started doing that developing meals and all these things and. Fast. Forward, my wife lived about she was given eight weeks eight really eight weeks live when we first got the diagnosis of cancer. Her her her glass dome was about the size with baseball of the time we found out but she lived almost two years using all the ketogenic diets and all these other metabolic therapies we came up with the night coined the term, starve your cancer with Tom, and they told me not to use that was brutal. We don't want to say those kind of things up we that was my concept of what Mitt back then. and. So we did all these things made all DCA we looked at all. She was the first person do all of these things all of them? As she says, she was my six foot to my six two mouths. So it was it was very good. We worked very hard but ultimately. Because they miss they diagnosed her sooner they her brain tumor. They thought she had condition put a pacemaker in she was a very big athletes. So they didn't think they didn't think looking for an MRI to look at the. They said it's a heart. That's. and. So by the time we shouted Burke auction therapy plus ketogenic diets plus Ivy Vitamin C. were necessary as a as a frontline treatment for this. she couldn't get an Heiberg auction therapy because he had a pacemaker in a blowhard up and so be the last three months. We just got in a car just drove around always did. And the last week that she was living. I got a call from a company called Quest Nutrition, and then the people make the quest bars. And they were so interestingly started told me that they wanted to do this. This thing that I was doing with the cancer trial, but they want to do a big, they want to try something to see if I could do this. Then they would fund my studies for people with global. DOMAS. And my wife looked that being said, don't you dare? You'RE NOT GONNA. Do you know my time for sure don't do this. So what we end up doing is after she passed and she didn't she passed about one two weeks later. I called them up incident thirty days. Out I'll come out and and look at it and I wasn't very serious because I was like they make candy bars is silly I'm I'm a scientist. But I went out there. Lovely people, Ron Tina. they were just so into science in nutrition as a small company, they were making a lot of money and they showed me what they had no more. Oh, my God with all these things I can make these meals. I can do these things because what I understood is when somebody has cancer, they need all the help they can get especially when it comes to things that they consume. So their food. So we made the first line of kigen mills that were used in several clinical trials and it's around the country globalist Doma. When leukemia but by doing that, we're able to take all those trials that were failing. Ketogenic diets make it more like medicine and those Ketogenic Diet trials started to work much better on. So that's from there. From there we kept going it that we were able to fly people in from all over the world the quest they quote we open this cancer sanctuary in. Austin Texas that we did the same things we treated dogs like they were the president I mean, it's crazy. They were able to get Heisenberg oxygen therapy, Ivy Vitamin C. They were able to get all these things. And then we would cure them of their cancer and they were live out their lives on this farm where they had exercise in playmates and a swimming pool. It was just amazing that quest put all this money. But Four for my purpose was to get the people but their purpose, they actually loved their dogs they didn't have kids so I really got to understand that. You know about how people of different animal soon whereas a person or animal. But that took me to this last part of understanding how can genyk Diet worked and I was introduced to something called to jury depletion up one of our conferences we put on a conference in every metabolic oncology or metabolic therapeutics is what it's called now down Tampa, and that's where we start invited people from all over the world and Ketogenic diets made a Rockstar. So everybody came down we now we get about. Ten, they get about ten to twelve thousand. A. Twenty Five, thousand people lashed you're in California. and. So it's a big thing and everybody that's anybody metabolic. In metabolic therapies comes this thing now is just amazing an amazing amazing thing. So that's quest attrition did fantastic and from there I found out about the tune depletion about five years ago. From from in. and. So that's what we are now. So now the cure dogs cured mice and now we're starting in people we've done there have been two clinical trials. With this in both one in breast cancer and prostate cancer in Europe. Do the United States we treat over ten thousand people. So I like always like to Sadok Debbie overnight success after thirty years, right? So in these trials, you'd latest trials were on deterioration declares yes attorney. Yeah and what we do is I will tell people that again. Don't think of this as an alternative therapy S-, really complementary therapy and what I mean by that is as we talk about what deterent depletion is and what deterioration is this, what it ultimately allows you to do is to make the patient more resilient emotionally socially physically and cognitively anti make those standard of care like radiation and Chemo were better. and. So we published plenty published over one hundred papers on this but make them work better and thereby making the standard of care. We're better and a side effects less what you're able to do from. There is get better clinical terms that's are rallying cry get better clinical outcomes. One more thing that we did there is we collected thousands and thousands of research papers and I love what you do because every time I listened to of your podcast, some youtube videos, your cancer hacker and. That's really what you are and what we do is we we actually cancer hackers to what we've done now, taking all these thousands of papers and put into database. And so the they call me a futurist is because what we do I predict your future based on the. It's like super like functional medicine on steroids while I tell people predict your future markers. and. Life Markers everything from your vitamin D levels and how you got that Vitamin D. How long you hold your breath to wet Netflix's movies. You Watch you know because all these things what people for Johnny snows or what you already know is there are tens of thousands of of papers that tell you. What you should do to get better to beat cancer but nobody's put it together until we've done it in one place and so we've combined. So, now we have is a way to affect cancer and a way to measure those markers. So when you talk about Vitamin D or One of your eye Adine, we've got those papers and we can. Track all things to say what's real and what's not real and where it's to we have access to the data. That is also right now it is part of what we do is for the sooner deteriorated will move in a protocol. What you have is a portal and with tennis portal. Once we understand just like once we understand all of the things are missing. We start to plug the holes didn't we can measure again and the database with this am top right because everybody's gotta use ai because you're not going re ten thousand papers trust. So it was but it's going to tell you what is the right thing for you and lay out your. So that's we're con constantly mapping, and then coming back from your results to change your course little bit to change it a little bit better change a little better and as a result, we have helped people get incredibly fantastic results. Remission rates are longer lifespan is longer quality of life is super better because what a lot again I'm gonNA keep slap your back because I really believe this hanging. Yeah it it says the people it's surviving cancer is not enough it is not enough you want to have. Even a better life after because you know what to do, and if you know what to do to prevent cancer, especially prevent it from coming back. You will have a better life because that's what it requires to eat better to live better. Grief All these things which has its effect owned tearoom, which we will talk about what that is next. Okay and did order a kids I'm waiting on. The I think it's the breath pastor. That's really cool because again, but this is not new. This is not a new science. The first Nobel prizes given the four, one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, four, Nobel prizes have been given for this over the years the last one in two thousand eighteen for what's called the nanomoles which will talk about. But up until that time, there was no way to measure deterrent inside. Abidi nobody was able to do that what we did but I didn't Dr Cooper, we invented A. Tests that would be able to measure the trim levels in your tissue in your saliva blood, all these other different in your hair every place we can measure determine all these places because it really is just a marker for health at a marker for age. So we invented this and we invented also how to look at it and how to see it MRI. So this is all very medicine science. I want to tell people this is we`re Very, interesting that you could see it in an MRI. MRI is are actually measures of protons. Most most people don't know that that's what it's misery and the difference attuned a deterioration. A hydrogen element is a pro time or excuse me neutral. So they waste something differently way differently, and so just think of a magnet. So when a magnet hit something the heavy it is it it's it's stuck down right so as as the As, the force the magnet goes off. A lot of thing flips off I. That's how am I actually works. They give you contrast to put more than heavy stuff in it. So they can see the light stuff release but if they don't put the contrast and they're just looking, they're roundabout looking at deterioration in hydrogen. lookie. Interesting. All right. So the line dollar question what is deteriorating? Thank you. So everybody get ready I'm going to make it simple and it took me twenty years of forgot how to make it simple. deterement high hydrogen everybody knows what hiring is the most. Your. Sixty percent to sixty six percent hydrogen depending on if you're a baby or. Ninety year old but you're mostly hydrogen in the form of water hydrogen are the things that hold us together. Thank them. There's like nuts and bolts were south or legal pieces. That's the thing that connect everything connects the mix all your protein stay together carbohydrates stay together. Think of it. That's what you need to start thinking about hydrogens. And it also is what Bison oxygen we breathe to make water. Deteriorate him. Is a twin of hydrogen. Thank of them as as a s fraternal twins right there she is. You have to girls. But the second girl deteriorate is twice as tall and twice as heavy, but they're exactly the same person but the only thing is they look different. But call, say look different they. Can't do the same things. So when you look at the curium and hydrogen, they have different Guoling points they have or when it become part of water different freezing points. So trim freezes I. IT Boils Lewis in Pitcher. Excuse. Me hajim boils also hard become steam I. write it up 'cause it's lighter. So we call it every hydrogen and light hydrogen or heavy-water and lightwater and everybody thinks about heavy-water. The first thing you think about an atom bomb and we think about you know. And, that's why they call it heavy water because it's made of deterioration is in it. So the way your body works we think about sued and drugs and supplements, and all these things. Your body takes in food and. We. Think of proteins. And Fats, and carbohydrates but your body sees the hydrogens and it takes these hydrogens off your food takes it into your mind cadre. Inside. Your mind a contra in called the credit cycle t cycle it makes ATP. We all know this you know. Go Get. Inside. Your by Takao you have inside your. You have hundreds of thousands of my to contra it inside dramatic conjure. You have thousands, hundreds of thousands of tiny little motors, calm animals, and if you think of like how electric tie a turban runs do. You run pass these motors and it makes ATP Makes Energy Energy, energy, energy, energy more energy and water. So for every three pounds of food, you eat you make about sixty five pounds of energy sixty, five pounds. And Free Thousand Gallons of Water Day. That's where nuclear subs and that's what we have thunder. We really are clear part machines. We just never thought about that. When. Deteriorate which is twice as big thank. These motors are going at six thousand revolutions per minute returning that faith that's fascinating maserati or or Ferrari or the almost as bad as the fastest genuine. So it's going so fast these these these hardly going sorts of so fast pushing around, make all this energy because you need so much energy just a survive that when a deterrent comes in, it's twice as big and. It hits that data motor embrace it. And when that nanometer breaks, it can't make. ATP. Anymore. It can't make this water anymore it's gone. You got the you don't rebuild you have to really make a new one you can't repair. So what is disease? And understand one. Let me go back again. Remember the whole process is. Hydrogen, the right hydrogens are making energy are making an you need energy for everything I mean everything. Soldier image. So let me to so people understand and I didn't I, didn't know this either is that deterioration is a naturally occurring. Mineral or element element. We needed for growth. We need woodson plants in the oceans abundantly, which I live near the ocean and there are no. Just. So okay. So let's Beautiful Greg for Senate because again that's it is. This is not a toxin it's not a poison it's life. What's happening on our planet however is as we become more modern MARMON comforts, we've put more deteriorate our diets using Jim Foods which required a to him using. Using arrogated farms, which uses water instead of rain and mountain water. You know all these things that they used to do in ancient man aged five hundred years ago. We don't follow those practice anymore because we an this agriculture things that we do and what your to our foods even the seeds, all of a GMO foods. The reason is not because they're bad for you is not because they have some kind of strange DNA it's going to grow third eye. Or. Four. In you. It's because it has higher levels of the jury minute and when you eat it that the curium then is going to become part of you. Right, you are what you eat. You are what and this happens to be in. This happens to be everybody knows all these things already, we just discovered the on the molecular level how place in my understanding the molecular level you dig and understand the macro level. When you talk about different diets, he talked about different supplements. You can talk about all these terms interns of deterioration. Because your body has built, anyways your body is set up everything in your body set up to get rid of deteriorate. That's what it's for to get rid of the tomb. The reason you sleep the way you sleep and deep sleep and Ripley that's to get rid of the tune, your bile. The way you're by onwards is it gets rid of the turned him your kidneys, it gets relive termine binds the nitrogen binds Tarim to leave it out. You breathe oxygen comes in auction bayswater to make. The water, but it binds it a turn him first. So if you agree that if you breathe did it's going to buy the deterioration make of heavy water and get it out of your body. Temperature. Getting deterioration, from GMO foods too many conflicts hydrated. And the wrong kind of water. Then, our body just becomes overburdened with. And then what happens yeah. So then you kill your mind and then we go back everybody might calm you. Then you kill your mind conju when you kill Your Mitochondria you had no sell you energy when you have no sell your energy, you cannot detox cannot your immune system has gone your insulin can't work it has a suggest energy so you can't breathe correctly more you can't sleep your agitated. You're sad you're depressed depressed all this has to do with the level of energy and you can't think you're way out of things. That's why we talk about brain fog with Oh you're I'm sure you're listening to remember that is a function of deterioration. So by. And modern. Life, we've actually destroyed all of our ways to deplete to turn. You know we don't sleep as well were stressed. We don't read as well. We hyperventilate, and so what we've done is to look at all these different ways to the pleat deterioration, understand it, and then go out to fix it by using deteriorates the marker. So we've repair the bio home we're not. We're not so much worried about. The. Different. Types of bacteria we're worried about the function of the bile does, is it able to deplete the term the way it's supposed to the function of the kidney when you wake up when you take your first year nation in the morning is there mortaring minute or less that urine which tells you getting rid of it at night because that's what sleep is for you have you literally have. Garbage bags on those little Mana Motors that fill up with the TUNA GARDEZI fill up they fill up in nighttime you get rid of them. If you can't sleep that means those garbage bags are there and they burst and make you fatigued and tired and diseased and old and gain weight I. Mean it's just it's marvel. It's really this is going to be something that will become part of. Of what's medicine doesn't it's moving more that way. Now, this understanding because we're not saying that anybody's wrong and we're, I want to make sure people understand it. You had not wrong with anything you're doing. We're now able to tell you what's More. Right. That's that's the best way to put it. Now. You have a center for deteriorate depletion is it is it a physical center where patients can go? Well, we have a we we have work of a number of doctors, but we have our own metabolic oncology clinic that's located in Los Angeles, California Ram by Doctor Alan Green and there we not only use all of our techniques like to turn to water which is the frontline. US and we just been another water work. With another we'll call cure, which is an oxygenated water. How young has about a thousand times more oxygen regular water as so it's like having H. In a bottle. So we're able now to remove to trim two ways wanted to loot it out with determine depleted water, and now with this new oxygenated water super native water, we're able to actually also bind it that way and to as as your patients will know or you're you're listening as you get cancer and get older, you don't you hyperventilate you can't breathe very well. So you have to learn how to breathe and we have breeding techniques, but this water is actually going to help a lot which is so excited than it should put us may make what we even better but we do have our clinic here and we not only. Use. This purple used. In concert with standard of care. For Chemo, but partial chemo. So you don't have to use as much chemo partial radiation hyperthermia. Men hyperthermia by this I mean it's it's it's not just getting in a hot a hot bullets. Really it's. Dan Getting million dollar machine that has also been shown to. Standard of care grow or make work better, and then we have a lot of things to and you're going to last that we've just started is our emotional oncology part. And what we're did, and that's the idea that especially breast cancer is that a lot of the thing emotions is very, very, very important and may even be the cause of cancer I'm not even going to say it's not. But if you're able to address those emotions, we know that ninety percent of our patients or clients do better once that emotion is gone and it's just. So you know our said our outcomes which are published. At anywhere from depending on what stage are anywhere from five to twenty years of against what expected outcomes are not the main thing that's incredible and. People that are listening can actually they can go to the website and you can order tests and do them in the comfort of your home and find out what your deteriorate levels are. You can actually work with coach or just get some help online if you can't travel to La. At least start the process and and and from what I understood on the website that basically you're you're teaching people about. You know Ketogenic Diet Limited the CARBS sugars getting into the ketosis state improving the water, the breathing the sleep all of those things. So yes, you're exactly right and we even call it a tuned depleted diet because it's it's really. It's not about meet. It's about. Malaysia amount of deterioration the foods that you're eating and so we're very agnostic about that. Yes. Akita Diet as I start was all about meat and fat that's not true. Your body could care less if it's a state or doughnut is simply wants to write hydrogen or the wrong. It's your choice. But yes, you can come to our site again, I always talk about our whole thing is to get better clinical outcomes all that's what we do. We sell products get there but no, that's not important. Part important part is that you do better you do better because I don't want anybody. Dying needles look like my wife or daughter did needlessly. So you you are site, which is dede sitters, dot com double d sitters, dot com, and for you backslash. B.. C.. Press. Breast Cancer Congress you can come here again. DD, centers dot, com backslash BCC or if you just want to put in get better clinical outcome better cancer outcomes. You can get site and understand everything. It's very simple. It's highly highly highly effective and most importantly all the most important thing it does it makes everything that you do work better. So everything nothing that it can't make work better except stuff that doesn't work. On. Well call. Do you have any parting words of wisdom for someone WHO's? On a healing journey or perhaps newly diagnosed right now you're listening to. I yes I do I. Really do is we always say one thing they're gonNA give you. Different outcomes they're going to say this is what's going to happen to you. This is going to happen this this this this this, and it's going to skirt a frig out of you. What I want to tell you is once you understand how it works understand trim levels understand everything Dr v Stocky about. What you will do is no different. Different and that's what I want people to start thinking don't even. Make it like snoopy you know that Bob Blah Blah, Blah Blah that's what you should. That's what you should here because they don't know what you know. So that's what I wanNA tell people that this is just is just a bump in the road and we'll show you how to get around those bumps. And we always we tell the women in our community. There's no need for fear. You know traditional medicine has created such a fearsome outlook about the word cancer. It doesn't have to be that way and you know we've I've been through it. You've seen Brisson examples with your your family as well, and all the the patients that you've seen. You know there's there's a better way and it doesn't have to be one or the other can be where East meets West. Beautifully, with Doing. So thank you for everything that you're doing and and the whole that you're giving and appreciate all the research and I can't wait to get my kids and get. Man Thank you because again you know you're going to be willing to pictures on the hall of fame because that's what people see is this is who you can be. On thanks. All right. This is Dr sending you a big healing pod till next time. Bye for now.

cancer scientist cure Dr Hugh Collins brain cancer Austin Breast Cancer Concord Breast Cancer Tom Siegfried football Chemo Dr Barry Nick Dr Guarany Zone Zony Ma co founder NIH Wellness Warriors principal investigator
The Productive Podcaster | EP33: The MF'n Podcast

The Productive Podcaster

34:07 min | 2 weeks ago

The Productive Podcaster | EP33: The MF'n Podcast

"There are millions of podcasting done. All over the world take on the personalities of their creator psalm bringing thousands of listeners. Some bring large amounts of revenue while others entertain millions and help sell products. Like many podcasters. You want to reach your maximum potential. But how how do you make. Podcast stand out from all the rest. Join dr baruch matty's and he talks the experts who are doing it on the productive podcast. Hey everybody welcome to another episode of the productive. Podcast i am dr barry mathis. Visit your first time joining the productive. Podcast let me tell you what this show is about. Well i coach people on productivity for a long time and when i started podcasting i realized the people weren't getting their podcast started weren't getting a ngong because they thought everything had to be everything had to be a certain way and i wanted to show people that you can be productive in podcasting doing any way you want to so what i did. Is i put together a podcast to bring people on here who do different podcast. Show all types of wage. You can do. Your podcast thing is for you to just get started getting going and you can learn as you go. You can change it go so forth and so on. So that's productive podcasts. Now what i want you to do with though do who are new. And for those of you who listen for a long time. But i wanted to do right now. Is share share share shared. Everybody let them know. They need to be listening to productive podcast. Also i wanna make sure everyone out there subscribing make sure you're doing that and also take advantage of our patriotic man. We asked some stuff on pay. Great thanks for you just for supporting the podcast for you as well as the move on right now i like to start up the show with something. I like to call pros and cons pros and cons now. What frozen contract pros and cons. Where i give you some professional advice on starting podcast so if you can be a productive podcast now we're talking about co host shows today. Some people would like to have a colleague or friend co host the show with them. There's a benefit to that the benefit of that is. You don't have to do all the talking. You don't have to worry about creating all the airspace needs to be filled. You can have someone at different different contrast to what you say so that they can keep an entertaining to people now. Some of the challenges. What that challenges if you have to make sure that you're recording that thing if you're in different places so that everything can be in alignment with one another. You have to make sure that each of you is in alignment with it comes to sound the comes to timing and so forth and when it comes to if you're making money if you're splitting money is it going to be a fifty fifty split or need to make sure all those things are discussed in in place before you get started his best to have it in writing. That's my vice. So what will do right now. That was my prototypical today. On pros and cons. We're gonna take a quick break and when we come back. I got a great guest guys today. Most entertaining guests. That you're saying bury you say that every week. Why can't help it if my friends are the bomb. So i'll i want you to do this way. You are state. We'll be right back right after this message with more productive podcasts to learn everything you need to know about starting podcast well and to create your podcast weekend. We put it all in two days and help you get your podcast going by next week. That's right playa next week. All you have to do is confident. Create your podcast leak and show you how to get your podcast up and running. We will show you how to attract listen. We will show you how to get people to pay you for your products and services. What products and services products and services. So you how to create all the krieger. Your podcast weekend. All you have to go to free podcasts. Weekend dot com and get registered today and we have special bonuses. Some of you even get us to give you the equipment to start your podcast. That's right we're going to give some of the pot adding to get started. Go to create your podcast. Weekend dot com. That's great your podcast. We can dot com and get started on your podcast by next. It's time to be a box a media boss. If you're in business for yourself time you get your message out and podcasting is the best way to do it. Let us create a gun for you. Podcast experience with media boss. All you have to go media dot com and we'll create a gun for you podcast right now. That media boss dot com. I'd everybody welcome back to the productive podcast and once again. I'm dr barry matthews. I want you guys to get ready. I got a great guest date. And let me ask you something. Do you want open and honest. Podcast conversations for adults get ready because man. The mfn podcast. You heard me right. We'll give you just that your on me and my man missed the headquarters. You heard that right to because he gonna tell you what he raised with his podcast right now so everybody helped me. Welcome missed the headquarters to productive podcast. Welcome computer show man. Thank you. Thank you dr barry. Thank you for having me on appreciate it. We'll mound glad to have you here. S that have so. I i gotta ask you the name of your podcast you all. That's the first question everybody asks. I know that so. I gotta ask how. How did you come up with that. Wow so it took a long process if you really. If you don't want to be honest it wasn't as easy as you think. I mean i know. It's a simple phrase You know it is adult themed but a along time we went through like maybe about three different Three different names. I think we went through the garage. Bros. the culture crew of we went through a lot of different names. And we set it on this one because Are opinionated on a lot of things that we have is particularly myself I am extremely Opinionated about a lot of differences sometimes a lot of guys on the show mother co host kind of call me the overly opinionated sometimes but and i think he kind of makes me who. I think it makes me who i am. You know so So i try not to change that at all so myself. My co host Thick i bandit and you heard i right guy bandit because he has probably the thickest glasses you probably have ever seen my that takes me back to those neighborhood. Dave give everybody nick. Yeah we took it back home. You know what i'm saying. We all resigned from new orleans for the most part so we wanted to keep it a real authentic organic. You want to keep on a loose environment that we can just have a good conversation like you. Having in the barbershop Accept the differences with us. We have you started out in a garage and that's kind of how it started so we we started out in the garage and My friend's garage out the on the east new orleans and We just kinda spitball from there and then rate it. What kind of topics have y'all discussed this only so if you ever get a chance to listen if any of you listening to get a chance to listen to the teaser. Episode the teaser. Is that what it is is a big tease. But it kind of really gets deep into our conversation about relationships. Kind we start off with men versus women you know. We put it on the strings early. We can never win that one. I did my best to try and you can drive a total reach. The soon we realized they ain't control the buddy and lifelong. You're right about that. We tried best to tackle the conversation about Who's in control. You know who leads the who leaves the household. More is it truly. The man is demands king of the house or is it the woman for whom Release from behind the whole year. That one it took an interesting turn that and it was only fifteen minutes but it took an interesting turn real quick. Do you keep that to fifteen minutes. Oh okay okay okay. Okay okay a test on you. You touched on group economics. Oh good basis of our our show why we came together As far as we start out with five people ask you to that guy. We start with five but now we're at for unfortunately One of our brothers Had to step away and take care of his personal needs. You know so. We made sure we took care of him on that But we also touched on business. We touch on money. We touch on Fatherhood we touch on a different thing. We talked mental health lasso so we touch on a variety of things current events. So we make sure we try to stay current on things as much as we can and try to stay grounded. So how long have you been doing. Podcasts we started the park s in may twenty twenty and we launched in august fantastic. So have you have you been able to monetize it. You know we never. We never monetize yet because a lot of people wonder. Do they have some contact with day. Someone close to me. He's a barrett. I wanna start a podcast. And i wanna i wanna make money with i like it ain't it ain't like that to start making money and understand. This is not a fast process man. He doesn't have an audience so nobody knows who you are right so i think that that's what i wanted to ask that because if you've been doing since august fantastic that's fantastic but it. Yeah a lot of people understand these guys out here doing their podcast right now because they have something to say. That's the main you need five. Yes yes main reason if you can monetize it once you build. That up was stabbed your identity as who. You are the podcast. Then yeah you can start working on ways ways to get money going on. Now let me ask you. What are some of the challenges. You guys hadn't doing that when we first started. Yeah wow so. Yeah so one of the first thing. That was the toughest thing that was really trying to define who we were as podcast. Okay i mean yeah. We had a nice attention grabbing name. What what is the show right exactly. When we first started off it was It was kinda shaved room. And i didn't want to try to go there. You know i. I didn't want to try to graph from the sleazy titles. And you know all the gossiping and all that stuff i wanted to actually have something actually set up raw substance for an entity to because the other half of our show is we. Actually we actually Interview entrepreneurs in our community and so we wanted to make sure that we had something actually backing up that in on the other half so one half of the show is is four was talking about whatever current events is going on or whatever we feel is important alive and then after that The second half of the show is now that we starting to really get into season. Two is We've been talking to people that think like us had the same business mindset us for myself. I have a business background. I have a business degree. So i want to make sure that i want to really implement that end. I spent so much time and money in school. It you know what i probably should be working in somewhat somewhat of the fielded aiba. I'm actually. I actually no. Yeah and i think the biggest thing to was speaking about things that you actually know about two on a day. I think we we got into the realm of sometimes of a recording. Some things that we didn't really comfortable talking about or at least have enough knowledge about. Yeah and i think that was one thing that we really made sure to be tackled get me grasping who really are now season. Two that good. How long were you seasons. First season was about fifteen episodes with a couple of bonus episodes in there. Okay how often do packets a once. A week be drop tried to be consistent but you know life. Yeah and the thing is is. I'm i'm distracted this podcast. This is probably one of my thirty thirty thirty second thirty third episode. And i'm still in the first season so of trying to figure out how long ago go before i think i might do fifty. Okay yeah before. I take a break in his reason why someone asked me to start another podcast too so it was someone else with you so no well with myself. I'll be interviewing people with discount will be. I'll be interviewing world leaders okay. I'm people like kings from africa and governors and stuff so really. I couldn't pass that up so yeah sounds great. Yeah so that's not going up. So that means i'm gonna. I can't do both at the same time. Take inside. no yeah. I'll tell you what if you can't talk about the work that goes into putting together the act. There are people listening right now. They wanna podcast. They don't know should they do everything by themselves. What is it what goes into nada. Well it i think it depends on what you're doing to I would say make sure you you understand how many people you have. In my opinion three or less is the best route to go. I think two to three is good. Co host co-host Record and the reason. I say that is in Having one pop haven't one person is like talking to yourself. If you comfortable talking with yourself then you'll have a great show So if you haven't two three four people even five now you kind of get into the what everybody's comfortable with talking about. Are you going to be able to provide any substance if you talk in this round. Learn this rumor that round so that was some of the things that we had to make sure that'd be made sure that everybody was comfortable topics that we're talking about. Some of the things that we were talking about was politics to we try to touch here and there but we try not to dip in there too much. You know the political economy but I i like the way we're going right now. I everything been going. Pretty good Season was a little rocky. I think because we were kind of moving around in the darkening so to speak. Yeah yeah you're learning. You're letting a lot you're learning the podcast to learn who you while. You're learning each other the chemistry. That's a whole latman each. I'm a horrify people. Let's see him. As one young lady who i helped reduce her podcast and her model was a little different and i liked your model much better because hers was. She has some friends who she talks to and she said hey. Come on pike as well. We'll just shoot the breeze about a different topic autograph but the thing is she was the only one commit it so you guys are all committed to it. S a group podcast. This was her podcast but they would joining in helping her out or they want committed so it was hard. That's hard to do because there's only one person permitted to. Do you have a group. Yeah if one person or two people or if not everybody involved is committed. You're going to have a really tough time. Yeah you gotta have everybody on the same page. It's like having a team not just like in sports or if you're working in the work environment you gotta have a team. That's all in one sink. One goal in mind when mission so having everybody think on that level of will really make things very easy on your mindset. Trust me interviews of cool people right. yes yes We we had a chance to interview. adam orissa from Bravo tv properties of from From from to rome with love we've also interviewed a bomani ex from clubhouse lou We have a few more surprise. Guest is going to be coming up throughout the season so we have a few more coming down the pipeline so love to in season. Three's going to be nice. I love it so so. Are you don. Don't you said you're down. The four people in your pocket. Are you looking to bring another a personal. You're going to stay at for no. We're gonna be here stay. Were comfortable standing for election. Well i mean let me clean it up it. The only reason why i just wanna give us a little context. 'cause i think some people might go through the same thing because i've actually got the question a lot and i think is important like i said before is important. I know what you're talking about is also important to know what direction you wanna go into because if you don't know what you're talking about the direction of you know what is your even general audience right s important important port having those topics in those Who your audience is before you get started in mind. That's a good point accu. In in that vein. How do you all come up with your discussion topic. I one person that does that prog of all of you all have a meeting to discuss different topics. How does that happen right. So we normally me. We try to have a weekly A weekly zoom call with all the guys because everybody lives in different locations so we try to have a weekly zoom call. You know what. It's friday night thursday night whenever everybody's available you know every you know life is crazy so we don't. We don't pinpointed on taylor day. We all dennis constant data record. Gotcha on we try to stay consistent on that. So we always course saturday nights. We always made shohei saturday night. Not be getting the guys together. We get these topics together. Normally is a myself in those topics together. And we kinda brainstorm from there. I i love that name. They got better. I mean i've told you man it makes me think of something nickname to my neighborhood and people were winning those names company but only the people in the neighborhood so yes sometimes those names come down upon you not because you wanted to come because there's something that everybody was comfortable calling. I got a friend. I grew up with him. He had had a large head. We thought if we we called him joe rocket and get when we grew older. It got cool good. We started called on. Go rock so now. It's a cool name. Saturday iraq as a cool but it started out because of head because he got comfortable because he knew yo you know and he got comfortable with that name visas fitting in now. You kind of just certain it's an cooler version of that exactly exactly exact. Blending mentioned thick i by. That's cool name. So i let you go. I want you to tell everybody the name of your podcast again where they can find you right so the mfn podcasts. We all we on twenty different platforms. Not hard to find we on apple. Podcasts google podcasts spotify audible pandora iheartradio pie being wherever you wanna live for podcast. We are on it We'll also on the black podcast at which is available in a google. Play store so you can also catch on. That platform was well We're also on ide g which you can catch his at the mfn pot were on twitter at the american. Podcast one Yes this hit us up on there. You can even drop us a line. We have a phone line that you wanna drop us a text message or a voicemail will will even play back on the show if if it's interesting enough or not perverted because we get a few You wear call sometimes. But it's a four by four point nine nine ten fifty nine eleven eleven eleven look is this. Is this as headquarters. Here of the mfn pockets guys to do is make sure you support his podcast go. He told us everywhere. It's everywhere i guess what. He's not going anywhere he's not gonna where he thinks we're going gonna be right back with a next segment called podcast. He'll be right back right after this message. Why do media boss club right now. Well because you can get a podcast done for you you can learn all the aspects going going putting together a great podcast and have someone else would for you. That's right we will build your podcast around your content and make it so you can concentrate on the money making activities of your contact media boss. Klopp dot com ca media bought clubs dot com today. And let us get your podcast starts right now dotting. A podcast can be daunting tasks a lot. That goes into it. And you're probably wondering if you're able to handle it. Well why don't you just take two days and let us teach you how to do it at the create your podcast weekend. That's right rigorous. Show you all the aspects of how to start your podcast. How to keep your podcast going how to attract listeners and how to make money what your body cast create your podcast weekend dot com get registered right now. Let's face it you've been talking about starting a podcast for quite some time. But you haven't started yet. Why is that could it be that. Just don't have the time to take your day to day teaching so busy or could it be that you don't wanna learn all the technical aspects go into putting together a quality well at medium club we take care of that. How would you like to have a gun four experience. That's right and media boss club. We feel your podcast for you. We will edit your podcasts. Google put an music for you. We even put in commercial break that you can put your advertisers. Then we will take care of all of the uploaded to the great podcast phones. That are out there. That's right we do everything all you have to because right now go to media. Box club dot com ca media boss club dot com. And let us handle the heavy lifting for you. Hey everybody look the did. I disappoint a what i told you. Man mr headquarters was the bomb. Brought it with the nfl podcast. Once you've got to make sure you pay attention that but guess what i told you gone. He is still here. he is still here. And we're gonna do podcasts. right now. Pot quest now pod podcasts where we take one of the questions from audience members and we answer that i know we talking about the same. I want to get my question. How come you can't read my question on it. Well i'm gonna tell you how you can do that. All you have to do is go to our facebook group which is the productive podcast and make sure to join and i want you to engage. I don't want to just put a question that i wanted to engage with us. Let us know you who you are what you about. What's he doing up there now when i say that. Don't go. potent outcast. Lincoln now mean we promote engage the no one and build a community. That's what we're doing but actually question that we may get an answer up mr headquarters. The question today is how many episodes blending do before. I take a break. Wow yeah that's a great question because i think If you go too long you can burn yourself out. So we'll be in. This was my creation that i did with the the show for seasons. I decided to do seasons instead of having a full length of amount of shows so which is fine. You can do that if you have a nice team behind you. Because i think a lot of times. People look at these bigger podcasts. But they don't see behind the scenes that a lot of these podcasts have a big massive amount of teams behind them. So if you're starting out yourself or a buddy or two or three hours suggested this make sure that you set a standard and said. Hey you know what i'm gonna set out this. Maybe eight to ten shows. Maybe even fifteen. Just start off with a season and that will give you a chance to sit and watch in kind of sit back and be able to assess everything that you different that season take a break. Take a load off. Actually let your mind reset. He might even get some better ideas to because of that. Trust me. it's gonna take a load off 'cause starting pockets. You're gonna have a whole lot of has to wear so trust me. Get break yeah. That's right about that. One hundred percent and another thing i would say to. You is if you're talking about taking a break you'll know he wanted to break. Oh yeah you know. Regardless of what the counties of how many episodes you've done your know when you wanna take a break and guess what if you know you've got to take a break your audience know it to yes we take. Your product will not be the same they can feel it and they look and they will let you know yes they will let you know if that is the case take a break is nothing wrong with that. Take a break and we'll new content and what it also allows you to do is go back over the other content and see what thank. You may need to work on to improve. Yes what things you may wanna take out what they may want to add to your podcast and don't understand this. There's nothing wrong with tweaking. It's nothing wrong with changing things. It's your show absolutely your show so if you feel that you need to take a break and do those things. Hey break the door. Just don't take too long. Yes i would like to say when you podcast. If you go past thirty days without uploading anything into the podcast data directory they will create up their label you as a An advert inactive podcast. So make sure you have. Something will just a snippet a clip or teaser. Something in that little break. This is preloaded into like a promotional thing. Yeah yeah absolutely. Do something do something if you if you want to keep that audience enticed as well. You keep them interested in you when you're combat. They want to sit here today. You don't have like a game of thrones not like that so whether they can't wait for you you have to keep them interested shit genesis so you gotta keep them interested because they only got. They're gonna come back with guests. Nine eight name star now. No people move on so and they will find another podcast. Listen to so. I understand that i want to thank mr headquarters once again for joining us. Tell us please before we let you go where they can find your podcast. The name your where they can find it as well. Yes appreciate that again. It's a the mfn part or the mfn podcast. You can go by googling. One word the m. f. n. pod or you can take out twenty different platforms that we're on With such as apple podcasts. Google podcasts spotify iheartradio pandora audible amazon music The list goes on the black podcast which is available on ios end. Google play store You can also check us out on. I g which is a d handle is the mfn pot you can check us out on twitter. A the mfn podcast one. I love it. I love him. He's got to cover. I got. I need to get mine up on some of those. We're gonna talk do it. Yeah most definitely. Thank you once again going god before he going on. Everybody would fly before you make sure you going children's love made you support the podcast. This is not a competition guys. Leeann this together guy. So make bought him. Make sure you showing for love supporters. Podcast scribe it. I'm sure he got something tonight. Merchandise for y'all will show you ask you about that. Well so mr headquarters thank you once again. You have to have you back some time as well matt appreciate your brother appreciate the opportunity. Thank you again. No problem no problem guys. It is time now for the podcast profile. This is where. I find a podcast that i listen to and i thank you guys may may like. Let's take a listen to one. I listened to. It's called handle with care. Podcast by letting carry madrid. I'm going to have carry on. The podcast kerry with grid handle with care and talk to talk to people who have been a survivor of breast cancer. Mandate that man. Cancer does not discriminate man. So many know that. I've had people effect. I think all of us have someone who defected by cancer to great podcasts. Handle with care listener carry. Mcgrigor might might enjoy now. Podcast giveaway. that's right. I give away some of your wanna right now with. How can i give away. I want to get something to the. I'm telling you go to our facebook group. The productive podcast made shaw joined. The group may show you engage and we may call your name giveaway. Well guess what the person tonight who is a gentleman by the name of greg. Lewis greg thank you for pants. Podcast greg podcast. We are giving him a report reporting in progress sign and put on his door. 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Do AMPSAs cause AOBs?  PDP008

Protrusive Dental Podcast

52:15 min | 2 years ago

Do AMPSAs cause AOBs? PDP008

"Most of us unfortunately go to lectures to have what we already know justified so as long as as long as someone is telling me what i know is what i'm doing is right has been right then. I can take on a new pearl or something and add to it. I'm comfortable with that. If someone someone telling me that what i'm doing may may not be right that's upsetting and what i've been saying for years is that i'm not saying that what you've been doing all right welcome to the protruding dental podcast the forward thinking podcast for dental professionals join us as we discuss hot topics and dentistry clinical clinical tips continuing education and adding value to your life and career with your host jazz gulali. I do anterior midpoint. Stop appliances course anterior open bites right so if you're unfamiliar with these appliances is basically tonight god that only covers that say to two or three three or or five to find and as many combinations opposing and whatnot larger smaller but essentially they don't cover all the teeth they are segment to appliances and the classic version of it would be like an anti war in the u._k. As s._e._i. C-i-s sleep clench inhibitor other other versions are available white soft false which is something. I use quite a bit or splints. There's loads of different types so if you're listening to this podcast and you've clicked on to find out if these sorts of appliances caused anterior might send probably you've come across all seen photos all perhaps you use these cautiously or perhaps uses freely. Let's find out basically the back east. Don't touch the muscles switch off. That's essentially how it works. So you're biting together on the night. God you're putting only at the front the back to touch the muscles cannot contract efficiently with the power that they can do when backlit contact. Why did i do this. It's episode. It's a huge discussion. Point full of controversy basically people are convinced that these sorts of appliances imagine one example covering to to will cause an anterior open bite by the posterior teeth over erupting so i invited an expert in this field in or facial pain dr barry glassman to speak speak on this topic to get clarity on whether these plans to actually cause such issues today's producers until b._r._b. Technique okay. This is four class four four composite so any sort of build up in consett. It's not the be right back techniques zoo. It's actually called follow ricky barati technique and and shortened to be if you have someone who has had a class for fracture. Let's say and you need to do a nice bill and you want to a layered approach. Usually classically you'd have to do some sort of a wax up and then take a party stent wakes up and then transferring on therefore you've got your plato thickness and therefore we can build the anatomy into the party not index now so with the techniques basically negating the need for a wax up you take a putty index to include the fractured tooth you just taking putty index in the situation and have it in front of you including the adjacent teeth so that later you get a positive seat of the stent and then do with a pencil you draw on the potty way he would like the insides alleged to be basically use the adjacent teeth as a as a guide and then using a round ended tungsten carbide for your move the silicon party where you've demarcated with a pencil so essentially you're creating the wax up with the burr into the party and there we are you have your instant wax up within the party to actually build the classical fracture to the correct shape and morphology using a layered approach so it's a neat little trick and i'm going to shout out on on blog w._w._w. Dot jazz dot dental under this episode in the show notes which you can download a p._d._f. So let's listen to the interview with dr barry glassman and for the record at the time of production. I have no financial interest with s for us or dr guardsmen seminars some of the terminology and ideas doc glassman shares can be quite difficult to grasp over audio audio at the i listened anyway and it's quite hide either is quite high level expert knowledge he shares with us and some of it went beyond me as well but i'm hoping that this will settle the bay about anti midpoint stop lines and whether they cause anterior overbites thanks so much for agreeing for this honesty he was lying either nope into sports and football but it felt like in the last minute transfer window and football when you when you managed to to sign a new player and everyone's really excited. That's how it felt like to me well. That's crazy but that's great though about your lecture and i went to last year at the london. I was actually life changing for me in the sense that i'm i'm really into collusion. Okay so that's the whole. This podcast called the protrude. Dental podcast is not just collusion is about all sorts of things dentistry but it's always a flavor on i'm into it but then your perspective on it i thought was so so powerful and i'm so glad hopefully we can share that with our listeners today truly <hes> so that so. Let's let's start with that. How did it change your perspective really really rewired my brain and i know you know exactly what i mean because we just don't get taught to think about it the way you explain so basically what i took out from it was when we design in their quote unquote a closer harmony when we have everything in canaan guidance when we have everything in class one that only it only happens when the teeth are together and that's the gist of what you're saying but when we design inclusions as we design them and please tell me misinterpreted what you said we design these collusion's for power function we design for function but we designed them with power our function in mind and actually the only time it matters when the teeth are together and maybe the crux of the problem is power. Function is the fact that the teeth together for too long. Would you think think about not. I feel like there's actually that that is if i were hoping that someone would walk out of the lecturer with something <hes> that that <hes> there are two things you've said that make me feel as though <hes> you i i was successful the electric the two things were yes that we designed a collusion's for a power function not for function <hes> that when we look looking we we look at the amount of time that teeth are actually together and whether they're actually together one way function and when we think about it we don't really we don't ask patients at the end of restored visit the next time were they able to eat meat the next <hes> the next very rarely a complaint that patients have i. I can't eat as well as i did. <hes> the show so it's really <hes> <hes> when we look and see where the teeth contact during function what we know is that it's a it's unpredictable as nothing to do with what we could evaluate on articulated has not you know you can't look at a case and say well. This is where it's going to hit when were functioning. We have no idea we have no idea if it's going to hit our or where will hit inclines and et cetera and has a lot to do with our domestic dory sorry cycle and the bullets and the kinds of things that you know this amazing body that god or darwin but together <hes> has created created and and we we it's it's it's overwhelming the amount appropriate <hes> mcadoo receptors information that goes into into the mountains about nucleus into our central nervous system. I recently learned to appreciate what you're saying there. I read a book handbook by someone kula lab jay levy i think believes based in the states and his sort of research was just how much sensory feedback is is contained in in in teeth sensational announce at our mandevu. I mean the whole mandibular functioning which we can't even pretend that we we can know and this doesn't make us any different than than than medicine. It's not like medicine knows <hes> when we look at a at a car accident and we look at what we're someone gets injured. We'll try to we try to figure out the force vectors how we can't we know that you know there. There's no relationship between the amount of force force in the amount of an inequality davidge done to an individual and all has to do with a with a with magnitude and direction of four sectors that are too difficult gold for us to analyze absolutely but before we dove in any anymore i i just wanted to say for because because some people may be listening and they don't know who you are. I feel like like we got so into it because i also share my excitement of having you on so again. Thank you so much for joining us. I know that you remember your diplomat of so many things diplomat of the board the american academy of craniofacial pain headache society or facial pain. I'm just picking a few of the of the tell me jazz at all. I don't really know all that <hes>. You know to be honest with you. I appreciate that. I don't know that there isn't any of those that make me feel you know that that that make megan qualified enough to speak on the subject as much as my intense interest in science that i find is fascinating is is rivaled by so many others like yourself so <hes> <hes> it's g. I appreciate all that and and i know that that looks you know people look at those things but you and i both know that that's there are lots of if i look at some of the restorative gurus and i look at some of the things that they've accomplished you would you would think that there and therefore will carry weight and i listened to what they say and shot her so well. Listen your very humble for anyone who wants to read it. There's a list of your credentials you look. I can say that when i went to lecture last year it it really resonated with me and then i read a chapter of yours in a book by steve hudson that you did. I'm trying to remember the messages from dental masters. I think it was that one mm-hmm anyway and it was you were discussing about the whole teeth including together and what not which we're gonna come onto this and the podcast but definitely you've had a massive impact on my my career my tree and planning my thought thought process so thank you so much for that and i want to go to share that with everyone so yes. How did you get into being interested in this field in particular i e <hes> i guess the wide term would be a collusion but you might want to call it something else or facial. How'd you describe that a pain pain pain pain management is pain management joint dysfunction so how'd you get into that. You know it's it's the way that i think many of us get into it. I am i took what one of the reasons i teach. <hes> jazz is that i try to avoid for everyone else. In our profession the treacherous chris path that i wound up taking <hes> i got into it in the in the late seventies <hes> before many of you were born i <hes> i was this <hes> cheating a young woman in her mid thirties that i truly believed and trusted who had specific <hes> max laurie by cossack paid aide and no matter what anyone ended honest eventually had the tooth extracted eventually had to bridge placed and and nothing could resolve our pain and someone came and at that point a flyer came across my desk to be to go take a course with niles gucci who was teaching the what was called this a cacuso studies society for studies and is basic concept was that everybody should have their condos up and back in a reproducible position wherever uh not wonderful yeah exactly and we're all i want to go through the whole i the reality is that i went from camp to camp. I studied with harold gal for seven years. I studied with with <hes> nor muscular with bio research for years <hes> and i was just just in looking for for answers that <hes> and believing everything i was told when in fact all this much of that information formation and as much as i have respect for many of these what i call pioneers people who created a path for are the science that we now have just like those pioneers were fabulous. We certainly would want to be using the maps created by the original pioneers in the united states and <hes> unfortunately <hes> those those pioneers were very happy to see growth and change in their map. Unfortunately or gurus don't wanna see rosen change because it seems to they seem to be very protective of their legacies and so when science comes around and the demonstrates that maybe some of the things that they were teaching <hes> <hes> was it wasn't accurate for example interferences causing causing hyperactivity allowed turquoise basil's which we now know doesn't can happen or miss out there as someone who i religiously religiously but i go to a lot of clues in courses. It's my thing. I i really enjoy. I really do enjoy it. The whole temperamental disorders doing more complex rehabilitations designing inclusion inclusion from scratch. When you're trying to protect your restored to work i suppose then i do follow those principles anterior guidance and that sort of stuff this thing which only really matters when they're together but i think when you're doing rehabilitation debilitation he saw have to begin from somewhere if you have a choice between having more forces during a function or less choices. Why would you take more so the answer. Of course that's exactly right. There's nothing and feel. Some people have misunderstood you. Don't i feel as though some people think that what you have to teach is is saying that you can do anything you want and you don't have to follow follow strict protocols or do the way that we're supposed to a full madria they've misunderstood trying to your what your messages and that's one hoping to so now today well i i get that i get a lot of mr interrogation i i i'll say inclusion doesn't matter unless you're colluding and people only hear the first part and and when the and and so they'll only hear that inclusion doesn't matter and the problem is with that is is that the reason they hear that is because everyone's telling them how important that inclusion is the key. It's the answer and if <hes> <hes> so as soon as i say it doesn't matter it just turns people off. I've learned you. You know it's funny. I i will not accept an invitation to speak at a study group for an hour on inclusion because i know at the end of the hour i i don't have enough time to to do what you said in the very beginning. The first thing you said to me was you. You were rewired distinct differently. Well think about that jazz in order to be rewired. You have to get rid of the existing wiring and then you have to rewire. Yes you have to open yourself up and i'm sure people come to chisholm didn't have an open mind and they would just send their ways. I'm sure you have stories people. Maybe other than anyone of a walkout all thrown stuff at me why and no no question i get people get. There are people that have to do when when many of us go to lecture many reasons no no one in in the u._k. I forgot you gotta say going to the u._k. It's it's it's not as much fun because everyone's so polite but i i always very respectful and i have no idea how angry some some people are because i you know because of the tendency to be respectful and the united states. They're not quite as respectful so we'll go ahead and we've got trump as president for god's sakes so so they'll go ahead and throws off an interesting to me. You know whatever <hes> but what what what what i'm so what i'm saying is that people go to lectures doctors for various reasons and the most of us unfortunately go to lectures to have what we already know justified so as long. There's a as long as someone is telling me what i know and what i'm doing is right has been right then. I can take on a new pearl or something and add to it. I'm comfortable comfortable with that if someone's telling me that what i'm doing may may not be right. That's upsetting and what i've been saying jazz for years is that i'm not saying that. What you've been doing is a right if you've been receiving success in doing whatever you're doing. No one who home. I say it isn't right. What i am suggesting is that maybe it was right for other reasons that you suspected maybe it's right because the mechanisms assumes that you're that are at play the contributing factors that were touching are different than you suspect that they are and if we are truly understood better both the contributing factors that we were controlling as well as the differences that exist from patient to patient then we could to put our treatment into better perspective and help more people more conservatively brilliant well. I think people listening to this now. I feel some people may be saying hang on. What is the across where we get into the main reason to get you one is because i know your someone who based on that later i went to i could speak to you for days and days and days. I'm really really love job the devotion to come up with something so simple but obviously your lecture. You're coming to london shackled soon. You're lecturing about it and i get the people the details but i wanted to home in on one specific thing and that was anti points talk plans insurance. I see him. I'm sure you i know you get tagged on facebook and stuff all the time. Hi and people are getting into that debate and i'm sure you're sick of seeing it. All the time okay base. I was at tend to school though that these appliances devil's work because they will cause over eruption of the posterior teeth and you'll get an open by and all sorts of terrible things will happen to you so can you please tell me or tell the audience yes. I know ready from going electric why this may not be the case or it may be the case for in different mechanisms okay so so let's talk about <hes> first of all why we use anterior midpoint appliances so the the our what the purpose of any appliances so i would ask you as as a as a dentist dentist <hes> you've got a patient and you've got. Let's say something very specific. We've got a patient with some <hes> joint pain upon awakening and <hes> suspicion of of early <hes> internal derangement of some sort whether it'd be an inflammatory state whether it be <hes> slightly compromised <hes> tethering hetherington the disk and and and some some clicking so we've got some low level clicking and significant joint pain upon waking okay so that's what we've got a patient that that dentistry will say has some t._m. J. or t._m._d. Which is you know drives me crazy but nevertheless yes but we we can't get into everything so so so so so i say to a dentist a general dentist what are you going to do is or you know i've got a patient and you not. They brush their teeth. You can look you can see where patterns it's so. So what are you gonna make. She says guard great. I said so and you tell me as a dentist someone before you took my course someone said i wanna make a night guard and i would say to you. What's the mechanism. How is that night guard going to help so before. I don't use <hes> <hes> i would have said i'll make a bike raising appliance or wherever so maybe a soft bite night or maybe in michigan splint feeling fancy if the patient afford it and and the mechanism that would work would be raised the bite therefore it will take the kondile slightly away from the foster and allow the inflammatory exit exits to be declared and reset the system so they'll stop brexit. That's my probably would have said beforehand which glitz goods great answer. That's a great because that's you know and and there isn't it's not there isn't everything in that answer isn't wrong so <hes> so there is in fact a to be honest with the jazz. That's a better answer and then then i then i usually get when i asked dennis o. <hes> <hes> obviously your your interest is and is is greater than many and many who may be listening may not have come up with all that or maybe some of you that's great <hes> <hes> the the the reality is that yes we know that there is no true. <hes> what we're we're talking to also remember that we were taught about the first twenty millimeters pure <hes> right and we know that it's true so we know that there's a media correct. That's why i understand only from your course and i went when i read further and further into it so yes i now accept. That is not purely rotation. Yes it isn't an articulated but not in the mouth right right in articulate has nothing to do with with actual the way kinda actually function yes so so so now we so as soon as we put something between the teeth now how when the elevators contract and bring our teeth up against it we can't close as far as we could have and consequently our condo when we're done we'll obeef further anterior than it would have been if we had not had that piece of plastic in our in between are so yes we bring that con dao now down in forward and if there's an inflammatory state <hes> and there's a there's a potential of reducing it. What we haven't done is what we haven't haven't is. We haven't significantly altered a so <hes> the the force magnitude so the magnitude <hes> what we know always and we show this the courses remember. We have a video where we show with dental contact. We all know this as dentist. We all know that that the what's what's the purpose of lateral excursions canine rise and ladder excursions. It's our yet is in the in in in both countries would say it shuts off musculature pitcher. What does that even bob and and i would like to say please. Please correct me if i'm wrong but standing is on your canines it goes down to thirty percents of maximum. I don't know that that may be what we do. Know is that we look at the studies of torian others the further post earier the contact the greater the forces sanitized so canine contact is better than by customer contact but i'd rather not have canine contact canines what we've learned our post your your teeth functionally but interior teeth aesthetically so if i can so giving a patient canine rise in their natural tissue earlier explain is the best para functional control we can obtain in a natural dentition and oftentimes oftentimes jazz. That's that's more than adequate to keep our patients within their adaptive capacity pasolini. I'd actually have more patients he'll if they didn't have that level of protection prior to us giving it to them so aw whether we give it to them with an appliance michigan whether we give it to them within our collaboration we have the potential dell patients in that regard ard no question about it so when people say i say that you can't help people with with you know you need to have anterior midpoint. They never said that. That's not what i'm saying. What i am saying is that in even superior way to reduce those forces and if we look at the study of may in two thousand thousand where they looked at e._m._c.'s and they looked at specifically at conjure a compression we find that it ain't terrier midpoint stop despite what what we're taught that that it's going to increase the force because of the lack of post your your support we find out that that's not true that it actually decreases <hes> the compression and that and that when you combine the magnitude and direction of the because of the direction of the masters anti early in the anterior not to have your opponent. There's nothing driving that kondile back the way we were taught into retro disco tissues. It's like it's like a nutcracker but you'll furthest away from the hint of the nutcracker so so you're describing interestingly enough what you just described is the alteration in in the source in the magnitude of the force so yes as the more anterior we come to the <hes> the further we get away from a class one lever the yes the forces decrease but more importantly also were as importantly is that not only those forces decreased but they don't incorporate what we're taught that those forces will incorporate with an anterior midpoint stop. They don't incorporate a poster ization of the kondile leading to pressure against the retro disco tissue and pain. If so <hes> that the purpose of the mid point sop is to create the best environment or altering the forest direction and decreasing the forest magnitude during a power functional event that has no 'cause puffing so then wasn't they cause an answer. That's the next thing you find written around. People people the main reason why people don't use it. I was scared first three years when i was qualified of using these appliances. Even though i thought been reading about it i was scared to use is it because i think i'm going to get sued is going to happen. This is not the right way so i was scared because of that the myth that is going to cause an aunt here might because you're postures will start over erupting so can can you please <hes> bust this myth yes they don't over up is finished and the fuck a so so so so it is it is facile so <hes> your your concern is appropriate and you should be concerned yup so let's make a couple of statements number. One post area don't over rob over up because there's an intern turn midpoint stop appliance in place any more than they will over erupt without an anti midpoint stopping place so when if i said you jazz. Are you wearing an appliance at night. I say no no good good answer. What made you say that. Are you wearing an appliance tonight. No so then if you're not wearing an appliance at night what keeps your your teeth from erupting and someone would say well the dental contact as what are you talking about. There is no dental. That'll contact is as you go deeper into sleep. There's more and more muscular relaxation use you swallow to three thousand times a day but you only only swallow two to nine times an hour. You swallow with less veracity the e._m._t. Levels are less and the likelihood of reaching 'em i._p. He during the swallows is next zero in a non powerful person either non pack for a not not next to zero in the swallow. Okay thank you yes in the swallow. So what is it that the keeping your teeth from erupting wanted. How is it very different than if i put an anterior midpoint stomach points in so why are we getting super russian normally so the the reality is is but you and i have dentists and we have seen when we lose a opposing opposing tooth we get super eruption and and when we look at the study the robertson studies of all what we see is that after sixteen hours there are changes that that lead to the super eruptive activity so consequently as long as the teeth are in function though likelihood weekly good of super eruption becomes next to zero so i have patients for example jazz they wear their nighttime appliances they wear daytime appliance which we call max laura interior passenger points that they wear during the day to stop there especially dentists and so they were there daytime appliance they whether nighttime appliance and as long as they remove these appliances to eat the likelihood of developed valve might goes extr extremely hello now when interestingly enough when these when these opened buys do occur and they do when they do occur if you then and we've done this over and over i worked with keller labs who makes the there in in the united states there are anti is in in u._k. The u._k. There s._e._i.'s and and i've worked with keller lab that made these f._b._i.'s and we we did a whole bunch of studies with with with patients who developed a aotearoa invites him with my own patients. What we found is that if we took the two models of those patients and put those models they fit together perfectly clearly. This was not then super russian. There was something different happening. Now i explain this in the course and i don't mean i don't wanna make light of this or skip over it because it's it's awfully complicated but it is it is and i think that the costs gave the justice and the time it deserves because this gets discussed a about so much and such a big issue in appliance election that people are worried about so it does deserve more time but i think people appreciate that. We're trying to keep it concise. Yeah yeah we we talk. We've talked about what what we're looking literally a change in texas and the change in the trajectory pattern of the neck so the bottom line is this is that you never her want the punishment to be worse than the crime so we would never suggest to use an anterior midpoint stop appliance in a symptomatic patient with especially usually if the over bite is a as less than a millimeter because that's the patient that could open up on you and you go oh my god what happened and and and and and now the patient camp bite off letters or something and which is no big deal with my pain patients they could care less but if they didn't have pain in the beginning then the the punishment is worse than the crime and they're not happy and they shouldn't be unless a fantastic way to say. I still remember that saying and i say to my patients what you said and you know what the other nothing. I say to my patients what you told me and you said these three words already to me. Yes it is exactly like thirty percent mccain. I think i don't know and i think we had a moment lecture where you just for the first time said look. It's okay not to know i just say. I don't know just learn to say. Actually we have everyone together because because here's the reality i got sick and entire of going to all these gurus that knew everything and when they don't know a jazz they made stuff up. They just made it up to connect the dots because god forbid you paid the money they should know. The answers in the answer is often is i don't know so i over you know. People got really upset with of me saying i you know i pay joel all the money here what you don't know so so i changed it to. It's not known a ah still that was a great thing so thank you have a change in my life right so what tim reporting. Let's outlines is always talked about scenario. The patient we talked about how through mechanisms they cannot cause over eruption but they can <hes> 'cause to konda repositioning the best. I know i would say it's possible for the use of an answer mid point stop to contribute to an anterior open bite with altered a trajectory as a result of usually an improvement and and in the cervical chaos or cervical were doses so that's a little. It's really not conjure position as much as it is the older trajectory. Can you make it more tangible because some of those terms. I'm still unfamiliar with. Can you make it idiot proof for someone like me sure. Take your lower jaw rested. Okay close together right now. If you just take hello john russet now and move slightly forward or just forward just or from that position. Don't move forward. Just change the way you oh you you close to alter the trajectory so now you're only hitting your anterior teeth right you starting position you kind of the same position but your trajectory change now just imagine you can't do this. Just imagine you change your trajectory so that your your your whole mandible <music> a closes with a with a back teeth touching log onto hit. I now because with that change your victory. You've got an antirio by your teeth are exactly exactly the same haven't changed but the trajectory chain the musculature and combine with the posture and your and your in your head neck now. If you think about this you see how many times have i seen dentists spend an hour two hours perfecting a collusion just making everything perfect and the patients lying down position jared undergone tap tap tap at the top and they're making now. They've got the perfect. All the dots are lined up and it just great. Oh wow i've completed this and what i want to say to them now. Sit set the patient up close. What's going to happen. Scott changes postulated is of course so the trajectory changed is the you didn't change your teeth. You didn't change the position in your in a condo of fossa. Your trajectory just changed uh-huh so if you if if where where you are your posture changes in terms of your head in your entire ed neck this was brought brought to us when when we had marianna rock abbado from chile spent a week in my office and went over this and he explained it detail and and showed us and we actually took cervical arbuckle films of my patients with before and after treatment and because i had taken all before and now these patients with open bites came and he took new ones and all of a sudden <hes> each and every one of them we saw an improvement in their in or from their car to toward more normal dada curve and all of them had the but that's amazing and that's another great thing you've told me because i actually learn about the rock about oh pain map. Maybe in february actually so it's amazing how that's coming coming back. Is that something you use new practice. <hes> we use marianas exercise program or attempting to strengthen ligaments. Ah is brilliant <hes> at some of marietta's concepts in terms of joints <hes> he spent a little more time lately with some of our nor neuromuscular friends and i think he's he's he's well. I'll leave it there. Okay thank you. It's okay so who come see conclusions not through the mechanisms you described changing trajectories that can happen but the mechanism is not over yet and also keep it it also keep in mind that the anterior bites have been recorded in happened with four splits. I mean they they. They just oh yeah. My principal principal ever had on one was a significant one from a michigan split. It can happen from any splint really to the types of patients. I avoid delivering answers to people who have the minimum overboard already asymmetric that just like you said and also the other one. I like to put it in there and tell tell me what you think about. This is people who who when you when you when you tell them together. They say which bite like they have like. They don't have a well-defined m._v._p. The quite warm they don't have a good interlocking is something that could be could be. I think that's something that i love you know trying to because i somehow think that in that patient you might get more of the sort of slipping if you like change introductory as you describe it i would have before this conversation said condo repositioning both see. I see what you mean is. That one to be avoided is that. I don't know i it so that i don't. I don't know i raises a really good. That's a whole nother discussion that we can have avenue. Of course we spend a little bit of a significant amount of time talking about this and and and the concern for which means a patient who who is become hypersensitive or aware of their bite <hes> and how we create that and so how do you deal. How do you deal with the patient comes in it says dr jazz. I have two bites. Can you help me or dockage is my bites not comfortable. Can you help me. I'll only i know that we really don't john go into that in detail but i always say the last thing you wanna do with either of these patients is even look at their bite even evaluate their bite right and god forbid change their by so and yet you can't help them so we go over the teats because that's really an important extremely ainley important <hes>. There's not a dentist that i know it hasn't dealt with somebody hasn't walked into. Can you help me with my bike's. Just not comfortable in and and and and in how you deal with that. I don't mean to be you know me i. I'm not this is not. I don't believe in mama drama. I hate it but i will tell you you how you deal with that has the potential save someone's life. That's how this can be brilliant and just two more questions because i think we've answered the main question about anti-immigrant stops appliances over option which keeps on coming on and on and on but i won't say juries an anti midpoint stop appliance. Are you concerned about its. It's long term use so so that's a real that's really interesting because we long-term years and we hear this all the time a ah some really good instructors in in in in <hes> in prosthetics and it's very common for them to say well you can only use it in a muscle issue not not in a joint primary joint issue and of course jazz. Why do they say that. Why do why were they say you can't use it in a joint primary joint problem because they think that it will impinge on the retro disco tissues a bench if they think that the condos will be driven even backwards right so to please do me a favor and don't let the good is it s for us matt neal know how much you know oh because otherwise they would never pay that string me all the way over they would just hire. You absolutely absolutely so they're they're. They're the the literally concerned about so they can't can't use it in a in a primary joint for that for that reason and as a temporary appliance or why did they say temporary plants because otherwise long-term we're going to develop the super option and in their way to this temper mm pre appliance because then you won't get through the format rotation. I know that's really not but i feel that is the other side of it. The ugly side it is that these spins could be done in patient pain and so i think the full mouth rehabilitation ghetto painful actually the spin all who has his role as well so then let me address that because i think you just hit something extremely important and that is we are taking what i call the restorative pain disconnect now this is not mean and people again so readily misinterpret this and think that i'm saying that there's no relationship between between inclusion and including and pain dysfunction of course. There's a relationship with all my goal. The keystone of my treatment is not not not let those touch touch at all so so yeah if i'm trying to keep the teeth apart then clearly them being together creates a problem though our problem dentistry is that we i assume they are always together we think of teeth we're trained to think of teeth as together <hes> so we want to look at when they are together and then keep them from getting together and and then reducing the forces and allowing god or darwin the he'll so but but what what often happens is that there's there's this this connection action. I'm going to put an appliance. It's going to tell me where this jaw has to be and now i can do thirty. Six crowns in order took the supposed to be people often say various ridiculous. They're only thirty two teeth is it i know but if they can do thirty six crowns they will so yeah so so there's a there's a our concept is that we don't do restorative therapy to help our patients. We help our patients so that we can do the restorative therapy they want or need that's perfect and i and i think that's that's worth repeating all sort of copy and paste that snippet and say it again because that is the real crux that's awesome and one more question now there are a couple of aclu's will camps whereby some people say that actually all these studies show that during mass decaffeination and and while we consumer foods our teeth do touch together and there's another camp that say that actually when we're producing the r._t. Do not touch together and i still the answer. Do you know the answer yes so they do talk together. No the answer okay so can you please at the because what is the because i hate. I hate this viewpoint to viewpoints. I'm pretty sure i can give you two papers where they argue different things right exactly exactly so. Here's my question no matter what the answer is explain to me how it matters okay. That's that's a really good question. Let me let me think about this. <hes> <hes> matters to that next time. This debate comes up. I'll have the right on sutter otherwise otherwise. Let's let's let's go back here so let's assume that they do okay the question question. The question is what does that mean then and how do they touch and how does it matter so one thing. I will tell you let me ask you if they touch. Will they touch in. Am i see that i i'm pretty sure myself. I mean i mean from from what i read is. No we don't fully get into my right. That's you if you if you had paid need and you're on your right side. You're no longer in m._i._t. So if there's a if there's something between the teeth you can't reach it might be now you take a normal normal bullets and you put balls in between your teeth you know and now that you're when you look at the mess katori cycle you look at it at elliptical pattern of in one thousand nine hundred eighty one miller's has doesn't even approach you know this concept of <hes> fencing a functional fence when you think about it the role the teeth play in our mastic dory cycle is next to zero whether whether you've got flat cuss with you deep cost you're going to chew like air cow or like a rat kidding. There's a there's a must there's a functional generator that controls our pattern has nothing to do with our team and then as soon as you add the the the angles of those customers are our next to meaningless so so so the answer is yes they can. They can touch in some inclined plane in somewhere somewhere along the line. They don't touch any force or with any duration to they can't do that. Create the damage that is done during para function and so so wile it depends upon the patient's doubt of capacity of their capacities so low that any contact any increase in the levels can set them off in terms of any of the bonus owners of the of the structures short on those patients who tell them you know you gotta eat softer foods but the vast majority of our temperaments are patients with government and joint issues issues. We tell them you can eat whatever you want as long as long as it doesn't hurt you if it hurts you that signal to tell you you shouldn't be eating it but what you can't do is sleep that my client because that you can't control and those forces are far worse than the forces you'll be experiencing during function excellent excellent and what percentage of people display parental exhibit powerful nine hundred you know this one yes so if we look at the literature editor will get anywhere between eight and eight so you so so so so the losers very very dispersed i on this. Here's my question to you. You've got the hardest structure in the body of the opera arch and then on the lower arch. You see where patterns on these t you tell me what happened. How can we lose the tip of a canine. How is that possible. When we know god or darwin put one there so if one is missing or we see where patterns of teeth there's a firm suspicion that that patient did either is boxing or hasbrouck remember. There is no time stamp here so it doesn't repair itself so the patient may have made math stopped but we know somewhere along the line no was there's a history of power function. You can't a you don't have the intensity intensity or the duration to alter to services now in in the united states. There's this whole thing called a cluele disease. He's the discussion of the united. In blaming all the steps were all horrible people because we not diagnosing inclusion disease and i and and we've got to restore and repair all this occlusive disease in you know in our course we spend a lot of time looking at all the factors of the cranium system and putting the teeth in perspective do and understanding that you know you can get where patterns on teeth and and if you don't have other signs or symptoms and you're not concerned about the wear patterns and the patients not concerned about the wear patterns you know we don't you know that that that's not you haven't done a horrible thing by discussing with the patient and if the patient doesn't want anything to do with it you know and he is in isn't concern we shouldn't <hes> i don't know of many people that have died of tooth wear and ah or even aesthetically major issues of an and as you wanna restore. The patient wants to restore them then you can do that. Dardenne <unk> dr welby better do all we can to protect what we have restored from the forces that created the problem. I play brilliant. Thank you so much. Josh i think of lots of content here and i think they'll really answer. The question about anti points appliances and over option is anything any final comments obviously include information about your course which i think everyone should go to read rewire your brain and it was so powerful for me in my career. Trajectory is anything that you'd like to add the <hes>. The only thing is is that i wanna make make it clear that because we're looking at things that are different doesn't mean though that there's the fear that what we've been doing up to. This point has been wrong. It may be that it has been right but it may be right right for reasons different than we once believed and that we shouldn't be afraid to ask the questions to that. We can get better at solving more more problems problems more conservatively for more people what i've learned is that what general dennis are capable of of of doing is massive that for a long time on what i realized is that is that when i started using these anterior points of appliances what i found was that patients would come to me and with a series of symptoms and problems albums and we would start them on their plans therapy and three weeks four weeks later they'd come back. He's okay now. We're going to start with all the other support therapy that we had mine and they look at me and they say y. I've were better and what i realized is that general dentists can do that and then they can refer to people like myself itself in an oral special oral facial pain <hes> people people who have limited their practice oral facial pain <hes> and then for support therapy they can go there for support of therapy but it's amazing how much they can accomplish their own offices once they get over the fear failure so thank you very much for listening everyone. When is you can see. I really enjoyed having on the show today was really useful great knowledge and so we have the answer and to emit points appliances will not cause open invites because of posterior over eruption per se however in a small percentage of cases with any appliance including anti points appliances you can get anti-rome invites and the mechanism is not posterior over option is it changed the trajectory of how teeth come together and there are certain risk factors that might poop predisposes you to having an an uh-huh and that's covered really well obviously conversation dr glassman and the thing to remember exposes as dr goldman says the punishment should not be worse than the crime so try not to use it in eight cases or those with minimal overbites. I tend to use them for my pain patients or those. I want to d program diagnostically well. Thanks so much for listening want to mention before you go about the dental tvos congress in october. If you have an oreo book. What are you waiting for something that i look forward to every year and i hope to see you. That's got some great workshops including inclusion complete dentures preparation where they scan not the same time you get instant feedback so all these workshops are available at tom reporting so <hes> check out dental to congressional turbo look forward to seeing you there. I'll put the link the bye bye <music>.

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The Worst Case Scenario with COVID-19

This is Why

24:49 min | 4 months ago

The Worst Case Scenario with COVID-19

"The second wave of the pandemic is well underway. The national epidemic kirstens that case counts awesome pass peak level seen during the first wave and average of about four thousand eight hundred and now being reported daily. Paul epidemic growth is continued at a rapid pace and about fifteen percent. More daily cases reported this week. Compared to last and hospitalizations have reached record highs hospitalizations have been increasing weeks following consistently elevated disease activity over the past two months over the past week. An average of almost one thousand eight hundred people with covid nineteen being treated in canadian hospitals on any given day including over three hundred seventy five people in intensive care units threatening the healthcare system across the country. I'm adam toy. And i'm dave mcivor and this is why what we're going to do. Today is a bit of a thought experiment. Consider it a bit of an inoculation against fear. But don't be fooled. The pandemic curve downward is deadly serious cases across. The country are spiking massively. We are facing a winter. That's going to drive people inside more and more and were really at risk of seeing a case loads go up and hospitals get overwhelmed and more loved ones dying so we need to do everything we can right now to slow the spread of covid nineteen to stop this spike in its tracks. So what happens if we can't slow the rapid increase in cases and bend the curve yet again. What is the worst case scenario before we get to the worst case scenario. Let's look at how much space hospitals and canada usually operate at so one of the things about canadian healthcare and it differs in different provinces somewhat but we have very low numbers of beds per population so our healthcare capacity is actually quite a good deal lower than in other wealthy countries always oecd countries certainly lower than the united states And that's because we have not invested in the past decade or even more in both primary care or hospitals or that sort of thing and some of that has been strategic and others of it has just been not at the rate of population growth and how our populations are aging so actually our you know. Our hospitals as as we as canadians are often. No are you know at capacity in the best of times. Dr barry pigs is a public health physician and assistant professor at the dalla. Lana school of public health at the university of toronto and what we need to do in cove it is we need a to in the first wave shutdown those those operating rooms and shut down a lot of the normal stuff we do and tell people not to come to emergency rooms in order to open up enough capacity to deal with a truly urgent cova concerns. And that's what we're facing right now. It's a little bit more gradual and a little bit more systematic right now but we still do risk being overwhelmed making space for a surge and covert patients means surgeries are having to be delayed and thanks to the pandemic. People are putting off seeing their family. Docs but could that. Conversion process making more space for coronavirus patients takeover. An entire hospital. I don't think the hospitals go go entirely it but certainly there are floors. That are going covid. You'll hospitals now in the second wave. Have alternative so they've put up. Some walls enlarge larger rooms. They've actually got an emergency room. Sort of pop up tents that are actually negative pressure tents inside certain rooms in the hospital particularly an emergency room. We have to do procedures that are. Potentially you know significant spreading events like intimating putting a tube down someone's throat to help them breathe and you can only do that when you have negative pressure. There's only one negative pressure room in many in many even advanced emergency rooms and so they put up these pop up tents with with these vacuums in them. And you know those. Are you know solutions. But you know a lot of the equipment for example is outside those tents so you know what healthcare workers are able to do and how they function is dramatically affected. Not only in that extreme way but You know all of the people they have to put on make seeing people in emergency rooms. Make eight makes you know anesthesia. As surgeries or regular old primary care that much more difficult somewhat lower volumes as well as you know more challenging to diagnose People if you're doing things virtually or if there's any kind of greater distance or even a challenging relationship because of mask some of the psychosocial stuff is diff- more difficult to communicate. There are so many ways that covert is is impacting us and the more cases. There are the more deaths there are the more this impacts our healthcare system overall the more you see that Infiltrating into the system. And that's what we see with the big second wave that we're having now so as canada's healthcare system showing cracks under the stress of this pandemic. I mean we've already got all of those first cracks and those first cracks really haven't gone away since the spring the most obvious cracks and and the ones that are talked about in the media. Most are these icu. The thing we're measuring you know the things. We measure our definitely important. So acute care beds taken up by cova patients. Icu beds taken by kobe. Patients are the things that are in the media during the media because they are important. And that's why reporting on them. All the other things are are sometimes difficult to measure so we definitely know that some countries including canada. We're looking at overall mortality. So we can't you know that we don't have data systems. Unfortunately and certainly not an ontario. Where i am alberta's a little bit better But we don't have data systems to be able to really understand what's going on but we certainly have people studying it in the simplest one is looking at overall mortality and we how many people have died of covid. Or you know. We're pretty good about that. We don't know how many people have died of all these other things because our health care system is not funkier. -ociety is not functioning many ways. But we do know how many people are dying overall and we can see the difference between a normal year and right now we subtract those cove it Patients and we can see that our death rates are up and in many countries. We know that connect canada. We don't have as good numbers but certainly we know in some countries. It's as much as twenty. Or thirty percent increase mortality. Some of that is due to covid cases that are not identified and others are due to you know all of these other problems and And that's really significant. Really the full sort of post mortem on that is only going to happen as the months. Go on and maybe even after cove But hopefully we will come to understand that a little bit better. Is there a possibility or a scenario in which you know these cracks worsen and hospitals literally become over overrun I mean we saw images in from other countries in this first wave of You know. Kobe patients waiting in hallways. What could could that happen in canada Absolutely that did happen in the first wave and and that is happening right now. For example where. I was associated lobster repeal peel region which is right next to toronto which has exceptionally high rates of of covid right now and and you know a couple of the hospitals. They are really You know they are overwhelmed. And and You know we. We don't have a breaking point where everybody in the hospital just puts up their hands and says well that was it. We're at a breaking point. We you know keep slogging through it and we make do and we do the best that we can and so there isn't a point where we say it's all over and we are definitely not where they were. You know in italy at the worst of things or new york where the worst of things. But you know the honest for many patients many healthcare providers whether it be doctors or nurses or frankly hospital administrators who've been working tirelessly like school principals unrecognized in many ways here You know there's a point past which is just very difficult to continue. And because we've been doing this for so long They're already. I think many of them past that point and yet they continue on so. I don't think we're going to see this this point where we say. No that's it were overwhelmed. But in many places in We are somewhat and the key. There is that some places over overwhelmed others are not and others can help out so we can. In in the for example transfer patients to other hospitals that are certainly at capacity or close to it but are able to help out a public health units. Who are doing a contact tracing when they're unable to to do that because they are overwhelmed they can send some of their cases to other health units to help them out when all of the health units win. All of the hospitals in a region are at that breaking point and can't accept the overflow from others Even when it's extremely urgent you know that's where you have people really in extremists You know. I hate to use the word dying in the streets. Because that's not really what people are doing but you know dying in the hallways potentially and dying when they didn't need you and when they wouldn't otherwise have whether it's from cove or other things we're not quite there yet and and that's what all the government's all do public health authorities are trying to avoid Dr pigs let's switch to the rural urban divide in healthcare. How robust is rural health care in this country and could declined to surges in covid nineteen numbers sooner than its city cousin absolutely so it is no secret whatsoever that The difference between rural urban suburban medicine is dramatic. I don't think people always appreciate how dramatic it it is. I also work just north of toronto in a city of two hundred thousand three hundred thousand people. It's forty five minutes away. And i can tell you that the primary care specialty care and and in some ways in patient hospital care is not the same as forty five minutes away in any way shape or form and you know has deteriorated quite a bit at least ontario because of a lack of funding through successive governments and that simply during covert or time of any stress whether it be h one n one in two thousand nine or now Is is exacerbated. All of these in in equities are exacerbated significantly and and that's true you know North of toronto. And it's most certainly true. You know four or five hours away. And everyone is doing the best that they can and and in many ways pretending that those differences don't exist or during doing our best to mitigate them but absolutely they absolutely do exist so we've had sars in two thousand nine now copeland nineteen This you know for this past year Or almost past year now How should provincial governments view the threat of of pandemic napa dynamics the the unfortunate reality. We haven't just had sars and and and kovic we've had inbetween there. We've had a bullet we've had zico h one n one You know We've had lyme disease spreading In in southern parts of the country We had a number of Novel either threatened epidemics or potential epidemics that have highlighted the need for the public health capacity in in different ways each time and the reports that are generated at the end of each one of these including right back. The sars if you go through the sars report the nailer report Every single point there. You'd say wow that's a brilliant idea. We should probably do that before the next pandemic well that was in two thousand and three some of those things. We acted on and created the public health agency of canada. Antero the public public health on terrorist created. But you know over the years whether it's defunding it or bring it more underneath provincial Auspicies as opposed to being independent. You know we've seen erosion of the capacity to act and respond and as a result. We're seeing some of the situation that we're seeing now many in the public. Don't really see those those cracks because people in these organizations whether it's in front line hospital primary care public health. Are you know working absolutely overtime. And trying to do the best they can but all of us on the inside certainly see those relationships at how they could have been better how we could have had structures that allowed us to communicate better and act more efficiently and the consequences of of not having those. Are you know The response is not as robust as it could have been. What is your best advice to individuals who are listening to this to to to prevent her healthcare system from being right so the best advice is really the simplest advice which is do not interact with people outside of your immediate household unless it is absolutely essential and that's simply at any any more intricate or you know. Detailed advice misses the key message. And that really is it. At this point in the pandemic do not go out do not interact Unless it's absolutely necessary. And i think that's something difficult for people to do. Many people are doing it and a lot of people are not doing it People are saying well. If i'm asking distancing and it's all outside you know. I can do that and and you know that probably is safe for you on. An individual level makes a lot of sense to people but an population level right now where we are in most in in alberta ontario quebec at least sticking to your individual personal household is the way to go. You need to go to work. And that's you know you can still probably do that. you know. Kids are going to school in most jurisdictions and that's an exception to that rule but outside of those things you that is what people need to do in order to prevent further spread. I got a chance to chat with tom. Sampson he's the outgoing. Chief of sima. Or the calgary. Emergency management agency multifold. We're to try and ensure public safety are the continuity of essential service provision. so that's You know making sure that the waters on or police fire. Ems come to your door to maintain situational awareness about what's going on to try and communicate with the topic and then and then you know when you talk about support support any order related issues out of the medical chief medical officer help and then to to win. This is all over figure out how we best recover and we get ourselves back on her feet but our plans are for all those things and we've been planning for quite a while for pandemic. You made the comment that maybe it was in october that they you have layers upon layers of plans for this pandemic And you're able to pull old plans off the shelf. And implement them for light for the city of calgary. I'm wondering if you can You know i it. Tell me what the those plans were. what kind of business areas within the city that they were The they addressed. And what are the typical sort of steps that that That went into or what. What did those plans typically say and how those are going to be how those are using the pandemic know. I won't say it but there's a number of things. I need to get together for you. So we we started with an infectious disease management plant. That was built off of sars And you know the the original sars outbreak in ontario and then subsequently bullet those sorts of things from that in texas to these management plan. We knew how we would Structure our system in order to respond. So that's the physical hierarchy of the city of calgary but we also do who buy in advance for supplies so the numbers amounts of personal protective equipment over the years. So things got refined. Because honestly nearly days we had everybody buying everything and it wasn't as refined coordinated as it should be so we over the years refined coordinated into that to some of the best materials to have some of the dust mask to protect our first responders police fire and others and so those things have all been done. We then got heavily involved in this country that so not only business. Continuity within seen calculate our friends people at the chamber And you know the small business groups and those sorts of things and so we have information on how to keep your business running and admit that the earliest information was all based on you know if somebody flooded or something in the power went out. How would you keep yourself going but what. We didn't realize that information was absolutely transferable to the capacity to run your business in govan You know as long as your business can be open We we then. I think you know on so too did the rest of alberta go to this shift of the capacity to work remotely and so whilst the pandemic started in the city of calgary probably had about three thousand people that had the capacity to work remotely. We now greater than five thousand people can work remotely and we're actually quite efficient at doing that but the next step in that needed to be that from an emergency operation seretse classically gather a whole bunch of people to deal with the problem. And you go back to the days of the twenty flag. We had a couple of hundred people working out of armored see operation center. Now we worked with eight and we lincoln with those people electrically. We can break off into meeting rooms and we can do all those things so that we know exactly. How are we make it go if you look at another initiative. That was started we. We asked people in their respective groups to start got to cooperation centers. And we've seen of course started way before this cowdery police started their own the real time operations center but they've also got a place taps collaboration that helps them make decisions. And i don't mean to speak for the police not not at all but those same concepts are place which roads that are in place for transit Very place with our our building services and so those groups are are are functioning at a far higher level when they fire their tactical operations. 'cause he we can no longer afford to work at the speed of government we just can't and And we are the. And i say that you know tongue in cheek. We just have to be different than the way that we do things. And we have learned in calgary we've learned in alberta. Do those things differently. Go back to the flood. And when i see people retire they say i wanna work like you know one of the highlights of my career was i got to work in the flood and that was the most productive feeling i ever had and then subsequent people say well you know the first wave of colbert was productive. Wave that i had to. And so i think saying that we need to do as as the province as this country is we need to seize on those things and those things that are that stopped just as as bureaucrats. We need to move out of our way because that's how we actually respond well In this community now ensure there's pieces nest but allows piece that allow to you is. We've really become an agency in calgary and so you know we're over sixty members You know in our emergency management agency. Everything from atco gas to the calgary's by the way. I was on the phone with today. You know about reports of lights and so we all of those groups are they think they encompass all the school board saying encompass not for profits. They you know the chamber. You know our our own administration in the city. All of those groups are brought to bear. When there's a problem. I think one of the biggest challenges would cove it is. It's not it's not directly ours. It's it's the provinces and so we're hearing this supporting role and we're doing our very very fast to ensure that whatever close here of how the minister of health whatever they need is done for the betterment of count aeriens seema has grown to my understanding by leaps and bounds largely through Trial by fire or by flood And so you've it sounds like you. You've developed a robust Knowledge and understanding of how to manage emergencies. And we're now one with this pandemic But i also understand that. You're in contact with other jurisdictions i'm wondering if other cities provinces across the country Have you know the same sort of robust to your understanding. Robust preparation for emergency like this and wondering if you can speak to the whether sima has shared learnings from the thirteen floods and other events. You've got so. I think that we're pretty fortunate in calgary and were unfortunate. I'll start with the unfortunate unfortunate that alberta has more than its fair share of incidents that have occurred underground fires floods You know windstorms hailstorms just created one point four billion dollars to damage damaging minorities. So we're fortunate in that regard How berta sir. Calgary has roughly five hundred fifty five million dollars insurable loss per year As a result of these events that keep up to us and so we're fortunate in the sense that our city council the province has helped us in establishing an emergency management agency that brings together large groups to deal with this on a local level. We chair what's known is so central emergency management committee that's grouped up their communities around us. Co-chair that with With another member but we meet on On a regular basis and You know we made attack. We're also part of what we call 'em nine or the large nine municipalities in alberta. We meet with them on a regular basis and then finally we meet with a group called the big city emergency managers. These are meetings one hour per month sort of thing or right now. We're meeting with our our our so central every week. But we're we're sharing information. And so you know i'm given information from What our friends in nova scotia doing as well as given our friends you know. Thank hoover in surrey remembers and so we share that information and somebody'll pop up a and they'll say hey. Does anybody have acts wires at and We all operate from a position of we should share. And you know the kind of sharing that i talk about is one where we include warts and all so you know and by that friend of mine statement we share what also went wrong with that program and one went right with it and so that that gives the next group who Who who might be contemplating taking on an issue. That way it gets the malacca on it this is why is produced by me. Dave mcivor and adam toy. It's a national radio show and podcast. You can reach us by email. This is why at global news dot ca and on twitter at this is why if you like what you hear and want to hear more. Make sure you subscribe to this. Is why so you never miss an episode. Were available on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you find your favorite podcasts. And if you like what you're hearing telephoned. Thanks for listening. Wash your hands. Wear a mask and stay home. We'll see you soon.

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The Productive Podcaster | EP22: Debt Free Degree

The Productive Podcaster

29:19 min | 3 months ago

The Productive Podcaster | EP22: Debt Free Degree

"There are millions of podcasts. Being done all over the world take on the personalities of their creator. Psalm bringing thousands of listeners. Each week some bring large amounts of revenue while others entertain millions and help sell products. Like many podcasters. You want to reach your maximum potential. But how how do you make. Podcast stand out from all the rest. Join dr baruch matthews. And he talks the expert. Who are doing it on the productive. Podcast hello everybody. Welcome to the productive. Podcast i am dr barry matthews and i wanna thank you for joining me. Hey if it's your first time doing here on a productive podcast. Let me tell you about what we do what we do here. We show you it. It's okay to be you on your podcast. The thing is a lot of people. Wanna start a podcast. And they think that they have to be a certain framework in order to do it. And we're here to show. There's no cookie cutter way to do it. You can do it help you want and we bring people on here to show you how they do their podcasts. And what makes them feel special about their podcasts. So you can feel special about yours so even if you're a brand new if you're thinking about starting to podcast an if you've been pike asking for a long time but you want to do something a little different. This is the place to be the productive podcast. I'm dr barrett matthews. I am a productivity and profits consultant. And what i wanna do is make sure you can be a productive podcast so as we start out every show. I i have to tell you before we go to our first segment. Make sure you subscribe and make sure you share this with everyone. You know whether. It's on. Google records on itunes tune in spotify stitcher. Wherever you're listening we wanna make sure if you share that even if you're watching on youtube as well we wanna make sure that you shared with everyone. The first segment we start up every show with is called pros and cons pros and cons. Now what is pros and cons. You may ask. Pros and cons is where i give you. A professional tip on being a productive podcast. What a thing that. I get from a lot of people is barrett video. Should i do audio. So i do both well. Guess what you can do either or all. It doesn't really matter it. Just where are you comfortable. Where are you comfortable if you're comfortable just talking and not being seen today then. That's that's fine. If you're couple being seeing you can do video and grow with video which you can also do. Both you can do both in reach different audiences. It's really up to. You is to your level of comfort. I don't want to stepping out of who you are when you're doing your your podcasts. Unless you want to grow by stepping out of who you are. It's a great way to learn to grow. If you're not used to being on camera it start doing it. And you'll develop a level of comfort will get you in that realm so that is pros and cons for today. So what we're going to do right now is we're going to take a break and we're gonna come back with a fantastic guests. I know you'll all be interested in hearing so make sure you get your pad and pen out share with your friends. And we'll be right back after this tint the rumblings you even thought about starting your own but how everybody knows. Podcasting is the fastest and best way to get your message out and grow your business at once. Although everybody knows this nobody showed you what to do. While podcast nation is ready to do all the heavy lifting for you while you just liver your message and grow joined the nation and start your podcast. Today text podcasts. Nine two nine two four four four three to three and make them hear your voice. Hear what i hear the sound of your tribes your audience your people. That's the sound of your nation who love to hear the sound of your voice as you re your special message to them in years berry. Podcast how did you get it. Let us handle that. We're podcasts nation. We make sure they hear your voice. Podcast mission is a full-service podcasting firm. The does all of the hard work that you can be. Talent engage. Your message to your people just takes podcasts. Two nine two nine two four four four three to talk to one of our south on how you can get started with your very own. Done podcasts or go to podcasts. Megyn dot com get started today that's he od k. A. s. t. nation dot com for people are waiting on. You make them hear your voice. Podcast speech welcome back to the productive. Podcast there. I am dr barrett mattis. I'm excited about my guest here today. Denise thomas is her name and she has a podcast called debt free degree. Let me tell you something as someone who knows about student. Loan jet especially intrigued to hear her. Today this basic living a debt free life is something to which we all aspire sadly many must go to school only to get an education on being overwhelmed with debt and being burdened with bad credit. Because of that debt. Well denise thomas list show you and her podcast every degree how you can change your future by learning how to be have a debt free degree. I love the title of that. So denise first of all. I want to welcome you to the productive podcast. Anki barrett is really good to be here. Thank you thank you for agreeing to be here now. First of all what made you want to get into podcasting overawe. Well it was on my list of things to do eventually in my business and an opportunity came along to To learn how to do this podcasting thing. And i said well you know it's it's here it's now it's i might as well. Just take this opportunity and learn. I wasn't going to do it yet. i really had planned on. Oh maybe next year. Maybe the year after right and i realized there's really no reason to wait and so i got it started in that vein because there's a lot of people they can just like you. What challenges did you run into. Oh goodness i guess one of the challenges that everybody has a different List of of equipment that they use so when when guru who's teaching how to do podcasting suggests something another suggesting something else so the truth is almost anything we work. You just have to be very aware that in podcasting you're literally in someone's ears so you do need a good microphone and that's probably the most important aspect and probably the biggest thing you'll spend some money on but even then it's not like super big money. It's not like trying to do a tv production or something like that so so pretty much anybody can get into podcasting with just what they have at home and then as you can You can afford to purchase. You know a decent microphone and it doesn't to cost a heck of a lot of money it really doesn't antacid great answer appreciate that amount. I hope you guys are taking note this. That's some good stuff right there. She telling you the truth now. Your podcast debt free degree. How did you come up with that title. Well one of the things that i like to do but one thing that's really important for me here in the us is that i wanna reverse that statistic of college debt being such a big deal for everybody because what i learned through with my own children is that college doesn't have to be a debt sentence and we have been told ally that everybody has college debt. Everybody thinks that but they don't the truth. Is that thirty percent of college. Students graduate debt free every single year. It doesn't matter what the economy is doing. They're not all you know superwealthy or or college athletes. That are being paid or anything like that. They're normal people. And i was in to develop a strategy for my own family. Got both my kids to graduate without student loan debt and my husband and i were able to go gallivanting in an rv. Five years while my son was in college because we weren't paying him to go to college. I want other families to be able to see the other side of that instead of thinking they have to have that. Because you don't and debt free degree Just came along from that. And how long have you been going guests. The podcast has only been around for about six months. Maybe i can see. It's going to pick up traction because that topic alone is a magnet for people. Because let's face it. There are a lot of people who do have that from college. And it doesn't seem like doesn't seem like they know how to get rid of it a lot of times they'll tell me this in your podcast. What kind of things do you offer to those people who have built up a lot of deaths from college. Well we cover a lot of topics in the in the In the podcast everything from starting off with children who are in middle school going through high school and going through college. We talk about how to deal with this idea of debt. The different types of debt. I think part of the problem with our system right now. is that students who are signing their dotted. Their name on the dotted line for a long contract. Don't really understand what they're doing. They don't understand the math behind it and they are getting themselves into this situation where the debt just keeps going it goes on and on and on and they may have signed initially for a ten year contract. Next thing you know. It's fifteen years or twenty years and all they have done is except the the offers let's say that loan companies give such as. Oh if you're having a little trouble you can put your loan offer a little while and just put it on pause. Yeah that's cute okay. But they don't tell you is that the interest is going to continue to build every single day and every time you put it on pause you are lengthening the life of your loan as well as increasing the balance and they're just little things like that that i try to make pete make sure people understand whether their apparent still dealing with their own student debt or about to get their own children into college and are hoping to avoid that debt. That is. that's a great point. Because i mean i can only speak from personal experience. Of course i was a kid and my parents told me. don't worry about. Don't worry about it. You you focus on your grades and so forth so i didn't worry about it and while i was well before this will remember here sign here. I didn't think anything of it. Because i was told. Don't worry about college and don't get me wrong. They probably did tell me. This was going to be my debt and seventeen. I wasn't didn't care. Because also i'm thinking when i get out of school i can take care of that like that but when i got school handed me some papers. The expert loan. What so yeah. I mean i know there are other people who are in that same situation as well. So i let me ask you. Have you ever had to. Did you personally deal with that. When you were in school i did. I had student debt only for my last year of college so from that perspective it was pretty lucky but one thing that people don't realize don't think about is that the odds are because seventy percent of college students graduate with debt. The odds are you're going to marry someone else. Has student loan debt so although my dad was one number my husband's debt was another. And you don't think about that even if you have a great income. Let's say you're making you know seventy thousand dollars to start off with we'll will now if you're doubling debt and only perhaps one of the couple is employed. That doesn't look too good. You start tight on that right. Wow that's something that. I didn't think about it like that. That is so true. You're doubling that debt and it's a harder mountain so in that when when you talk to people. Do you prefer talked to them before. They've even had someone go to college. Absolutely the ideal time. I know that one of the things that we've all been told and we all here as you said. Don't worry about college till right and the mantra right now and has been for many years. Don't worry about college until high school junior or even senior year take those exams until late junior year etc and the truth is if you wait that long. You've left a lot of money on the table because college scholarships actually begin as early as kindergarten. What yes no way. Are you serious serious. There is one scholarship for k. Through third grade. It's called the google doodle scholarship. And it's just you know children's just draw a little picture and send it in and they could win a thousand dollars words college towards college and most of the scholarship opportunities out. There are actually just a short essay to write. Most of them are not necessarily need. Based you don't have to have straight a.'s. most don't even ask for your gpa. But you have to get started early if you start early. You have a much better chance of being able to graduate debt free. If you show up late to the party you can still get a lot of free money for college. Because it's always out there. I know another thing that parents do is and kids as well as soon as they get. That application turned in for college. They get their acceptances and their financial aid letter. They think they're done. No ma'am no sir. Not stop looking for free money until the last parchment is in hand wound because there are scholarships that go all the way through college grad school doctoral school as even professional school. You can get their scholarships out there for med school in law in law school as well. It's the money is if it's like rain there but you do have to apply for. It still blew me away to can start like is kindergarten that that just blew me away so let me ask you for parent who wants to start. Putting together for the kids starting in kindergarten. Is there a benefit or is it doesn't matter what if they keep compound get one in kindergarten. Good one in britain. Is there a benefit to doing it. Keep applying for the next one the next month. Yeah but there is something that they need to realize. The vast majority of colleges will stack scholarships wanted to prop up the other. Okay but there are a few out there that do not allow scholarship stacking. So you do need to realize that. It's possible that some of the some of the colleges. Your kid may apply to a might. Not accept those scholarships but the good news is many scholarship providers. Send you the check. Not the school directly. So as long as it's coming to you then you don't have to worry too much about that. Does that money has to be used for the scholarship. It depends on the depends on the actual Rules of that particular scholarship provider. Some of them. It has to go toward tuition. Some of them it can go toward room and board or books I've actually. I suggest that parents teens look for colleges. That not only allow you to stack scholarships but what's even better is the one that will allow you to get over and above the cost of attendance and the next check while i like that little. My teens actually graduated with extra money. All that sounds good. Why talmadge rv. I love it so let me ask you talking to your your podcast. How did you start growing your audience with under your topic. Well social media was part of it. I did put out a couple of blurbs. Now dan with my the artwork for my podcast. I actually changed the banner for my facebook profile to be my podcast banner. So that people would be aware when they happened upon my. You know my my profile. There i sent out in through email and things like that on whatever list. I had to be honest with you. I think it mostly just grows organically with people searching looking for a particular topic. I love it and see that you said that because when people think that college debt is not necessarily a sexy topics speak but i love the title of your podcast. It's debt free. That free is something everyone wants to talk about. So it and i say that because those of you who are watching listening right now understand that. Would you think about your topic or your title for your podcast. Make sure it's something that people what people are looking for people need because if if something bitch negative in it you may not think it's negative but if they hear negative been they may not pay attention to what you're doing so i love that you did that love that. Have you gotten feedback from that. The only one that loves that farrell had a lot of good feedback from that. That's correct and i also I chose the same name same title for my youtube channel so that i can do what you're doing here. You can have a video for interviews that you're doing and then take the audio out of it for the podcast and put the video on youtube. You're keeping your brand going exactly. I didn't ask you this do you have. Do you have a book on on debt. Free green actually. My book is coming out in about a month. it's titled it's titled cracking the code to free college like that to see that were free means a lot to people and free. College always good well. The best part is saving money as parents most of us do have a 401k. Or some type of retirement account at this age by the time your kids are are getting ready to go to college and most parents think that they have to take money out of their retirement to pay for their kids to go to school. But that's not the case. It's actually a bad idea to take the money out of retirement because let's face it when your kid graduates. They get a piece of paper. Will that piece of paper is not going to put food in the parents mouth right. It's a piece of paper is for your kid so really have to think about yourself i and think about how much money can you save by helping your teen figure out how to do this. The right way. I know i will be listening to debt. Free degree myself. I mean this. This great student debt. But i need to be able to educate other people on what the needs to telling leave. Tell people where they can find your podcast. You can find it on pretty much every platform out there on tunes on spotify. You just name it. It's there but they can find me. They need have any other questions at get ahead of the class dot com. I love it. Get ahead of the class dot com. Got i wanted. I'm glad to hear to join us. Today she's stick around for minute because we're going to be back after this method with pot quest and sees that help us to answer some of your high caste question so make sure you guys stick around for a second and she will be right here with us. Guys stay tuned. we'll be right back with more upper. Got the podcast. You've heard the rumblings you've even thought of starting your own but how everybody knows podcasting the fastest best way to get your message out and grow your business at once although everybody knows this not showed you what to do well. Podcast nation is ready to do all the heavy lifting for you while you just deliver your message and grow. Join the nation in start. Your podcast. today techs podcasts. To nine two nine two four four four three to three and make them hear your voice. Do you hear what i hear. That's the sound of your tribe your audience your people. That's the sound of your nation. The people who love to hear the sound of your voice as you bring your special message to them and your very own podcast. How do you get to them. Let us handle that. We're podcast nation and we make sure they hear your voice. Podcast nation is a full service. Podcasting firm that does all the hard work for you so you can be the talent and get your message to your people just text. Podcast two nine two nine two four four four three to three and talk to one of our staff on how you can get started with your very own done for you podcast or just go to podcast nation dot com and get started today. That's p. o. D. k. s. t. nation dot com. Your people are waiting on you. Make them here voice podcast nations. Welcome back to the productive. Podcast as you all know. I love when i'm right and i would write about these times. Says she joined us here. She was a fantastic guest here in. She is still here with us. And we're gonna take on hide quest. Podcast pod quest is where you get to answer. Ask a question to us and we're going to answer that question for usa. Today's question is do. I have to listen to a lot of podcasts. To be good at podcasts Beneath i'll let you answer it first and then i'll take it okay will also say that you don't have to listen to a lot of podcast but it is good if you've listened to some and understand the kuala that other podcasters are using the difference if there's are some that are that have a poorer quality Sound because that does make a difference in the the experience for the listener. Also be cautious. I'm going to say about mimicking other people's podcast. Because you want it to be you you want it to be uniquely yours and not be something that you know like you're acting or what have you or trying to mimic some other Podcasters voice or what have you. It needs to be you love that. I love that and i'm going to kind of piggyback. Lucy said there's that. I don't think you necessarily have to listen to a lot. But i would save listened to a variety. I listened to a variety. It doesn't have to be twenty different. Podcasts hear variety. Because as i said at the top of the show There's no cookie cutter way to podcast. People do the different ways on different topics in different ways in different formats and so forth so listen to a variety so that you can see how you fit you know what type what type of some people out there are scared through a podcast because of the ideas that they don't think the public would be welcoming to it. Yes what you'll find your audience so just listened to a variety and then go do view so these once again. I want to thank you for joining us here. Unproductive podcast that we definitely appreciate you and you're definitely welcome back to join us and everybody listened to debt free degree. Makes you subscribe to her. Podcast make you. Download makes her share it with everyone. Debt free degree. Thank you once again to these. Thank you a right alright. Alright so guys. Guess what we're going to do now you got it. You got what we're going to do now is we're gonna do our weekly giveaway. That's our weekly giveaway onto productive podcast and our giveaway today goes to michaela prince michaela print. She actually is going to get an audio copy of my book. Why did you get it gun. That's going to get my book. Why did you get an audio to help her to be more productive. And i know some of you are out there thinking right now. Well hold on barrett. How how can see that. How come i don't get it while all you have to do is join our facebook group which the facebook group that productive podcast. You're just joining the group and we can put you in there so that you can get take part regularly now. You have to engage in group. And when i say engaged i mean comment on some things that posts something about is promotion thing is actually about you just gave. We're talking about podcasting being productive in doing so. So guess what guys. It's also time if we have more podcasts that it is time for our podcast profile. That's it's the podcast that i have happened to listen to that. Thank you may like as well. Let's call the bible fried denise pass. We have another denise the niece past. She has a podcast. The bible tribe if you want to learn logo spirituality in the bible suggest jessica to check out her podcast and lastly guys. It's time for one of my favorite segments of the show was called pod quote. Rapper pod clerks pod close by quoque. And we're actually give you a productivity quote to help you to be more productive in your life out there and this quote comes from that alexander graham bell alexander. Graham bell telephone got so he actually had to put him say. Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work at hand. The sun's rays do not burn until brought to focus. Concentrate all your thoughts upon. The work is hand work at hand. The sun rays do not burn until brought into focus. Meaning that nothing is gonna happen until you really concentrate on what have to do then. Things will burn. Then things will happen. So i recommend that to you as well so that wraps wraps up another episode of reductive. Podcast today guys. I wanna thank you all for joining me. I wanna thank my guest. And he's thomas for joining me as well. I wanna tell you guys. Make sure that you share sierra's make sure you subscribe. Make sure to let everyone know about the productive podcast. I look forward to help you be a great podcast for yourself and i look forward to making sure that we can bring great yesterday. You every time we've come on so guys thank you once again and as i always say before we leave. Don't just so for being all some say you're go to all all and take action. Everybody we'll see you next time. Thank you for joining us on the productive podcasters. Free store to join us next time for another great show. We welcome your engagement so make sure you participate by joining the productive podcast. Their facebook group in china in also share productive. Podcast of with some of your friends right now. If you have a podcast and you're looking for gas or would like to be a guest on a podcast. Join our podcast exchange at www dot podcast world. Directory dot com. We'll see you next time.

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6. Your Brain On Coffee

Stronger

44:13 min | 2 years ago

6. Your Brain On Coffee

"This is the stronger podcast from live strong dot com. We trending topics the make you think. Trump sugar. Gluten caffeine to fasting each episode. We'll talk to experts who help us get to the bottom of these health trends while journey your frustration with food into power. Empowerment dig in career host we've strong dot com. Food and nutrition editor Aaron mossbacher and news editor Verizon mast. So many of us love it so much, but there seems to be endless conflicting advice about whether it's good for us on not how much coffee too much coffee, and how does the consumption of coffee fit into the intimate fasting lifestyle on this week's episode of the stronger podcast, we speak to bulletproof founder and CEO. Dave Asprey about just why coffee is addictive and what exactly it's doing to our health and our brains. What makes the difference between good coffee and bad coffee. And why is it so hard to give up Asprey gives his unique take on the myriad benefits. Coffee has for us. And also what the drawbacks of all that caffeine consumption might be. But before we talked today. Let's hear what some of the live strong team have to say about coffee and just how a dicta- that is. This time of my life. I don't I don't believe I can give up coffee coffee to me is a must as soon as I wake, oh, I've never considered giving up decaf coffee because it just seems like such a small amount. And it's my Cup of coffee is like one of the best things about my day. So I probably I probably wouldn't try to give it up ever tried to give up coffee. No, just caffeinated coffee. I don't think I could live without copy to be honest. I would probably go mental coffee does not make me very happy camper. It's actually it keeps me a week. But it makes me kind of angry and bitter at life coffee has a really big affect on my mood because it kinda just starts my day. And I'm kind of I'm Tom be without it. So I would say that it's pretty key to me having a good day coffee perks up in the morning and gives me a little bit of energy to keep me going throughout the day. I don't know for me. But for a lot of people just like, I it registers different. Everyone's body. Like, I know some people like, oh, if I don't coffee way, all the headache. And to me, that's like such bullshit. I'm like that's like made up like, what do you mean? Like a coffee induced headaches. He didn't have it. So even though I drink decaf coffee. I think indefinitely still be a habit. I there's caffeine in decaf. So it definitely I can I can feel the the lift to give me. But again, it's more like a ritual that kind of gets you ready for the day more than it is like a boost of energy. Yes coffee. I believe for to me is more my head. If I don't drink coffee. I just can't function. I definitely think I rely more on coffee than other people too. But I don't think it's an unhealthy relationship. It's pretty clear people are very protective of their coffee habits. But luckily for them, that's not all bad bulletproof diet author. Dave Asprey talks to live strong about how coffee affects our health and our wellbeing and the fastener effect that felt coffee has in our appetites. But first reminder that the stronger podcast is brought to you by thrive market Zan. You know, what's so cool about thrive market tells me you can filter your shopping experience based on your dietary preferences or the specific product you're looking for. So let's say you're on the hunt for coffee thrive offers certified or Ganic and fair trade certified coffee that you can feel good about buying putting in your body, thriving market. Also sell. M C T oil, which you can add to your coffee to make bulletproof. Nice. And you know, what else? I left by thrive. Markets website wine thrive has a new amazing clean winds program all the wines. They carry have no added sugar and a free of any unnecessary additives. Plus each bottles made from only the best organic biodynamic, sustainably farmed grapes from wineries around the world. Another reason, I think thrive market is awesome. Is they really took this program to the next level. And brought on a master's Malia. So not only are you getting clean wind. But you're also getting wine that is handpicked for amazing taste and the best part is all wine start at just twelve dollars per bottle or shipped right to your front door. I mean, it's a no brainer. Especially because right now thrive market is having a special offer with first time customers can get twenty five percent off that I purchase and a free day membership by going to the link thrive market dot com slash stronger podcast. Not only can you order, the delicious, clean wine and caught. Fy that thrive market offers, but they also so many other awesome products as well, stronger listeners. Don't miss out on our special offer for first time thrive market customers. Get twenty five percent off your first purchase and a free thirty day membership by going to the link thrive market dot com slash stronger podcasts. Cheers. It is. Always. Thanks to thrive market for making visit issue of the stronger podcast Postle. And now our interview with bulletproof diet, author debut spring coffee, how exactly does coffee effect, the brain what's happening in our brains when we do drink coffee. Well, coffee has a bunch of different effects in your brain. And the thing that's probably most well known is caffeine but caffeine is one of thousands of compounds actually found in coffee and different things in the coffee are going to do different things to different cells in the brain one of the most interesting parts of coffee that affects the brain is called polyphenyls and polyphenyls are the colored compounds found in herbs spices brightly colored fruits and vegetables. And it's one of the reasons eating your vegetables is good for you. It turns out coffees. The number one source of polyphenols in the diet, at least in most western nations and polyphenyls affect the brain because polyphenyls help cells in the brain called might oh Qendra make more energy. This was a subject of my last book called headstrong. We still you how to get more energy in your brain. And was actually awarded with near time. Scientists bestseller book. So there's real science behind just the colored stuff that makes it black on top of that there's caffeine, which is the mean, the meaning agreement that we've all heard of it stimulates your central nervous system, and there's something called clergy acid, which is another kind of polyphenol that scientists think helps with blood sugar metabolism and possibly high blood pressure, which are related to things like having your brain work less. Well, as you age there to other compounds that are my favorites, they're called capital and Kalahal. And these are coffee, and when you use coffee with a metal filter, they go into the body, and they may be good for your liver. There some studies that say they may even protect against cancer. But there are other studies that show they turned down inflammation in your brain. Even though they may raise LDL cholesterol, which isn't something that concerns me. And there's some other things that happen some other forms of item and be that come in coffee that could have an effect on the brain. So what you're getting is quite a lot of different benefits. So is coffee addictive because I know when I wake up in the morning, it is the first thing I think about and why is it addictive? And how is it? Addictive. Well. Addiction to things that are good for. You is an interesting topic. Because if you every day, and then you stop you don't feel as good in your incented to do it again. But if you stop for a while, then you don't want to do it. So. You could say it's a dictator of and certainly people who study addiction will say that it's a dictator, and they'll tell you that it's physiologically addictive, which means that your cells adjust to having or not having it after about three days. So if you were used to drinking, a high amount of coffee, and you quit coffee for three days, you probably wouldn't feel very good after that any residual cravings are simply that their cravings. They're not biological and what's going on. There is caffeine in coffee. Can help adjust the amount of energy in your cells via something called cyclic AMP, which is involved with the creation of ATP in your cells. And it's one of the things that gives you energy. And when you suddenly stop coffee, your cells regulate their energy metabolism differently. But it I would call it mildly dick, and you're talking about three days, according to most of the studies out there of when you might not feel as well. That's why if you want to quit coffee. I don't know why you do that. Given all the studies that show. It's a really good thing. If you wanna live a long time, but if you did decide to quit copy you taper off us half, decaf and then half. Sorry, two thirds decaf cetera et cetera. But there's something else in coffee that really does affect your brain and affect the addictiveness of coffee, and when coffee is processed before it's even roasted there's something called a mold toxin or mycotoxin and this forms because most coffee they allow it to sit in big vats. Of water that are you made out of cement in the water is not filtered for two days and starts to well ferment is the plight term and spoil would be the other term depending on what's in the water, and this form, some psychoactive chemicals and things that are bad for your kidney, your bladder, your DNA, and for your brain, these are well understood in agriculture, they're regulated by almost every country on the planet except the us and Canada. And if you drink these things in your coffee that user by roasting and brewing, according to thirty four different studies on my website. This is an issue. What you end up getting is the jittery cranky exile feeling that happens when you drink some coffee, but not other coffee. I know about this because I had to quit coffee for five years because it made me feel like an angry zombie who wanted more sugar when I fixed the problem by making clean coffee fell different. So when you talk about coffee does your brain will copy, that's not free of these multi axons is going to make you jittery and cranky. And it's going to make you crave. More coffee. So I drink less coffee now drink clean coffee, but it was a bit of engineering to make it happen, and is really worth knowing that that that coffee rage that you can get it's not caffeine. That's doing that. It's toxins that are doing that. And so some people drink coffee other people seem to mainline coffee throughout the day. Is there such a thing as too much coffee like all the the kind of scam mongering stories about to overblown like is there any truth to that? There is such a thing as too much coffee bows, Zach the famous writer poet was rumored to have between fifty and two hundred cups of coffee a day and probably died of caffeine poisoning. So it can't happen. However for us. I'm your mortals, the studies on long jetty show that up to five cups a day, whether it's caffeinated or decaffeinated, it's still associated with a reduction in all cause mortality in other words, if you drink five cups of coffee a day, or or less that your chances of dying from anything go down, which is profound and interesting and something that only makes sense when you look at polyphenol effect on on coffee. There are some people who are fast caffeine, metabolize IRS, and you can get a genetic test that will tell you all sorts of things about you including whether you metabolize caffeine while. And some people are slow. Tabligh lighters. If you're a slow metabolism one Cup of coffee. You're Ampy for eight hours, and that's it. So you have your morning Cup of coffee, touch it. You'll probably know you're sensitive to caffeine because all sources of copying mess with you. It's pretty unusual the fast metabolize IRS can drink a double specify before bed and sleep like a baby because the stuff just doesn't affect them very much. But for most of us having two cups a day is very normal five cups a day as well studied. In fact, the benefits accrue as you get up to five cups today. So four is probably better than three at least from the perspective of that study. But here's the problem. If you're drinking coffee that has toxins that cause you to crash. So you need another coffee to function you have issues if a drinking coffee because you enjoy coffee, and because you because you're using it for the effects that has on your biology and you're having throughout the day. It's a very different perspective on it. So I'd say if you need it to function survive, you have an issue if you need to get out of bed. You know, what you're probably waking up too early. And this is another broad issue where people wake up early to bring their kids to school or for jobs that start way too early for the way. Our bodies are wired or you have a dream Alexandrian. I've had extreme adrenal exhaustion in my career. And I went off coffee to try and treat it which was the traditional thing, and that didn't work very well because I was just as ambi- day. So instead at one Cup of coffee in the morning. Yes, it was bulletproof or at least a precursor to bulletproof without sugar and all that. And the reason that is if you have low quarters all in the morning, one Cup of coffee is going to help you you just don't have it all day long, which is sort of like an over overdoing it when you're working on having your dream class recover. So lots of people we spoke to in the office, including myself have a ritual surrounding their coffee drinking which. Seems really important to them in like an important part of their day. Can you talk about the effect to these rituals have on like your mind and your body? What a profoundly awesome question doing living that and living not so hard. So. Coffee or tea are some of the oldest rituals in human history. As far as we can tell probably equal to sharing a meal with someone. So there's a lot of I'll just call it generational or species level old programming behavior that goes into that and for me the coffee ritual before I had kids was a little bit complex. But it was almost part of my meditation. I had a Japanese siphon pot. It's called and use a Bunsen burner to heat up water until steam pressure would build and push the hot water into the coffee Sturt three times with a special paddle. And if you did everything right when the the vacuum pulled the coffee, you'd have a perfect volcano shaped come and it was sort of like, Mr. meow ghee karate kids, stir it, just right? And it was so cool. It took ten minutes to make one Cup of profoundly excellent coffee, and my mind would be clear before even drink the coffee. Because I was so focused on the stir. And now that I have kids I do it very differently. But the idea that doing the same thing at the same time every day is grounding that it's it's centering and somehow generates a sense of continuity in peace, it's real and sharing coffee with with a friend with your community has been done since the very first coffee was was created in Ethiopia thousands of years ago, you'd have it with with your your tribe, and it has never changed. And I think that maybe people have forgotten the value of tea ceremony or improperly serving coffee in whether you have a little tray of Sugarcubes, please stop that. If you still have that ritual, and a little thing of Creamer in a little tray and proper little tea, teacups, remake, Espresso, whatever it is. It. Feels good on a level that has nothing to do with caffeine and Denison triphosphate and things like that. Some people seem to be under the impression that caffeine makes them anxious. The coffee coffee gives the MAGS -iety is there link between coffee anxiety, or is that the toxic elements that you were talking about earlier if you are a caffeine slow metabolism, you may feel exiled from from too much coffee, even if it's clean coffee, and that's simply because your body says I got way too much caffeine here, I'm working on chugging through this. But I came the tablets it very well, so that's a biological stressor. When there's stress on the body, biochemical stress, you will feel it as stress, and it'll feel like emotional stress because the body isn't really sort out stressed that. While you make up a story about why feel anxious and I make just because it's someone else's fault. May actually be I'm anxious because there were toxins in my coffee. But the feeling of the of the toxins is that I think that this problem of feeling anxious from coffee is is way bigger than most people recognize I'm very sensitive to this and the. Season. I created the bulletproof coffee beans and the whole process in lab testing and going to Guatemala and installing new infrastructure to make coffee that didn't have this fermentation problem is because I really love coffee, and I missed it for five years, and I would get that anxious feeling happen. Sometimes a few minutes after drank it and oftentimes two hours afterwards. How I'm getting brain fog. And I just have the pressure in my chest like, and then I realized that's what it is one of my favorite stories. The CEO of a substantial t company. Called me on Skype. I hadn't met him before. Dave. I started my company twenty years ago because coffee, maybe jittery and anxious and cranky. And I really and as about saving tried the toxin free stuff. And and he says, but look, and he should be an empty five pound bag of my beans. And he said, Dave, I can drink your coffee without insight. You solved it. Thank you. And it was one of those profound things as an inventor and entrepreneur while the what a what a kind and gracious thing to do coffee tea. I I like both of them. But it was it was really interesting to see that. And I've literally had. I don't know if literally a good word there. But I would estimate ten thousand people over the last eight or so years have convinced that Dave thank you copies back in my life because I don't have anxiety when I drink the clean stuff it. It's a real thing if chocolate and and soft drinks and caffeine pills all giving Zaidi you have a caffeine problem. But that's very rare. If coffee gives anxiety, you have a mold problem, and you should stop putting mold in your coffee. So the other day I was at a charity race with my sister in law and I drink a Cup of coffee right before we started running. And she looked at me like I was nuts. And I was like I need I need this to run not that I need it to run. But I know I'm gonna run faster with it. So I'm wondering like in your opinion, what are the benefits of coffee in regards to performance? So he doesn't vary by individual. You know, there are some sports now that limit the amount of caffeine. You can have before the sport. Because it does give you an unfair advantage. It's the real deal, and what you're doing makes huge amounts of sense pro athletes. Do it toured France cyclist do it, and it it's actually a great thing. There's something else. I wrote about in the bulletproof diet, which was sold. I think about a half a million copies in fourteen languages, and it's called impor-. And this is a receptor called the mammalian target of ram Isan. When you exercise when you fast, and when you drink coffee, those are the three things we know of that suppress MTR, and when you finish doing those things immature springs back with extra power, and it's that pulse of impor- that causes muffled development. So if you were to say don't eat all night long. You're. Sleep do a little bit of intermittent fasting, which is built into a lot of the protocols that I that I recommend ven drink your coffee exercise. Well, you're going to have a large wave of 'em Tor, which means you're gonna get more benefits from actress. So. Yeah. Drink your coffee before you work out, especially before you lift it's a great idea. So I don't eat breakfast. I've never been a breakfast e eater, but coffee is a non-negotiable. What is it about the combination of coffee and fat that keeps us satiated? And and what is like how does affect on mood. I guess is the question because if I have coffee with heavy cream, I will not be hungry until noon. But if I do not have the coffee, and I eat something I will be stopping with an ala. You figured out something something important, if you if you have carbs for breakfast, you should expect to be hungry because you wake up and your blood sugar goes up, and then it crashes, and then you want more food, and I've had the same problem. What you'd probably find is that if you went for a full proof coffee, which is the lab tested beans in oil called brain octane oil and grass fed butter that you'd have a different effect than heavy cream. I love heavy cream and coffee doesn't have the same cognitive effects in the reason for this. It was one of the reasons is that milk and cream have some protein molecules intact that stick to some of some of the stuff in the coffee. So that it doesn't get absorbed. And I reference studies in my book the other thing that happens when you're using brain octane oil is this is a flavourless oil. That's derived from coconut that Ray. Your level. Of key towns fat burning monkeys that are in your body. When those go up just a little bit then two compounds to hormones in your body shift dramatically, and this is way less than going into full blown Kito going to eat no carbs for the next month with on bacon kind of mode. These compounds are is the person's called ghrelin, and this is the hormone gives you hunger cravings, and if you eat carbs, your grill levels are going to go up, and you're gonna get cravings. When you have key towns present Grell and drops. So it turns off the craving signal. The other hormone is called C C K and C C K is the one it's a hormone that makes you feel full. And this hormone goes up when you have very low level of key tones present much less than full blown attritional ketosis. So you put a teaspoon or two of brain octane in your coffee and your Kitone levels change, then your hunger hormones can change, and what ends up happening is you simply don't care about the bagels or the cookies or whatever the donuts that. They're putting in front of you in the office. They have lost their siren call. You can also add protein in this works really well for women the protein that we sort of put on the map as collagen protein and bulletproof was the first company to say. This really matters for performance. Let's how you look and you're gonna age where one of the very largest collagen companies out there now, and when you put collagen protein in your coffee, you can't taste it, which is really important and collagen doesn't prevent the good parts of coffee from going into your system. If you had milk protein isolates, and some of these other cheaper proteins that people might push you to us because they cost less than in your coffee actually takes away coffees precious ability to do good things for your body. So I'd say do experiment with coffee plus protein, but don't do carbs in the morning. That's just going to say you up for for a weaker day cut. It. How does coffee factor in to intermittent fasting can it enhance intermittent fasting? Intermittent fasting is a really beneficial technique, and my my book in twenty fourteen at came out and talked about intermittent fasting talks about two flavors of intermittent fasting. But really there's three there's the I only do what they did in laboratory settings which in laboratories because it didn't with mice use. Usually, they just give them water. So you could say I'm facin purist. And I would only have water and anything else might change it, which I consider to be kind of fearful you can see what works dozen then there's the fasting with no calories whatsoever. And it turns out just black coffee. Too small cups of it has enough caffeine to double Kitone production in the body naturally. According to a recent study, so the whole point of Inman intermittent fasting is usually to help raise key towns. So you could use coffee do that. Or you could use something that I invented called bulletproof intermittent fasting. And this is when you. You don't you eat dinner before it gets dark? You sleep all night you wake up and for breakfast. You have a bulletproof coffee, which has zero protein in zero carbohydrates on it. So you're talking just brain octane oil butter and coffee, and when you do that, you're protein digestion equipment in the body. The enzymes they don't get turned on your insulin stays perfectly a stable, and this is validated. By a third party who tested something like one hundred fifty breakfasts and found that had the least affect on your insulin because it was euro was bulletproof coffee. And now your body got the key tones from the caffeine in the coffee and Keaton's from brain octane oil. So now, you have Kito levels as if you've been fasting for three days, even though it's an intermittent fast. So you don't lose energy you don't get hungry. Don't get distracted, and you can actually do your job. And if you have lunch at two o'clock, you just don't care this is very sustainable, and it's something that I've done for years. And it makes it makes it easy and painless to maintain my weight. I used to weigh three hundred pounds. I'm about two hundred and three pounds right now. And I'm nine point six percent body fat. And I don't diet. I'm not hungry. It's pretty cool. Aside from the MCAT oil. What are the fats do you recommend for coffee, and we talked about heavy cream? I would I just wanna tell everyone. Hey, whip up some heavy cream and just spoon it right on top of your coffee, and it's so good. But I find it does not work. It has too much protein potentially a member in protein where you don't get this other affect and now we're getting pretty deep in lipid, biochemistry. But it's worth knowing about bulletproof funded some research at the university of Washington around core, water, biochemistry. This is the stuff that never gets funding dollars. But it's very worth understanding because this is part of our biology, and what Dr Gerald Pollock figured out is that when you have tiny droplets of fat suspended in water. It changes the structure of the water in our memories remain tiny droplets fat. So when you put butter fat or very likely brain octane, they're actually working on quantifying that right now, you get this. This change in water. It turns out for yourselves to make ATP for energy for your cells to fold new proteins into carry out their tasks they can't use the water you drink. They take the water you drink, and then they make twelve hundred nanometer light that's called infrared heat, and they use that to convert the water from bulk water into exclusions on what you put cream in your coffee. The coffee doesn't become exclusions if you put butter fats or brain octane in it, and then you blend it you must blend it for this to happen. You make small droplets fat. It actually changes the structure of the water in the coffee. So that when you drink it yourselves can use it directly, and what could be into this was that I discovered bulletproof coffee, at least the concept of it in remote, western Tibet at eighteen thousand feet elevation on the side of mount Kailash, which is the holy mountain in eastern religions, and they gave me a bowl of Yacob butter tea at a tiny remote guesthouse. This place was a half a mile. The nearest water and this little Tibetan woman every morning for her entire life. She had taken Yock butter and tea, and they'd pour it into a wooden churn, and they would churn it for ten minutes by hands before they would drink tea in money. They would never just eat a bite of butter in wash it down with T, which is what any intelligent person you'd think would do. And I thought it was a little bit crazy. In fact, the wealthy Tibetans with two yaks and not exaggerating either they would have a solar powered cell and a blender so that they could blend it and say themselves training, but they would never dream of doing training. Well, turns out that when you blend these fats into that your coffee, it does change the water. They noticed the difference. They've been doing it for thousands of years. And that is why if you pour cream in your coffee, you're unlikely to get the same effect as if you blend some specific fat molecules into your body. The other things that you could add to your coffee if you wanted to almost any kind of oil that you'd like to get more of into your diet. The problem is try putting krill oil or fish oil into your coffee. You're probably not going to like it. A some people use some nut oils, some people like to use on almond milk, and then add the brain Aachen oil, and it should mention brain octane oil is one of four kinds of MCAT oil. It's the one with the most lab studies about raising Keaton's the most common cheapest and most available MCAT oil does not raise key towns anymore than corn oil, and it's allowed to be labeled an MCAT oil, and this is called Laurich acid. So if someone selling MCAT oil that says Laurich acid in it that's not gonna raise your key tones. Have you ever tried putting the fish oil in coffee? It sounds disgusting. I have tried putting everything you can think of in coffee, literally thousands of experiments. Yes, I did fish at one time. And it was truly awful the other thing that was surprisingly awful was I put a quarter avocado and wants to see if I could get a little bit creaming us, and I gave it to my kids, and I took on drink and daddy. What did you do to this coffee? This is the worst ever had. No one likes hot all the Konta. No. I love Advocaat does. But I haven't met in a serious lapse of judgement. I tried putting like my fish oil in a smoothie day. Like, maybe the other flavors will mask it. Nope out. So. It was the grocery saying I've ever made a fishy. Milkshake Oklahoma's horrible. Because I formulate supplements, and I'm working in this live to one hundred eight year longer thing a lot of fish oil. You can get is rancid if it's expose very unstable. So exposed to heat and light it has way more of a fishy flavor. If it gives you like those fish burps, you have issues in the most precious type official comes from fish eggs. And this is what native Americans would do. They're actually save fish eggs, dry them. So they could give them to pregnant women because they needed the extra DHA and right now just last month. I just launch us up lament that's based on fish egg oil that sustainable assembly harvested, and so there's special phospholipids that go into the brain. And I can tell you that I would not put that bullet proof fish oil in my coffee to save my life. I'm gonna use the coffee to swallow the pills like. Like a normal person. 'cause I just can't imagine a fish flavored froth on anything. Totally. So I have a question about the guidelines that given to pregnant women about coffee consumption. So I'm pregnant and one of the things that I thought of apart from peel panic was how is this going to fix the insane amount of coffee, drink everyday. So I guess we're told to stay below two hundred milligrams a day, would you recommend that full pregnant women, you know, from just your opinion and also is bulletproof safe for pregnant women. This is an awesome question. My very first book was called the better baby. Book thirteen hundred references around for tilde, my wife, who's Caroline ski trained physician was infertile when I met her and we put together a nutritional program in the lifestyle thing that allowed us to have one child at thirty nine one at forty two. So I spent five years crunching data on fertility. And yes, I looked at coffee and to this day. Lana is a consultant for entrepreneurs in Hollywood people in all who are looking to get pregnant without IVF's. This is something we really know about in my house and. What it comes down to is a lot of the stuff you see. Oh, you never have a coffee. If you're pregnant was promoted in the nineteen fifties by company trying to sell a burn grain substance. That's a coffee replacement. So it was just negative marketing. And there isn't great science support. That said there are a lot of things that your body is not going to want you to have or is going to have more of the idea of anchovies ice cream, or whatever cravings, you get your body's going to tell you really strongly if you're lacking, zinc, or you need more of this or less of that is going to tell you. And if you get the wrong stuff, you're gonna have that welcome to morning sickness thing. So this is your body's way of keeping the inner environment as as fertile and supportive as possible to have a healthy, baby. And if your body's telling you, drink some coffee, I will tell you the toxins that forming coffee do have affects throughout the body on. Siler metabolism. Like the negative things. So drink really clean coffee. If you're going to you're going to do it. And if you start getting negative effects, don't do it. It may change by trimester. I've seen that for sure. And a lot of pregnant women will switch to green tea, but here's some research from the book this really important, even one Cup of green tea reduces your levels of full of acid substantially now, it low levels of folic acid give you well. Spina bifida in your kids twenty percent of people have zero symptoms spina bifida, including me, actually, it just means that some of your bottom vertebra don't fuse all the way. And if you're going to drink tea when you're pregnant, which is probably good idea. There's some good benefits to having a Cup or two of that or a Cup of coffee. But specifically with t you're gonna be taking something called metal full eight, which is a form of full cast. Everyone can absorb and. Yes, that is something that bulletproof manufacturers. For a reason. I just told you the reason and so the short version is the evidence for caffeine being bad for you in pregnancy is at least at lower levels like that is very very low to none that I've been able to find the evidence about coffee what's going to depend on what's in the coffee. That's not just coffee. So if you're drinking clean coffee, I have concerns with it. But if you drink clean coffee, I'll like the stuff we make and then you don't feel good or your jittery or you get other affects from your baby or your body's saying, I don't want you to drink that. Then don't drink it. And it's okay in terms of brain octane collagen protein, the stuff that we make and and grasp butter being appropriate. When you're pregnant the evidence is very strong that you want collagen because your baby is made out of collagen and fat, and it's not made out of vegetable fat it's made out of animal fat and saturated fat. So what I what I drink that if I was pregnant. Yes, would I give it to my wife? Yes. Does. Clients who drink at. Yes, do they drink ten cups of coffee and they're pregnant I would hope not one or two cups a day as normal. That's what I drink and I'm not even pregnant. Is made me feel a lot better about. Every day. They can keep drinking coffee. Give before bed though, sleep is really important when you're pregnant I hand that I'll be up all night. This is the metabolism thing. Always wanted about this. 'cause my mother drinks coffee at midnight. I'm not kidding. Then ten minutes later. She's in bed. Snoring. Don't understand it people who can shoot Espresso right after dinner. I'm like, you're a wonder to me. There are a few people out there who have inverse effect to caffeine. They're put in usual, but it's actually calming and relaxing for them. And I'm not sure that they're from this planet, but that's how it works. And it's kind of neat. If you're one of those people you look at back to your question about caffeine in the brain caffeine can enhance short term memory and some studies, and you know, there may be some affect on long term memory that's positive and one study found that caffeine could improve long term memory after learning. So in other words, you study then you drink some coffee, and you might remember better. And that's all interesting. So if you could drink that before bed, maybe it remember your dreams better. I have no idea, but I don't recommend coffee or bad because I'm probably not gonna have any dreams because I'm not gonna sleep the bulletproof rules are stop drinking caffeine at two o'clock. If you're a normal Kathy metabolism, you may if you're sensitive stop drinking at ten AM. Also, can we talk about the best time to drink coffee? Yes, please. All right. So there's two different answers for this. Based on your your circadian rhythm natural settings about fifteen percent of us. Wake up at five AM, bright eyed, bushy tailed, and there's a word for those people. They're the bad people. All right. This is according to Dr Michael Breus, sleep researcher has been on my show bulletproof radio couple times good friend, author of a book called the power of win. So those fifteen percent of people wake up early. You know, what you don't need your coughing you wake up wait and hour or two after you wake up tab your coffee. And then there are people who are naturally a genetically night. Owls. We were the nightshift to guard our cave back on the on the planes when we lift and for people like that when you wake up have you coffee, right after you wake up because it makes you feel better get your quarters levels up in it advances, your circadian settings that way, which is a good thing. And then for most people they are what he calls a bears. They wake up at a normal time. You can have your coffee an hour after wake up or right after you wake up, whatever you like. But it's important if you're bouncing around at five AM, you don't need just wait. And if you're dragging than have it. So the short answer is it depends on when you wanted to wake up if you're if you're. Natura wake up time is eight thirty or nine you probably want your coffee right after you wake up because someone made you wake up at eight. And that's how it works. Dave. Are you ready for the final five brain candy question around a high love it? Okay. And these should be answered with one word to one-sentence super-quick, fire answers, right? Right. What is your brain TV or your Goto show right now? Right now. Silence is not a good thing. I'm just thinking I haven't really been watching a lot of TV lately, I've been working on my new book game changers. So the is happening. So I'm off TV as as a right now. All right. Well, let's go to the next question. What is your brain book? Aside from your books. Now that would be a lane. If I don't know it's in those books. I wrote them right now, I am I am really paying a lot of attention to raise Dahlia's book, which is called principles life and work, which is a very worthwhile to read. I'm also listening to the Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy. With my nine year old who's learning all sorts of bad things from it. What is your brain trip? Ak where do you go when you need to reset? I go into my forty years of neuro feedback pod that I have at home, and I hook about forty thousand dollars electrodes to my head and then go into altered states with a computer helping me sorry that was more than two words. Not the beach. Trippy? What is your brain music? So what you listen to when you need to focus or out. I tend to listen to EDM of some sort of some sort of electric sort of chill stuff. What your favorite EDM artist at the moment? I am pretty lame. I actually I'm a big fan of Steve Eric's work, but it's hard to say, I usually turn on Spotify and say find a channel, and then I know pay attention because I'm doing something else. And what is your brain day or an ideal self-care gay that boost your brain power? I like to sleep in which I almost never do as father and an entrepreneur author and whatnot. So I love to sleep in a little bit and sort of hang out in that half awake half asleep space for while. And then I would do breathing exercises. I really liked to do something from Dr Barry Morgan called energy for success. I can get a kindling experience in ten minutes with some of his sound files, which is kinda cool to get going. Then I do yoga, of course, I'd have some bulletproof coffee as somewhere in the middle of all that. And then I would eat really good food for the rest of the day and probably do some cryotherapy. Why not? Awesome. Well, that's the end of our brain candy round. Thank you so much for coming on. I learned so much today. I was a lot of fun. Thanks for having me on. And if you don't mind I would love to recommend my new book game changers. I've actually studied the answers from five hundred guests on my show to figure out what makes them tick and use the ticks and math to figure out what works for most of them. And built it into a book around what people who change the world due to make themselves better a change in the world. It's called game changers. It's on Amazon now. Okay. Great. I am definitely gonna check that out. Because that sounds fascinating. And thank you. Again. Davis has been fulsome. Thanks so much so much. That's it for this season of the stronger podcasts special, thanks to Dan's impo. Chris morales. Sam Nygren Deanna Nunez. Adam Lanza came Conti. And of course, Dave Asprey. Don't forget to subscribe to the stronger podcast on itunes share with your friends ensure your instruments, right?

caffeine Dave Asprey founder and CEO Asprey Verizon Tom Keaton editor Ethiopia Dr Barry Morgan ketosis Aaron mossbacher news editor us university of Washington Malia Kalahal
Vape Pens, Hair Growth Serums, Fixing The Pineal Gland & C60 (The Next Great Longevity Molecule).

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:10:35 hr | 1 year ago

Vape Pens, Hair Growth Serums, Fixing The Pineal Gland & C60 (The Next Great Longevity Molecule).

"On this episode of the Ben Greenfield Fitness podcast. I think As a whole what we're doing is going to be the next shift in human longevity. He would put his front paws down on the ground and literally. Just pull himself forward until his hind legs plopped down HYPOCR horrifically depressing two weeks later and said into this actually works and I said I know you're more on. Why are you not putting this out? Why why are you not sharing this with us coming? I'm wondering why are you. Billionaire did help performance nutrition longevity ancestral living biohacking and much more my my name is Ben Greenfield. Welcome to the show folks getting getting into C.. Sixty today this anti-aging molecule I get asked a lot about weren't covered with this brilliant guy came to my house for this episode. Now if you like this type of anti-aging strange fringe molecule stuff. Then you need to grab my new six hundred eight page book that takes a deep dive over two hundred pages of have a loan or anti aging and longevity. I talk about C.. Sixty in there which we're going to talk about today's show but a ton more. It has everything from immune. The system enhancements to structural beauty and symmetry to fat. Loss Muscle. gain anti-aging soup to nuts. This book is a guide to the human machine and and it's available now for preorder at Boundless Book Dot Com. That's Boundless Book Dot Com to check that out. This podcast. Broadcasting is also brought to you by the wonderful tasty coconut honey ca cow NIB infused kion clean clean energy bar. It's like a fricken s'mores with none of the guilt so basically I formulated this with all super clean ingredient so it's cocoa butter and sea salt and grasping respite gelatin. It's got almonds. It's got coconut flakes. It's got cocoa. Nibs the feedback I get on this is that this is like the most addictive -ly mouth-watering hiring energy bar. Anybody who eats this thing has ever had kids love it too. And it's super clean and guilt free. Wonderful Snack pairs quite well. May I say as your kion smelly with the kion antioxidant rich coffee. You get ten percent off the key on clean energy bar if if you go to get kion. Dot Com get K. I. O. N. DOT COM and use code BG F. One zero saves you ten percent instantly so get it. Kion dot com use code be G. F. One zero and definitely trial then bars. This podcast is also brought to you by organic by why Green Juice my friends at organic fi have made salads wonderful again meaning that you can drink the equivalent of about ten salads ballads when you wake up in the morning and it's all certified organic Sh- is Nat. We're talking Marinda. Correla Mint Spira Lena Macho Green not wheat grass. If it's green it's in there so it's this Super Alkali zing powder. It does not require you to chop the planned end to clean up any of this stuff. You just put a couple scoops and what I like to do as a nice clean crisp cold Nell gene bottle of water and then you dump a few spoonfuls of this stuff in shake it up and you've got instant green juice for a fraction of that overpriced fifteen dollar green that you get from some cold press juicery now this stuff off. It comes out to about two three bucks serving few use. My Discount Code is actually GONNA come out to less than two bucks serving you go to organic dot com slash clash Ben. That's organic with an eye. Organic fi dot com slash Ben and Use Code Ben G Two zero to get twenty percents off of anything from organic by specially that green juice. Try it out. We are recording all right. We're recording I can hear your voice. It's Djelic Irwin's in Djelic when they're sitting in my kitchen table. Hey everybody listening That was the the rollicking lovely Djelic Voice of ion not Ian I-in Dan Mitchell. Although it's spelled it is saying spelling MOMS and artists that's aft- two. You can't argue as a toddler all right so so to give a little. Oh context for those using in. I was at Paleo F X and a bunch of people telling me like he got to meet this brilliant researcher richer inventor like mad scientist guy named in Mitchell and eventually. I was introduced. You that a former podcast guest to my doctor. Dr Barry Morgan. The crazy activities Chinese energy worker guy he interviewed or he he introduced us. And we've kind of been texting back and forth breath but it turns out like probably the thing that I'm I get all the feedback from folks that your most knowledgeable in is is this stuff called c sixty of never done a podcast about sixty S. Something that I get a lot of questions about like what C. Sixty what's Buckminster Minster. fullerenes carbon sixty it CETERA. And I've I've never aside from a very brief stint like four years ago just kind ordering some online seeing what it was used it yet field has changed a lot. You send me a little bit and and I WANNA learn. Learn more about this stuff But I keep hearing about C. Sixty over and over again in researching this book. I'm working on about longevity like it also came up there in terms of some really really really compelling studies on in age reversal and so I figured what the Hell. Let's let's do this so you actually for those of you who are wondering. Yes US sitting here my kitchen table just a little little vesper workout. Yeah very very intense workout. Yeah what did you think my God while when they say you can and pack in three three hours of exercise into twenty one minutes I now comprehend why they say that. Yeah Yeah and so if any of you listening to us this thing before it like puts full by full-body arm and leg based almost like a cat device like blood flow restriction arm and leg. And you felt that because I oh yeah I put those drops on then. It fills them up with ICE ICE war. So you got cold compression. You're barefoot or you have socks on so you're grounded rounded earth on these metal pads and then it's a full body exercise machine eighty twenty one minutes of high intensity interval training. Yeah it was kind of like being strapped into medieval torture or devices like the machine from the princess bride works. Yes is doing something and you were here last night to the Sauna. We had a fun dinner with my brother and during dinner you just kept talking about stuff and making mental notes. Mike Okay we gotta talk about in the podcast. The podcast like one thing that you mentioned mentioned we'll get into C.. Sixty guys don't worry but one thing that you mentioned. I think this summer when we were on the Sauna. We weren't actually smoking weed or CD or anything like that. We were just chatting. Vape pens came up and you talked about how you figured out how to basically make vape pens not burn the lungs or or not have the nasty amounts of propylene glycol. Whatever what exactly did you do with the vape pen so it was kind of an interesting puzzle? I had talked to a company in California about it a few years back and they we're trying to arrive at a way to vaping that wouldn't be detrimental and I really their focus was on and I really didn't know tremendous mad about it at the time I but I researched it a little. Bit and kind of nudge them in the right direction and basic idea was to to pre lace their vape Jews as it's termed with compounds that would block the metabolism or you know kind of when you metabolize things. Sometimes it burns a lot of compounds Out of your brain so in this case cholesterol precursors and things like that so that it would pre lace all the compounds so that it didn't cause any drop in your normal physiological levels and of Choline Yeah of Choline and which works like a champ because then there's there's no after effects where people get headaches or anything right and then to use things like pulmonary surfactants which is what US premature baby because it opens up the lungs the Alveoli expanded. Dan Clarify not a premature baby. Well what I'm recommending here. Is that all premature babies vape right so the the basic ideas you open up the lungs because it seemed like there was kind of an arms race going on in terms of how people would stack on. We've got two thousand milligrams we've got five thousand milligrams which is kind of pointless because if you really break it down doesn't matter how much you're getting in your system if you can't utilize it right so it's all about bioavailability so you can figure out a way to up regulate the bioavailability then you can use less and get a higher higher yields so and that's exactly what that didn't terms of using the pulmonary surfactants that you can use say two hundred milligrams and get the equivalent input biologically from what you'd normally get from a thousand milligrams and so you don't have to do as much to get the same yield you saying to her milligrams exactly that's a lot thousand milligrams. Yeah it is is a lot. Yeah it's a whole lot. Do you take me. I do not misuse just a couple of hundred milligrams. Yeah so in order to facts doses considerably like ten ten all these bottles. Yeah if you look at the literature on that you really don't get the kind of cognitive impact that you're trying to get until you cross the threshold about one hundred fifty to two hundred milligrams tonight. I am obviously a shrinking violet with a two hundred and fifty pound frame so I have to take a little bit more than your average. Your boy yes I have found the same thing like Oh yeah like I was talking with. Hunter McIntyre did a podcast with him he's a Pro Spartan Athlete and Cross fitter and I think he's he said like his his minimum dose is something like two hundred milligrams exactly and to to get the right physiological impact because despite the fact that our frames may be slightly different sizes. Our brains things are just about the same way to sleep like a baby and I took two hundred last night after after we retired. Yeah that's actually that's when I get the most benefit from it is because I don't generally early sleep. That takes the edge off. Yeah how'd you sleep last night out there by the fantastic roosters than wake you up. It was great. Yeah no I think I could be a little blue fringe for that but my God fantastic electrically appear super clean catch a lot of flack for that If people will raise an eyebrow out that some of the research on calcium channels and the m. f. but all I can tell you is Iceland feel like a million bucks and I'm a home. It's completely legit. I I mean if you read the the latest data on it I think as a as a whole the. US is one of the only countries that doesn't acknowledge the fact that you know you can this regulate calcium channel flow. Just I mean it's what six hundred times the input available from from stress that you actually need to modulate ion flow. Yeah or speaking speaking of a controversial topics another thing. I WanNa talk to you about before we dive into the topic of the day which is C. Sixty is. I think we're talking about fluoride this. This is the floor. I came up last night at dinner. Time fluoridation and not necessarily getting conspiracy theory about how government is using it for mind control which which. Aw that's arguable. But the idea that fluoride can actually accumulate in for example thyroid tissue then classify the pineal gland and we chatting about how I think I mentioned a lot of people use plant medicine. For example if your opinion gland is calcified you're not gonNA produce much. GMT So many people. Paul who may have pineal gland dysfunction might be using something like whatever I waspa- or or or five or something like that actually not feeling with they should because their their land is essentially calcified. And then you said Oh I have a way to scale the tell me about that. So it's it's not research I did that. It was research out of Russia about fifteen years ago but I- co-opted it and when we were doing the The initial formulations of one of our first round products for animals because most mammals have the same thing and they were all drinking the same water and hence the same aftereffects. If you use a combination of peptides you can actually d scale that. And that's one of the things I mean obviously anything in that whole you know. Glandular secretions they're kind of important. Because when you look at Nanogram microgram quantities having the same sort of just just tremendous effects on your biology. You're listening huge responses with these very very minimal tweaks in dosing internally. So one of our first runs was to use a right. So and that was the compound and we put it in the. It's a peptide so we just had this special special Tetra Peptide formulated which at the time was kind of funny because the first round of having formulated the price I got back for one. Gram was thirty. Four thousand bucks. Yeah which I thought was a mistake. At the time I called the company and and she the woman was blatant said Oh but that includes shipping. So I'm assuming they would have delivered Alexis ship but a lot of ties dosages micrograms admittedly. Yeah and we ended up using I'm fifty. Micrograms was kind of dozing that we ended up going for but we included that in the first round of products and it had a really pronounced effects on the animals animals and I think a great deal of the impact in the the efficacy. The first round of products was because of that because just we weren't just addressing some of the components opponents you can hit with C. Sixty and some of the other inflammatory components that we were hitting pretty Olympic enzymes were using those tetra peptides modulate things at secretion level for your endocrine system system. Can you buy those commercials. Those in the past decade since I started playing with all this stuff a lot of that change and you can also peptide called again. It's a a fifth alon or a piddling depending on the sites you go to really Of The frigerator back as as to twenty day cycles on it based on the conviction protocol. Yeah I didn't realize it had an effect on the pineal gland. Yes that's very interesting. Okay so I've already got it. Yeah that's that's the thing and everybody's twice a year ten to twenty ninety days protocol. I forget what the doses per day I wanna say. It's something like ten meg a day and there's human trials in Russia showing all cause ause mortality. Yes without approach. Yes just like an insulin syringe subcutaneous. So that's why we included it included for animals because one of the things we had a patent released wegas three three or four months ago but we showed that we effectively done was created a buffering solutions so that we could buffer most compounds against degradation and for the stomach acids ads and also for heat so we even with proteins were blocking denaturing up to eighty degrees Celsius which is kind of a trick. Also it changes just the the levels that you actually have to utilize a lot of different compounds. So I'll I'll give you linked to the pattern but it's it really changes the amounts that you actually need to get into your system because of all the way through your Gi track down your small intestine so you can actually get access to it. You've got a lot of patents. I found your patent page online because I was looking up some stuff talk about but I didn't really introduce you that comprehensively and I'm sure people are now wondering who the F you are you playing with peptides. And they are. How do you describe yourself like a researcher? Scientists research scientists. That's kind of the current incarnation of what I'm doing right now. It's it's all biological puzzles. And I I have the inkling that probably in another three or four years. Most of it will be looking at hardcore physics because the things that I've been working working on biologically seem to be tending towards availing themselves for more change based on the frequency response like a lot of the cancer research we've done one of the one of those patents was on an anti metastatic therapeutic for cancer and we have effectively shutdown the ability for cancer metastasized. Now it's not a cure because if you have a primary mass or some distant site that already has a mass that's vascular is it has its own really regulated. Good blood flow. You can't necessarily just shut the thing being down and kill it there but I can't say pretty definitively that once you start ingesting that compound metastatic behavior stops cancer will not spread in metastases metastasis kills. You mean once you start adjusting C.. Sixty it's not. Just see sixty so the trick there if you look at the patent it's three basic compounds right so it's a lipid in which is just the fat and that's bound to the sixty and that allows it to pass through cell membranes. So it's kind of in effect giving the all access pass that Y I see sixty s often combined with olive oil like as a carrier exactly and an olive oil it's great carrier it allows for membrane swapping on the cell surface surface really readily oleic acid swaps out with normal somatic cells really really readily But there are other things like coconut oil if you want to do different things and elicited sort of different responses body not surprisingly different oils breakdown in different components the body and our metabolize different areas of the body. So if you WANNA do something that's GonNa Modulate your liver you obviously you'd use an MCAT because that's going to go into your liver. Infraction it there. And if you WANNA use something else you might use. EPA because you know those those kind of things break down and move to a different area trying to elicit a response in your brain. I go to Noah. Acid is what you really want rain. So Harrier oil that see sixties delivered. Gordon would influence the site of action with the ball. -pletely okay it's like using a different key for a different lock. Okay and I want to get more into C.. Sixty and especially specially see sixteen cancer and how that's affecting metastatic cancer momentarily but back to you your research. Scientists like Janet like lab lab or job actually look like I have a really great lab Just north of Tulsa and in the Great State of Oklahoma. Oh my and so I travel back and forth between Austin where we have the company headquartered in Tulsa Ok so carbon sixty companies is in Austin in your lab where you're doing all this mad scientists stuff with vape pens and descaling opinion gland and see sixteen all that jazz. That's an Oklahoma. Yeah that's that's kind of where the crazy magic happens in mad scientist interest. Is I think the moniker that usually thrown out because I'm constantly playing with things like couple weeks go was building a microwave cannon to see if I could knock out cancer cells the in situ yeah really yeah it will because you can get them to pass through normal tissue but then because of the c sixty being inside the cells you can get the C.. Sixty to oscillate and then create hyperthermic effects where you can target specific cells and because of the way we set up the anti metastatic therapeutic it it goes in binds to the cancer cells cancer nutrient primal. So it's going to suck things out of your system fastest and it's favorite food is sugars so this the Anti metastatic is bound. There's that paradoxically committee like some forms of breast cancer. For example eat up ketones instead of glucose. Yeah exactly well. And it's it's also I have great respect for it after having been wrangling with it for quite a few years because it metabolic pivots on the flyers it needs to to make sure it can insurance own survival and so but it's kind of a broad stroke I think we've tested twenty two different cancers and we were able to Zap them all and the basic gist. Was You know you you take a full in which is just see sixty abducted too fat whichever failure playing with depending on where. You're getting a C sixty molecule you before the exactly. Yeah so you take that and then you hook that to a sugar so I did. That threw a different type of thermal analysis. And just used I heat to bind it in very specific way and then once you have that. It's actually it's oddly specific because you literally have to have the right. Particulates is the right thermal curve. Hit all the right gradients. It's kind of crazy as fate would have it it. Just it was a bit of a lockout nailed it quite literally. The first shot out of the gate. which was in retrospect knowing how easy it is to not get it now after having tried to find tons of different ways to work on it it makes one kind of ponder the idea that AH literally the first shot out of the gate you know? Got It right. Then as opposed to probably hundreds of other approaches and not able to get the same response so pretty lucky. Who is this what you went to school for like? Yeah I had a full ride started out studying. Chemistry shifted over and studied jazz performance. And that really. Yeah well to me. It's it's effectively the same thing right. It's all about resonance and it's all about combinatorial corey relationships so chemicals and admittedly I have a little bit of a knack for it but chemicals and music or the same sorts of things you have bass tones that you we play with and then you have to look at the relationships and you can force it. I mean you can you can create some sort of you know redux reaction and you can get something to go through but it. It doesn't mean it's elegant right and so what I'm always trying to do is just like music. You can play to together. And they can be this Gordon or they can be harmonic. But what you're really trying to do is you're trying to find an elegant solution ocean and so that's I think that's the crux of what I really play with. The most is looking at all these different compounds and seeing well. How should this function? What can we actually do with this? What kind of response can we was it? That's going to be sort of magical and and it really is. It's more art than science. And when you really start to break it down and you have the basics. It's just like music. You have to work at getting your chops up. You make sure that you you technically have the capacity to do that sort of exercise but then beyond that it's really a matter of off. How can I make this move in an artful way? This is the end goal and trying to do something here. I don't want to get a certain response. How do I do that in a beautiful fashion? That's elegant because nature truly is nothing if not elegant inefficient. It's kind of brutal sometimes especially if you look at cancer it's it's a really very very brutal function but it wastes. I know steps it really. It serves on an individual basis. It's tragic but on a If you look at my dad was an anthropology professor and if you look at kind of the overarching impact on the society it's it's actually really beneficial because it's you know. Thinning out the heard for for people who are marginalized and giving those same resources and reallocating them to younger partner. Standpoint cancer is doing and it's the society's changed a lot I mean we're no longer just tribal folks so I mean obviously we're cooking and a kitchen here as opposed to you know outside over fire so things have changed and it's is not as relevant as it once was just same sort of thing applies to pathogens and and you know the discovery of antibiotics. I think as a whole what we're doing with sixty is going to be the next shift in human longevity is my after doing a decade of work on this. Yeah I WANNA talk about that do you. Do you still make music a career as a jazz musician I did. I did have a career as a jazz musician for quite a while and yeah I still practice. I play the trumpet. No sacks yeah jazz saxophone yes you and Bill Clinton yes slightly different levels but yes they just had. It had a name the one famous saxophone player. meaning that yeah that Bill Clinton listening on the simpsons. Okay so in a battle over there so would you just do before we started recording. Tell me what you did and what this stuff isn't holding it because I want to try whatever you just did with the coffee and the and so what does this bottle. Oh okay so that is revived is what I think is the best product that we says rain. And you just did a very good job defining that so we've got C.. Sixty in here and was olive oil that yes in an olive oil and then Sarah Yo pep today. Which is Sarah Days Radio Pep? Today's REP years already. Kind of the day. Join Sport Com. Yeah it is and the the basic idea is that was actually a drug and Japan for quite a few years and then they down regulated it to supplement because they found that they they couldn't get enough of it to be bioavailable and what I was alluding to in our patent that was just released as we we're able to very definitively show that it works like a champ if if you can actually deliver it to the body and get it you know able to be used where it needs to encarnacion which I know helps to deliver fatty acids into the cell. Zoe put that actually that. It was really for repair of restorative stuff. After the fact it's most of the things in there have a couple of effects. It's not just a one off okay. And then co Q.. Ten yeah and in Coq ten because it's going to up regulate a lot of cell function all right so what. How did how did you do this? tablespoon here okay so the way I do it as I shake it up and make sure everything's back than suspension suspension. Okay then I shake shake shake shake. Put it in the put in handy spin their K.. And Dope with this the coffee. No actually I'm gonNA use the coffees. Yeah chaser exactly so. This is a little coffee before you put it in your mouth but a little coffee in your mouth. Okay hold on and this is for those of you at home Keelan just your soon. How okay? So this isn't my mouth. Take a little swig of that. All Right Swish it around put another little bit of coffee in your mouth and sit down delete in my mouth like almost kind of thing not at all so it says to tissue take two tablespoons okay. So as I'm doing this. The more the merrier. Tell me chairs tell me what C.. Sixty s okay. So C. Sixty buckminsterfullerene bucket balls. It's literally it's a soccer ball in shape ape made of carbon atom so it's an ultra which just means another form of carbon and it was discovered in one thousand nine hundred five three guys who discovered it all got Nobel prizes is for it because I knew form of carbon and a couple of hundred years and at the time there because they found this they were actually looking things outer space and they saw a signature Richard that they couldn't recognize and they finally figured out that it was actually sixty carbon atoms grouped and so they brought it to a researcher who's a mathematician and said what is the shape of this and he said said it's a football and so it is literally it's a soccer ball. It's a truncated echoes Adrian. So made out of carbon atoms and it's got a bunch of different properties because of that configuration. figuration it's very stable. It's very very strong in a lot of research was done early on it. There's kind of a glut of people trying to jump on the bandwagon and do the research but due to a couple of oddball reports that came out people didn't think it was gonna be very beneficial biologically so it really kind of crunched everything down for a couple of decades. It's in the research didn't really move forward. And then in twenty twelve a report was released and I'm sure you've seen this it was Fathi Mussa was the fella in France. It's and they had done a study on the the fact they were doing earlier in L. D. fifty which is a lethal dosing fifty. You're trying to figure out what kills the median percentage of the population. And when you introduce a new compound to animal and so in this case they gave it to Rats and the rats lived ninety percent longer on average wjr and they actually sacrificed the last percent ninety percent law yet and so they found that the control group died than they had an olive oil experimental group it died and then the C sixty group but yeah ninety percent extension lifespan on average and it had a bunch of other oddball properties. To like. Normally when you're in your lab and your knocking now you know your lab rats or mice you with Carbon Tetra chloride and the perhaps could handle more than twice the normal amount of carbon tetra chloride because it buffers and really. So you're kidding. Livers are buffered from oxidative stress and from toxins. It'll handle you know if somebody went to the hospital for an acute toxic threat. They give them activated charcoal because binds oxen's and it takes a system with the same things. Apply here because of the carbon but at a much more enhanced volume because of the spherical configuration on the surface. So you just have this maximal binding volume for toxins so binds talks INS and carries them out of your system and oddly enough it also does a similar function with radiation so you end up with huge protection against really yet ready. You could use something something like this for example for airline travel and you're getting exposed the x rays etc interesting so see six is not something the body makes itself. This is a molecule that is synthesized in a lab as Buckminsterfullerene or carbon sixty bound to an the oil and then delivered via supplemental form has leipold fluorine. Yeah exactly now typically found in nature. It's been around since the Big Bang so it's thirteen point eight billion years old but but it only occurs at kind of the intersection of a couple of different factors of vacuum whitening strikes. Occasionally you can get lightning strikes without a vacuum but generally like when we make it in our lab we have you know a chamber and will depressurize it. So we put a real high vacuum on it and then introduce helium so it's got an inert dirt atmosphere and then take two carbon graphite rods and blast them together usually driven by an arc welder and the resulting explosion. You sit it out and you get about three to seven percents sixty out to all of a sudden it's very cool and the equipment looks like it. Looks like something that should be in back to the future. Looks like you're pretty sick nick. Yeah you're driving. You're driving something. Everybody makes it like because I started to look around like there are it's kind of like CBD like there's a lot out of sixty websites like Oh yes you're a bunch now on C.. Sixty sixty this on that. So are all these labs spread across the country across the world. Oh pretty much doing the same thing making the same C.. Sixty no they're not actually At least not through the same method. Now they're making C.. Sixty but I can tell you experimentally because tested a lot of it from different laboratories it's kind of peculiar in that some of the methods like the plasma arc method is one way The Carbon Arcs that we're using one way. There's flame mm synthesis method and they all have their pros and cons. THE PLASMA ARC method. The color is different and one of you can attribute that to particulate culet size or you can attribute it to different configurations on the surface. It's it reacts differently biologically and I and I'm not sure you know if you run run we have an HBO see in the lab. And when you back on it pops up as hey C.. Sixty but I can tell you experience. It reacts differently in in your body and so I'm not sure exactly. What the with the differences? But I can tell you that there's a difference. Okay not to say that it gets any better or worse effect fact you feel different. My personal favorite flavor of it is from a carbon arc and we make some but we buy a lot from different labs all over the world some in the states some in Europe and it at the carbon arc variety seems to function the most and also like in Fathi Mussa study. That's what they did. They bought it from a group out of the states. We did it this road and study. That was ninety percent longer. Yeah we did a similar thing. I was actually looking for inflammatory response but we used P fifty three knockout rats and those are the ones that have their tumor suppressor cancer. Yeah yeah those are the very unfortunately yeah aesthetically challenged because they have lumps all over their body very screwed rats idiopathic we just present with spontaneous formations of cancers. There's and ours oddly. Enough didn't do that. And they live ninety three percent longer so these roads are supposed to get cancer. You give them see sexy then you get cancer. Yeah that's exactly right. Hey I want interrupt today show guest an I an R I n I should say we saw on it The night before we recorded this podcast cast we sweat it out and we chopped up good in my sauna and Basically what I do in my sauna is all often. Do Yoga Swing kettlebells. Do Blood flow restriction training. Get a good sweat on. And then I'll visit with folks in there. Why because it's huge? It's a sanctuary. Sauna made by clear light. So it's got all the stuff that clearly features in all their saunas. EMF Elf shielding their lifetime warranty They've got all sorts of little upgrade. So you can throw in there like chromotherapy it can pipe in music. Theater built in speakers. This thing is like the Cadillac of infrared. Red Saunas see all the benefits of the deep deep sweat from infrared the same heat shock proteins and longevity benefit you get from a dry sauna. It's the best of both worlds. Get Super Super Hot. I usually will turn it on about thirty minutes before I go in. 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Ben Gets you twenty percent off gotta try this stuff. Out males or females works for both sexes after all both sexes sweat so tried out native urine dot com and use discount code code. Ben What's going on there. What exactly is happening well so cancer? In order to proliferate you've got to have a dysregulation in the energy level interest Louis specifically in the Mitochondria. You've got the energy level. You can't kill the thing but you have to suppress its energy and you also have to use a type of peregrine signaling and Johns Hopkins in two thousand seventeen released a paper where they had noted that ah they had identified. I'll six eight as the peregrine signaling side of kinds that were cancer refusing to promote metastasis. and Luckily we had had already been filed for a couple years for patent. Because we'd seen the same thing in my lab and it was a really good to have that backed up because cancer. Cancer Co ops. Your body's own immune system and uses it to signal spreading so if you crush the site a kind levels and really precipitously make those things fall. Then there's no signalling mechanism to spread. Which is why are any metastatic? Does a really good job. The other function as I lead to earlier was if you down regulate the mighty contro function enough in the energy level goes low enough your ATC drops you. Don't get enough. ATP then cancer can proliferate can't kill you but it has to wound you effectively late but if you keep the levels up regulated it doesn't allow it to spread and so we've done. Testing are boost was roughly eighteen percent of the low end into fifty eight percent on the high end of uptick in ATP and that was just within actually that was with the serum that you just took the other serums this stuff. I just called revive. Yeah yeah so that was. That was a mild uptick in comparison to the rates that we've been able to get since then and and so we're constantly growing and changing. We're trying to research. I mean we'd really as a whole see three sixty health. We effectively think of ourselves as a research company. We have products that support it but really it's all research based okay. What who do I notice? Okay let's I wanted to do something like this as an anticancer strategy judge or a life extension strategy. Would I notice anything from Lake what I just did like these couple of tablespoons with coffee. Is there an effects acute cute effect on cognition on exercise performance. Anything like that not after two tablespoons. It's going to have to build up. You're going to have to reach a certain degree of homies. Stasis in your body if if your cells have enough of it yeah you'll notice a pronounced effect now. I just to be clear. I would not use that as a cancer prevention strategy as a as a prevention strategy Our Anti metastatic agent. It's great as a preventative. Anti metastatic agent is different. This different. Yeah and it's what's on that it's similar configuration but it has sugar in it okay and the sugars cancers are attracted sugars. They pull it in so they act Trojan Horse I. It's exactly what it is. We jokingly call it the cupcake of doom. What's that stuff called? We actually just call it antietam but anti Yeah that's on your website to no. It's not it's not a market. We're we're actually thinking about putting that out as a supplement in the next couple of months. Yeah which will be which will be hopefully Profound and make the show or interested in anticancer type compounds. It's very interesting. There are a lot of people who do it prophylactically for that reason right now don't even before it's out and about on the market. What else would I notice from taking this stuff? cognitively there is a shift you it takes a few weeks but what happens. Is you start pumping pumping out new neurons. So yeah at at a rate of about two to three to one relatives to in Jeff One. So neural growth factor one nine. It kicks out new neurons a lot more rapidly and also the the morphology than is kind of odd in that normally. You know you've got your so met the center. And then you have your arm spanning out at the end of the acts on and they morph logically shifts that that span is two to three times larger so you get the proliferation rate of two three x and then the actual span span to the end of the looked at this. Yeah there's some really great data on it coming out of Japan I think I'll send you. I know it's really when you start getting into this. Yeah that's why I said earlier. I think this is really the thing that's going to push. Push our lifespans forward. Because it's not a steady curve right it doesn't go up just at one incline. You end up up with these points of inflection term anthropologically punctuated equilibrium. So you have points where it spikes up and then it plateaus off. which is the introduction action of antibiotics good sanitation things like that they make our lifespan collectively? Jump Up and I really this is. My money is on this pony more than like. Let's let's say. Na de or telomerase activator like Tammy one eight or any of these sexy anti-aging compounds people are talking about Tammy one eight. I haven't played with personally. I think that's Billy Landry's thing. Yeah Sierra scientists and that you know he seems to be very sharp guy and interviewed him. Yeah and I'm sure that there's a lot of validity to that and I don't think it's an either or really my guess would be that it's more of accommodatory effecting because when we're trying to list some sort of different response biologically you can't can't just address it with chemicals you know you can't just address it with naturopathic stuff you've got to look at the totality of person. Go okay. So we're physical chemical Michael Biochemical magnetic electromagnetic and you have to address all those different things. So I don't think it's going to be a one shot. anti-aging approach is like a like an Alzheimer's approach fruits or or cancer approaches always multi modal. Yeah exactly and so for me personally. I do a baseline of C.. Sixty but then I do you know. PRP stem cells tells other compounds a lot of a lot of 'em in I think I haven't actually used. Nr but that's I'm sure at some point I probably will but I'm I'm not convinced that if you're using an menu need to be out in I actually would agree if I thought I really needed it. I'd be doing it right now. But you know I have a pretty consistent regimen where I I do in amendment in a D and for anti-aging stack like that you would definitely throw c sixteen the mix one hundred hundred a long. Yeah one hundred percent and I mean that's really a lot of this stems from. That's what I was trying to do. In the very beginning a decade ago was it was closing in on a decade. It's a little over eight years ago was trying to figure out how to shunt biological logical agent. And then after you do that you start looking at go. Well you know if I'm going to try and increase the health of an organism. What better way to do that than to literally roll the clock back? Yeah you told me last night. As she gave it to my dogs one hundred and then I went to your website. You have a pet section of the website. What's going on with dogs? Well biologically. We're all mammals so this is pretty much everything with for so if you've got for or care about something that has for much for. Yeah well you see sixty so got a good head of hair there. Yeah so with my dogs. That was the first thing I tested it on myself and my partner at the company. He's done canine rescue for the better part of thirty years now and we both tickets ourselves before we gave it to our dogs but then as soon as we knew that it was safe we gave it to our dogs. And we we both of our dogs of the time he had a greyhound who had been hit by a car and he rescues greyhounds and it made a tremendous difference in the dogs mobility ability and with my dog. He was a great pyrenees. Golden Cerro pet today Senate. Yeah exactly. Yeah and that's one of the real sweet spots is not did I grasp but the basic idea is C.. Sixty drops the inflammatory response. But you still have some hot spots in your joints. If you get the Pepsi's in there it will find its way to those spots in it. Actually derivative from silkworms Yeah it's a silkworm enzyme and they use it to break down Kookiness I know I actually. Ah I think I've talked about this before on the podcast but I've I'm putting into a new joint support formula that I'm working on for kion. Pep today is or or form of that. Is One ingredient in rolling out. It's great stuff it really is in. Yeah I mean that's that's why silkworms use it. BECAUSE THEY WANNA come out and so when you have those his hot spots left even after you drop sign levels in your inflammatory responses go down. The serapis finds its way to that and then actually eats the scar tissue and and breaks it down and moves into your limp. So you with this compound your structurally remodeling the inside of your joints. Every time you take it so it goes in and knocks out a little bit a little bit a little bit so that you're left. With actually less structural media there to get inflamed. Every time you move. And so you just give a tablespoon to your to your dog or cat or your pet morning exactly. Well Yeah Cat's lot less than half a teaspoon. My dogs the one who was a great Pyrenees Golden retriever mix. He was. Structurally not as sound as you would hope a dog would be just because breeding but it made a huge difference. He had gotten to the point where he would try. And hop up on the bed with me have to put his front paws up on the bed and whole himself up and then when he wanted to get down he would put his front paws down on the ground and literally. Just pull himself forward until his hind legs. PLOP down and hit the ground of horrifically depressing so then after I started giving him the sixty which was companion. Sixty is what we call it When it actually went to market which was a couple years after I guess about three or four years after I'd sort of giving it to him it was great within two weeks? He was running and jumping up on the bed. And then turn around and jumping off the bed and you know I would say definitively bought two three years of time which for me was great. You know you've got this thing. Called the hair growth serum do so hair is not something your body preferentially really worries about all that much it kind of is more concerned with survival and your cells functioning and neural function and things like that and cardiac cardiac function but flicker cells if you trigger them from television. Resting phaser cottage in phase. Back into an antigen growth cycle. They will do what they I do. And really you know you can. You can look at dihydrotestosterone conversion rates but might take a little different. I figured if you could up regulate myocardial function inside fully Likud cells. They would do what they want to do. which is just pump out hair and sure enough that that is actually how that works so take it orally topically topically really? Yeah it's just transdermal so very simple and it was actually that came about because my daughter walked in one day and said Dad your hairline is receding and I thought very narcissistic. That's not happening so I rolled out to the lab and whipped it up in a in a literally. I left it on the shelf. I regret my hair and didn't think about it left on a shelf for three years and I was talking to a friend of mine and I said the same thing and he was very balding at the time and Isa wait. Wait roll that back you did a what and I said. Yeah I made this thing in my hair drop. The hair line is a diesel. Haven't said yeah sure and said send it to me so I sent it to him and he started growing his hair and he texted me in two weeks later and said this actually works and I said I know you're a moron. Why are you not putting this out? Why why are you not sharing? But I'm wondering why are you. A billionaire did talk. Sadly maybe it's sick Ford Mustang out there just backed into dodge ram hence the name rampage. Which did you must've sorry about that? No worries it's all good Yeah that's the Ram it really lived up to the name I it's it's never really actually been a focus for better or worse I really. I love helping people. I love solving puzzles it really. That's what drives me and I I think if if if I were probably wedge into a different arena. You know maybe I would focus on that but it really isn't. It's not what doesn't more me. Okay so I have a question for you this stuff supposed to be. I understand a pretty potent antioxidant and anti inflammatory. Are you concerned at all about some some of the research. They've done synthetic vitamin C and vitamin E. E. Like blunting the hormetic response to exercise. Or would it be would concern. We're like synthetically shutting down inflammation too much. Yeah I am actually concerned with that. I you know personally I take it in a way that I illicit Lissette Horn Mesa's response. I I try and not do it completely regularly I cycled a bit as a whole it. It's is proving out to be a selective antioxidant which is different molecular hydrogen right. And there's a ton of work on that right which which they've shown a selective antioxidant is one of the few antioxidants that doesn't blunt exactly. It's all the data that I've been both generating and reading with C.. Sixty it really appears to be similarly Selective antioxidant which is kind of kind of nifty. But for me the jury is still out until I've got something definitive that shows that and I think because I think at this point the science just because there's there's not enough of US researching it. I don't think the scientists quite there so that said I take it one day skip a day two days skip a day five days skipping skipping and then also the other thing that's different is we we list. We did clinical testing with animals. We came up with what was safe and one x rather five x ten twenty and so we put dosages that are normal. I do tremendously large doses but I was going for different just about not everything. Yes I'll tell you a funny story in a second but that's That's probably prudent. I would imagine you know because you sent me a couple of bottles. I'll oh probably start to use it most when I travel. Because that's what I'm exposed like. We're doing solar radiation the most inflammation those stress. I doubt I mean when you've been out here and my peaceful way so I don't need a lot of anti inflammation here but this stuff could come in handy for travel. Sure baby to balance it out because because of the environment here you might want to actually take something. That is a stressor. Maybe drink more I can say I could whip something up to chat a little bit more load on your metabolic. Yeah I'm sure you. He could funny story though. Speaking putting load on me metabolic. -Ly you also sent me. This unlabeled bluebottle texted you. This was like a week ago. What's this shit neuro? Plastic choose any D. and peptides C.. Sixty and capri acid in a AH is like hells yeah. I'll so I I just kind of held the ball up to a mouth and took a swig and probably did that a couple more. Sometimes I I would imagine I probably got about four tablespoons into my system a little bit Arush like shocked and I sat down. Amoun- podcast somebody. So I sat. Did this right before I have my morning smoothie and he said I like started started sipping in my smoothie replying to emails and it was like fifteen minutes t minus fifteen to a podcast. I was supposed to repeal. Fifteen is probably really in my stomach. My stomach goes yeah there we go and I barely made. I sprinted up those stairs right there I barely made it to the bathroom. Gang ganked down my pants and just like sprayed like just a all over and I sat on that for like a half hour. Thank you for saving me from noon to do my coffee that day and I remember I texted you from the toilet makes traffic stuff. I think it was the capella acid. Even whatever you're using it enhances whatever prelic acid form you're using is is working but yeah it was like with the intense diaper pants phenomenon. Yeah see sixty has a tendency to potentiate the effects of things that you normally have broken down and not attract. Yeah yes it it does its job. Yeah even you know you have to build up to it really slowly. Because I've been building up on that same stuff for quite a while. And if you go over over the threshold there is a tablespoon yesterday actually measured and use the tables NFL fine. What is that stuff? Is that also something you sell on your side or is it's like a it's an energy we're about to on me now. It's an energy serum that we're about to start selling and we're doing some testing with it very shortly with the university versa. Because we're we're trying to when I was alluding to the idea of e we can up regulate. ATP WE REALLY UP REGULATE ATP you get very pronounced Spike Cup cup-ties earn it. I won't disclose their yet So speaking of being mister mysterious. I know you're up to allow him wearing and your secret Batman lab for example you and I have chatted back and forth a little bit about depleted water At the time that this podcast that you are listening to right now is released. I probably will have released my podcast. I just record with Dr Thomas Cowan in which we discuss his feelings about the impact of Deedee W on cancer and how effective it could be for cancer. Prevent Jenner cancer therapy this idea of water. That's been depleted of this heavy isotope of deterioration which would normally displace hydrogen in the body. You keep that from happening and you've actually got very cool form of water. That could be quite therapeutic and right now it's expensive to get buy it for ten to twelve bucks. A ball from Romania or Ukraine. They're only three places on the world that actually make it and I also interviewed water researcher Robert Slovak and he talked about t. w. well you and and dd w generators and this whole idea behind. W and then you said that you were looking into. Dwi as well yeah trying to kind of keep up with all the things that might be adjunct therapeutics that really make an impact. Dwi is brilliant in my opinion. I think it's in in addition to the Anti metastatic static formula sixty. I think the introduction of D W will make a huge and pronounced impact it's doing similar functions because it changes the away. Your your Mitochondria are actually able to process right in the in the synthesis process. When you're going through the electron transport chain you actually have on your Mitochondria pieces that are moving at about nine thousand? RPM's and deterioration breaks that it really impacts it negatively. Now when you're a baby or a teenager you actually want determine ferryman your system because it promotes rapid growth. But when you're older it starts to break down your mitochondrial function and if you eliminate it because there's right now we're probably probably exposed to ten to fifteen parts per million more than you would have been ten thousand years from Pesticides Herbicides Radiation Industrialization. Exactly everything kind of combining. It's not the not the best thing for US biologically but because of that similar to see sixty if we lived in a perfect environment if we all had an environment that was really nice and pristine. It wouldn't really be thing that you needed that much. But to combat all the environmental stresses and give your body edge yeah. Dwi think is brilliant I think guys at the DETERIORATE DEPLETED WATER CENTER IN LA. I think the work that they're doing tremendous they also had a project for for the Kito pet sanctuary with their place called in La Deteriorate depleted center. I believe actually all I think I'm supposed to. I'm going to La. Ah next week. I think I might be supposed to be going into that. I'm not for sure because a Lotta Times I just wake up and get on whatever airplane themselves to get on based on what my calendar says but I think I think I'm going down there to do an interview those guys. They're they're great. Actually it's Yeah Q.. Collins and Laszlo boroughs okay. Yeah I would say that Well worth the time to talk to them. I had a lot of questions have you. Have you tested your deteriorate levels not with their determinator. Yes I just ah just looked at it. It's the center for duty depletion and I thoroughly recommend that if everybody has the capacity to do it you know. 'cause guys talked to him giggling eternal. We've test by the way the show knows for those you listening in all linked to ions website all these different c sixty molecules and Dwi and the other stuff we talk about. If you go to Ben Ben Greenfield fitness dot com slash C.. Sixty podcast that's been greenforce dot com slash C.. Sixty podcast so you think. CDW Is is. I think is legitimately legit. Yeah I would recommend that people do it especially people with cancer. I Y- There are just for the average person. I think there's going to be a tremendous impact when people I see things that actually modulate their mind conroe function. It makes a huge difference. You know you talk about the analogy with here is if you were playing tennis. Tennis Ball Canada's his launching tennis balls at you and then suddenly one of them is filled with lead. You know your your return on the ball. Filled with lead is going to be very different than your return on a tennis ball. And Yeah that's what happens analogy. Yeah you're spinning you're spending along at nine thousand Rpm so then you drop something. That's twice the weight of which are intended to be using it. Mechanically breaks things like play baseball. The bowling ball exactly. Yeah interesting what else. Are you researching that you think is is Kinda hot or at least interesting into you hyperthermia. Actually that's saying. Oh kidding yeah I think hyperthermia is GonNa be really profound for people with my story about hyperthermia Serbia now. So I went to the Swiss Alps and I led a two week. Detox retreat there at a place called the Swiss mountain clinic where they use all European biological medicine treatments like liver electrodes that they attach on the front and the back side of the deliver to do some electrical current to improve a paddock function They treat mold mycotoxin lime. They treat cancer. They have all sorts of different injections but then they all have all these different machines from pulse. Selective filled therapy to blood oath. Senators to A hyperthermia I was sitting in the doctor's office. They're waiting for my console because every day during these two weeks you're meeting with physicians trying out protocols KC and I looked up at her shelf and she had a book called hyperthermic treatment for cancer so I started thumbing through the book. And I've I've victor out a little bit with the used the Sauna for heat shock proteins. And have this biomet that I sleep on for my naps. Upstairs and a lot of Korean literature came from that kind of alluding to the beneficial effects of Hypothermia on killing cancer and This physician's desk manual had a ton of very compelling research on it. I'd never seen before on hyperthermic treatments for cancer and I asked her about the treatments they do there and they have this full-on hyperthermic unit. And I don't have cancer but I told her that I was very curious. I I was very interested in just seeing what this thing felt like so she scheduled the time for me and this was during the heatwave. This this was four months ago during the heat. Wave in in Europe says one hundred and seven degrees in the Swiss Alps and the way the protocol goes is. I you got on a bicycle and a non air conditioned little gym they have next to the hyperthermic hyperthermic facility. And you're supposed to get your heart rate up and get your body temperature up to kind of prime the pump Su. I'm standard cross box. You do some aspirin. Go bigger. Go home that was pretty. I helped on that bike and just jammed for thirty minutes like eyeballs pop out my sockets. I'm like from we get so I'm dripping with sweat. By the time I get off that thing and then I I call the nurse and I'm like I got my thirty minutes. And so she says follow me and she walks me into this room. And there's like this pod right this pod that the essentially you put your whole body into just your head is sticking out and she put a rectal throw a rectal WPRO a rectal thermometer in and apparently for cancer you WANNA get up to forty one to forty three degrees. I'm going to say this in Celsius because that's yeah that's what we were talking about at the time and that that's what all the equipment was showing in the room so she put the probe in an all ready from being on the bike. I think Homeo- statically were at what thirty eighty five something like that. Yeah so you're taking it up to about one. Oh seven of US inducing fever so thirty eight from. I'm doing the bike ride. And so you lay there. You get inside this thing and it is like the worst most claustrophobic sauna. You can't move your arms. Can't move your legs. It's just your heads sticking out because it kill brain cells if your head was in there and you just lay there and there's like a little like DVD player on the on the pod that would theoretically theoretically allow you to like maybe watch a movie or I'm sure because the environment you want to be and we shall. I told the nurse puts. She's like no his broken the shit in there and I'm watching the temperature climb in climbing it. Hits hits about thirty nine and my heart rate's already oh I'm I'm Sheila. I'm doing high intensity interval training session on on an Aerodyne bike or something so the more or less than hit. The nurse has like the little flexible plastic Straw with a little glass bottle and she just keeps coming over to me. Turn my head SIP. That water turned my head back because I can literally feel myself just filling in filling with a pool of my own sweat. Sweat my body inside this hyperthermic chamber and then when I hit about thirty nine and a half she just starts basically putting ice towel after ice towel after is toll on my head to keep my my brain from suffering the effects fever. Because you've got to keep the head cool and I started counting to twenty over. You're in over and over again just to deal with the extreme discomfort heat pain and high heart rate from that thing. I got up to forty one and a half degrees and I. I didn't kick the CAN I. I basically I backed out. This was two and a half hours in and I'm like I'm good. I'm good because I literally could like. I'm I'm a masochist role in with a Turkey baster. I mean they know and then I'm like I need to go jump in the cold shower because they're up in the Swiss Alps in the water does get pretty cold there. She's like no no shower that that we go bad idea lay in bed for four hours with this induced fever. Sweating my ass off passing in and out of consciousness laying on my bed continuing to just like saturate the bed with sweat and thought going through my head as la. There was basically twofold. Never GonNa do that again if I had cancer. I actually probably would be highly motivated enough to do that but again like I would have to have cancer and just imagining Mike Cancer cells dying as I did that hyperthermic treatment. So we'll see that whole body hyperthermia army and that's that's intense. I I am kind of a fan of localized hyperthermia. You're going to introduce so in use hyperthermia. What are you thinking of? I'm thinking of using something like rf or something like that to induce hypothermia in a localized environment like liver tumors or something like that. Go in and use a one hundred megahertz ultrasound sound and realized that's actually one of the machines are using was called Indaba for the liver. Yeah yeah those those seem to be. I've read a lot of literature lately and they seem to be really profound and I do think I mean if you just think through the process of what do I need to do to get this out in a specific area in my case assuming you know oh how you can stop metastatic spread. Then you want to be able to treat it in that one spot in hyperthermia localized hyperthermia again. Seems like a great approach. Okay got hit it from all fronts so we got. We got vape pens that do not harm the lungs. Yeah by the way are those. Are Those available. Knows they are not that was. That was more like a eh good idea. We've got using using epetedo onto de scale the pineal gland up C. Sixty combined with some of these things like olive oil syrup. Today's co Q.. Ten some of the cool formulations you're working on and the hair growth serum you've got determined clearwater localized hyperthermia a lot of cool things. Anything the interesting that you're up to. Yeah there's there's a whole host of things that I probably really ought not talk about yet but yeah we're you're safe. No one can find your. Yeah I figured the Internet. It's the most the most anonymity you can afford. A person live broadcasting on the Internet. Now I probably that's probably enough. Okay Okay Gotcha. So with C.. Sixty just a few more logistical questions. DOSAGE IS GONNA vary based on body weight yet based on body weight eight and metabolic conditioning. I mean if you're in great shape like what I would tell you is you could do the same thing. You're far better shape than I am so two tablespoons up at you know if I were you I'd probably do three or four. That we're GONNA hit a balance really rapidly and then you'd notice the effects quickly and one word of caution though is they can super precipitate your skeletal muscles so you. If you do mega dosing you have to be very cautious and conscious be conscious of your movements because you can move too much weight. You'll get a signal across and little fire more of your muscle normally your brain down regularly firing to twenty two thousand a fourteen year old halo and they make the the head worn device that induces neuro plasticity also enhances motor neuron activation. Listen and you actually need to be careful if you put before an intense way training workout because you can actually recruit so many motor neurons that that the e centric Eric Muscle tissue damage. That leaves you sore for a long time so you have to be mentally prepared for. That's exactly right and mental preparation I built in it for myself and this was a couple of years ago just to try and see what kind of responses I could elicit before halo was thing and I ended up burning to patches into my scalp where I had to very large large rectangular patches sexy it was hot literally okay so so pre workout. You could actually take three or four tablespoons US need to be prepared for. Yeah you've got to be very cognizant of how much you're actually moving because if you can normally move one hundred pounds. Suddenly you have the capacity to move three hundred pounds just is because if you do that much recruitment you'll hurt yourself your body's not designed for that so it kind of puts you in the driver's seat a little bit. I doubt you could go from one. Hundred three hundred pounds sounds. That's a jump that's like saying like I mean that's like saying somebody who's doing it. Three hundred pounds walk into a four hundred pound squad. Well Review if you think about the really all it takes is if your brain is shunting your response so that you can only get twenty five to thirty percent capacity firing and then suddenly you're able to get sixty percent incapacity firing you effectively doubled. Yeah what you can do and if you take too much and you suddenly you're going to electrically you're stimulating one hundred percent of your muscle missile firing. It's effectively like fight or flight. And so you're going to. You're going to cap out at what you can normally do. Which is about three times what you would be able to do? Normally which again and I would not recommend. But it's just a matter of firing which I'm GonNa take this stuff and put on the halo headset and then go to the gym. I got to be on a plane. Eulogy I'm playing to Mama then. I'm in the gym this afternoon. We'll do it up. Yeah I'll give you some feedback your websites a link to that in the show donuts but that's where people can get just regular old C.. Sixty yeah they could get this stuff we just which is the c sixty with the syrup today. Some kind of like the joint support stuff in it. Yeah I know are you got another one that has called revitalize rejuvenate juvenile and. That's more for what it's actually geared for women in just anyone who's really working it has hyrog- acid in it and it's geared for cell holly onic acid supple skin. Okay Okay Cool and then you've got the one for pets and then the

cancer researcher US Ben Greenfield scientist Japan Dr Barry Morgan Dan Mitchell partner Ben G Bill Clinton Djelic Irwin California Russia Oklahoma Buckminster Minster. fullerene
 Dave Asprey : ON How To Build A Young Brain And Body For Life

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

1:20:04 hr | 1 year ago

Dave Asprey : ON How To Build A Young Brain And Body For Life

"The idea of hacking is that you can take control of a system. You can manipulate it without understanding. What's inside you test inputs outputs so that actually works really well and biology algae? But it's not. What medicine does it's a different thing? It's what bodybuilders do. It's what the anti-ageing commuters it's what Navy Seals do. That's what people own resources due to the race horses. So how do we apply that to ourselves. Hey one welcome back to on purpose. The number one health podcast in the world. Thanks to each and every single one of you thank you for coming back every single week to listen to learn and to grow and you know that my commitment to each and every one of you is to find and connect with guests that I believe can help you increase your performance your productivity and live happier healthier. thea lives and today's guest is going to do just that now. I've been waiting for this conversation for quite a long time. I can't wait to dive into Dave's mind because it fascinates fascinates me when I'm looking at it from afar or through common mutual friends. We have but for those of you. Who Don't know Dave asprey? Here's what I wanted to know. Dave is the founder and CEO of bulletproof three sixty creative bulletproof coffee two time New York Times bestselling author the host of the way award winning podcast. Bulletproof Radio Serial Serial Entrepreneur and global change agent Davis dedicated over two decades of his life identifying and working with world renowned doctors scientists and innovators eight is to uncover the most advanced methods for enhancing mental and physical performance. Today he'll be sharing what it means to be super human. Mr Mr Bulletproof himself. Dave actually thank you for being here. It's finally here likewise I'm super happy to be in show. Thanks for having me. Yeah absolutely. I'm so excited they. We're talking about your new book. Superhuman came out a couple of months ago and I'm finally here with Dave bulletproof planned age backward and maybe even live forever. I love that. So we're going to put the link in the Commonwealth so make sure you're going. Grab a copy of the book if you enjoyed today's conversation but Dave I'm going to start off somewhere probably very different to where people start. What would you bet your European player you know yesterday I jus- kicks? TV Okay is Asset Ping No. That's a good scurry. Okay tell that's how it went down. Was it a was it a clear wash out or was it is like how that serves spin like that but the cool thing was. He's a bio hacker to and is that as as place. I just did an episode with him and so he was already like picking up the thing is he. He got a few shots back but it was pretty fun. Yeah is there anyone who's ever been Utah. It's just sun ever be my son kick my ass okay and it. It sounds crazy. I started when he was five and I'd play left hand. I'm not left handed. Just so we could be fair. And as he improved his kids have neuro plasticity like no one else to keep up with him. I run into electrical current over my the halo headset. And if I do that it slows the ball down coming neo from the Matrix and then we're pretty much even so depending on the day all went halftime at the time. But I mean he's a little killer on that and and he's ten fifteen if you'll to keep doing that but I think so I've got a pretty mean Ping Pong game and when I test my brain on the neuroscience stuff from my nurses this company I have the response time in my brain of a twenty year olds and it. linearly goes up with age in part of superhuman the aging thing. Now I've got the data shows. I have a twenty twenty year olds brain and it's awesome because I can keep up otherwise I wouldn't. That's incredible. I can't wait to test that I I'd love to my brain is every pre whose brain has fascinated eighty two most. You've tested. His brain is a lot of times. I there's confidentiality. This is forty years old. He didn't have to tell me. Got It yeah okay so so this. This is a a neuroscientist. Five Day intensive program in Seattle custom hardware software Clinical grade stuff to see what's going on in there and then to performance tune it like a race car dr for your brain and we've had some of those spiritual leaders from South America come through One of the guys really fascinating actually. He's public public about this Dr Barry Morgan. He's one of twelve living grandmasters of loud zoos. Oral Heritage and He's spoken at the bulletproof conference and Just a good friend bounce show a couple of times so this guy is doctor. Strange literally he went to the the monastery. They interviewed him before they wrote. Oh doctor strange and he. He's has these abilities that works with Tony Robbins and works with me before I go on stage and things like that and some presidents presidents. Our country's Kinda guy so you look at his brainwaves. This is not a normal human being and some guys like him if he turns earns it. Up All the way hill fuzz out the gear. Literally you're looking at brainwaves and all that stuff and all of a sudden you can't get a clean signal and this is something intrinsic in our biology. Talk talk about real superhumans. You look at the people who are way outliers. Those who were the most interesting thing happens. Because how do we take you and me. And how do we turn up Our ability to do that because we all have that in us and that was one of the reasons. I want to write this book. It might take a few decades as so you're going to need more decades or you might cheat. That's in what I'm doing on the neuroscience I love that yeah no I. I'm excited to share weeks. When my books from a ton of research on the minds of monks we have a lot of similarities? There and I'm fascinated by how monks meditations can switch like you're saying on and off like a switch just from compassionate empathy to focus the disciplined disciplined without even a second of WOM- up and we've been studying this for thirty forty years but traditional neuroscience is all about seizures and surgery and things like that but ah now in the neuro feedback category. We know what's a carrier wave. We know what's happening down at Delta and it was happening Alpha in meditators versus a monk and the reason that my program is forty years. Zen Is. It's meant to replace forty years of daily practice of meditation because Hurry Meditate Faster. There's nothing wrong with that. That's incredible and and how. How have you seen the results combat? It it's ridiculous what you ended up with if you were to spend all that time studying and I've been to Tibet to learn meditation from the Masters. In fact I I had Yak butter tea. which was the inspiration? We're bulletproof coffee in Tibet. When I was there to learn meditation and stuff is more powerful? Some something happened with this weird mixing tea or making butter and things but you you look at what happens. There is while you learn. There's seven layers of Hal and all this wisdom and depending on whether you're looking at a Hindu perspective are Buddhists perspective or you know there's other traditional Chinese things or there's European so there's all these lineages inheritance and Chamonix training and all these things and and I've I've had a chance to to learn some of those but but there's wisdom and there's the felt state and what you can do is you can achieve felt state using the tools of breathing tools. Meditation Nation Tools of neuro feedback. And you can be there but without at least some guidance you might not know where you are you just know it feels really different and you can blow your mind open. Yeah absolutely and I've noticed I think for a lot of people who come from non spiritual traditions backgrounds a lot of this gray alta just Giving them a window into the fact that this exists and is possible and I think the felt stay is a much more tangible experience for them to believe that. It's not just some elusive thing. But it's it's rea- I didn't believe any of this computer science computer hacker three hundred pounds. Come up from a family of engineers in any owner. Believe this is clearly stupid. That's how I was dressed and when you feel something there's a signal in here that might be useful in euros. It's actually not just useful. It's Hackel and you can choose the felt state state and you can use that to sense the world around you and to connect with people and things. It was a pretty big awakening for me. But it's part of the path and what I discovered discovered and the reason I went down the bulletproof path at the same time doing for years. Then if you WANNA do personal development you WanNa meditate you improve your brain doing it on French. Fries doesn't it doesn't work. You have to get your biology in order because if your cells don't make energy it's sub cellular components that that drive most of your fault state and if they're running a half power how you can have enough energy to wake up your have whatever you have in the morning take care of of of yourself take care of your family and your community and had time and energy leftover to do the deep personal work too if you let go of a childhood thing or reach a new state of performance. No you're too tired because your cells didn't work so eat right and then do the meditative practice and you'll get more results in less time. So there's three types of people. Some people set goals only to give up on them when things get difficult. Others don't set goals the tool thinking invite unsettling goes. I can't fail them. He had there are still others. NONNI set goals and resolutions for managed to meet them time and time again. How do they do it? Are they superhuman. No they're regular people just like you and me. Dave just discovered something resolutions. Sion's don't work non-road Anyway. Resolutions require action but without intentionally doing the work to shift your mindset. You you'd find yourself failing and falling back into old patterns of door and behavior when things get tough. Let me say that again without intentionally doing the work look to shift your mindset. You find yourself falling back into old patterns off to end the heavier but I can show you how to break that cycle for good good. There are five intentions that a make or break for achieving your goals and being able to set resolutions with confidence awake attention attitude attraction and accountability. But how do you start. How do you practice these intentions in a way that creates lasting change? I'd enough to show you join me for free online workshop on the five intentions for a purpose food year in this workshop. I'll be teaching you exactly. How Oh you can put these five intentions to work in your life tell you confidently set and achieve your goals? I I'll show you how waking up early is the a key to a purpose food life and how to set up healthy nighttime routines second. We'll go over. How multitasking is actually hurting? Not Helping your productivity activity and are putting your attention on one thing at a time actually helps you do more than you think. Third breakdown three things. We need to remove from our attitude in order to grow forth. Teach you how to use the concept of attraction to enhance who we already are instead of worrying about who you on finally early you learn how important accountability and a supportive community are to growth. I would absolutely love to have you join me. You can sign up right right now by visiting J. Shetty dot me forward slash purpose. I'll send you an invitation to join. And what's the workshop right. Then let me just will be there for you Jay Shetty dot Mi Ford slash purpose. Let's make twenty twenty your best year yet and you went through to 'cause you were twenty two three eight hundred pounds. I was three hundred pounds. Yeah exactly tell tell us about that journey just before we dive into all of this incredible insight. Tell us about that journey transition of when you came to the point where you ally there is more out there but even before that this. What I'm doing my biology is in good for me? It's really weird. Anyone who's fat will will tell got some of they know their fat because we have a mere scale penske getting tight. What would I do here and then you say well? I'm going to try to do something and trying finds you. Something is already presupposing failure. I call it a weasel word in my books and what you end up with. Is You. Sarah I'm GonNa do a supposed to work and anyone one who's ever written anything says Oh we must be meet robots. Therefore it's calories in calories out so I did that. I worked out for an hour and a half affidavit. Six days a week for eighteen months was that Hud was fired. And although exercises addictive when you do you get the endorphins you get a rush rush from it. So it's hard to stop exercising in there. I know people are addictive. I I can't do it these I gotta go. That's not a healthy state right. That means you're you're stuck with the endorphins. The runner's high whatever and for me. I went on a low fat low calorie diet at the end of this. I still three hundred pounds. I could Max out the machines. It wasn't the hundred pounds of muscle I was covering flab. I still was a forty six inch. Waist I'm a thirty three inch waist right now and I just I looked it said. Maybe it's because the meeting too much lettuce that that was my. It's because I'm not trying to us. Yeah it seriously. All my friends are eating double western Bacon cheeseburgers and I'm eating the salad salad with chicken and no dressing and hungry just so hungry and I'm just putting all my willpower into this and I don't care if I'm sick on a curve final exams I'm GonNa go to the gym and I just sense a failure but it became as a self worth problem and then I said one day. I'm actually doing all this. I am not getting the results. It must be what I'm doing doesn't work and then you start digging. In the research I started trying all the different variations on diets. Edson went really deep on the corners of Internet. And this is back in the late nineties. You use the Internet for this kind of stuff. But I'd find weird researchers than I would just test it all because I was the computer science building the Internet as we know it pretty sure that I just hack this meat body and the idea of hacking is that you can take. Hey Control of a system you can manipulate it without understanding. What's inside you test inputs outputs so all right that actually works really well in biology? But it's not what medicine. Listen does it's a different thing. It's what bodybuilders do what the anti-ageing community has its navy seals do and that gets what people who own resources do to the resources so how do we apply that to ourselves selves and I said all right. I'm going to get over this childhood. Arthritis minute since I was fourteen and I found out later when I reverse I engineer did on. I lived in house than toxic mold and poisons the Mitochondria my body so I repaired that damage and said wait. There's there's always new levels the things I can do where I didn't think I'd look the way I look. I'd feel the way I feel a bill to do what I do. And I can. And I continuously getting empower and younger and faster. My brain works better I just mentioned a ping pong to see the actual data and to see the scan. Oh have eighty he's seven th percentile hippocampal volume hippocampus in the brain. Look I sorta fatted sick if I can do this. I'm pretty sure this would have started out reasonably healthy with a normal body weight. Normal biology has huge advantages. But everyone listening to this right now. You're thinking okay how I feel now how I've always felt that's pretty much normal but you're totally wrong. That's just what you've experienced but if you could feel five times better in ten times more energy you would never Renault because you never felt it so our job is to just teach people. Here's the tools to tap into it in the least possible amount of time and money. Because it's there I know it's there there. It's not unlikely for health experts to say it's okay to eat list of foods and the following year. It's totally unhealthy unhealthy. It's difficult to know what protocol to follow when it comes to getting all your vital nutrients to keep you a one hundred percent. 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One of safety and security go to simplisafe dot com forward slash on purpose today to get free shipping on your order plus a sixty day money back guarantee that simply safe S. I m. p. l. i. Safe Dot Com forward slash on purpose to save on home security. And it feels like that's the energy that experimentation at that stage is led to now this decisional aspiration to one eight one hundred eight years old like why why why one hundred and eighty specifically. Because I'm sure some math behind that I'm assuming and why why want to live Zong anyway for you. It's at least one hundred and eighty. I don't WanNa put a cap. Okay okay now. The math is really straightforward. We know we can do one twenty because we've seen it and those people they drink. They smoke they went through. See what's happening hundred. Twenty years go. It was nineteen hundred. There's no cars that have been invented yet. There's no microwaves world. World War. One World War Two haven't happened. Antibiotics haven't been discovered DNA. They couldn't even spell it back then. Yeah the Krebs cycle from GRAMATICA. We didn't know much at all. About how our bodies work and they still lived honored twenty. Yeah okay but they weren't exposed as much drama as we are no. They had more trauma. When we did exposure they had more trauma literally in the world? Yeah but not necessarily exposure on a daily basis. Do you know the odds of having one of your siblings die hundred twenty years ago the reason you had five or six kids is because a couple of more gonNA make it redundant array of inexpensive kids. They invented it back then. In fact we have been in that in society back then so people who grew up with their family members dying. You didn't know if come you can call them on their cellphone. Someone gets on a boat. They don't come back you don't maybe you'll get a letter. Three months later. People disappeared all the time. It was a pretty shitty time. Oh we didn't even talk about polio. Talking about all the diseases that just white people people out. That generally don't get us anymore. You go to the doctor. They're going to cut your arm off with rusty saw like this is the state people live one hundred twenty now now. I'm just going to have to say how are you. I'm thirty two thirty two all right. So what's going to one hundred twenty years from now given that we can rely on the Internet. We can look at pubmed. I couldn't write these books each of the books. The superhuman book would have been a lifetime of research in a library using microfiche card catalogues on this crap crap. But the fact that I can pull together this information and I have the weird brain that synthesizes it and I can talk to these experts. All of this is enabled by technology in the last twenty years. Do you think that we can't add fifty percents of the maximum lifespan. Over the next hundred and fifty for one hundred forty eight years like put it on your future hat and realize exponential rates of growth. You have a very good chance of living way way. Way Beyond one hundred eighty if they're still soil on the planet if a comment doesn't hit us right and if essentially we take care of the world enough so that that's the big one that's the world enough but here's the the other reason that we need more highly energetic old people in all societies that I studied and it's like the first chapter of superhuman a talk about the quest for immortality is something that's happened as long as we've had recorded history going back to the Egyptians going back to the alchemists going back to the Hindu traditions the Chinese traditions Kansas South American traditions. They've all been searching for this. And things like Taoism are tied directly towards that quest for. How do I live forever as a highly functioning in highly energetic evolve person? Well we've always had village elders. So what would happen is the young monks would go into the monastery and the eighty year. Old Lama will look at them and say all right. Here's what we've learned. I learned this from my elders and I learned it from my elders in fact allows tradition five thousand years of unbroken oral. History passed down from the elders. Well elders today. Unfortunately a lot of them Alzheimer's Disease Heart Attacks Retirement homes and we started interesting our elders rather than as sources of knowledge and wisdom the people who can guide us the best. We started seeing them as tubes monitors diapers wheelchairs and expenses dances. And that's actually never happens all of history. It hasn't had to this so I go to my way to interview people who are over ninety 'cause man they've got fifty years on me. And what did they learn that. I'm probably going to learn. In what can they. What pain can I avoid from listening to them? What I like them to be a hundred and twenty money and still have fully functioning vibrant lives so I could learn even more and they could share heck out with the world? Needs that plus J if you're going to live for hundreds of years more you aren't going to throw the plastic bottle on the ocean. You realize. Oh my God I better not shit in my own sandbox ochsner because I'm going to be in the sandbox for very long time I'm not going to hand it off to the next generation. The way currently the boomers are getting blamed. And it's funny because the boomers are saying well wait. We inherited World War. One World War Two from you old people. But they're all dead so we can't let you anymore we just keep going back and back and they're saying we inherited this from the civil war it it just it it goes. It goes back forever we always inherit this but the scope of inheritance is going to change in anyone who has kids is unlikely to say you know. I'd like to have kids three times throughout. Got My two hundred years there. You're going to have kids. You're going to put so much energy in life into them the way all parents do right. You're going to enjoy seeing them flourish. But we're not gonNA worry about an overpopulation problem and the data supports. I'm saying very very clearly Japan. US Most Western countries. The birth rate has gone down populations are declining. And so is the fertility rate. So we don't have to worry about. Global population is fifty years. I won't be a problem I've been three. I'm fascinated visited. The reason is because it's we're talking about also and I want to get your thoughts on this because I think we were talking about different things that you're talking about oversee. The physical abilities have increased with the rise of mental health. No even even if it is less trauma the way we're able to process traumatic events or tragedy tragedies or challenges seems to be struggling really. It's funny just I'm just yeah just throwing it out about trauma I know negative at all. I'm just trying to doesn't sound negative. Your there's a documentary That come out. They came out presents called. They shall not grow old diamonds in it. It's about World War One. Oh my God. The toughness the resilience of these guys. It's unimaginable it in the interview. People who are still alive from World War One but they show footage and and they they tell these stories in in your saying no human walk in the face today could do with these guys dead exactly. So isn't that a challenge in lasting longer because if the resilience Winston Grit with so much more higher than that people could lose their family member of the family room never came back from the boat but they never did. They have the mental health and they never talked about it then they can share in social media like or did they just not did they just not feel it whereas today where or at least sensitive and everything else it but how you felt this matters much it was how you showed up in the world so they they'd had crammed down. I don't know how happy they were. There's were veterans. People knew that people came back from orange. But there's also there was a community and there's something else that happens most of the time time if you took a big hit to the head you just died now. We have a lot more traumatic brain injury people who survive horrific injuries who come back with more trauma but our technologies analogies for dealing with trauma even some science stuff the things that are big focus from forty years of Zen. And you deal with nutritionally you put him in hyperbaric chamber. You can heal almost any emotional trauma and so many physical traumas. The problem is when a physical trauma ties to an emotional trauma. It doesn't work. You can also precondition Asian people a lot of a lot of times. People just don't know about the research some called heart rate variability. It's a core part of what what I teach people. This is how how to change the spacing between heartbeats when you're relaxed in a meditative state you have a higher change in the spacing between Arby's same number beats per minute but the pattern of the beach changes well if you teach soldiers to do this before they go into combat or kids before they get bullied doesn't really matter if your body thinks it's the same thing you actually don't walk away from that with PTSD. Yet you can precondition for it so what. We can teach resilience. And I wasn't necessarily surly highly resilient but I am now and this is just missing from our curriculum correct. It is a neuroscience state. It's it's You can define it it you can measure it. You can quantify it and then you can put a moral judgment there. There shouldn't be a mom judgment. Yeah yeah you know it used to be able to go to church and you know you've been bad or what whatever the pattern of your church was but people now are abandoning religion. Religion provided some of that the prayer before your meal. You don't have to pray to a specific. Dd that someone told you had to but you can provide a sense of gratitude attitude. which is the real nugget there without gratitude? You can't forgiveness without gratitude. Use staying fighter flight so you can program these things exam but what has grudge it actually look like in the brain and in the heart you can measure those and you can look I consider across from you with your wired up and I can say you're you're actually not feeling grateful. You said you grateful and you lied to yourself and hold you accountable to that. That is amazing. Yeah I do I love that too and and I and I hope that one day we can have that next. We know we're not lying to ourselves. It's fun being allied to take further people. But that's better being a lie detector for ourselves and that's why we have coaches. That's where we have. GROOVES is yes we have friends. The problem is that you're very likely to get angry at a friend or coach when they really call you out on your bs Agra your phone yeah all right. Are you going to fix the data the data. And that's what I do. It's one of the most important impactful things in my life has been. The forty years is then trained in. Where when I do that if there's something that I'm hiding for myself I'm not gonNA know it? I'M GONNA look in the deny it and you're GONNA do the same thing to me because our ability to look inside ourselves as very low but when you have a mirror mirror right here Yo have spent my teeth. But you're not gonNA know IOS finishing schedule you and let's really closely. Yeah exactly what I love about you though when I'm hearing you speak and I've never I guess I guess you don't when you meet someone. You unearth things differently. And it's like you really have this great jokes to position between wisdom and science which I think so powerful and beautiful and you started off there and I think when it's either or it can get slightly law. Sometimes they have to ally and one of the reasons I created this field of biohacking and it's now a word in the dictionary in twenty eighteen. They added it to Miriam Webster. My Name's in there and I could have this big conference around it as I wanted to take the data that we can now get for the first time ever things about hurry variability neuroscience and some called the expert zome which is the measure of all the things you're exposed to in your environment over the course of your life that changes your genetics. Go the data's that will never actually collect all of it. It's like a real a full-sized map of California isn't very useful. Because as big as the state right yet but we're able to gather so much data that we can now validate things like in the the book before superhuman. I wanted to test a daoist equation. The guys who are looking to live forever and they say flat out. If you're a guy and you wanna live forever. You should use this equation to control. How frequently you Because it'll make you old if you too much and I looked at that and said that's complete complete BS. I have to test and disprove this BS and I ended up publishing a years worth of data and I interviewed other experts in the field and IT turns out for guys. There really is orgasm hangover and what announcing have less sex. I'm just saying decide how often you're gonNA Jackie late. I would have said the data would not support fat and what I'm finding is the more I dig deep in Shimada acknowledge and you say how could that possibly work. And then I go and I look at the neuroscience of it like Oh my God God. These people couldn't using our language and our tech. They couldn't explain correct four out time but they learned by watching for generations and their elders handed off and handed gough and one of the coolest things I can think of in the space. The lady who discovered the opiate receptor in the brain massive. transformative thing her her name is candace. Pert and I'm I'm sad. She passed a right before. I could interviewer and in her book she writes about how after maybe twenty years careers being hardcore Western scientists atheists. Just rejecting anything. That might be energetic. She started realizing maybe after attention to this. Because there's something else going on. And and she met this group of Shamans and she tried to explain to them what the opiate receptors were and then the guy says something and they all laugh and then she asked the translator and the transition other laughing because they said Ha she thinks these molecules actually exist there. Ah allow it's crazy it. Toby talking about that. Tell me about the one hundred twenty thousand dollar style makeover of the stem cell makeover. Douse with Dr Harry Allison in Park City to break down what that is in why you saw a bit more abundant in. I write about the details of stem cells. And what's it's happening now and what you can get for five thousand dollars versus in this one hundred. Twenty thousand dollars is at the very high end of what's possible. It's the most intensive stem cell procedure. That you can do right now. What I did is I lay down a put you under a sedation? But not under these. Yeah and they pull bone marrow and people will go so painful headed done when I was on sedated. It's not that big of a deal. It just feels really ought even facebook did head of facebook live video like this. I didn't I couldn't do the This procedure because I was unconscious one before that that I did just to see what the components would be and I've done stem cells a variety of times different technologies. That are that are out here and they pull the bone marrow. They pull your own fat They can get the stem cells out of it and then they go through and depending on which part of the body starting at the toes every joint they inject themselves into the joint so the joints stay young. I'M GONNA be around for hundreds of years so I would like to be walking around under my own power. I've had three knee surgeries before I was twenty three and and so I want to be highly functional forever. I don't want to be an Cain when I'm old and then a Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon. WHO's been on my show Marcel? She she flies up for it and she threads a Kenya inside the spines. They've dripped my own stem cells inside my spine. And they are tracked into areas that are inflamed and they turn off inflammation and turn on growth So they inject every Vertebra then. Do the face hair male reproductive organs and I have facebook live. That made it another another time. That was funny without showing anything you can't UNSEE and you wake up four hours later. Going just happened. But the re growth and the the rejuvenation happens six nine months later as the tissues themselves turnover and you get younger. That's at the very cutting edge. But if you just have a a lot of new pain or an injury that won't heal. I did all that stuff. Three years ago is themselves. I had this thing in my right shoulder. It's gone all these things from my body that you accumulate over time When we're young we ought to go mountain? biking sure I'll play soccer. Even though he's a bone fragments sticking out my thigh. I just one more absolutely. Yeah and you pay for it later And then you can reverse it and that's what I did. That's what what level of when you when I'm hearing that someone who's not had any of those prices. Speaking on behalf of most of the audience I get done. What level of risk are you comfortable with? Have you researched this to so much depth that you when you do this you like. I'm not experimenting toil because there's very little risk like risk. Do you feel comfortable with. I talk about return on investment as the primary Lens. I'm looking I look for for anything I do. How much energy do I put into doing something? And there's how much time and there's how much money do I put into it. And then what's the return. I'm looking for and dying is the return. I'm not looking for the problem. So is that if you just do what you're doing now you're risk is probably eighty percents. That one of the four killers from superhuman are GONNA get you. It's Cardiovascular Disease Cancer Alzheimer's disease or type two diabetes. So you pretty much have an eighty percent chance of doing those. Yeah and that those all come with twenty plus years of suffering before you die and you're not in charge of yourself when you die so the crappy worst odds ever so. How willing are you to take risks to avoid that? I'm willing to take a few risks. But they're not stupid risks. I'm in a room. I've got one of the top trained neurosurgeons out there doing a procedure. The risks are exceptionally low. When you have that? I'm I'm not doing anaesthesia. I'm doing sedation. So the risks are low and the returns are more energy now more energy for the decades. More time I'm gonNA live and As I age I will age differently than baseline human models and that is very precious. And if there's a risk of one in the fifty thousand of something really bad happening one in fifty thousand maybe one in ten thousand. I don't know but I will tell you that if you're popping advil right now you're facing those same kind of risks. We're all facing risk all the time we don't know about because we never get to Italy. I in fact I gotta go back to those full of French fries. It causes more inflammation in your body than and smoking a cigarette for a longer period of time. You probably ought to not do either one of those but most people listening to this. Yeah I'm talking to you the French as good. I'll eat them right. Have you done the risk analysis on that behavior. No because it's normal and can we talk about cancer and alcohol. That's good yeah just go to pubmed. which is the database of all these studies that is and look at the relationship between touring now con cancer? It is not good for you. And you're saying oh I'm so worried that I do the stem cell procedure. That could make me feel really good and fix that that that join that hip or that back pain that they might want to use my spine for. I'm going to go spend five thousand dollars doing that. Oh I could never do that. It's too risky is too expensive. You spend five grand on wine line this year coffee. Yeah well that's worth I mean come on but The that whole thing okay. Okay you spent that same amount of money on something that we know contributes to cancer or and I'm not picking wind specifically just alcohol as a metabolisms increased risk by the way I actually had soccer last night. It's not guy never drink. I can tell you I took supplements that turn off the negative effects of it when I did that but you you can still enjoy life but people are not very good at doing risk math and when you look at those two things you spent the same amount of money on things that are vaguely pleasurable and vaguely bad for you or you could have done something. That was a step step up in your performance. I know what I'm going to choose. I'm going to skip the French fries. I'm an occasionally have really good wine. That's expensive instead of a lot of cheap wine and I'm the simpsons. Yeah no and it comes back down to what what we've of not not Hans set about wanting familiar pain versus unfamiliar pain. And we'd rob have familiar pain of everything that our ancestors have had family members who have had so. We have some familiarity with it whether cancer Alzheimer's we feel. Oh yeah it's kind of something we've all had we feel whereas the unfamiliar pain of I don't know what that looks like is so much more scary even though like you said very clearly and statistically that actually are odds are not good anyway and that's that's the that's the argument that that hits me the most is that in so many areas in my life. I'm convinced that the way we've always done it is is rarely the right way. It one of the things you learn if you if you go to any ancient yeah practice lineage. Look we'RE GONNA die. Why and even when I talk to my immortals friends you know the Super Long Development Upload Myself Internet newsflash the universal collapsing on itself sometime? We're all GONNA. I have to get used to that and a lot of people. Oh sorry that's just a fact of life. The question is how much suffering do you want to do before you die. That's really what we're redoing and for me. I actually don't like suffering. It's amazing but discomfort is different than suffering. So anytime you do something that makes your brain or your body evolve it will involve discomfort but suffering comes when you resist the discomfort Y- and understanding alright. I'm feeling a lot of emotional discomfort right now but it doesn't mean I'm suffering and struggling. It means I'm accepting and all right. It's a signal so I'm lifting this heavy thing. I'm really sore the next day. That was the cost of growth. I'm facing my fears and I'm doing it anyway and I feel like I'm GonNa Shit my pants and I'm going to do it anyway and I'm going to see what happens. That's how our brain evolves were wired to. It did to focus on things that don't push us yes because that's biology yes Once you decide you're going to take charge and you're going to push yourself you say all right. Maybe I will live of two hundred eight maybe a little beyond one hundred eighty or maybe I'll just ask someone out who I'm really afraid to ask about. Why the Hell you free to ask the whistle? Say No it. It's the same as saying look. Do you like pizza or Chinese if I like pizza like DART. I'd like Chinese. We're not compatible. It's not a judgement on you but if you don't ask you don't know. Yeah but people have all all this crazy programming their heads. I got rid of most of my crazy programming just through these processes and I don't think I could have the power to do that if I hadn't have just got my base biology working with food and so we get wrapped up in all these fears and resistance things but really the simplest lows lows hanging fruit. Here is just eat the stuff that makes your brain work and then you'll start being comfortable pushing yourself otherwise just too tired of Bush off absolutely. Let's talk about I wanted to seven pillars has the makers Olga. But before we do that. Let's talk about because you mentioned in now some of the foods that are good for our brain that a basic that anyone can start doing today and which ones to remove too. Because we've already what do you got. The ACA is in alcohol. Anything deep fried and it doesn't matter if it's Brussels sprouts. Sorry especially at a restaurant and I've got the bulletproof coffee shop in Elliott's a restaurant. I know happens back at the House and I. We don't have that oils there. But the typical restaurant uses the same oil for a long period of time oxidized this just plant oils are not good for us our cell membranes and go through really cool US new science in in Superhuman forty five percent of his cell membranes brands in your body are saturated fats and the brain militantly holds at constant but the amount of unsaturated. Fats can change dramatically between a mega three which is more of official and Omega Six. which is the plant based so if you only eat plants you don't get mega threes? The kind that come from not not plant based on mega threes. Those don't work. Unfortunately you end up changing about fifteen percent of your of your brain cells into these highly inflammatory things. So you tune. The composition of your being by choosing the kind of fat you eat you eat French fries. Your body will take damaged unnatural fats. That have never been a part of your system. It'll try to build batteries out of those and you'll get batteries that make half charge and then you walk around going I wonder what's going on. There's just kind of how I feel. Yeah I got a little bit of the Muffin top here. What you really have the Muffin? Top in your brain. So the inflammation happens there. So a big part of what I do is I'm eating at least half my calories stories from fat and usually seventy percent but I'm very careful the fats either undamaged eight a moderate amount of plant based fats eat Omega six fats. Much at all. You're still going to get a lot of them because they're out there but I'm careful to get fish oil which is really really good for you. You can do it by eating fish. If you're GONNA eat fish you want to the binds mercury in the fish it makes supplements that that have specific kinds of oils. That go into the brain but the real really good. Fats come from plants Macadamia nuts avocados. macos and coconut oil is one of those things where you say all right. It's good for you. It is to a certain extent every kind of fat including including coconut. Oil is a whole bunch of different types of fats mixed together. Different lengths of chains of fats and people have heard M. C. T. oils. Because I'm the guy put. MCTL's on the map right. It turns out that fifty two percent of coconut oil is MC toils so then An unscrupulous market say Yeah I'm selling MCAT oils bad news about forty percent of the fat and that's ninety percent of the MCAT oil coconut oil. It's legal to call it an MCAT oil but it doesn't have the special powers for turning on your brain Andrea so now you say wait this is labeled MCAT oil and this is labeled empty oil. But they do very different things so yeah you can use them coconut oil as a fat sources fuel source. But you can't eat enough of it in fact it will take twenty pounds of coconut oil to one pound of the stuff that I make and it's clear versus weak beer. Yeah so Y- it's it's important to eat some coconut oil but a huge amount of saturated fat from coconut oil. If your gut bacteria is broken will bring toxins from your gut into your brain your body so then okay. What else story eat it turns out the template for this is called the bulletproof diet? It is a plate covered in vegetables. And it's really important. It's not covering grains is not covering goes it's not covered and potatoes is covered in vegetables K. Green stuff and it's probably not covering kale either. Kale has a whole bunch of anti. Yeah I knew transcendent and I read about thallium toxic. Metal that accumulates veteran Kale than any other plant. We've ever found so we're talking Broccoli cauliflower the salaries fennel carrots stuff like that and then you cover it in fat guacamole grass fed butter things like that. Nuts all olives olive oil and I want to cover it. You don't have to go liberally a little bit of sauce now you want to soak it in fat. And then a moderate amounts of grass while copper tin most people eat way too much protein from animals. And I'm talking to maybe four ounces and the anti-ageing numbers it turns out. You eat less meat than you think you want to eat but if you go to zero meet I know you're you're plant based but but What you end up finding is that people today and most people in your show? They don't really say they care but they don't really care about where the animal that year came from so we are supporting the death of the planet by eating industrial raised. Feed Lot animals. I do not eat those. I never eat those. They will make Old they'll make you fat and they'll make you sick. They'll destroy your gut bacteria and along the way they're destroying the very soil of our planet so feed lot. Meat is off the map and then people say but I can't afford it like that's BS. If grasp on meat is twice as expensive eat half as much which is going to make you live longer anyway so your budget will not change change if you do this but what will happen. Is You go to restaurant and you say as a grass fed and say no. I'm older than that. And then you can say is a grasp finished and if it's grass fed and grass finished you've done the planet a favor. The animal actually lead a life that it was supposed to live right and you've contributed to soil and you need a moderate amount of that and you feel really good in one of the nutrients that's been missing a huge game changer. For me. It was Collagen and the reason colleges cool right out bulletproof. Put that on on the map. And we're now the second largest college and Bryan out there. The reason Collagen is so important. Is that for me. I had this arthritis in my knees and I always had soreness. It went away when I started eating Collagen and on that same trip to Tabet where I covered Yak butter tea discovered. It depends. You've ever thousand. I tried it and discovered how I felt on it. I had wrecked my knees. I descended seventy five hundred feet from the Anna. Purna Base Camp Area In one day and I my knees were bruised the cartridges Bruce. I already had pre existing injuries and screws in my knees and stuff. I couldn't walk across the street to get a cup of coffee. It was like you know to to canes and I felt like I was one hundred years old I had seven days until I was going to be able to recover never enough to walk twenty six miles Kailash and I just asked the guy on the bus with me I sorry. Can you read this Chinese menu to me at this little ULTA. Betton roadhouse restaurant in town and I'm looking for Collagen because I knew from the anti-ageing work I've been doing. I needed some building blocks to fix my knees. And you can buy Collagen Collagen powder back then it plus into bed known had it so I go to the only thing on the menu. That's GONNA work. It's a bowl of pigs now. I've never eaten before I. It looks like and it arrives and its chilled in. It's literally a big bowl of maybe fifteen cold pigs years and I'm just going. This is really unpleasant. But I'm in pain so I can I do here as a as I got the soup and I dip in the heat them up and it was our man crunchy. You know there were soft steamed and just sitting there but you know what the next day I could walk. It was that big of a deal. I just my body was trying to heal well and I did not have the nutrients I needed. He'll and now when you hear people who add college into their diet whether it's in their coffey whether it's on their things on their food it's kind of flavourless powder when it's done tastes like socks if it's done wrong. What ends up happening is the pain? I've had for ten years in my ankle. Knee my back. It just went away and my hair is growing stupidly fast. I have to diet more often and things like that. I hear that from women all the time they liked it because I wanted to thicker hair. They got it but now they're going to the salon more than they did ed so those were important nutrients and then there are. People are saying I I WANNA be plant based no way. Why are you planning based? Is this an ethics thing or helping nothing but all right so ethically as a guy who runs a thirty tweak organic farm turkeys and pigs and sheep where is the first was the fertility in the soil. That makes your vegetables supposed to come from. If we don't have animals. I mean factory farms for grains and corn and things like that what they're doing is they're taking gene these minerals from a mine. The sex isn't even a mineral nitrogen. It's a nutrient. They're putting in the soil. Well if they had animals that would come in during winter and just crap on the soil. The way the do on my farm the soil would replenish itself and it would actually get thicker soils the biggest carbon sink. We have right now. It's getting sitting thinner and thinner and thinner because we're basically overdriving the soil but we're running out of the things we use. overdrive it so when you go to a permaculture model you don't eat very much me but you might say take advantage of ghee or butter. But we're talking about one or two cows on many acres that walk around and do their job. Mother Nature designed sheep's and cow's and ruminants to just walk around munch on stuff and then poop and they poop everywhere is kind of horrifying as a farmer. But I have pictures showing this part of the the Cuddle on birth pasture where they live. It's vibrant and green without any water water being added and right next to it the power that was fenced off. It's gray. It's Light Brown. The only difference is the poop so you think about that go. Wow what does this mean on a global scale. It means that if we go all plant-based the very ecosystem that supported harms forever has always been based on animals. pooping on the farm it it ends and then we won't have nutrient based vegetables and you can actually pull off a vegetarian diet and pretty pretty darn healthy. The people are saying you know. I'm never eating anything that came near an animal that they haven't thought through the system of a and having gotten actually quite sick on a robbing a diet even pretty well educated on how to do that. There are some vegetables that don't work for people to yeah exactly and cooking is an okay. Okay technology so the nightshade family things like bell peppers for some people. They were just fine in for other people they will wreck you absolutely right. And I'm one of those. I don't eat nine kids because I feel like crap. Yeah food lead crept. Yeah and so I would say eat mostly like Vegan and the fact is now being fat. Ah Yeah but if it's industrially raise fat shame on you just put it on their great. Let's let's talk about Britain that's it. It's what I I love about. That is that I think and this. This is partly education to. It's the way we make. Decisions are often not stretched out enough. We're not looking looking at the societal community family. We look at things so small in one sense like affects us in the four people around us as opposed to how things are affecting. Then I feel like you're stretching. Mind which is wonderful. Just we shouldn't eat to feel really good all the time and we should eat to be here for hundreds of years. How do we do that? Yeah absolutely and the planet lasting which would earlier like everything else that we're dealing with factory phones killing the planet's there won't be any sold to live. We lost one hundred. Tell us about the seven pillars. Elyse and make some of you. It's you've kind of told us that this is interesting in your back twenty years. I started running an anti-beijing profit. We we were doing research. Had people people coming in giving lectures in Palo Alto but we didn't really know why we're aging. We had different ideas and they've now been so baked in based ace on really good research using unimaginable. DNA visualization techniques the ability to to do things out of star trek in terms of of seeing inside inside our body. And we know they're seven things that are making us and this is really important because I love him. Say What's the one thing I could do. A live longtime. It's the same things things was the one thing I could do to make my car last a long time. I'm pretty sure you gotTA rotate the tires and change the oil. Just just say a few other things fuel filters and all that so the seven pillars of aging. The things that we now know are the causes of aging and then the question is okay. How do you avoid this? If agents death by thousand cuts how how do I take less cuts. How they make the cuts less deep? And then how do I heal them like wolverine instead of just slapping a band aid on and if you do that that's the roadmap to living one hundred and eighty eighty and feeling good along the way so let's look at what the seven pillars Beijing are. Okay I'm one of the first ones is T- Lamar's and people have oftentimes heard about this. There's all kinds of tests you can order online that measure blood -Til Mares which don't really reflect tissue levels that well but what we do knows every time a cell divides it takes off a little little string of counters and eventually reached what's called the hey flick limit. A cell can't divide anymore times because his little counter got cut down. Well I gotta gotTa do is find the enzyme llamas that let's you've lengthened that and they go. One of the seven pillars is handled and in the book I write about a couple of things. There's a very expensive supplement lament. There's some lifestyle things and there's a Russian peptide small stream you know as you can just inject twice a year. That probably has a bigger effect than anything else I like about one. It's cheaper faster now. There's also something called Zombie cells and this is just just becoming an early trend in anti-aging aging although the researchers looking at these what the technical term is senescence cells and these are cells. That don't die but stopped working so sort of sit there and they make free radicals articles and they don't do anything and as you age you get more and more of these overtime so if you do something like a fasting or these drugs one called rapamycin my son. That's really coming out for from research and there's a few other compounds being tested there's another compound from seaweed or strawberries that I write about in the book. They'll tell your body to to kill the zombies cells. Get rid of them. And guess what's GonNa grow to replace them young cells. Who would have thought? There's extra cellular stiffening which is outside inside of the cells that come sailors straitjackets in the book. Kay what's causing that while we've all heard of a Beta amyloid plaque is the cause of Alzheimer's it's a symptom now 'cause but throughout your body when there is inflammation let's go back eating industrial meet. Let's go back to eating the wrong vegetables. Let's go back to eating sugar and fried stuff. These things that caused systemic inflammation caused almost so level. calluses or scarring and as it builds up over the course of decades you end up with cells. That can't move the way they're supposed to so you got to remove the stiffening and there's a set of techniques weeks to do that in the book and then we look at what happens when stuff builds up inside the cells imagined that inside every cell. There's an incinerator and his job. I was to burn garbage. Well what happens if you have an incinerator and you aren't allowed to pull any ashes APPS you need to burn super clean and then one day you just decide to stick a a bunch of glass and metal in there. It won't burn so the incinerator shuts down. Well this happens inside the cells all all the time and so what if you wait less of the things and did less of the things that clogged up your incinerators. And what if there's a way to get rid of the cells with broken incinerators. There are ways to do that. There's also extra intracellular garbage so instead of inside the cell there's junk outside the cell that builds up over time and one of the things I just did is. I just did a dialysis dialysis Last week where they pull my blood out. Run it through a special filter that gets rid of extra sailor garbage and then put my blood back in after for its clean. This is different than kidney. Dialysis it's similar technology but the filtration entirely different. It's an anti aging technique. That's just coming online. I did that up with Dr Doc. Matt Cook has been on my show a few times and so I'm getting rid of this junk. That's pretty extreme procedure. There's other things you can do like change. How what you eat is cooked? If you're eating burned industrial raise me. You're so doing it wrong. Even Ben Veggie thank you. Yeah the blackened Brussels sprouts stop already. You want to cook stuff with water. You WanNA steam it. Grill it gently. If you're going to grill it and you'll find a difference in how you age your cancer risk. Feel even how you look the next six day and so cooking matters as well as the quality of what you throw on the grill in the composition really matters and the science though is that it's causing this thing to happen. There's here's nuclear. DNA mutations again and the big one the one. That's funny. Because I wrote a whole book my my New York Times bestsellers sandwiched between Homo sapiens. That that book is on my two hundred was when I was missing so might okon drill. DNA mutation the power plants in your cells. These things that sense environment around you make energy make hormones change change how you're you're very brain thinks these things mutate over time and after I wrote superhuman a new study came out that said Oh oh when Michael conroe function declines that they are the things that power the repair of your nuclear DNA. So you have cells. That are the building the building a the map a roadmap the plans for all of the hardware in your body. That's your nuclear DNA and then you have the power plants in the wiring for it. All that's your Mitochondria. DNA and these things need to come together. It turns out. When you're Mike O'CONNELL DNA gets mutated over time? It mutates easily. It's no longer able to read and build cells properly based on this blueprint and it's no longer able to repair the blueprint. So this is a major cause of aging and the book before superhuman called Headstrong. I read about how how forty eight percent of people under age forty have early onset energy decline this mitochondrial declined quantifiably measured and everyone over age. Forty doesn't make energy as well as a young person unless they hack it and so one of the big things that you do in superhuman. When you're following the plan there is you say how do oh I make energy lucky person? Yeah and when you do that you get the response time in your brain of a young person and you get better skin in your cardiac function improves. And you don't get Alzheimer's disease. And you don't get diabetes and you don't get cancer and all those risks are actually associated with Mattock Andrea. But it's only one of the seven pillars so you can have the best metal conduit function ever in my cells in straitjackets straitjackets and have lots of senescent cells. You're still not gonna like what happens. That's why you manage your risk on all these and everything in this book. All seven of those things. There's his region that's free that's fifty times the supplemental thanks to the love. Here's what the crazy billionaires doing and I went out of my way to do all the crazy stuff invited really need it as much as I could so that I could write about it and talk to the experts while they were. Probably you know injecting me with whatever and get the knowledge but also share share the experience of it. What makes me really happy is right now? People were fortunate to go see Dr Harry and do the hundred twenty thousand dollar whole-body six hand. Dan Stem cell makeover. He's got one that doesn't do the brain stuff that's more affordable and. I can tell you if you wait five or ten years. I'm pretty sure that the costs are going to come down but right now before the cost to come down it takes very cutting edge people and people get really pissed like this is just for old rich people. Here's a jail cell phones when they first. This came out thirty years ago when you were two years old. You probably don't remember this because you're too but you'd see the Mercedes. Three hundred. The entire trunk was the cellphone transmitter instead of this big old brick on his any drive down the freeway and L. A.. Talk on the phone and all the other people in cars asshole think he has a my God stupid rich people and their cell phones here. These are the same people. Oh you know playing tetris on their phone or whatever but what happened is demand comes first. Everything is stupid expensive because it's the cutting edge of innovation the fastest assists computers. When I was eight years old I had a computer? 'cause five thousand dollars. There was a Hemi down for my dad. Worked in the industry it was before windows was invented before dos was invented and no one had that when they're able I was like I didn't even know what I had this weird little green blinky thing right but now we all have that in these anti agent technologies over the course of the next ten years. Twenty years will come down to cost dramatically. Because they're being funded by people who are willing Ling to basically spend everything they have to get another couple of years of quality life and all of us at a certain point in our life no matter how much or how little we have. If you're facing death they say you know what I wanna make that bargain and what I want is I want for everyone. Listening to the show to benefit from a few wealthy people do that right now and it is good for the world is good for everyone and the cost will drop just like computer processors. Drop right. Well I am happy to and I appreciate the fact that you do go into lifestyle lifestyle changes here to the lake and I think that's really really important. I I liked both because I I think it is so important. Like what you're saying. It's when his wisdom and science it's lifestyle and it's these stem cell changes right. It's both levels because it's yeah well levels of change because we're not changing our mindset. We're not going to change our behavior in front on changing abaya logical behavior. We call them change on psychological effects. So I like to hope that someday. We're going to have such good and affordable technology that all of us can I went on the cheesecake. Diet it for a year and I went. I went on on a huge series of inappropriate dates and I picked up all these weird diseases. And I've got this huge tumor I'm just going to go into the doctrine for five buxom hit reset and I'm going to come out as again. Okay maybe this will happen. I don't think so but I would like to think that our technology good enough that you could be that stupid. Yeah I also commit to reckless. There is data that shows that we adjust our risks. Seat belts came out driving faster. Yes that's what I mean but you know what it's okay that there's risk in life who wants to live in a risk free world. It's not reckless. Yeah so what I think will happen though is when you realize you know what if I make a mistake like that I can recover from it. I'm more likely to do something. But how good of a world is that. You mean I could possibly do something. That's more fun more exciting more risky or more more worthy right. And if I come near dying I know I'm going to be okay. That's profound versus right. Now I'm too afraid because I might die. I won't create that world without fear. Yeah but the world is still has risk. Yeah and user. Yeah and I vibe with the part where I always and I guess this is always a small percentage of peop- percentage of people but it's it's the part that it's like yeah. How much can you risk without hurting anyone else? Yeah I think that's where pain to me is interesting because it's like I'm I'm like I'm like yeah. I WANNA live to extreme limits and test the barriers but never the cost of other people and I wonder whether you when you can reset. There's there's that risk of the holiday can reset to you know and we all know that people just as people age differently Oh yeah also eight emotionally differently. They'll to deal with trauma differently. They tried to do differently. It's funny people over fifty surprisingly a show more happiness. I've studied happiness given big lectures on it and wrote about it in game changers ears. They actually show. They've actually had enough time to deal with her. Shet yeah right and this is a horrible tragedy of of being human. If you have children in before your twenty-five especially the woman you're lifelong risk of every kind of cancer goes down. Your health will improve your odds of living longer go up. It's actually really good for you. The the problem is that for twenty five year old to have kids. You haven't had enough time to build up a financial base and you also have been had enough time to deal with your emotional shit so now you're GonNa have kids and you probably won't be great apparent because you haven't had a chance to do your own work right. You're still finishing separating from all the programming from your parents and all so you're saying I'm GonNa Wait Time In my thirties financial base but now Having kids is harder on my body raise harder on the family so damned if you do damned if you don't and it's one of the reasons that the birth rate is going down people are saying I'm going to choose not to do it. I'm going to choose to wait a long time. And sometimes they're way too long but part of it is what you just talked about there absolutely. Is there anything have announced today that you're like Dave. You're like J really want to know this so I really wanted to talk about this. Whether it's you know it could be anything I mean. There's so many other places we could go with this but I just want to give you the one one of the things we haven't talked about a lot is cognitive enhancement. Okay this is something I've done for twenty plus years new tropics. Reasonable daffodil is Kinda cool. You Look Back Act ten years. I went on nightline the only guy who would do without a bag on my head. Yeah I went to war and I was on Madonna the whole time it was only when I can even get my Mba and still work fulltime and all that and. It's one of many things that I just want to say. It is well within our current technology to increase your Iq and increase your mental performance across all all kinds of of Measures there's natural plant based compounds and animal based compounds you can use will help you and I write about this stuff. On My blog David Dot com there's pharmaceuticals that are proven to work and every month or so you'll see some big article saying experts. Say these can't work experts. Who didn't read the Goddamn research because I put it in my book and there's five studies that show that you can type fifteen percent faster on this stuff like if it doesn't work? How can this be possible right? So we know that these things things work and I don't know what's motivating the people who will look you in the face of light you say that they don't work because they do in some circumstances and they might work for you but they might not and you owe it to yourself to find now if you want to do that. And then there's technologies breathing and meditation being the cheapest and most accessible and there's the neuro feedback stuff that I'm doing it forty years and we didn't talk like my funky glasses. Yeah Companies Dark company I founded and I will tell you I have doubled my deep sleep by using the glasses I made for sleep. I couldn't buy about nine. You have five percent of the cells in your eyes receive a light signal that you never see it goes around your visual cortex into the timing system. Awesome in your brain and you can look at your body like a computer. There's Quadri little tiny notes are called Mitochondria and they need to work on the same clock. Because if the ones in your deliver think it's daytime in the ones in your brain thinks nighttime they don't match up so this light comes in and tells your brain what to do and it spreads the signal throughout the body. Well the glasses that I make for sleep with dark patented set of frequencies. These are all of them. It's not just blew blocking. That's not enough blocking is too much during the day and not enough at night. These are the ones that keep you awake. See with his glasses. I can fly to New York I got no not at all. It eliminated jet lag for my life and I get more sleep now in six hours or quality sleep than the average twenty year old gets in eight hours of sleep and I published actual numbers in here in Superman how to do it so who who thought the color of light is a variable matters only by measuring seeing what works in understanding the fundamental wiring of our body. Can you create something something like that So for me. I'm wearing these glasses now is called the dark day walkers and with these are doing. They're blocking some blue light. Which means my brain works? It's better all day because a lot of the interior lighting. We have today creates brain stress. So by five o'clock you want sugar in your tired. I don't like that I don't do that anymore. So willing to walk around looking like a Rockstar and I can tell us where she does. Oh Man you talk about fried and fried. Yeah sugar sugar is bad news you eat it and it creates me called advanced location in products. Guess what clogs up. Those incinerators themselves. It's advanced location in products. So you're basically browning the tissues in your body. You're increasing risk of almost every disease especially early cancer and specially cardiovascular and half of. What's in sugar is? Fructose and half is another kind of sugar. Sucrose Glucose Glucose Sucrose Glucose fructose. But Anyway Fructose is what causes non alcoholic fatty liver disease so if we were to look at everyone's liver in the room right now. There's a pretty good chance that there's some value ever gone. And if you're on an exclusively plant based Diet that doesn't have any saturated fat for animals. Your risk actually goes up a little bit but so you look at non alcoholic. Fatty liver disease is caused by sugar. So if you don't eat sugar it doesn't work and what's interesting. You see this. Little Little Weird Puck. Shady Continuous Glucose Monitor right now. And we'll see if my shirts loosen up. It is so you show enough. You must've yeah right. Yeah yeah the so instinct face. Yeah it was joke so it didn't have to my face on it but this this comes on every fourteen days I put on the other arm arm. And you can wave your phone or device over at intellectually. Tell you what your blood sugar is. I love that you create this. No this is a type one diabetic. You don't WanNa know what sugar does to me so this little device and I can wave it over this and it said five point two. That's of Canadian in or European units. So this is one hundred and middle of the day and at the lines perfectly flat so I can tell you I didn't eat. Something caused a blood sugar spike. The odds are that if after your next meal. If you're one of these on you're going to see your blood sugar go up to one. Forty one fifty if it's a typical Vegan meal now if you were to say. I'm not a typical typical vegan. I'm eating a plate of green vegetables and I'm not putting grains on it and not putting a lot of legumes. Maybe a little bit and I'm putting a ton of olives and Avocados and in seasonal seasonal. How we could deal doing that? A wife is the expert. Okay you'll see if it works because if your blood sugar spikes news. It's not working so I've been able to tune. What is fasting lasting doing and all that so it's database and now I know what is low blood sugar feel like? I don't get it very often but when I get it I know I know why and I can also show you. If you get get crappy sleep you will have no ability to control your blood sugar. If you have emotional stress in your life you eat the same food and Charles. Bolivar's crazy. Yeah so that's the latest Hackamore can I have similarly and I love what you just said that because we know that when we're stressed we tend to sugars. We tend to COBB's pretend to fats. That's what we do. What do you do when you're stressed when I'm stressed mostly I meditate on the blood of my enemies? What are you what are you actually? I usually like the type of stress. It's usually breathing or meditation. Okay so that's not bad no other. There's some inner energetic stuff That I drive picked it up. Done all sorts of interesting training in other countries There's users and things I can do there. And there's this amazing thing you can do it. It's called you call the friend. If does work call therapist. It's pretty remarkable because you can talk through new really understands the ideology of stress and you can be that for your friends to. It's just hard to see it I'm not going to see the big picture. Sometimes I'm human. Unfortunately no kidding but the the problem is is that if you don't have some like that in your life I for your friends are afraid to really tell you. Actually you really are an asshole half the time. But I'm still friends with you. It's really hard to tell you that it is a so therapist jobs. Say actually eat a hundred percent. You're blaming the other person you're just being childish little jerk and you put your pants on the right way this morning and then you're going to have to do the introspection so you've got to have someone like that in your life and and so I'm feeling super stressed and can't figure out why that really doesn't happen to be anymore but if I'm feeling super stressed and I think I know why and I can't figure out with friends I'll call a therapist psychologist and I don't have necessarily regular sessions. Maybe once a month and I'll just check in and then I'll say I'm having a hard time with with this thing and it's really causing stress. which is very unusual experience normal stress like normal people because I had all my stress responses and then we figure out all right? It's usually this is a key thing. It's a false belief so you're acting rationally in your feelings make sense if what you believe to be true is true. It's just bad assumptions. And those false assumptions options lead us to terrorism. Terrorists were crazy now if you believe what they believe. Their behavior is rational. Beliefs are wrong and so if your beliefs are wrong your emotions will be broken. And that's what a psychologist of really good one therapist can help you see. Is that you assume something wrong. Which is why you got in this in this jam I am so? Let's change your assumptions. And then Oh and then the pain or the stress melts away because you changed the world you live in absolutely. I feel like I've been talking to the real life ironman. Have you ever been told that. Don't tell anyone that people have said that. I mean I've got my ring. Yeah I I I wanna I wanNA feel good all the time I know I was blessed with feeling like I was old and literally I had the diseases of aging before I was thirty high risk of stroke and Heart Attack Act prediabetes arthritis all that crap. I don't WanNa go back to that like I know what it's like absolutely I'm not going to get all the way the way people expect because it's just sucks too much absolutely early. Today we end every interview the final five which is rapid fire. Question Round one word or one sentence on says Max Ready. Okay awesome question number one. What's the lesson? Can you find hard to teach others how to stop being Vegan. It's hard to Eh tell. Tell us on January. Isn't we'll maybe vase. That actually is a really hard lesson a lesson that it's hard to teach others others is that there are layers of abilities and powers energies. That they have that they've never seen. It's just hard to believe. Okay second question. What's one thing you were once set and they recently changed your mind on? I was once certain that the less you could sleep better. Sleep is such uh-huh big waste of time. I used to have slipped my eight and a half hours a night sleep quality. I've become a sleep advocate over the past few two years as I looked at the data I still sleep as little as I can. But my sleep is really good That was a big change. That's a great point. Okay question three. What something about you? The most people don't know that would surprise them. I was I was once bitten by Vampire Bat in Colorado. I don't even live there but I woke up when I was a kid with a vampire bat feeding on my neck. You being serious. I'm very serious. I didn't believe you know there's a real species. They hypothesized came in on bananas. This was pre internet but we actually caught the bat and to come on that thing not very big but yeah it was Kinda scary. Gary woke up middle of the night it was feeding what it was and all my and I grabbed it and I thought was a mouse and it wasn't it bit me and I never hits the floor. It was really creepy but yeah that actually happens. Yeah Wow Yeah I. I had a bad experience but he came in literally I was. I was in India and put it landed on my face old and and I literally just push shove luckily and bite me or anything but usually a fluid land on my face. It was is. It's the carry a lot of diseases to not just rabies interesting interesting. Okay all right question number four. What something you once valued that you no longer pay attention to? When I was young I really valued actually two things? One was being rich and I made six million dollars. That was twenty six and I lost twenty eight and twenty six. I said I'll be happened happened. We have ten million dollars and six million dollars which is a super dick thing to say so that that fascination with when I have more money I'll be happy. I have wash that and you could say because you have enough. That's true that you need about seventy four thousand a year but I can say that that obsession with at now above a certain level. It's just what what would did you do with money to make the world better place because you can't spend it. It'd be stupid so that's one the other one is it has to do with like wanting to be famous and recognized. When I was twenty three I was in in Entrepreneur magazine because I sold the first thing that was ever sold over the Internet and it was a caffeine teaser? Said Caffeine of choice. The I e commerce before the word ECOMMERCE was out there. No one knew what a big deal was historically For me it was just being scrapping. I'm trying to pay my college tuition but I was like look at me. I'm an magazine. There's a picture of me in my double. Xl t-shirt in you know Puffy Red Red face. And I just realized after fifteen minutes of that It didn't do anything lately. Like all of the I'm going to be recognized it. There's no value in that and I'm going to be enormously wealthy. There's some on that very much so for me. It's like the the rich and famous thing. It's about your mission in those things. Whatever thank you for thinking it through? I love that okay. It was a great aunt's house. Happy happy we often it. This is the first ever asking. This question is a fun of five so you get down to this. I wanted to ask you this question. If you could create any law for the world to follow what would it A. B. I like B.. Kind would be a really good one. But the really amazing law would be the law that limited the number of words in the entire set of laws house in the country. Okay Fair enough. Thank you your of your even more fascinating person than I could ever imagine thinks ad I really hope I'm a student now. I actually want to come to you for a million different things and a million different personal questions. And we'll just. Yeah No. I would love that. I think you've you've open up my mind to a whole new set of thoughts and beliefs today That I've heard people talk louder these things here and there when I've been at conferences and meetings and events and one on ones but you've done it does something else that's happening today. So yeah I mean that so I would highly recommend. Everyone has been watching or listening today. Please leave his book. We just skimmed the surface but we dove into a few themes and topics. That you'll find inept in the book and more importantly the lifestyle points as well remember tons of free advice tons of things you can start doing right now fries and sugar a good place to the star the Dave thank you so much incredible guests on purpose and you have very abbey here thank you.

Dave asprey facebook soccer Alzheimer Greens US engineer Commonwealth founder and CEO Dr Barry Morgan Mr Mr Bulletproof New York Times South America Seattle
29. Barry Fudge: What it takes to win....and keep on winning

Access to Inspiration

23:42 min | 7 months ago

29. Barry Fudge: What it takes to win....and keep on winning

"Welcome to the same inspiration podcast where you can be inspired by people who may be under like youth. I'm Soo Stockdale and if you haven't yet connected with us on social media, you can find us on Instagram and Facebook by searching access to inspiration or if you want to transcript to this episode go to our website access to inspiration. Today. We're going to be focusing on the subject of Elite Performance package. And my guest today is dr. Barry fudge. He has supported Elite Runners over four olympiads to help them to achieve their goals battery has a PHD in physiology and I was until recently head of endurance of British Athletics where he constructed a world-leading endurance program for both coaches and athletes in shooting that when a British endurance Runners stood on the start off. Race, they were the best prepared athlete in the field. So standing on the start line today. Welcome buddy. Hey, sir, how you doing? Fantastic? Well, it's great to hear from you. And I know that your program was built around the motto of owning the start line and it helped to produce the multiple Olympic successes of people like Suma Farah who's one for Olympic titles. So what is it that's really important when people want to be owning the start line. So there's a couple of things really that I focused on with the athletes and coaches, but the main thing was trying to get a bit of emotion cord which to spark that creativity wisdom and the concept is that start with the end in Maine so they visualize themselves standing on the start line. Say for example in Tokyo next summer and thinking about all the things that they need to they need to feel confident to feel happy to feel like they're ready to go and take on the world when that gun goes off. So they start with that concept and it started some emotion in them and it starts to make them think about birth. Perhaps I need to have done this work out or I need to invest body way or I need to have spoken to this person and so on so starts to create something that goes right by this point next dog. I need to have done this and then allows a conversation about how do you get to that point now? I can see that making sense with the athletes themselves because they are the ones doing the work to be owning that start line. How does it work with the court case because they're having to work through the athlete to ensure that the athletes best prepared. So is it the same way to motivate the court case? I think it does and and many ways it's more of a technical conversation as opposed to an emotional conversation. So for them, for example, there might be a specific set of workout still needed to have completed by there and sometimes it's very easy to think I'll just do them by that point wage actually the underlying physiology and the preparation required to get them to be able to do those workers successfully takes them off and it might start in October the year before and might have various birth. They need to put in for the year to get them to that point. So it's more of a technical conversation as opposed to what is going to make me feel confident. What is going to drive outperformance when I stand on the start line if you've actually one of the things that really focused our minds in the UK many years ago was a film Chariots of Fire if we can remember that a visual of all the athletes running across the sand and instant Andrews in Scotland and inspiration roll have a pivotal role in encouraging people to strive for more than they think is possible what inspired you to have a career in sport and in particular in athletics just general store is inspirational to people everywhere in the world. No matter where you are. It's something that does capture the imagination of people whatever you go and whoever you speak to but for me personally, I grew up in a house where sport was massively important facts a guide was Welsh. So we all played rugby. I've got a twin brother as well. So there was always Fierce competitiveness around Sport and actually the thing that got me into work in in sport was I don't know whether your listeners remember the old bath British lions and VHS tapes used to come out after each two and for me it was if I can't play at that level. I would like to work at that level and be part of a team that contributes towards performance package for me. It was watching that the team behind the team on those VHS tapes are quite a while ago. They inspired me to go to university and learn about four times. What is it about sports science these days that really has such a pivotal role in influencing athletes success, but I first started my studies in sport. Most of the testing was done in the laboratory and it was you know, quite extensive process a lot of roll around testing and so on nowadays technology with things like GPS and heart rate and all the fancy gadgets that are out there and a lot of science is actually done in the field. So whether it's a measuring an athlete sleep or way that it's measuring an athlete run there's all sorts of Technology there now that allows the sports scientist to what the coach to perfect performance which is completely different than birth. And get in a very controlled experiment in a laboratory would have probably been in a university twenty years ago. You know when I first started my PhD in Kenya, which was almost fifteen sixteen years ago. There was no such thing as GPS over there in terms of running now, everyone has a Garmin watch or something similar that they attract the training runs with and they load them up to the Internet and the coach looked at it off the user in the social media profile. So Technologies had a big impact on the way Sports scientists can work. You don't actually have to work in a lab anymore. You can do all from a computer and does that mean then that data and objectivity is playing a much more important role in I would say so, I mean, I think that Sports Science as an industry has struggled with data in terms of the can be too many data points. And so some of these GPS watches, for example, they're measuring ten two hundred times a second. And so there has been a bit of a paralysis of times around which bits of data and how to use off. And I think that the bigger advances are coming in sports science and data is just figuring out how to use it better or how to get the information you need a bit more efficiently data now is is what people are very interested in particularly teams where they perhaps have lots of players and so on and they're able to do a very quick audit or analysis of where players are at. So in terms of the world of Elite Performance is what you've been immersed in for a number of years body. What is it that you enjoy about working in that world because back to that inspirational thing I think is well, it does motivate me and it does inspire me to see some of these people can do they literally are the best in the world at what they're doing and it's an honor almost to be part of something like that and see unfold and it's particularly in the world of endurance running is the dedication, you know, there's no such thing as an overnight success and enjoyment running. It stated a grinding grafting stick it out to lots of bad days when it's been tough. There's a lot to be said for dedicating. And the thing I like particularly about the top and is the detail that you can apply which kind of Suits my personality of planning analyzing and so on so I can understand athletes and coaches for that much or being motivated to get to the top and to win an Olympic medal. For example. Yeah. I'm imagining it's a bit more of a challenge to sustain that success at the top over a period of years. So from your perspective a sports scientists and somebody who's underpinning that success what helps to motivate those athletes and coaches to sustain performance package time. It's actually a really really tough thing to do to stay on top and very few Sports people really stay at the top for a long time. They tend to be very exceptional people. You know, somebody like a Michael Phelps instrumental Ang Mo Farah and you don't run and are you single and sprinting you tend to be exceptionally talented individuals, but they do also go through very hard types in terms of emotionally or off. To happen to them that they have to dig in and work against so they're definitely not immune to that but there's something unique with some of these people that seems to sit and save them that drives them on for one reason or another and it's very hard to put your finger around. But when I was doing my PhD was it was based in Kenya and it was around why our opinions so successful and enduring tronic and one of the things that really came out of it was just a background or environment that they're living in and their desire to get the living where you know, the average wage was a dollar a day twenty years ago in Kenya and the Running World provided an opportunity for people to get out of the country and some money and come back. So I think there's different things that move a different people and that certainly different than what we more of a a British athlete to grow be successful. It's actually a very interesting area, but I think quite a lot of it is the people that are around you the people that motivate you it's not just about winning medals after medals. It's the people around you that keep you going. I think is one of the things for sure so having a broader support system people who are there to be with you during the highs and the laws that is pretty important. Exactly. Yeah, particularly the low as I said is a really important thing over the years. I've worked with Mo Farah and watch Dakota countless championships, but the one thing I would say that probably kept him going was the variety in terms of we always a different year. So although it's running set up the sessions the way we ran about certain things try to vary it so that it wasn't boring if they provide a challenge and the beauty of birth is that there's always some new challenge to go against as well. There's always something you're chasing whether it's one more year or somebody's record. So that's one of the things about sport if your body allows you you can keep going off. So people might assume that Elite athletes are full on at all times that they're operating at their Optimum. Now, I'm imagining that recovery is actually quite a critical Palm. Of the entire process would you agree and if so, how do you factor in a company a hundred percent agree again, take something like, Farah is best training wise. He probably only trading for about fifteen hours a week the rest of the time. He's recovering somebody smarter than me could what kind of percentages but it's a very small amount of time that you're actually training most of the adaptations come when you're resting you're recovering just massively important to stand out as particularly in sport the trainings just one component that you have to get right recovery is a bigger component. If you don't get right, you'll never make it a particularly athletes get older you have to concentrate on that recovery and risk even more if your body is not as young and adaptable as it used to be the recovery is even more important and it's probably the same for life in general. It's massively important that P rest and recover and look after themselves. I'm thinking about some of the listeners who may be in the world of business. I think that health and well-being is becoming a much more prevalent part of the thing to pay attention to in the workplace birth. You seen that? Yeah, for sure. I mean again if you just take it from the smaller bottle that you know, this eighteen twenty sort of idea is which is probably around about what we're talking about you 20% is providing 80% of your games. It's probably the same with recovery and I think people in the corporate world can learn a lot from Sport and one of the things I particularly like is the concept of Sprint's where you have a goal within a period of time and in sport package before weeks to six weeks where you work very hard and concentrate a certain thing and then there's a block of recovery and then you identify another four to six weeks and you go hard again and then that works in life and business as well the idea of wage identifying a Target which is quite close going as hard as you can have it a break going again a human body like Cycles. If you're enjoying this episode, you'll probably want to keep up-to-date with all the way from us pop on over to our website have access to inspiration.org And subscribe to our newsletter. You can do this at the foot of the home page and while you're dead, Jealous, but what do you think of the podcast series and which guests you have enjoyed the most we'd love to hear from you. That brings us on to the subject of Tokyo, of course because they expected cycle of the Olympics this year has not happened. How do you think that athletes and coaches need to be adapting to the majority of the Olympics so fascinating and question because I don't think anyone really knows I think the people that do except where they're at and adapt instead of complaining found wondering what they're going to do would be the ones to be successful. Unfortunately. There's nothing really anyone can do and and this idea about you can only control the things you can control you can't be changing the world. We can't be changed and what's Kodama coronavirus? So the ones who are able to adapt accept it move on will be the ones that will probably be successful next year the ones who spend the next six months worrying about how they can access or Jam or else where they're going to train will probably struggle but guess fascinating one who knows where we're going to be in four months time, nevermind eight months time. So it will be interesting and I think even if we get to Olympic Games and it goes ahead The Crowds Are there for one reason or another again will be fascinating and how people perform in an empty Stadium without the usual bus that they get from a eighty or ninety thousand seater stadium. So I think there's so many interesting questions about Sport and prove it and what will happen. That's an interesting conundrum for us all to be observing as when it left the Olympics happen in twenty Twenty-One thinking about your journey in a sport body and your career what motivates you to keep going through my journey. It's definitely changed from beginning to end and I think over the last couple of years has been more about helping other people achieve their goals and or at least the realization it's about helping other people. I think always has been and I think now I'm no longer at British Athletics when I was there it was about helping those people that are identified by the Federation to be successful at Olympic Games. Now, it's about helping a broader group of people and it could be well be athletes will be coaches, but it could also be business people who are interested in an insight into high-performance Sport and log Detail in the planning that goes into it that makes a business model that similar so it's very much about using some of the knowledge experiences some of the Saints from high performance for to help other people and a broader sense. That's it and it's quite exciting and we'll see what happens as you've been going along your journey buddy how or who motivates and inspires. You said, I'm always massively inspired by the athletes in terms of what they're doing. I think it does drag you along in terms of their story their Journey their challenges their highest or laws one of the misconceptions probably if you work in sport is that it's just glorious lifestyle and it's great and all the rest of it. The reality is that there's normally a moment at some point where it comes good. The rest of it's hard part is crafting and I really enjoy contributing to that Journey, even if they're not winning the gold medal. It's helping people as for me is massively inspirational and it doesn't matter to me I do off. I've said watching sport as well on T. And I think that does more of it me to keep doing that type of thing. But I am motivated in a slightly different way now in terms of trying to use my experiences over the last four olympiads staff of being part of the Leesport to help other people and it does make me wake up in the morning with a slightly different emphasis than what I was doing before but it's nonetheless very rewarding. So the same thing so I get from what you've talked about on a number of answers to the questions is about the importance of attention to detail and I'm just wondering if you can give us some examples of what sort of detainees are athletes and coaches paying attention to these days to touch on the idea of Technology as something that can give us detail. I'm just thinking of the average athlete out there that wants to get better what details should they be pay attention to part of the process of the on the start line is you visualize and you think about all the things that you need to do, but then also employ another strategy that I call it apt so adapt and birth For impatient so you work for a process and you go right. So what you want to do and for some of the people that I worked with it might be 210 Middleboro. It could be a want to run some food or American or I want to improve my golf handicap, whatever. It might be. That's my ambition. Then it's D for an ats4 determinants and I say well, what does it really take? And in the world? I was in a give you an example. If you're a 5,000 meter Runner email 5,000 meter Runner, you know that you've got to be able to run under 13 minutes. You've got to be able to run the last kilometer and two minutes 24 seconds and you've got to be able to run wage a slap and fifty four seconds and you've got to have a body weight less than fifty six kilos. Those are the types of details that our coach and athlete would be looking at and so it's very much what does a truly take off and then what underpins that is the next one which would be assessed. So, where are you now with some of these components and where do you now but some of the things that we can test so an endurance running wage Q test in the lab for some of these qualities the underpin a 13-minute five key or a 2:20 for Muskie. So you have Ada and then the last most important that is probably. Process and the idea behind the process is just trying to work out what other things would actually make the biggest difference and then which order should we do to them? So again when you sit with lots of athletes and coaches and I'm sure businesses do their jobs. Well, they come up with lots of ideas about how to be better. But the idea behind desk component is how do we find out what we'll actually make the biggest difference or make the biggest gains and then which order to be do the men and young ones team who's on your team who are the people that are accountable for their various things that we're going to do when you pull altogether you hopefully at the end of our session you have a nice plan and get it brings together, right? What's the prob? Most impression was it going to take whether you know what we going to do first and who's accountable or who's going to help me do it? That's the sort of world that I would work in very process-driven but Don Jose. Very natural conversational sense that is not like a tech box exercise. It's very much just a process to work for you and hopefully get the best of people that way I love that. I love the simple acronym the easy scriptions and yet no doubt the difficulty that lies behind that and I imagine that for some people when they get to the assess element of it and actually start to really understand what something take that may switch them off at that point. I don't yeah and it takes a lot of honesty to do it properly a lot of people are unsuccessful because they're not honest enough with themselves and again businesses. I'm sure of the same place lots of stories about businesses who who didn't see what was in front of them because they believed in their own party. I think it's the same with athletes and coaches as well that without that Honesty. Sometimes you get lured down the wrong path. Also, I think bringing somebody in external as well. So my previous role, although I was the head coach for the program. I was external in many senses to most of the conversation. Example you can consciously table together and I was able to come in and provide that structure in that framework and give some outside perspective that maybe we need to do already see so yeah, I mean it's adapter I used to see it sounds a bit harsh but in sports kind of true as well. It's a fast-moving game that you have to keep your eye on and review and plan regularly what you're going to do against what it truly take. My final thought Betty is that that formula sends relevant for people going into a world that is known so one can understand what the realities are. There are required is usage a world-leading 5000 meters. For example, what about for business days or for athletes or Sports people that truly want to step into the world of the unknown they want to do something that's never been done before how would you adopt the adapt metaphor? That's a really tough question and I think a lot of it is trying to protect the future and press a claim for example the way technology package. Doing for them in terms of aerodynamics and Banks and and so on that what it would have taken to one of gold medal and previous Olympics is no more relevant. So they're always looking for you know, where is it going to go to next month? There's a certain amount of production. Whereas a track and field what it takes to win is actually reasonably stable. There's always outliers, but there's a generalization about what it's going to take having the right people around you asking the right questions is probably the key thing like what although there's or what but that and if you thought about that but I still think a framework such as adapter on the start line allows you to work through some of those problems again quite often. I think it's good to have an external person lead you through that. Sometimes you can get stuck in your own Paradigm and your own way of thinking if it's just you and your team sitting in the office as you do every Thursday or whatever. I think that's important. Well, I think you've given us a real insight into what sounds simple as a series of activities that it takes to get to improving one's performed. It's but it's consistency over time and Relentless focus on those things. Which sounds much harder. Yeah for sure. And I think if you think about the business world, I guess flash in the pan business that does well, but to have continual success that you do have to keep your eye in the game. You do have to keep planning and reviewing and checking where you're at moving forward and adapting all the time and it's just the same in sport. It's no different and it does take quite a special leader or person or energy to keep you in that frame of mind and not take it for granted. I'm sure listeners can think of all different types of companies that haven't adapted in mood for the times, you know, a good example might be no cure for the four hundred years, you know, they were once the top top companies in the world, but they didn't adapt and they didn't move forward with folks happening and dead Sport and business is exactly the same. Well, it's been lovely to speak to you about it today and how can listeners find out more about you and the services that you offer on the internet and social media. I've got a website WWE. 25. Com, I'm on Instagram as well lap twenty-five underscore consultancy. I'm just starting over some new projects. My company's based around education issues or and inspiration and lots of hopefully exciting things from World affect performance sport can help lots of different people and lots of different walks of life. Fantastic. Well, it's been inspiring to talk to you today, buddy. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks. So I wonder what batteries experience is motivated you to do differently. Are you going to get out your training shoes and start running though, or even improve your running if you've already started if you enjoyed what he had to see then please leave us a review and apple podcasts. We'd love to hear from you. We're also on Facebook and Instagram just go over and charged for access to inspiration. We are setting up a listener's panel recording discussion where you can discuss with other listeners what you have gleaned from these broadcasts and what they have caused you to think or do differently off if you'd like to find more about that and how you can be involved then drop us a line by going on over to the website access to inspiration.org and leave us a message on the contact page off next week. We will be continuing with the theme of sustainability with my guest Melina Seattle vich a designer and architect who will be discussing the concept off. Sustainable luxury. I hope you can join us then.

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The Productive Podcaster | EP29: Sorry to Hear That

The Productive Podcaster

32:18 min | Last month

The Productive Podcaster | EP29: Sorry to Hear That

"There are millions of podcasting done. All over the world take on the personalities of their creator psalm bringing thousands of listeners. Each week some bring large amounts of revenue while others entertain millions and help sell products like many podcasters. You want to reach your maximum potential. But how how do you make. Podcast stand out from all the rest. Join dr baruch matty's and he talks the experts who are doing it on the productive podcast. Hello everybody welcome to another episode of the productive. Podcast or i am dr barry matthews and i'm excited to have you here because i have an exciting showdown it really interesting showing them glad you guys are here to share it with me for those of you fit your first time here with the productive. Podcast or i'm gonna tell you what we're all about. What we wanna do is make sure to you as someone who's interested in podcasting or if you're already podcast but you still may have questions about what you're doing it right. I'm here to tell you there's no cookie cutter way to a podcast. And that's what i do. I bring people to you. Who do podcasts. And let you know they go through some of the same challenges you go through and some of the things you don't have to go through and they're here to tell you why they do it and why they why they don't do certain things so you don't have to deal with it or self if that makes any sense now if you're here for the first time over here of your veteran listening to us one thing i'd like you to do right now is share this with everybody. Let your friends let your family. Let your colleagues know to listen to the productive. Podcast week can be found on. Google found on i two. I heart radio tune in spotify stitcher end. You can watch us on you too as well make sure subscribe to all of that so you don't miss a beat with the productive podcast but now as i like to start off every show i like to begin with the segment. I call pros and cons pros and cons pros and convert will pros and cons is a segment. Will i give you a pro chip on podcasting so you can be a productive castor. Now the one thing. I want to talk to you about is naming episodes of your podcast. Don't name the episode of your podcast episode. One episode to don't do that don't do that. They have something clever something. Catchy a how to or a tip to do this or introducing something. Whatever bill anything but this naming it one two three four. That's boring. it doesn't grab anyone's attention doesn't make someone want to listen to your podcast. So make sure that you can give them what they call a hook and pull them in. So that is pros and cons for today. What will ever do right. Now is take a quick break. Because i'm gonna bring a guest is really gonna bring something interesting to you all and i know you say bear always. Your guests are great. Well that's because they are. Because i guess are the bomb and i'd just like to brag about before i bring him on an activity. I'm always right so anyway we're gonna take a break. We'll be right back more of the productive podcasters they too. Let's face it you've been talking about starting a podcast for quite some time. But you haven't started yet. Why is that could it be. Just don't have the time your day to day teaching so busy or couldn't be that you don't wanna learn all the technical aspects the going to put together a quality podcasts. Well at medium club. We take care of that boy. How would you like to have a gun. Four you experience. That's right and media boss club. We feel your podcast for you. We will edit your podcasts. Google put music for you. We even put in commercial break. You can put your advertisers then we will take care of all the upload into the great podcast platforms. That are out there that we'd be everything all you have to exist right now. Go to media up dot com. That's media boss club dot com and let us handle the heavy lifting for you. Starting podcast can be a daunting task as a lot. That goes into it. And you're probably wondering if you're able to handelman well why don't you just take two days and let us teach you how to do it at the create your podcast weekend. That's right we're going to show you all the aspects of how to start your podcast. Keep your podcast going how to attract listeners and how to make money with your podcast create your podcast weekend dot com get registered right now. All right everybody. Welcome back to the productive. Podcast ma'am i wanna talk about this next guest here before someone ask you a question. Have you ever been your life. I want to tell you the grief is real. Debt is a part of life cycle. There is no one who can tell you when degree or how degree but cj williams has a fantastic podcast called sorry to hear that that helps the grief stricken to deal with the pain and to know that they are not alone. I am pleased in pleasure to bring to productive podcast. None other than cj williams. He's up to the show is to see you. Thank you for having me big bright. Oh smile oh y'all can't see it'd be listening but see has a bright smile so anyway i'm thinking mom there you go thank you. Welcome to show now. That is an interesting topic of about grief. Sorry to hear. I looked at the name of that too. Then it makes you wonder what is it about so what fresno the everybody knows a lot of the brain the title. I so what what made you think of that title okay. So i'm going to be honest so most people most people that know me personally know that i'm a little on the sarcastic side. And so they all everybody immediately goes to. I'm being sarcastic right. Sorry to hear that is sounds like it should be like a culture commentary. Whatever yeah well actually it is about grief it's about death um specifically so in two thousand seventeen. I lost my mother to a car accident. And the thing that i heard the most frequently and the thing that really also bothered me the most was people would say oc jay. I'm sorry to hear that your mom died or that. You know some whatever. The bad thing is and i was like you know there could be other ways for you to express your sympathy and still feel me as a person feel like you're being truthful. I'm being genuine in that in that truth right and i it is not saying that. I don't didn't believe them. It's not necessarily about that but it was there. There's probably other ways to stay the same thing that feels better. Now i get it. I get it so in that. What made you decide google podcasts. On it yeah. So when i when my mother passed in i i've actually lost both of my parents and a a few friends So people that were really important to me basically I said well my struggle is that i'm on the younger side and then might in my early thirties. Now and my struggle has always been like you know. I wish other people would know what it was like. Especially if they haven't lost anyone before so one way that i thought was really helpful was one here i. I'm a huge reader. So i read a lot of books. That a lot of memoirs more supposedly. Because i was looking for that lake sort of missing piece. That was missing in my real life. That said like. I understand. I get it. Yes i've been through something like that. You can hear parts of my story in your own story. So i thought a podcast where i speak to other people who have lost somebody important to them. So that's anybody important right. Your mom your died goal. Your sister your brother your friend rate so taking those stories in saying like hey to the listener. You're listening to a story where you probably can hear at least small notes of something that you understand and then for me as the person that's interviewing them they're getting the opportunity for meat to hear directly from me saying oh. I think i understand a little bit of your experience. So there's a little bit of two folds leeann understanding an empathy that i'm trying to promote my podcast like that. I like the that. I got to tell you first of all i am also the sarcastic person you. I can appreciate good sarcasm. it's a gift. Everybody doesn't have everybody. No one can do it quite like you can. So here's the other thing. I see someone. I don't know what to say Someone when they've lost someone other than i'm sorry. Or i'm praying for you or your. I some of them seem kind. I know your point is some of them. Seem kind of can yes. Sandra sponsors do people will say You know i'm i'm blessed in favour. They all use the same thing. It's a can response in. God is good all the time. How are you doing. I'm good right so the thing is it. Is we re reprogrammed to do that so I guess my question to you is for someone who has not lost someone who is in that situation where they come across someone who has lost much. What other things can you say it can bring that empathy and make that person You care yeah. It's really being as personal as possible weekend. Right like one of the for me like someone who didn't know me or my mother's super well it was you know you know c. j. lake. Your mom from what i hear was really awesome. I'm sorry that she's not here anymore. That's right in like that's a really change from. I'm sorry to hear your mom thank you. May we see now. You're getting into my head here so because you made me think that i think this could be. I could be totally wrong. jim. I think the people give that response because they're afraid to delve into it deeper hundred percent. It's scary light reight scary. It is because. I'm i'm sitting there thinking right now if i were talking to you on that and i started asking questions first of all. I'm wondering are you. Okay with me asking a question about you. That's that's the first thing because people they don't agreement didn't want to talk about it and then you have the people that want to talk forever. Oh yeah yeah. I've been on for our interview though. Yeah right. I don't know how to end this because i can't cut them off when they're talking about their parents who just believes person right. Yeah so it it's a it's an interesting. No federal situation via yeah. I think i personally believe that you can. You can do it in a couple of different ways. Run is one is. How close are you to them. Right so i i told you like the person who made that comment that made me feel like it felt so good. They didn't know me or my mother all that well but they had heard like cool stuff about her that they were in. That was important for them to stay late. I heard she was an amazing lady. And i'm sorry that she's not here anymore and that was like that was. That was a statement right. League person took thirty seconds of their day in. Like and i'm sure they kept on pushing in. That's okay For people that you're afraid to like have that conversation with. I think it's perfectly okay to be like. Do you wanna talk about your person if you have the time. And they have the time. I think it's totally. Oh gated you know. Do you wanna talk about your friend. I'm here to listen to the worst part. Is that when you asked that they say no okay. And then that's when he backed up and you say cool like. I just wanted to make sure i wanted to make sure you're okay program In the expert net now that's a resource some. Are you a group counselor. I am not so. I spend a lot of time listening. That is my superpower. Is that the world would be an amazing place if we spent a little bit more time listening and so rate at what did they say like. You had two years one mouse if you need to listen twice as much as he talk and so i've been really in my in my sort of my grief process. It's been more important. That i don't have a lot of initials behind my name. That's not necessary. I think but being an advocate for listening in listening fully and being president has been sort of. It's sort of what i'm really telling me. i mean even in the in the podcast realm. I if you know. I don't script out my questions now for what listened to you. Yeah guide to what the next question. It's absolutely listening. Listening is definitely vital. When you're especially when you're interviewing someone but when you're just talking to someone and garo here listening is vital listening can do so much more for relationship and it is important to the growth that relationship so what. I'm talking a little bit on your podcast. So how long have you had your podcast. So i started my officially my podcast. Launched in two thousand nineteen But i had been working on it for about two about a year and a half before. It launched wow. Yeah took a long time. I was it was so i was really afraid to launch a podcast. So it's like it's not just like your voice. It's your was what mike do. Use a wet system. Do you set a it. Was all of the lake technical stuff hindsight up a podcast endless getting beyond that hump of like do people care what. I'm talking about Rate so it. It took a lot of late mental so it didn't in terms of setting up a podcast. It doesn't take that long but it does take a lot if you're like me and probably many people. Are you just a little afraid to sort of put yourself out in the world. I mean even coming on here like it took me a minute to be like okay. I'm gonna be on camera. I'm going to do this thing he's going to hear can ask me questions so like scary. It's a podcast in now. Let me ask so During that period we owning them. I was i was Sort of so. I do have around twenty questions or so. That i ask in some way But it's not necessarily as it like super blatant that. That's what's going to show up on the on the in the in the episode. Because i try. I interview people for about an hour and a half hours The longest one was about three and a half But i try to keep it as short as possible for the person listening so most of my episodes tend to run about half an hour or so sometimes. A little longer sometimes shorter so i had started recording pretty early on in the process. Really i was just like what does it mean to you. Then think about the story that i want to tell the theme that needs to come out of this interview and so i was working on my own version of like producing in thinking about. How can i tell a story that it's so personal. I'm asking really really really personal questions and trying to get them one comfortable with me to tell me everything and then but then going through the editing process which takes at least double of what. You're actually listening to to be able to work through that process. What i was doing with a lot of deliberate like thought beyond being afraid for people to hear my voice. I mean i get it. But a lot of people have those those that About someone hearing them and then someone seeing it's a it's a whole different thing i mean it really is and yet it is real. It's my mother. Had me speaking in front of the church. When i as soon as i can stand up and talk. She's be wonderful. Like pat on the back for my mom was completely okay with me being in the background so being in the front in any way and told me a lot of oh. I understand volatile. Yeah was your mother. Told me that you're going to do this. I'm like what a sitting even. Give me details here. I am go right. So i get it. I definitely get that now as far as your often do does your pipe has air so right now. I'm on every other week. I'm currently on hiatus. But i am launching in next. Few weeks are really excited for about twenty more interviews. And i also have like some sort of off weeks where i talk about. Cj diary which is what what i call it and so i spend a lotta time writing in sort of thinking about the world's And so sometimes. I run into like really cool resources. So i'm very excited to like. Bring those as well to the to the forefront. There's some really cool organizations in courses that just sort of run into them berry like this is awesome so cj diary sort of my way of being like this is cool. I wanted to know so. Bring us where bill listening watching right now. I want to pay attention to the fact that she even watch. It was building up. She was forty so she had stuff in the kennel ready. Some of you are so anxious about going live. You don't have to You don't have to see record. I'm gonna tell you got by the time you all hear this lavar. It does yup route. What it does is allow her to work on her life. She can remote weekdays and work around my life. Yes exactly do it around your life ex exactly so i mean if one of those things that i just want people to understand that there's a lot of ways to take diety out of it. I don't i between you and you're helping a lot of people hope so great feedback i do i. It's been i definitely am i. Can i need to cosign on what you just said. Go ahead and just do it like your first. Especially if you're an interview podcast like i am lake. Take go ahead like you wrote down Definitely write down some questions. Sometimes you need to forward the conversation yet. Used to intersect. I have to take myself out of this equation. Yeah my major in college was media data again as you heard me say. I grew up speaking in front of audiences and i majored into media so talk me in front of people. Interviewing people is something that came naturally for me. If it's not something that's natural for you definitely right down your questions now. I don't write down everything in your podcast. Berry very mechanical. You definitely want to give this up an outline yourself an outline to do that. See i wanna thank you so much for joining us. Dan tell everyone the name of your podcast. Begin a where they can find it sheriff so my podcast is called sorry to hear that and i go buy it goes by s t h t on occasion. And you can find me pretty much anywhere. So if Choose your favorite podcast player. Spotify google apple. All of the favorites. All right gotta make subscriber guys. Subscribe to now pay. Yes what god. We're gonna take a break right now but see not going anywhere. She's gonna be right back for our next segment with his called. Podcasts guys stayed. Till we're gonna be right back with more google podcasts. It's time to be a media boss. If you're in business for yourself kind you get your message out and podcasting is the best way to do. Let us create a gun for new podcast. Experience with media boss clubs. All you have to do is go through media club dot com and we'll create a gun for you podcast right now. That's media boss comes dot com to learn everything you need to know about starting podcasts and well and to create your podcast weekend can we put it all in two days and help you get your podcast going next week. That's right next week. All you have to do is create. Your podcast can and let us show you how to get your podcast up and running. We will show you how to attract lists. We will show you how to get people to pay you for your products and services. What products and services products and services. We show you how to all the free your podcast weekend. All you have to do with your podcast weekend dot com and get registered today and we have special bonuses solid. You even get to review the to start your podcast. That's why we're going to give some of the asking to get started. Go to create your podcast. Weekend dot com. That's breed your podcast. We can dot com and get started on your podcast by next wife. Do contact media boss club right now. Well because you can get a podcast done for you you can learn all the aspects goaling putting together a great podcast and have someone else do it for you. That's right we will build your podcast around your content and make it so you can concentrate on the money making activities of your best contact media. Boss club dot com. That's media boss clubs dot com to date and let us get your podcast starts right now. All right. Everybody welcome back. I'm only right on this. So we have another segment and she is still around and that segment of course is called. Podcast podcast this is where we take an audience question ample before you even asked you probably. How can i get a question answered. All you have to do is our facebook group which is called what productive podcast go there to protect the podcast. Our facebook group. Go ahead and poke your question it now. I want to say this now for everybody. This is not a place to promote your podcasts. Handsome people. I've had i know right. Move your pocket. That's not no that's not. What would this is four. This is here to help. Other podcasts. And podcasts have a tip for them. That's great wonderful. If you have a question then we may ask it here. What does not depend promote your podcast. We'll have to get rid of your sorry so the question. The question san break united real real tight especially like just as just as a helpful hint For for facebook groups and things like that he should always ask the moderator. If it's okay to post your podcasts Especially when they're not to any off follow directions. The question they have hosted is there. Is there a certain time to do your podcast. Some time of day to the podcasts. I feel like this is kind of a longer answer than like morning so for me like we were talking earlier. That it's really important that you sort of let your podcasts warwick around your life and using the word around being really important so if you're a night owl perhaps you do it in the evenings if you're morning lark maybe do it early in the morning If you have a really busy street maybe. It's better at a certain time of day. So i live in atlanta and so in atlanta. There is always going to be airplanes. Maybe less so now but there's always airplanes in the daytime and i've noticed this is sort of me being out in the world. I've noticed that in the afternoons it gets. It gets a lot quieter. Yeah they're still airplanes but it just a lot quieter than it. Normally so i spend some of my time in the afternoons and then because my street gets a lot quieter. I don't have to worry about lake people going down my street or your dogs barking and whatnot so i also do a little bit of my work for my podcasts late late in the evening really like midnight one. That's good that the this letter you brought that up the neu- that would be thinking about that because like clockwork every weekday and eleven. Am is guided. Drive down the street and beats horn as he's going down the street every day at eleven. Am is don't know what his purposes you don't need to know is nobody's there was literally now when i hear. Oh yeah no. I think it's important that you pay patently pay attention to the rhythms of year plea very rate preset. Yeah like just pay attention to the rhythms of your place and so if you record at home and you have your eleven o'clock horn beeper pay attention to that. So mean shouldn't schedule your your phone calls or at eleven. Maybe be like eleven thirty at eleven five because he's gone by eleven o one. Oh it's like clockwork. He's busy answering the question now. I i'm not sure if the question was asked in relation to thinking did it's alive podcast because if you're thinking is the better time but here's the thing if you're doing log reporting than you have to think about that as far as what kind of natural light. You have gumming if you're going to do with camera if you're not then like like said you wanna about the noise as well but also if you're going to be dealing with guess what time of day is better to get these guests on now personally our hoarded anytime i record nine in the morning report nine at night i'd accorded noon. It doesn't really matter to me to win that person's available a minute room. Because my now i said we talk. This is recorded so she and we talked a lot. You wanna break. Is now the cnn. We this is my new friend guys. My new friends right revenue for it right but the thing is we. I'm our podcast. You what. I'm recording it. It lasts about as long as when you hear about about a half an hour long so it doesn't take a lot of my day i i've done like four and a day easily because it doesn't take a lot of time but it depends on like cj set around your schedule round your life. So the best thing i can tell you is put together a schedule of what your days normally light and then fit your podcasting in between there so that way you don't have to worry about stepping out of your comfort zone. Just do your podcast. could you wanna be. You wanted to be fun and that it'd be finally ago so that's my answer. That is our pot of thanks day. One more time ladies and gentlemen the name your pockets where they can find you again. My so my podcasts. Called sorry to hear that. And i'm jay williams you'll hear my voice on a regular basis if you listen and you can find it anywhere that you like to listen apple. Google spotify favorites my best friend. My new best friend guy Absolutely beards great guys please legislate laws ascribe her to for you. He everybody listened. Subscribe to your friends till your family till your neighbors. Go ahead and put it on blast in eleven o'clock and beat the horn. Do all of that. Thanks guys for listening so guys. Least you'll know what time i'm not gonna five but so see. Thanks for joining us guys. We're going to wrap up in two minutes here. But i want to definitely make have begun. Make sure the to scrap her podcast. Please make sure you follow her. As much as you can and share her podcasts. Well and also. I went to share the productive podcast for out with everyone. You know who gets what time it is. Now it's time for my podcast profile. This is where i listened to another podcast. And i think you guys may be interested in the listening. It's called wings of inspired business melinda wichita wings of inspired business by melinda. Wicha if you're into business and you're looking for a little bit more is bracing get your business going on recommend you pay attention to this podcast. It's very good. I think some of you be interested in and it's also time for the podcast giveaway my giveaway today. I'm giving away. Actually this door hanger here for those who podcast need little peace and quiet in your house. When you're doing your season. I just talked about the time to do. It will need some peace and quiet and this is not paper. It's not cardboard is actually little spirit of the net and it will hang on your door. Let people know leave you alone while you're reporting so this one goes to pat pat frame. Thank you for paying attention to the show. Thank you for engaging if you to have your name. Caught in a facebook group productive podcast. Make sure you guys are doing that and we would love to have you and make sure you pay attention. Us with privateplus got asthma rapidly. Show the last thing i want to do. Right now. is give my productivity quote for you guys. make sure your living more productive life in this. One comes from richie. Norton richie norton says making something take longer than necessary is probably the worst example of work ethic and is patently lazy. Look busy not cool. One more time ritchie dorm says making something take longer than necessary is probably the worst example of work ethic and is patently lazy but look busy. Not cool ricky norton. Guys'll understand this guy had stopped building. Busy work do more productive work. That's really what it's all about so got that wraps up another episode of the productive. Podcast undocked the barrett matthews. I want to thank my guest today. Ms cj if he was fantastic macer you pay attention to her. Podcast subscribe and make sure you pay our podcasts and subscribing share as well as i always say before we sign off. Don't just settle for being all some set your goal to all them all and take active everybody with the next app. Thank you for joining us on the productive. Podcast or for you to join us next time for another great show. We welcome your engagement. So make sure you participate by joining the productive. Podcast our facebook group and chime in also sharing a productive. Podcast with some of your friends. Right now if you have a podcast and you're looking for gas or if we would like to be a gas on a podcast join our podcast exchange at www dot podcast world. Directory dot com. We'll see you next time.

cj williams dr baruch matty dr barry matthews google medium club handelman lavar fresno jay Sandra facebook jim pat mike berry atlanta Berry apple Dan
147: Be Anti-Racist

The Next Right Thing

15:31 min | 7 months ago

147: Be Anti-Racist

"I'm emily P Freeman in. Welcome to the next right thing you're listening to episode one, Forty Seven. This is a podcast about making decisions, but it's also about making a life if you struggle with decision fatigue chronic hesitation or if you just need a few minutes away from the constant stream of information and sometimes delightful but also distracting of entertainment. You're in the right place for thoughtful story, a little prayer and a simple next rate step. Sometimes, I talk about specific decision making practices here, other times I'll share life rhythms and routines that help clear space for making more soulful decisions. In general, we explore why it's hard to make decisions discernment for slow. Processors as well as how to know our next right thing when we're sad or lonely. Other. TIMES, though I share a bit more personally and let you in on some of my own next right things with the hope that if you're in a similar place, you might find a friend on a journey. So today I wanted to continue the conversation about what it means to be antiracist in the middle of your everyday life. Before we do that I. WanNa tell you about this episode sponsor talk space. Because in the midst of what has been an extremely stressful season I wonder what it would be like to have a personalized support system. Someone to reach out to win ever you need them someone trained to listen without judgment and is there to offer accountability in support with talk space you can have that for as little as sixty five dollars a week talk space is on a mission to make therapy affordable and accessible for all. Because, we could all use a little extra support to feel are best from time to time. Talk Space has thousands of licensed therapist trained over forty specialties including anxiety depression relationships and more, and they've made it easy to get started. You take a quick assessment, choose the plan that best fits your needs and talk space finds the best therapist for your experiences. After your matched, you can send text audio or video messages in a secure private chat room right from your phone or device. We all need someone to talk to and Talk Space Strives to give you the support you need at a price you can afford. Right now, next right thing listeners can get one hundred dollars off your first month on talk space to match with a therapist who's right for you go to talk space dot com or download the APP use the code next right thing. All one word to get one hundred dollars off your first month. That's talk space dot com or talk space in your APP store and use code next thing at checkout. Now, on today's episode. Listen. On June second, I released an episode called on racism. It wasn't the episode I planned. In fact, we already had another episode uploaded and ready to go. But as I paid attention to the conversation happening on social media and in the news that day and in my own community. On June second two, thousand and twenty. It became clear that the episode I'd planned was not the right fit for the day. So I wrote a new one at nine pm the night before that episode went live. Something was rising in our country and something was waking up in me. A, took a few minutes to record that Short episode. And that was the beginning of season of lament. It's now been four months since that day that we all put black squares in our instagram feeds. And I know the messaging in origin of those blackout Tuesday post might have become a little bit confusing in some of the initial intentions of that original initiative might have been lost in the frenzy in the fast paced nature of social media. But I remain grateful for that day because I know that for some of us that day marked the beginning or maybe a new beginning a moment that we can point back to and say that was the day I made a decision to be more than not resist. That was a day. I decided to be anti racist. I think sometimes were hesitant to mark the beginning of something especially when it comes to something as important as racial healing because you worry that to say that day was the beginning for me implies that before that day you were indifferent or ignorant of the injustice or the pain in that doesn't necessarily have to be true. But marking moments is important like Ronald, Roy, Heiser says in his book the Holy Longing we get into trouble whenever we do not name things properly. In this case to deny that the summer of twenty twenty was a turning point for me and my understanding of my own privilege is to risk letting the moment slip into the background. To refuse to market for me personally. Means maybe I will forget to learn to listen and to do the work. This is not merely for a moment. This is for the long haul. When we decide something is important. We prioritize it. We it on the calendar, we practice it and we continue to bring it to mind. One Way to continue this work of anti-racism for me is to return to this conversation here on the podcast, the space that I want to steward well by providing a safe space for every listener not just the ones who look like me. I share this not because I think I'm doing it right or even well, whatever that actually means but sharing it for two main reasons first because I know some of you, some of my white brothers and sisters listening might be in the same place as me having been profoundly impacted by the events of the summer and maybe motivated at first to actively learn and grow in our understanding of more of the history of our country and to listen to the stories of the people who live here. But perhaps in the last four months, you've felt at a bit of loss to know what does it actually look like to be racist in my everyday life. The second reason that I wanted to talk about this today is because after writing and talking about some of the things I was learning about being anti-racist back in June heard from a reader aimed Toya who thanked me for talking about it instead a phrase I haven't forgotten. She said, I think I'm so used to matters like this not being on the radar of the white people in the media whose work I listened to or read a truly didn't expect for it to mean that much to me but it did. Toyah, I want to say to you and to all of my black and Brown brothers and sisters were listening my next right thing is to let you know I'm still listening. I still believe you. I'm still learning. I'm still sorry. The learning and the listening will never stop. So. What does it look like to be antiracist in her everyday life? What is our next right thing? I've already mentioned listening and learning to be key in this practice. So with that in mind, I just wanted to share some practical scaffolding and maybe these few action steps might help you to. Number one like I said, learn and listen for me. That looks like creating a system for organizing quotes, articles and resources that I wanNA save. For example, I spend a lot of time on instagram. So whenever I come across a quote graphic or helpful resource that explains something I didn't fully understand before like unconscious bias or the difference between race and ethnicity I save it to a collection in my dashboard that I've titled Simply the work in if you don't know how to save things in collections when you're on an image. That you want to save look for the little bookmark ribbon icon. It's in the bottom right hand corner, and if you hold that down a little screen POPs up at the bottom that says save two, and then you can choose a collection or create a brand new one to save things that you want to go back to and remember. So I do that both with resources and things that teach me something. But I also do that with stories, personal stories and narratives that I just WanNa remember in hold and learn from. So that's number one. Number two, Pace yourself for me. That looks like reading one book at a time I know it's a shocker. Don't get me wrong. I'm always reading several books at a time but when it comes to understanding race relations racial healing in the invitation to bring peace and humility to this conversation, it's helped me to stay focused by reading one book at A. Time for example in June I read a book called one unity in a divided world what took me. So long to finally read this book by Real Life Friend Dietrich's I will never know because I've had the book for years, but I finally finished it to the very last page and I'm grateful that she took the time to write all of down. Mainly, the feeling I had at the end of the book was hope gratitude and a profound longing for God, who is at this very moment in the business of making all things new. Are, also finished a book called be the bridge that a lot of you have heard about and have read that's written by Latasha Morrison and I finish what lies between us, which is a workbook that coincided with a course led by Dr Lucretia Berry. Dr Barry's course taught me so much about the history of racism in our country and she models her mantra. So well, which is to be people of peace with voices of hope doing the hard work of love. Third and finally to add some scaffolding to this practice of being anti-racist in our every day lives. is to simply practice humility. This means embracing discomfort. I don't like it but as part of the deal being human among humans means sometimes we just don't understand each other and we certainly don't understand what we don't understand. So we have to ask awkward questions and take small steps toward each other timidly wondering if we're saying or doing something wrong. I cannot state this enough. It's okay to be a beginner. An end are humble beginnings. It's vital that we learn to lament. This may not be a word you're used to hearing or using much less practicing but lament in the Bible is simply a complaint followed by a petition. And finally a resolution in other words it stating something isn't as it should be it's asking God to make it right and it's trusting him to bring it about. I mentioned be the bridge already in in that book Tasha says the purpose of lament is to allow us to connect with and grieve the reality of our sin and suffering. It draws us to repent connection with God in that suffering. She goes on to say lament serves an effort to change. God's mind to ask him to turn things around in our favor limits seeks God as comforter healer restore in Redeemer Somehow the act of lament reconnect us with God and leads us to hope and redemption. Grateful for her words and grateful for what she's teaching me about what it means to lament and I'm grateful that these women who have been learning from the summer and into the fall have taken the time to do their own work to share with us. Their own experiences and I'm I'm grateful. To receive them and to learn from them. I want to close with the same prayer I shared earlier this summer with a few lines added in. Maybe you'll want to pray these words along with me. May I hold my own responsibilities with the same care? Reverence and humility I ask for from our leaders. May. I use my voice to speak up and stand with even if I stand out. May I not underestimate the power of an honest dialogue and a loosely held agenda. May Not. Be afraid to examine my own heart in the presence of God. May I continue to seek? God's image as it shines through the lives of our black brothers and sisters. May I know when to speak up? And Wednesday silent. Win I. AM silent. Maybe because I'm learning and listening and not because I'm afraid. May it be so in the name of the father, the son and the Holy Spirit. Thanks for listening to episode one, Forty, seven of the next right thing. I hope this simple practice of being an instrument of peace can be just one more rung on the Trellis upon which your rhythm of life can continue to grow. Because while it's true. This is a podcast about making decisions. The bigger truth is that our daily decisions are actually making our lives. As. Always, you can find me in a transcript of every episode at Emily P, Freeman Dot com and you can find the on instagram at Emily Freeman. Thank you for journeying with me as I continue to learn what it means to be an anti-racist ally in the Kingdom of God. Hope, you're with me in it and I know there's so much could learn from. So many of you the last four months have been for me a time of grieving of confession and repentance and like we talked about lament. It's also been a time considering how I can continue to not only learn from the black women in my life, but how I can use my space vigilance to share their wisdom talent and artistry with my corners of the world. I'm paying attention. It's my next right thing. I'll close with another prayer. This one attributed to Saint Francis. Lord make me an instrument of your peace. Where there is hatred let me so love. Were there is injury pardon. Where there is doubt. Faith. Where there is despair. Hope. Where there is darkness. Light. And where there is sadness joy. Granted I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console. To be understood as to understand. To be loved as to love. For it is giving that we receive it is important. That we are pardoned? And it is in dying that we are born to eternal. Life. Thanks for listening and I'll see you next time.

emily P Freeman instagram twenty twenty Toya Toyah Holy Spirit Latasha Morrison Dietrich Dr Barry Tasha Emily P Dr Lucretia Berry Ronald Brown Saint Francis Heiser
How to Overcome Insecurity, According to Hollywoods Favorite Therapist [Ep. 15]

Airplane Mode

56:17 min | 1 year ago

How to Overcome Insecurity, According to Hollywoods Favorite Therapist [Ep. 15]

"I don't think we understand confidence. Let me say anymore bluntly I think that a lot of US confuse confidence with arrogance and Bluster Anna Anna complete lack of recognition of one's own flaws and insecurities. I think part of what has to happen in our society is a deeper understanding of what confidence actually is. Confidence can't exist in the absence of insecurity. Every human being insecure every human being is afraid and a person who is willing to actually admit that is actually more confident than the person who refuses uses to admit it because it takes courage to admit that you're insecure. What's up airplane mode listeners? This is your host Klay Skipper. This season were exploring the theme of confidence most of our conversation so far have been with people who have detailed well how they got their particular type of confidence today. We're going to be doing something a little bit different. We're going to be exploring self-doubt or insecurity so my guest is Dr Barry Michaels. The psychotherapist I I. I came across Dr Michaels in a Great New Yorker Story. That sort of showcased him as the therapist in confidence whisper to Hollywood so a screen writers who are struggling with writer's block or actors who weren't able to deliver performances they wanted to. They went to see Dr Michaels and he unlocked their best most creative selves selves. The way he does this or the sort of working theory behind his work is something. He called shadow work or working with your shadow. The shadow is a psychological concept from Carl young young and in this episode Dr Michael is defined as an alternate self. That lives inside of you. That consists of all the qualities. You wish you weren't but our says basically all of your insecurities or the things you your shame or aren't willing to really show to the world to Dr Michaels work all about engaging with that shadow and trying to overcome these insecurities so that you aren't aren't hiding part of yourself and once you that you feel more confident and that affects your professional success. It affects your romantic relationships that affects how you just move and flow through the world to other things. I particularly particular enjoy about Dr Michaels. Work one is that he has worked with some very successful and very high profile people and they also struggle with self doubt and a lack confidence so if you really feel plagued by those things out there take some solace knowing that pretty much everyone is doubting themselves on some level and also he's been doing this work for decades now and it does seem to be very resonant successful with a lot of people so if you're skeptical or cynical and I understand why you might be. This episode. goes deep into feelings emotions. He puts me through an exercise. That involves me engaging with my shadow that left me feeling vulnerable. Give it a chance because I do think I do. Think he gives a lot of techniques and actionable advice on how to overcome your insecurities in gain greater sense of confidence. So I think of the episodes we've done might actually be the most practical. You WanNA learn more about Dr Michaels in his work. Check out the tools book dot Com. Hopefully you find some tools in here for you to use. Here's my conversation with Dr Barry Michaels. All right Dr Michaels. I'm so excited to have you on the podcast. We have spent the episodes. We've recorded season two so far talking to you. People who display some level sort of elite confidence we've talked to a cave diver and NBA sharpshooter Master Trash Talker. And so I'm excited. Have you on to talk about a little bit of the flip side of that coin. which is I think something? We all struggle with which is self doubt so before we do that though I want to set set some table stakes. So how would you define confidence like what is confidence in in your conception of it you know to me. Confidence is the felt experience that you can act in the world and have an impact on the world if you have to be on your own in order to feel confident. You're really not confident so to me. Confidence has a lot to do with how you function in the world now also has to do with how you speak to yourself and how disciplined you are in your life but the people that I treat who are really confident have a sense. It's just an experience of themselves as masterful in the world is what I would call it. You can call it anything you want. But I think if if you've ever felt confident you're in your life you know what I'm talking about. It's a sense that I really know my stuff when it comes to this situation or that situation whatever whatever it is and when we speak of people you work with how many people that come to see you generally struggle with some form of self doubt or insecurity everyone everyone everyone. Yes and this is one of the most important things that I can say to people because we have a real myth in our society which which is that. There are some people whether it's because they're so wealthy or so famous or so accomplished or whatever that they've somehow graduated beyond insecurity and I'm telling you I treat some of the most wealthy successful people in the world and every single one of the has been is insecure. Thank God because it keeps me in business but but insecurity is built into the experience of being being human. I mean if you if you step back from it for a moment and think about life and all living beings whether it's plant life or animal life we are the only only living beings who have the knowledge that we're going to die. I mean that's insecurity defined. You cannot not be insecure with that knowledge. It's scary and I really feel like we do a disservice by setting up a group of people people who seem because of the way they behave the way. They're portrayed in the media to have gotten rid of that insecurity rather than saying to ourselves know. Oh everybody has to battle with this and if you can't deal with insecurity in the right way you can never really be confident. So That's interesting has to be it. It has to actually be built off of the experience of insecurity. Es because I was GonNa ask you where insecurity sort of comes from. Because obviously I. I would say that we're not born with it but it seems like you're saying some of it comes or a large portion of it comes from the fact that it's end and at some point some of it comes from that existential feeling of we are temporary. You know we own We are our fragile beings in this world and it is going to get away from us at some point but I agree with you in a more personal sense. Insecurity comes uh-huh developmentally as a child becomes aware of him or herself and in particular becomes aware acutely absolutely of those qualities that they have that are disapproved of by their environment. and IT SORTA depends on the type of family. You grow up in if your family family disapproves of you know sadness you know. It's like a cheery family and everybody's supposed to be happy all the time then the sad part of you. You're gonNA feel insecure insecure about that because it's disapproved of later on by the way you move outside the family into systems that have different different values from the family for example in boy world. It's gotten better than when I was a kid but it's still not great to be shy to be eh sad to feel vulnerable to get your feelings easily her to be insensitive and so those qualities get pushed away from your identity the problem with pushing the qualities away with sort of repressing them in a way is that they're still there haunting and from that point forward you have this fear. which is that? Somebody's going to see those qualities. What we're really talking about by the way is the concept? It's it's a union concept of the shadow which is kind of an alternate self that lives inside of you that consists of all of the qualities. You wish wish you weren't but are the shadow is the source of a tremendous amount of insecurity. Because you can't get rid of it. Those qualities are there where you were born with them. But if you don't like them if you're constantly disapproving of them then you're constantly hiding them and then you're constantly afraid that other people we'll see them and that's the source of insecurity. I didn't expect to get into it this early but I literally came from a therapy session two hours ago where we were discussing discussing this very thing about you know My family is a family where we did not really engage in feelings very much which which is not to say. There weren't feelings but we didn't really discuss them or label them or have the language to talk about them which was probably unsettling for for a small the child so and so a lot of my insecurity does stem from sort of. You're not supposed to be vulnerable. You're not supposed to show emotion things like that. That is my shadow in some in ways. Yeah so do you mind if I work with you a little bit and just as a way of demonstrating how I would work with that shadow. Absolutely yeah I'd love to do that. Great so close your eyes and take some feelings that you do have inside of you and that if possible. Maybe you feel leery of expressing if not ashamed of them And just take the feelings and push them out in front of you and give them a face a figure that looks something like you might be the younger or it might look worse than you because you know you don't like this part of you. Obviously it was disapproved of But try to feel. Feel as if this thing that you're seeing in front of you is real now just to start with. What are your impressions of him? Like how do you feel about him. I immediately go to like a very shy middle. Schooler sort of bookish and sits sits at the front of the bus reads. His book keeps to himself his quiet and feels out outside for some reason. Yes so oh. He doesn't belong in some way Yeah and how do you feel about him like if you were to like introduce him to other other people would you feel proud of him. Shamed him embarrassed of him. I feel sort of tender and compassionate towards him grow. I I up but I would not want him to be seen by other people sort of like a little brother that you don't want like you love but you don't want hanging around exactly like we're fine when we're home alone but I don't want to bring you out with my friends kind of thing exactly. Yeah yeah great okay. So look into his eyes ask him like this. You can use your own words but the basic question is what is it like for you that. I am kind of ashamed aimed view when we're around other people like I WANNA hide you. How do you feel about that? How does it make you feel? So I'm asking that to him exactly and don't worry about making his response. Let him actually respond. Ask Him and then so what he says. You have to do it out loud if it's uncomfortable but what. Yeah lonely I think is is the word that jumped out to me. God now. Have you ever felt lonely in your life. Certainly yeah good. So so what I want you to do is again look into his eyes with that feeling of loneliness inside of you and say to him. I know what it's like to feel lonely and I'm really sorry I made you feel that way. You have any response to that. I feel like it's posture. Just sort of it became less. Close off now ask him like this. I'm speaking you know clay homey something. Even if it's small something the thing that I could do in the next twenty four forty eight hours that would make you feel like I've chosen a new path like I'm changing my relationship with you in regard to this this thing of hiding you in front of other people. Well I would not hide side you know. Sometimes I read books and I feel ashamed. Because they're leg self healthy if you will and and like I'll place them face down on like when I'm out to what if I go out to read at dinner. Something place them face down so other people don't see them And so not doing that. Yes so he would like you not to place them face down to sort of declare. I'm reading a self help book. Fuck you excuse. Excuse my language no. That's okay yeah definitely yeah okay so what you can open your eyes what you and I just did. Was this sort of classic shadow work and see what I would recommend to you. If this were you know bonafide therapy recession is. I would say to you number one. Just interact with him a little bit every day just conjure up. The image apologized to him for having left him alone and made him feel rejected. And then when you're out and about during the day try to carry his image inside your consciousness when you're in front of people particularly when you're talking to people so that and you don't have to describe it to them you don't have to tell them anything about him if you don't want to but what you're doing is telling him just simply by holding his image inside of you as you're talking to other people what you're telling him is. I am not ashamed of you. I will not hide you. I own you oh as a quality of me I mean you can see naturally how that has a bearing on confidence because if if you are even if you're not aware of it if you're hiding such an important introspective intellectually curious part word of you if you're hiding that you can't possibly be as confident as you could be if you owned it. It was just like yeah. That's that's that's who I am and again this is not about blaming parents. Parents automatically have value judgments I had value judgments with my kids and so we unwittingly but in evidently create shadows in our kids and it's up to them to own their shadows that's to me that's part of the work work of adulthood becoming a fully fully like realized adult is owning the parts of you that you actually feel good about you were made to feel bad about will totally and it's it's interesting that the place that I saw was on the bus because I think that that you know certainly even if my family was not a place where feeling was that present. It's also sort of like a generalized course people that grew up with and whether or not they were that way or they weren't actually that way that sort of the narrative or story. I've I've decided to tell myself about that time to your points. Not all at least in my case not all the the family one hundred percent also by the way just. I don't know if you've noticed this but buses are shadowlands. 'cause everybody's awkward word at surrounded by strangers. You're you don't want to good impression because you don't really want to court contact with people but yeah you definitely don't leave a bad impression. You don't want to become the shadow of the bus. You know kind of yes but it's also interesting because I don't think I think represent as the opposite of that use very outgoing and charismatic. So I don't know it's interesting and by the way that's very common where the persona that we adopt is the opposite of what our shadow is really like and again. This doesn't mean that you have to go round declaring that you're a bookworm. It doesn't matter what other people know or don't know it's just about self acceptance when you can accept the parts of you that you think are bad or are you know degrading in some way or that make you feel insecure when you can accept those parts you. You're confident So let's talk about about that so when you don't do that shadow work or you don't accept those parts of you. How does that usually manifests? What people who who deal with sort of deep self doubt got an insecurity like what are the ways in which that most commonly manifests itself? Well the most immediate way is that people start to avoid situations that risk revealing their shadow. You know this is why public speaking is the number one fear in every single survey. That's ever done. It's actually ranks higher in people's minds than death which leads to that great Seinfeld oke where he says so that means at a funeral most people would rather be in the casket than delivering the Eulogy Joke. But it is a good job. Yeah so public. Speaking is a classic example. Because there's no way to control people's perceptions of you and if the crowd is big enough there's no way to even know the crowds perception of you because there's no way to focus enough attention on each person to figure out. What the hell do they think of me so? Public speaking is shadow land. It's it's a place ace where people automatically reveal their their shadows or at least fear revealing their shadows. And it's and it's why people are afraid of it but there can be other the areas that you avoid because you feel ashamed of your shadow. It might be going up to you. Know someone that you admire or are are attracted to and you can't do it because you feel like this ogre living inside of you and you don't want to see it it might be confronting your boss. It might be asking asking for a raise it might be you know a situation where you wanna be creative but you're afraid it's going to be bad which it probably will be at least in the first I five drafts and you can't get yourself to do it because you can't tolerate the fact that it's bad it's shadowy so that's the first manifestation is that if you don't don't have a good relationship with your shadow you stunt your own potential because you spend more energy hiding your shadow than just letting it out doing what you're meant to do and knowing that it will be perfect and embarrassing. It sounds like a lot of it has to go back to your original point about about a way of being in the world. It's a lot of it has to do with our ability to tolerate uncertainty on yes or inability to tolerate uncertainty and our the inability to tolerate disapproval and judgment that holds people backs to such a huge degree agree. We're so afraid of what people think of us so again when you love your shadow and feel that you're in an unbreakable the alliance with your shadow. Then you can go out there and say and do anything you want if someone disapproves of you fine. I respect that it's fine but it doesn't change who I am because my identity rests in the relationship with my shadow rather than in my relationship with some outside person who may be judging me for reasons of their own by the way yeah. Do you have thoughts on why it is that people who are high-achieving achieving and very traditionally and superficially may be successful struggle so much with their shadow. And you know those are the people like you said is society citing book Admiral. Right they will. They should feel confident they have everything will because classically people go into I mean all of my patients are in the entertainment industry. People go into the entertainment industry with positive motivations by the way as well but I'm just going to focus on the negative motivations they go into who it particularly actors to court approval and attention. They crave positive attention. And I'm not saying. Every actor ever retreated craves positive attention but most of them get into it because because of that and really the strange thing is that in order for them to be truly successful as an actor they have to be willing to court disapproval. Because you can't act for the audience you have to act in accordance with who the character is and in order to act in accordance with who the character is. You have to be willing to say people might hate this character. And that's it's fine with me in fact if they hate this character I've succeeded because this is a bad character Bad Person Yeah. I'm just take Joaquin in Phoenix. Playing the joker. That guy can't go into that part courting approval. Yeah Yeah Yeah exactly. What about though like by Miami? It goes to do some people who have you know. I don't want to armchair diagnosed anybody but I'm thinking of people who are sort of competitive psychopaths whose his name's might rhyme with like Schmidt. I'm Jay or Schweiger Woods and like who have you know. Used their shadow. Oh to get to a level of dominance or superiority that some other people have never been able to achieve. I mean obviously there are downsides to that but it also has catapulted them to a pretty rarified air no yes and but I wanna make sure I understand. What are you asking about that? Uh like how we're able to become successful by allowing their shadow to take over. Essentially they were never good enough. I guess is volume. Say and they were never gonNA. I WanNa be good enough and as good as they were. They probably weren't good enough. That speaks to some deeper insecurity but it also seems to be an insecurity that had D- certainly may be Destructive in their personal lives forces but in there you know in the one area where they were channeling that somewhat. You could say if you're just basing it on Athletic Eric Prowess and Athletic Excellency. Constructive forces well. Yes so look. People come into any business but particularly not the entertainment industry with lots of different motivations. Some come in just with the desire for power and for for approval and popularity or what you're really describing isn't popularity. It's just raw power. They want power and and in that way. If that's your motivation having a bad relationship with your shadow is actually a good motivational system. Because by trying to get rid of your shadow hide it to the greatest degree possible. You can manipulate the most number of people so I I have no doubt vote. That psychopathology is a strength. If your goal is power if your goal on the other hand is a a good life with a degree of power then I recommend you do shadow work because you'll never have a good life without your shadow. If there's this alternate being living inside of you who is lonely and who feels alienated and who feels hopeless bliss that you'll ever recognize him or love him in any way you are going to be unhappy person for the rest of your life because from from time to time he will take over and you will feel all of the desolation that he feels twenty four hours a day seven days a week so we want a separate two things one is what the external world rewards and sometimes it rewards psychopathology. You know. That's it's just you just look around you. That's pretty yeah yeah. It doesn't take a genius to realise that but I'm not in that business. My my business is maximizing the potential of the person and also the personal satisfaction of the person and that requires that you come to terms terms with the shadow. And that you deal with him and that you forged an alliance with him that's unbreakable. I was GONNA ask sort of what I mean. Just in our current socio issue of climate like how much of everything that's happened could be described to a crisis of confidence in some ways. Well you know I think part of what's happening and is that we as a society really need to redefine confidence. I don't I don't think we understand confidence. Let me he's eighty more bluntly I think that a lot of confuse confidence with arrogance and bluster and complete lack of of recognition of one's own flaws and insecurities so people who act arrogant and overconfident. Some people actually believe that. That's true confidence now. I know that that's wrong. I know it's wrong. Because they've had people come into in my office and act that way and within five minutes. They're crying as I've gotten them to reveal just how scared they are inside and how all of that is just pure bluster luster. It's just bullshit but a lot of us just take a superficial view of life and we actually think that that's confidence and so we vote. Vote for it with our social media posts or whatever it is and are literal actual votes because we wish we could be that way in a sense we respected rather than seeing through it and that I think part of what has to happen in our society is a deeper understanding Of what confidence actually is confidence. Can't exist in the absence of insecurity. Every human being is insecure every human being is afraid and a person who is willing to actually admit that is actually more confident than the person who refuses to admit it because it takes courage to admit that you're insecure. That was going to be another one. That questions is sort of. It's not a purging of that insecurity. It sort of learning to live side by side with it. Sounds Yes yes I will tell you that. In the last five years I've launched a new career as a public speaker and I- I openly admit to the audiences that I speak to that I was terrified of public speaking. I mean truly truly tariff The first like ten workshops I gave I woke up in the morning and felt like I was a condemned man being led to the gallows Gallos. I every fiber of my being didn't want to go and I have become confident not because I wasn't insecure but because I acted in spite of the insecurity I did it over and over and over again. The last time I spoke I spoke to fifteen hundred people by the way after Bruna Brown which is a real trip. Because she's asking what she she she will teach you to be vulnerable. So that's holy. ooh Ellie one good thing totally totally and because I acted in spite of the fear. I'm one hundred times more confident. Now that I was so in a weird okay part of what I WANNA teach people is that you can use fear as a guide in there is fear. Tells you what you could do but are insecure about and if you do it you get less and less insecure and afraid of it. And that's what confidence is. It's not the absence of fear. It's the overcoming of fear. You know one of the things I've learned in my time in therapy. Is that a lot of these emotions like fear and insecurity we we feel great. Shame about but the shame will keep you from curiosity are asking why and so two zero point like what is the fear there to show you and if you try to stuff it away then you're never going to actually be able to look at it and see it and maybe have it transformed into something else. I yes yeah exactly. I've gotten to the point where I use my fear as guide like if I'm really afraid of something I've reached the point where I say to myself. That's something I have to do a half to do it because ligament sample public speaking. That's the best example I have if there there are moments where you feel confidence lacking say before you have to speak to a large audience or even if it's just in a session with the client Dan. I mean what are some steps you take in that moment to sort of I guess supercharge your confidence or or what do you do disorder to to work with your insecurity in that moment. The thing that I do the most often that works the best is shadow work so I take the part of me. That's insecure cure. That's really scared. That really does feel like a condemned man leading Keno going to the gallows and I pushed the feelings out in front of me. which in itself is worth the price price of admission? Because at least I'm not feeling you know they're like right in front of me where I can deal with them and then what I do is I look deeply into his eyes and what I say is this you and I are about to get up in front of a group of people and we're GONNA talk. Here's my promise to you. I love you now and I will love. You just is much when this is over. I don't give a shit how well or poorly it goes. I don't care if anyone likes me or hates me. You who are my first priority. We were born together. We're GONNA die together nothing else matters except that you and I are together in this experience ads and usually that has a really calming effect on me because it puts my priorities back in the right place which is inner peace piece an inner sense of like I know who I am and if people don't like this they don't like it it's it's okay with me kind of thing and you. I assume you teach that shadow or to your clients correct. Absolutely I would end a forty. To fifty percent of my work is with the shadow. How receptive are your clients to that work in that idea because when you just did it on me like you know I've I've been doing therapy? I am a little willing to go there but even in the moment I'm feeling kind of like uh-huh this is awkward. This is embarrassing. You know like this sounds a little crazy and I'm sure I can't be the first person to feel that way so you know I'm sure people who listen to this fulfill that as well. Some curious perceptive people are and how you sort of get them to buy into the idea and then maybe what results come from it they get people to come back and say Holy Shit. You know this works. Yeah I that's a great question. I do not experience much resistance. Wow interesting yeah partly. Because given therapeutic conditions I find that people are much much more receptive but the other thing you should know about me. Is I m just the least dogmatic person you'll ever for me. If somebody has a hard time shadow work which I'd say maybe twenty percent of people. Do I go to something else. I don't I don't really care to me my job job to find the thing that works and then teach them tools for sustaining that after they leave my office because the therapy happy doesn't really let me put it this way. The healing doesn't happen in the office. It happens in real life situations outside of the office office where I've given the person tools whatever. The tools are whether they involve the shadow or not tools to use in situations that make them feel uncomfortable or insecure. And how often when people you know you mentioned that a lot of people who come in who work in entertainment industry come in or get into the entertainment mystery because they want to you know they're seeking approval in some way when they can front Chatto and they come to whether it it'd be full terms or some sort of terms with their shadow and they may be give up the need for approval. Do they then lose their passion Shen for acting or being entertainment industry because now and that was no. I think it's the contrary. Actually what I've found is that look. Everybody goes into what they do with mixed motivations. Some of the motivations are impure like needing attention or whatever but some part of them also Oh really wanted to act like really wanted to have that experience of descending down into a character and becoming that character after I mean actors love that no matter how narcissistic or how much they want attention they also really enjoy the experience of morphing into another human being. I love that experience and I'm not an actor. So I can defy with you know with how they feel what I find actually is that after they work with the shadow. They're even even better at their craft because they've lost all self consciousness. They're just not afraid of how anyone views them. They can take notes more easily because they don't get defensive again because defensiveness comes out of insecurity and a need to project a positive image and anytime you get a note. The person saying you did it wrong long essentially but what. What's what's even more like? Satisfying for me is that I see them going for it in a fuller way because there's no part of them hanging back or holding back in any way if a client comes in to do the work with you and they are just Deeply insecure they're just struggling with some serious insecurity and they commit to the shadow work overtime. They become more confident. I'm curious how you would characterize describe the difference in how they exist in the world or what their aura or they're sort of vibe or frequency is like you know after they've done the work and become more confidence than it wasn't I came in and they were insecure like what are the telltale signs. Yeah Yeah I mean there at least two telltale signs. It happened almost with almost almost everyone. The first is they take greater risks in in air career. Because they're not as afraid of exposing their shadow. It's it's like if you see my shadow it's fine with me in fact I'm glad if you see my shadow so remember that one of the worst consequences of hiding are feeling ashamed of your shadow. Is You stay away from situations where your shadow might be revealed and those are professionally the most satisfying justifying situations. Because those are the riskiest. Those are the situations where you really stretch where you're really like on the wire on the high wire doing the High Wire Air Act but the other thing that happens that in some ways it's even more important is that their relationships become more authentic. See if you're hiding your shadow auto. You're hiding apart of yourself that is integral to who you are and your partner. Even if he or she has never heard of the shadow auto knows. They know that. There's something hidden because people aren't stupid they just know that there's something inauthentic going on and most host of US hide our shadows from one another particularly the more intimate a relationship gets the closer it comes to the most embarrassing parts of the shadow shadow and so we hide it. Even more those things get hidden. and that creates a kind of a superficiality or an inauthentic city to the relationship. Will if you're comfortable with your shadow then you're bringing all of you to the table and when you bring all of you to the table. The other person is much more likely to bring all of them to the table and so- relationships become much richer and more satisfying and frankly more interesting testing because it's not the same thing every day. It's like God. I felt this today or my shadow was thinking that today or you know whatever does is what I'm saying making sense because it's so so hard to describe this but if you're hiding part of yourself you don't realize you're being inauthentic and without realizing it you're telling the other person your shadow isn't welcome here. It does make sense to me. I think the the thing I'm that just occurred to me is sort of when you hear that sort of insecurity around you're always performing forming right and then yeah in that way is like being cures is sort of a form of self absorption in a way. Because you're always thinking about how am I coming off. How Am I? How is my performance being received and that keeps you from getting out into the world right and so that would necessarily it would make sense that that would make affect your relationships and make them less authentic and so yeah I think it does? It definitely makes sense Klay. That's really well said and that's another point and I'm glad really glad that you brought it up you don't realize it but when you're insecure when you're self conscious you're being une giving 'cause you're holding back parts of yourself because you're embarrassed of them. What the other person experiences is not that you're protecting yourself but that you're being aloof? Cold on giving withholding holding. So when you're comfortable with your shadow you're not holding on so tightly and you can give more energy to the other person and what I find. Is that when you give energy to. People they blossom They just they just feel comfortable. They settle in and they're much much more relaxed and willing to reveal parts of themselves and that's how authenticity and intimacy really occur yet. I'm just thinking the word Aloof. It's like I'm imagining in that hypothetical connection or you know meeting the two people go away and they probably both think that other person didn't like me very much rakes aches and it's like but but not that's not true it's just. They're projecting their own security under an. It's like how many times that happened in the world. Exactly it happens all day every day. Exactly is this different from imposter syndrome. Because that was one thing I want to discuss that you but imposter syndrome just seems like maybe a symptom symptom of this larger shadow one hundred percent. Yeah the way I would explain imposter syndrome is. It's the feeling of fraudulent. You get when you become aware that the image. You're projecting doesn't include big big parts of who you are It's it's different different from in other words I'm judicious about what I reveal about myself to other people I'm picking and choosing but if I'm I'm denying parts of myself if I myself have a judgment about parts of myself then I'm working hard to project a false image of myself and it's work that you're doing that creates imposter syndrome. It creates that uncomfortable Mismatch between who you are and this image that you're projecting of yourself and the amazing thing is people with imposter syndrome. are usually exhausted by the age. Forty because they spend so much energy trying to keep up this pretense offense is like they're constantly running an advertisement about themselves. You know kind of thing and that's exhausting. That is exhausting when I can work with with people like that and they start to feel comfortable with their shadows not only do they reveal more about themselves they just get a boost of energy. Because it's like Oh my God I can stop hiding reading so much totally. And if you keep that hiding it's like the face becomes the mascot some point right and that's I was reading that the John Diddy an essay on self respect and she has that great quote where she's talking about. You know you have to return to that devastatingly well at back alley. Where like you know yourself so so you can pretend to be one way but at the end of the day you're going to be you know the devastatingly well a back alley is is where you've grown up to come to terms with yourself and that it can be hard if you're performing some way all the time? I love that the the wording of that the back alley because I see shadows in their you know in territory definitely so I'm curious what role disciplined plays in confidence right. 'cause I'm almost thinking like the more times you work with the shadow and you show up for it the easier this becomes maybe like if you're disciplined and showing up and doing the work yes one hundred percent. It's really important to be disciplined with the shadow work. But it's also way beyond that. Think about it if you make a new year's resolution that you're gonNA to stay away from carbs and sugar and by day four year eating doughnuts. How much confidence can you have in yourself and this is really important? Horton because people need to know that a big part of self confidence is self credibility in other words. Do I believe that I. We'll carry out the commitments. I've made to myself if the answer to that question is yes that I'm going to be confident because I believe that when I make a commitment it will you'll be done but sadly if you ask most people if they really honestly believe they're going to carry out their commitments. Del Admit the truth which it is. Yeah we'll do it for three or four days and then I'll stop and then within a week I'll forget I even made the commitment. It is mathematically impossible impossible to be confident when you are constantly letting yourself down like that so people don't realize but there are parts of you that are watching watching what you do and when you make a commitment and then so easily break the commitment those parts of you lose faith in you and they should lose faith in you. You're not a credible partner So yeah one hundred percent self discipline is incredibly credibly. It's an incredibly important component of confidence if you can't believe in yourself you can't be confident now over time. If if you do you the shadow work do the sort of critical voices still come up and you just know how to deal with them or do they sort of after a while. I don't I think it's unrealistic to think that critical voices aren't gonNA come up. I mean again. I've treated people on their deathbed and they're still here in critical voices. It's just their relationship to those voices have changed has changed so dramatically that it's it's more like Oh yeah you again again. I guess you had to come to the picnic to find whatever. Yeah Yeah where we really get into trouble with. Critical voices is that we listen to them. And the critical voice convinces us that it's our voice and once you can start to differentiate who you are from who the critical voices. That's half the battle. They gain in their power from sheer repetition. Even if you just say that's the voice I don't listen to inside yourself within a couple of weeks that that voice won't have as much power he deconditioning away exactly. I'm just looking at this quoting I. From Joan diddy in that says the self respect is the willingness to accept responsibility for one's own life. I don't know why that's popping out to me but it's just interesting because it almost feels like in that respect. Confidence is sort of a harnessing of one's own agency but also like she says sort of being accountable to yourself in a way to that I think is powerful and interesting. That's exactly right and you can even substitute the word shadow. Oh for life and it would make sense in the context that we're the we're discussing. If you take responsibility for your shadow you can act actualize allies yourself in ways you never. You never realized were possible. So as a way of wrapping up. I just WanNa ask you for you know if someone listens to this and you know because I find I find this stuff very powerful and refreshing but I must have wear the not. Everyone is maybe as willing to believe as I am if someone came away from. This is feeling skeptical or cynical. I'm curious what you would say to them about why they should give this shadow work trier. What the benefits might be if they did give it a chance? I would tell them exactly what I tell my patients. which is I'm going to give you some tools if the tools don't work fire me because if the tools will work you shouldn't be paying for them? Yeah I'm not asking for true believers I don't I don't really Lee I'm not. I'm not a preacher. I don't anything but if they work then who cares why they work like you not even get into that. Just use them and if the person has particular problems with the shadow as a tool there are. I mean our books. There are gobs of other tools that you can use. That will have a very similar effect on you. I mean one of the tools that I sorta SORTA was tempted to mention earlier in the podcast is a tool called reversal of desire. It's a tool that's designed to get you to do things that you're afraid raid to do you avoid or that. You procrastinate on regularly and the reason it is important for confidence. Is that if you don't do do the things that you're meant to do. You can't be confidence. You gotta get yourself to do those things now. It's called the reversal of desire. Because there's always we some pain associated with taking action especially on things that are important to you. There's fear that it won't work out. There's fear that you won't do it. Well there's just the pain pain of getting yourself up off your duff and actually doing something like I feel that every single time I sit down to write. There's some pain about just having to having a writer sentence that I know is going to be crappy on the first draft that I'm GonNa have to edit over again. Yeah it's called the reversal of desire. Because are in and most natural desire as human beings is to avoid pain. It's just built into us. It's called the reversal of desire. Because what the tool does is it says. Bring bring it on bring on the pain. Not because I'm a masochist. But because I know it's going to be painful and I have to teach myself to move through pain to get get to the other side in order to overcome pain and that's exactly what the tool does is it it. Has You visualize the pain and as you visualize running running through the pain and getting to the other side and being free of the pain which then enables you to take the action step. I like that a lot of that doesn't involve the shadow at all. Yeah but no. That's great fisted tool but it's actually more effective for some people that's great. It's made me think of this author by the name of James Clear who wrote a book look all habits and he talks about like starting a new habit. I think he's specifically talking about going to the gym and he's talking about how it's painful and he's like each time you go. Oh you are casting a vote for your desired identity right so you want to be a person who goes to the gym but after three months of going to the gym everyday casting a vote for yourself by going to be the type of person who goes Jim you are now persons who does go to the gym and it sort of Zeinabieh of that exactly and that that has two points that are really important associated with it one is is. Your identity consists of your habits. Yes if your habits are bad your identity is gonNA be bad. You're not gonNA feel good about yourself if your habits are good. Your identity is going going to be stronger and the other thing I wanted to bring up that. I very often analogize tools to weightlifting We would never expect. Our bodies is to stay in good shape without exercising our bodies but we expect our minds to function without any intervention on our part and in my experience as a shrink. And just simply he has a neurotic human being my mind completely dysfunctions. The moment I stop using tools my mind needs to be exercised it. I need to put it through its paces in the form of tools in order for it to stay clear and creative and productive I like that yeah. I like that framework the mental Jim. Yeah exactly ackley. May I ask you what your shadow looks like. Well you know my show. I've been working on my shadow for thirty five. Years has taken many many different forms over that time. I'll tell you the first shadow. It again to which was a fifteen year old adolescent lesson kid standing for some reason at the corner of Chautauqua in sunset and pursue palisades. Which is where I grew up and I I went up to him and I said and I'd I'd like to talk to you? And he looked at me with the most cynical look I've ever seen. He gave me the finger and he said fuck you asshole and he walked away. Wow how's your relationship. Now yes much better. Good being disciplined and intrepid. I showed up every single day. I swear to God every single day. He gave me the finger and walked away down till about a month month and a half and and completely out of the blue. I walked up to him again and instead of giving me the finger. He put his arms on his hips and he said all right. What the fuck do you want? Why do you keep coming down here? And that was an opening that was that was my realization was are A. He's open to something and he. He and I began to talk about like what he was. So angry at me about which was basically that I had abandoned him. Head never expressed my anger to anyone under any circumstances because it was too unsafe to do that in my family and we became really really tight like really really good with each other But the reason I'm bringing it up as a to answer your question but B also to encourage people not to give up in other words. The shadow doesn't trust you and it doesn't trust you for good reason because you basically thrown it into the closet around people hasn't been a happy life for the he's is like your poor white trash relation so don't expect them to necessarily be your friend automatically just because you heard this podcast and decided added a show up for him at specked. Some resistance and persist every relationship requires persistence and it's no less true with the shadow. I love that that is a great place to end though. We do always ask one final question. So I'm going to ask you that. which is for a favourite? Fuck up favorite fuck up you know. What my favorite fuck up was in? It's not gonNA sound like a fuck up but for me it was. I became an attorney me before I was a therapist so I went into the wrong profession from me completely lately and it took me three long years actually six long years because three years of law school and three years of working at a law firm to realize. I could not do this anymore. And so in my eyes it was a fuck up. I mean it was like Jesus Christ. I wasted a lot of money a lot of time. What the fuck am I doing but the older I've gotten the more? I realized that it was an absolutely necessary step in my development because it trained my mind in ways is that nothing else could have. I mean this sounds a arrogant but I love the way my mind works as a result of law school. It just it. Just think so so logically and it's something. That's very helpful to me in therapy because I can see the logical traps that people get caught in and I can see when. They're being irrational irrational. Now fortunately I also have a really good heart and I'm able to connect with people so I don't want to make it sound like I'm a lawyer in the room when I'm supposed to be in the room but it's the kind of training that I wish everyone could have because it is truly a different way of thinking and you are never ever as on your toes when you're in a class of one hundred people and you're standing up in front of her Professor Who's taught contracts for twenty years and knows every every single trap that he can get you into an. You're working as hard as you can not to get trapped. And there he is he catches you in the trap and you have to sit down embarrassed. You know uh-huh so good training it was really really good training even though in a way it was a flop because it was a real detour from what I should have been doing. Well there you go these fuck fuck ups always turn out to not really fuck up. So that's and that's why we asked for them. Well thank you. This has been tremendous and I truly appreciate you sharing all those insights nights in working with me through that exercise. So thank you very much. I do appreciate it. You're welcome. I really appreciate the questions. Because they're deep and profound and I I love exploring these things things on a deep level all right we went deep today. I appreciate you guys listening if you are still listening. If you haven't turned off the episode thank you thank you Dr Barry Michaels. Thank you to our producer Jessica and molly. That is five down so far this season we've got five more to go. Hit the halfway point. If you guys are liking the podcast please subscribe. Tell some friends subscribe. Or maybe if they're not looking just going to their phone subscribed for them thank you uh also some of you guys have been reaching out to me on Instagram at Klay skipper or sending me emails. Klay underscore skipper at JICHI DOT com. I love hearing from you guys. I really appreciate all the feedback. Negative give or positive if it is positive especially if it's positive think about leaving review those help but happy to hear from you guys suggestions you have books you think I should read people I should have on. I'm always open to hearing that and I really do appreciate you guys listening and reaching out so that is offered this week. We'll be back next Tuesday with another conversation on confidence

Dr Barry Michaels US Dr Michaels imposter syndrome Klay Skipper writer NBA partner Hollywood Carl Dr Michael Anna Anna Jim Schooler Seinfeld Eric Prowess Schmidt Miami
THE NERD ON! UPDATE: Batman Suit Revealed, Sonic Movie, Rick Moranis, Nerd On! Live Show  EP41

Nerd On! The Podcast

30:15 min | 1 year ago

THE NERD ON! UPDATE: Batman Suit Revealed, Sonic Movie, Rick Moranis, Nerd On! Live Show EP41

"In in this update three to one. What is everyone? Welcome to the NERD on update. Baby we on your show Show we were talking about the stuff. That excited us in the news We answer your questions later in the show part of our patriots on a page the nerd on nation. You get what we call a nerd on nudge. And your questions get bumped to the front. I will answer them. They're so check that out at Navan Dot. Io Back Saas patron and don't forget y'all we got a live show coming up. March seven Apogee Studios Santa Monica. Bring your friends. I think some of the other day steal someone else's family and bring them with you as well. I would say that we're GONNA HAVE WE'RE GONNA GUESS WE'RE GONNA have a lot of prizes to give away we're GONNA be hanging out Join US since we don't do any introductions I don't have any news Tom I ain't takeaway so my news Happened earlier in the week. But it's still pretty because I'm the scene out saying that wasn't even English boy and So test footage of Robert Patterson in the Batman suit came out and It was delivered by one Matt Reeves who is best known for doing the planning the apes or finishing the point of the apes trilogy Who's the director and he released via his twitter on a video link And just hash tagged you know. Like all the Batman Stuff. And the way he's been revealing like rolling out certain information like. I've been kind of loving because it's just like here's an image. Hash Alfred and it's like I said Connor Coney and we'll show like John detoro but so speaking a little bit of the the footage It's a slow fifty second video slow fifty seconds time Pretty much close to close to the camera and the armor. The suit is much more. Armory isn't what Snyder's like more Mesh cloudiness. Ombu is all set to the music. Score of Mike. Giovanni who is going to be? Who is the The composer who best-known doing Things like from doctor strange and like planning the apes as well and a lot bunch of other things too. So it's the finding that I wanted to bring about. The news was that You know the Internet's fun. People are fine. People hate the terrible and it also Composer has gone to twitter and dislike started clapping back people who are talking so much shit realize yeah and so I mean one of the things I really liked with someone like. I don't really stay like this. You had like more of the ball Blah and then McConnell was like see the taken cordially disagree and then there's other people who are just like Oh. My God is absolutely downs. Like just like this comment. Sounds like Dang? This guy is commonly. Now it's so it's really cool He also did like far from home and stuff like that too. So he's very familiar with the world of superhero genre scoring so that but talking more about the suit No reveal of ears and a semi formed a bat symbol and a lot of people are piecing together that the bat symbol potentially could be created from the gun that was used to kill Bruce. Wayne's parents I think that's a leap. I think like you really into the image Is Cooled. That is that's actually got Like premiered or introduced as a mechanism that Bruce Wayne did During the Batman. One thousand that Kevin Smith wrote for Jim Lee. Oh Yeah Jim Louis Park. Yeah it's the first chapter of the thousand issue which I recommend everyone will get it. 'cause there's several copies of it with different variant covers So it was really cool thing to turn on the idea to turn Something that caused Bruce Wayne so much pain as well as like what with guns symbolize into something. That's always going to protect your heart. Protecting a lot of people are pointing out that the the metal used looks like the butt of a gun. Yeah yeah there's some some clip images and stuff like that that definitely I mean it does. Look like yeah. I'll be honest armor itself. I dug ARKHAM ASYLUM. A stickler the stitch fifties also the last caller. Yeah there's a little bit of a college I really like I really. I really noticed that. Do you think like not. Not showing the full cowl like maybe the tall ears Obama's taller so we're like wanting to see that and I don't know interesting like with Ben Affleck's it was like shorty as he was short with Christian Bale. It was like a little bit shorter. I mean it was ever. Since compared to Burton's Lebron had the longest shortest shorter shorter source. Now I know you think they're going to stick with the blue and gray or some. There was some rumors that it was going to be the blue and gray suit which I'm pretty hyped for now There's question right because I mean That's what matters said like he wants to make this the new war thing and keep it close to like iconography of the old days it used to be purely a black cowl grey suit purple gloves. It was the original the original original love. If it's like a dark blue like for most of it in the armor parts are like gray or something and so it's interesting and I I I'm excited for it. Yeah Yeah we'll see you nice. Oh no but usually sorry real quick. This suggests that they're going to be shooting most likely out in public somewhere because like I read something online where they made a point of like when they revealed the joker thing he was like right before they started shooting so it was like they're controlling. Yeah Yeah of course a smart rollout stipulate that way. I mean what? I've typically light that. I think what happens with Batman stuff? There's always test footed tickets released. It's really weird that it doesn't happen psychotic image Sarwan. Hello Hi thanks so my news is that sonic is blown off the box office for a video game tation movie it beat out. Detective Pichu Osh. No I'm glad video game adaptations are doing. Well sorry chance. They their launch furniture to be Jewish fifty. Four million honest was fifty seven and it's projected to be ninety eight million by Mo money I will say we don't know how global box globals one hundred million people beat it. Maybe because it's just so much bigger that's true. Yeah yeah they're probably omitting that piece of information where global probably not on there. I watched it so I having the conversation. Yeah I mean like in that sort of thing. What's like video game nations? You can't do unless you feature. I'm excited to see it. I mean my my people have been saying side. It was a pleasant surprise. Carry Fan Big Ben Schwartz Fan. I what I imagined what I think I'd want now. I think they do as a full. Cgi movie crossover between PGN Animal Animal Crossing Movie. Super Cell and you just pure pure perfectly for kids true. 'cause he's our kids movies and the ones are aimed for adults. Don't do that well. Well this one did. That is exactly. This ain't for like 'cause in November of last year is when it was supposed to come out but they had those you know the posters released and they saw the trailer released and everyone was like no no But I don't know if the movie would have would have done as well if the Internet didn't have that free. I mean it's like a whole thing of prices get press like you're saying the name. Sonics and more people are just aware exists true. I will also say like I. I WanNa have somewhat positive around fans or where? It's kind of like people were invested in the fact that like they wanted to watch this movie and they want that the sonic look good and so. I think what they wanted and their wallets. And they're doing it. So that's that's really cool to see that more of this kind of content coming to the forefront shout out to the team yeah one of them went under remember. We talked about that an update which was nice. I mean side to side news related to Tom's with Batman. Id W has a new board game coming this. I believe it post this week on kickstarter for a board game that has batman the animated series. So it really good Tom Excited about that. But the news that I am so fucking excited about is a couple of weeks ago. There is an article that was being posted on my feed and it was like Disney confirms that Rick. Moranis is not returning for the kids. Or honey I shrunk the kids and it was like. Oh Wambui who? I was really sad. But then this founded. That's exactly how I saw sound when I cry right way. We have Boohoo Josh. See I gotta get my name in there This week however it was confirmed that he is coming back. You heard the episode and was like who who's at what's it originally or a very Disney plus television show from what I'm seeing is it's called trunk. And it's going to be starring. Josh Gab. Shrimp Shrunk Shrunk. Are they used trunk? Say what the harness honey I shrunk the kids. How many trump the kids the kids in the trunk kidnapping snow with the kids decide? Oh wow very different computers and the thing is like I. I'm come out of retirement since his wife has also said. I don't know if you guys like like went to Disneyland before all of Marvel and all that of Garcia's kid show the ride the ride which is a wonderful thing which was like four d experience under your seats to and that's the thing where like I think. A lot of a lot of students are sitting on a lot of properties that they actually aren't using such as like honey. I shrunk the kids which people could be cool for an on. Like just in the same vein like ghostbusters. Whereas like it's kind of being set for a new generation but yeah I'm using some of the motifs from the last year so it doesn't alienate people but it's going to be are rated could actually pay to watch for Moranis to show three I to be perfectly honest doubt it. I'm the leader of that. So you know there's more of a reason to honey. I'm incredibly excited for this. He is an actor that I I really respect in all. He's done an for stepping away and being like no. This is what I do. I'm raising my family and for somebody who is so like I would say. He was such a high value celebrity at that time. And so to see this happen. I'm like wow that is always like the kids are grown up now. I gotTA shingle. So I'm really excited but Yeah the next part of our show is answering questions from the audience and Joe. My heart people so excited. Aren't you love? I Dude I love this part of the show I honestly do. It's such like a safe these questions for you. I such a nerd on I just. I really wanted reaches sure that everybody at home knows you can submit your questions two questions at nerd on dot. Tv and you can send them to direct message to any one of us have been slide in my God. Blessed DM's yes. Yes Tom but guess. Send US your questions and they can be anything. Jeremy Am asks. What is your favorite type of gemstone mineral or Rock Uncut Tom Cole? Righteous rightous gemstone mineral or rock. Guilty on three. I wonder if they're they're asked like Geo. D- Oh amethyst Amethyst custos name or is that pretty yeah Alexandra. It was always something that I found an interesting name. Your name. Yeah No. That's a cool looking rock to explain it to the people who are listening. It sounds okay. Caused were safe. Nerdy space reminds me of like the summit Alexander. From how has he looks Alexander shape okay? So you're going to summon some mystical beasts. Hell yeah okay. It is cool looking so we have Alexandra spoken with. This was the next one. Let's look like or civil as purpose for the Purple Gemstone It's IT'S A. It's my birth stone and Really look at it. I love like big big jobs of Amethyst. Boom are one of my favorite. Things is very pretty looking rock and gemstone. Yeah I've ever always been because it is my birth stone. It's just been ingrained in my head Paradiso though don't Greenstone Greenstone I'm also thinking French. But it's probably pair dot. Yeah I've been saying wrong. My whole life. Go this guy with Josh. I WANNA say my classroom is blue's favor I don't care about that one. How Keelan Tom all he does it alter like this one but you know also. GonNa talk to when he's allowed to churn though Kaylynn. I like hematite grand collar shape. Hematite is A. it's like a Black Mirror type of stone hematite. I'm typing in knowing it. It looks like a like chrome ish almost a lot of things out of it. One of those fake stones you get from the fake ones. Yeah on hasn't answered yet. I haven't I don't really go have a is Barrett Stone Mine my birth is overhaul but I mean like I feel like I do like jade like Asian conditioning everywhere. Like like seeing jade statues. I really like especially when they're not super hokey and like Jada jade jewelry like when they're like around gold which really cool but a lot of family a lot of turquoise that I was just yeah I have Where I grew up like kind of a Desert Mountain area though my dad would collect turquoise jewelry was made by people on a reservation. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA call in the fans in the nation real quick because there's a line from a show that cracks me up. I don't remember what show it was. One character says. That's IT I quit. I don't WanNa do I'm going to move to Arizona and sell Turquoise and the other person says you can't do that the market is flooded there. I can't stop thinking about that director. Jan was a while ago. I thought it was always sunny but I can't find it anyway Jadavpur Dragon Neymar Hematite. Opal Zero so nice. It's my birthday next question. Next question comes from Chase Chase Chase asks. I recently watched the film bright on Netflix and enjoyed it better than the second time. I was wondering if maybe you guys would do a podcast on the film one day. I'd love you guys forever and always if you did the new in Jesus Audits Yes I mean like Josh. Talked about this before with We had someone asked about tech ends so I mean we definitely have this pool of like suggested episodes that we we definitely need to start going through. Yeah needs to be fair. We have we do and we have done episode. Several episodes that are from that list through is instead of throwing US under the bus. Like he just did. I definitely need to get through them but I think yeah it's cool. So yeah definitely it's on this Have you guys all watch? The thing works will Smith with the Will Smith in the or with will Smith in the south on the net flicks. Or can I find out on the spoofing or the whoever you WanNa Watch stories will Smith added to the list and we'll work our way through it. Thank you for the message about that. I mean like I said before and I'll say it again on our website. There is a form that you can contact us through and you can say it is a topic request and you can send them over. We saved them. We add them to. Where can they find it? You can go to dot TV and then at the top There is a drop down menu that says contact and there is a selection that you can say topic request and send them. We allows us to better to exactly because we get to be perfectly honest. We get them a lot whether they are in social media comments whether they are in email we get them a lot and so we do appreciate them and do look at them. Yeah but this essentially Pixar onward seems to be a very similar setup not at all no nut up setup as far as the like concept of the universe no not at all. There's no racism in on right. Yeah because it's in La in their cops and it's all about raising women's living with ORCS right racism. I just meant like the fantasy element of it creatures work and Lord of the rings whatever. There's no it's okay. I'll get sore fancy elements like making their coffee in the morning or whatever. Yeah it's like world of warcraft and Training Day. Yeah together The next question Glasgow from yes. Thank you The last question comes from Wonka. The wizard actually a new member of the NERD on nation. Welcome to the Patriot nation. That's not what it's going twice. Okay ask if you guys could make your own superhero movie. Which Superhero would you go with? Who WOULD BE THE VILLAIN SLASH VILLAINS? And what would the plot be in this hypothetical question? You can also cross heroes and villains from different brands. Wow that is those your dream wet job of a movie that John. Off Now one only one left. Actually I already have an answer to this and it would be. We're so mad at you fucking great idea. It would actually be a movie based on by our official that we made Be Fun those of us that is apparently. You can't do a movie at the whole setup for everyone having movie. I don't know what we're talking about over several weeks. We we did a series of what we would be superheroes what are back story would be. What powers would be you can find that previous update episodes? I don't know off the top of my head. What number they are also love. Got Some really cool art from Our listener and nerd on nation member. Jd Maggie realize only think posted mind whoops while ago. Alvin would follow us. Cool be sick on a dream I mean I think I've talked about it on our extra show. Which if you're a patriot. You can list to Think I would have wanted to do you. Obviously Bam and beyond but then Blue Beetle but then the reading. Hbo Max Show So. I feel like I can talk about the one now because like now my dreams have gone so my blue beetle. Follow hymie raise. And he's in New Mexico and He is Hispanic But he lives amongst a lot of Indigenous Americans and A lot of the stories I really wanted or the themes I wanNA go about. Is that like? There's a lot of like I guess Marginalized youths in there and a lot of things get processed the system but then even allow them get lost in the cracks and get like sent off to human trafficking. And so it's like knowing those dangerous or out in the desert of the streets and also that He there are like small little pillars of technology and people trying to like resources to them one of them being headquartered and Ted Kord who is the original like the second blue beetle He You know has like a facility. That's like hey this is like to help you get into technology and stuff like that. And so that's where rates then find the blue beetle scarab and the bluebills scare much like a symbiotic Symbiosis Wow Like a Vietnam or like or like upgrade it has a personality of itself. We don't reveal that it's alien technology so far. We have like the way the misconstrue was like. It's magic because it was found in Egypt But headquartered would get murdered Assassin by death stroke and death stroke would be like The villain But then during the second act is when a transfer student from coast city came. Wally West no and so while he is like extra. Do a crossover with blue beetle and it would be like this blue origin and while the West has been like is just. He's just there and say oh it's like oh you're are you flash kidding. I'm wally kid flash and so it's like okay. It's like one of the teen titans while we're sitting here. It's like we just wanted to look this up and then not making a big international cause is identity wasn't exposed cordite but we don't know how and then you find out more. Oh death stroke did this to try to find the SCARAB And use it towards the Legion dooms purposes and the very end. It's like hi. Amy being like sad because he has no real mentors in his life sentence and then while he was like. I Have Barry Allen or you know have the other flash and all that stuff tad was his mentor but then he dies and because that's part of the Hero's journey where you mentor dies so they'll be a line when he's really sad and it'd be like a blue beetle sad. That's why you're not in any of the Writing Room. That's on update. Thanks really hockey mine. Okay mine quick Mine would just any sort of nightcrawlers story Not so much? In origins the villain. That's a tough one. I would love to actually see night. Crawler go against doom. I was just going to say if you really cool because he like if he was escaping from Liberia. Yeah it'd be great and he's just trying to get back to kind of convince them to join him in some way or another interest. Feel like you've done like a fan casting of night crawler you I did I did. I did a fan casting of all the X. men that I wanted to see if they didn't MC version And he was the actress name at this point but he was An umbrella academy He's such a good actor. I forget his name guy off the top of my head. Tom You look it up. is British actor. I believe he was also in Another kind of superhero. Wish show You Got Eight and Gallagher. Yeah that's him. I believe right number five. No sorry then Robert Sheehan who Claus Claus. He's incredible in that. So yeah he's fantastic in all the shows that he's done especially later season of Kademi but that would be my my vote for. He was ignorant moral engines and moral instruments. Abc Show about superheroes misfits. Yup there. Anyway that's my casting for nightcrawlers very cool night crawler. Movie Percent Lloc I think that it would be dope to have a movie based on invincible By Robert Kirkman It's just a really cool show about this kid who is essentially half alien. You know No actually I'd be okay with a movie like because there's a lot and it ended just I think last year is when it ended But it would be cool. The no the the the whole series did so And they had multiple parts of it and it was. It was a really cool. There's an omnibus for It's just a really six story and I I would be okay if it was just basically kind of an origin and just everything that happens with his dad and kind of the twist there and how it ends and then a lead into kind of us. I mean really. The sequels could lead into the wars and stuff but oh man it's just like a not DC nor Marvel Superhero Story. That's like just as just as ethically I mean essentially what happens is it's kind of like a imagine if Superman was came to earth. He's your dad. And but he stayed in hiding for a little bit and then became a superhero type on the earth. But he had a family he had a kid. And the kid doesn't have superpowers Intel. Like he's fourteen or fifteen and all of a sudden they come upon him and he has all the powers that his dad has he becomes a superhero. And then I was GONNA say. Just don't WanNa get spoiled Brat for me. Oh did he at son of it. But that really Dr Barry Dr Berry you son of Kaelin so mine is I want to do with power girl. Oh I 'cause played her a long long time ago and I thought some of the things that they the artist did with her was hilarious. So that fits my team very well. and then One of her enemies is divine which is literally like a copy of herself but like the evil version or copy. I know but I I like the idea of like Having these two very strong ladies fighting each other and then like basically coming from different perspectives and then over the course movie like your mother's name is Martha Raddatz. Yeah just like that something along those lines but probably a little better and working together at the very end. Yeah so who's the real villain? Probably macaroni lacks luthor. Never actual or have the fight so that I can. They can flatten the air. So I can build houses. There are Sandra's all baby. Lex Luther. And his real estate tonight. That was always his boy. Main thing was real estate. It's great for one movie. Yeah no all of them know next question all the questions. I have a question. Are We switching question here? What is it? What's going on March seventh again again? Show that's causing us out. That's all studios SANTA MONICA DOORS. Open at seven thirty. Be there or don't this is the question. Where if they forgot all that stuff working they go to look that up. You can come. She knows Corey's mom and what's the email address at questions in all seriousness? You can go to note on Dot. Io backslash live. That is our facebook event page for this. Rsvp or don't that's fine cut con- it's GonNa be fun. We've had to be there. We've had a lot of fun planning and there's still lots to do but we would love to show you all the things that we have been doing. Come Win Prizes. Show come win. Prizes leaving cost you anything three window. I'm telling all my friends. You tell your friends and had there a week on my facebook and stuff and then bring your mom's friends stage nude. I WanNa talk to them. That was supposed to be prize winner anyway. Yeah Anyway thank you so much for listening to our shenanigans. I could still so much friction. Anyway thanks so much for listening. We appreciate you. Please do stop by our website if you are new to us third on DOT TV. It has all the information of everything that we do. Consider joining the NERD on nations to support us. It helps us to be the best that we can be. Heard on backslash Patriae on and do please to rate and review US wherever you listen to us it does help us to which helps us to be better so we know what the listeners can help us get out of bed in the morning it does. It's entertaining to us as Corey windmilling inside of his jeans. Yeah means I wear. Khaki on that is sounds like when the world is turning. Allison gets sexier say it again back on that you the drill as always I do.

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Can pop-up surveillance testing sites curb the spread of COVID-19?

The Current

25:25 min | 5 months ago

Can pop-up surveillance testing sites curb the spread of COVID-19?

"I'm martin savage and is and we're back with a brand new season of seat at the table. The podcast where we have in depth conversations with notable guests from media sports and pop culture. But this time we're capturing personal stories about the power of the black lives matter movement the urgency of this moment and really what it will take to move forward seat at the table is available now on. Cbc listen on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast as we know. Reams of people with covid. Nineteen symptoms are showing up at testing centers and hospitals across this country. You've probably seen the pictures of lineups wrapping around buildings or winding through city blocks. Maybe you've been in one of those lines. Some infectious disease experts. Say it's not enough to only let those showing signs of covid nineteen come to them in nova scotia this past week and a half. Dr lisa barrett has been leading a new round of so-called asymptomatic testing asking people without any symptoms or known exposure dacoven nineteen to come and get tested a pop-up cova testing sites. Thus far they've set up in downtown halifax bar and near university campuses. Dr lisa barrett is an infectious disease specialist at the house. University in halifax joins us. Now dr good morning. Good morning. Tell me about this. Why did you decide to start testing a symptomatic people in this way. So along with Dr todd hatchet and the public health leadership in nova scotia. We recognized a couple of things number one we had groups of people who were in social situation who probably didn't have symptoms who were probably infected and we weren't going to Probably convince those folks to go to regular testing center and get tested and number two We also saw that. It was becoming more difficult to convince people to disclose their contacts. Potentially as testing gets more stigma stigmatized and formal and so the goal of this particular initiative was to go out to where people are number one and use this test as a tool of engagement in the right place for people who may well be dramatic and spreading the virus at point of person using a rapid test with volunteers that didn't stress the healthcare system so several purposes and they've been done as you mentioned in burs downtown universities as well as community libraries and community centers. Told me about going to the bar in downtown halifax how did that go. I mean wh what did people say when you would bar and you say i would you like to be tested for cove nineteen. Yeah not your typical saturday night. Note I will say it's a very different experience than the last time i socially went to our So this was a Bar that was actually closed but on a street that had high density of social settings including bars and other hospitality related industries. And so we used eight births base. That was well known easy to get to and within meters of other places where people were going for their night out. We brought a group of volunteers as well listen. Medical professionals for oversight and set up nine inside that said free rapid covid testing. Come get your cova test and in that particular situation. It was some of the staff as well as some patrons on the street gut came by for their test and we were also training people who medical professional to do both the swab learn to use personal protective equipment. And to do the test right. On-site can you say these are rapid tests. How quickly would would people get the results right so at this particular birth site that we first started and i get to say bar with a good east coast accent. Make sure we keep the pirate version going here We had people getting the results within about fifteen minutes. There we w- people waited in another area. That was well ventilated. There was tons of room for social distancing and it was a relatively low volume at a time about five to seven people We had a space for them to wait out of the cold And then they got the results We've only took their cell phone number so again. This was a very low threshold model. When i mean by that is we're not asking for fifteen pieces of ideas like we do at the hospital especially for people who may not have a lot of ide- And then they could just go on their way Immediately after we identified them by text So we just text them an answer. We go out confirmed that they perceived it and off they went. What did you find. Oh we did find a person so with that. First night in the var we had one hundred and forty seven people who are completely asymptomatic and it's also important to note that these folks also did not have known contact or known exposure sites so berry much really and truly people who would never otherwise in our current system beginning tested One person who was positive lived with five other people who have You know jobs that. Put them into the public domain and are fairly essential and so that person before they were able to spread to the other people in their actual household. We found down and also important to note that we do a gold standard confirmatory test before we do the full public health investigation and again. This is not information that perhaps you would have been able to ascertain. They may not have known if they're symptomatic. They may not have known that they have code without a test. Like this absolutely Very grateful people. It's amazing you know. I didn't anticipate this part. We wanted to use this as much for finding folks when they were eight symptomatic and allowing them to self isolate But also this concept of community engagement that at our point in the pandemic in this province with relatively low case numbers to really shut things down. This is a great way for them to engage and be a part of the covert effort. People are incredibly grateful to get access to knowing their positive again. A negative test. We reinforced means. Nothing to them. They could be positive tomorrow. Could you know because positive at any point on so people are exceptionally grateful. And this person as well as every other person we've identified subsequently at different sites. Let me bring some other voices into this conversation because this discussion over whether to do more symptomatic or what. Some people call surveillance testing Playing at across the country Calling for nests is an infection control epidemiologist at the university of toronto. Dr lenora saxena is an infectious disease specialist at the university of alberta to you both good morning. Good morning doctor. Saxena it's interesting because Dr barrett there was saying that in some ways this works best if you have a population that has low numbers of of case counts Your provinces kind of the opposite of that. And i just wondered just before we get into this. We're learning through Reporting by our cbc colleagues About what's going on in alberta and the fact that the province has been planning on these field hospitals perhaps using the military to help. What do you make of what you're hearing this morning. In in that reporting well i am. I would tell you have having watched. Our case counts and our hospitalization counts counts rising over the last file And having been concerned about you know the. I guess whether the public health measures that have been applied would be sufficient to slow that down You know Many people were were concerns earlier in the fall. And now we're at a point of maybe having a field hospital I think that it's somewhat predictable. At this point that we would have to really look at where we can get capacity. I think there's there's still a lot of questions about you know whether they would be Look how full services site that is versus a fairly light care acute monitoring and isolation type site so. I'm not involved in the planning of that. And i don't know how close it would be to fruition but you know in a way it's prudent to look at all the options that might be available. Because i can't tell you that our hospitals are pretty full right now so it's It's not reached a breaking point but certainly something that is increasing. Let's go to the issue of trying to figure out where cases are spreading in cases in particular That may not have symptoms. What do you make of. What's dr bernard has been doing. A nova scotia dr jackson. Well i think rapid testing has a lot of promise if done well and in the right places and i mean they've had find target population And they're doing it. In the setting of of lo- low prevalence like. There's not a lot of disease right. Now they're trying to find. I guess people who'd be Likely to spread the disease. Unwittingly and so that's important in our setting right now looking at similar testing some tough perform much better than others and they should be validated by your local lab people and so we have to validated tests. Here one is one of the very very rapid ones that looks like a pregnancy little card test In which you can you can't really trust a negative but you can't trust a positive so that can be used to detect people who might be infected likely to spread and that might be something that we could do for example in northern work camp where they're think he's no outbreaks And you know. Just basically look for that needle in the haystack person who does not have symptoms or have symptoms. They're not paying attention to and is capable of transmitting infection. And that could make a big difference but you do have to have goals in mind with these One of the other tests. Actually i think which is the one that dr barry is using actually kind of looks like a large blender basin. It's it's it actually performs very much like the lab based pcr at least when it was tested here and it takes a little while longer but you could use that for example in smaller health center And you wouldn't necessarily have to confirmatory testing and that set setting if validated the test. And so that would actually be good for smaller communities that you usually have send all their testing in. It can be really slow turnaround time. Hi i'm laura lynch host sees what on earth every week we dig deep into climate change challenges such as shrinking glaciers runaway wildfires or floods threatening more and more people not just the problems we also look at potential solutions. Never forgetting that behind all the talk all the science there are always those striving to find ways to cope with the world around us. What on earth is available on the cbc. Listen app or wherever you get your podcasts. I'm i host of ideas in this age of click bait and online. Shouting ideas is a meeting ground for people who want to deepen their understanding of the world. Join me as we crack. Open a concept to see how it plays out over place and time and how. It matters today from the rise of authoritarianism to the history of cult movies. No idea is off. Limits ideas is on the cbc. Listen or wherever you find your podcasts. Calling for people have have referred to this sort of surveillance. Testing is like a canary in the coal mine. What role do you think it could play in helping to control cova transmission or at least getting a sense to wear that transmission is happening. Why thank you put your finger on it right. There is right now especially in ontario. We've been using a flashlight without a bulb or batteries and the dark room trying to find toby. And that's pretty tough. We could and should be doing This kind of asymmetric testing. And actually i would argue even more targeted sentinel testing. We know very well. How covert we know cove it spreads and the most sailing example to me is Servers bartenders. They have an incredibly dangerous job because they are mindfully working with people without masks and they're doing it for an entire work shift. We don't have any other workers do that. That's where cove spreads. We should be testing waiters. I mean not forcefully testing waiters. But we should be doing that. That would help us find cases it would help us find cases before this transmission and would also help the public wrap their head around the idea that restaurants and bars are dangerous places. What about what would have been in schools. I mean there's a lot of attention that's being paid to what was happening in toronto in Thunk left park public school in toronto. There's a pilot project that was happening. There tell me a bit more about that colin. That was yeah fantastic to be done. It's a couple of months late. It had been promised since august the idea that we know that covert is going to go in schools. Because we know that there's covert in the community and schools are a great place to be able to to have a population there to be able to test them and And then be able to go back into the community and look at the families who are involved do isolation and prevent transmission so they found nineteen as symptomatic cases Which is why. I think it was one staff person. Eighteen kids from fourteen different classes. So that that tells you that there's probably not a lot of transmission going on in school but this is a great way to be able to find out what's going on in the community and this should be going on in schools. It's interesting because i mean that was just a third of the school. Would you assume that you would find a symptomatic cases and the other two thirds of the students quite possibly quite quite possibly that happens to be a very high risk neighborhood where covert prevalence is higher. And that's exactly the right place to start. I'd like to see it in other schools to the question is important because it got a lot of attention just in terms of the numbers. They're focusing on one school and only third of the school. We've been hearing that schools Are are perhaps not the centers of transmission that maybe we expected them to be. And i just wonder whether what came out of that. Testing would a challenge that at all the evidence has been mixed around what risk kids especially kids under ten play on one hand. They seem to be much less infectious than we would have expected based on other respiratory viruses on the other hand. We may not have been testing kids as much as we should have. because they've been a synthetic cove. Its trump card. Being a symptomatic has really thrown the conventional wisdom on its head and that's been very difficult. I think for public health and for the medical community to adapt to dr baruch. Given what you've learned in halifax what do you make of the idea of a symptomatic testing in schools. What's the best way to go through that. Yeah i so. I do think it does depend on where you are and coming back to the test characteristics. We actually are using the pregnancy test looking one not the smoothie blender e type sized one mainly because we can get result and. We can train again volunteers to do this. I think there's a very important point. the doctor for just made and that we have to start thinking about this virus differently. We've got a lot of people with cova the cheek so this is not just about numbers and finding canaries in coalmines about community engagement. And when you take rapid test that give to an area where they can an or don't perceive it to be high risk but should you're actually offering the ability to engage community in a different way of thinking about this virus. And you know it's not only public health that's had trouble with this. Eighth demotic spread concept. It's the public. We haven't done a great job of messaging that in a very sustainable way. So i think to your point. How should ethan thematic testing be used in schools. I don't think it's a bad idea in terms of the community engagement to use rapid tests. You're gonna miss some positives but these are people you weren't gonna test at all before anyway and so to me. That's an acceptable risk. As long as it's message dwell people worry about this concept of risk Compensation and doing riskier things because you get a negative test. We've certainly not witnessed that in the conversations we've had with other people. They very clearly understand that they could still get cove and you know even the next day that could be positive so i do think that schools are good place to do it. The challenges the test itself does still require and these affair angios swab One of them can have nose and throat swab done but really getting people to do that. Really is a bit of a challenge. And hopefully we'll be able to come up with something that's a little more Nostril friendly over the few months but the concept here of the concept of going forward with volunteers not regulated health professionals in embedding community. The idea of covid living that includes testing for a while. i think has become part of what we do. Doctors saxena were we at when it comes to the rapid tests the prime minister on this program earlier. This week said that the federal government had sent out He's at five million rapid tests. There are some jurisdictions that are using them including now berta there are some jurisdictions. That aren't using them. Where are we at when it comes to the deployment of rapid tests. Well i think this conversation kind of tells us that we're varying stages of adoption for different reasons and You know in places with high high rates of covid It is very important to validate these tests and it is very important not to just to buy any test. That's available as some companies are because some of them are are literally no better than flipping a coin through. You have to know what you're dealing with and you have to tested in your setting and When you have that in hand you have to just be you know very mindful boat how you're gonna use it and what you want to use it for. And the biggest risk as has been mentioned as a people will trust in negative on a the test and so they get the rapid test on their way to visit grandma or something. Well that that's the wrong way to do this But if you are rapid testing to identify people who might infect others in. You know in close quarters. Unavoidable close quarters in workplace for example. That's a good way to use this test or as some people have advocated and has not really been studied in the real world yet frequent low sensitivity testing so frequent easy home. rapid testing. Could be something that you could deploy within the community we. We're not at that point with these tests but there might be some that become useful for that and again that would be set up properly. So they're not gonna we're not gonna be able to test our way out of that's just like we can't just mask our way out of this. We have to do all the things. And i think that we really do have to ramp up our access to testing and that these tests offer a way to do that but we have to make sure they're the right test in the right place. The uso has approved At home cova tests but they aren't available in canada. We need them here. Do you think. I think that you know there. There's some attraction to that idea because we know if we do a less good tests more frequently we end up finding things a little more accurately But they haven't been subject to any kind of wide-scale evaluation. So i think it's very promising and i'm interested by it but i really do think people have to go through the steps of document and up for sure this is how well the test itself performed and disposal program. This is how this program performs before you start implementing it widely but you know those things will be done and it might be the case that at some point will have like a saliva based Tests that you can do in your own home a kind of like a temperature check and not that might offer value on a population basis. But there's a lot of steps between now and then and again as you say. I mean people will react in different ways to a positive tests negative test in terms of how they behave. And that's something to be cautious of exactly. I mean it's not that people wouldn't be capable of doing this threat way but people love to trust past and so it is something that we have to message very very carefully calling for now. So you mentioned the idea of testing bartenders. Who else if you're doing surveillance testing Or would you call sentinel testing. Who else do you think we should be testing if we if we do need to test more people and again understanding that. This isn't going to be the way that we get into this. But it's going to be a way that we understand what we're in. Who else should we be testing. It depends again where you are but from what we have learned so far. And we've done in ontario really poor job of actually being able to compile that list because we do so little so little research a little measurement but i would add teachers to the list. I would add I would store clerks to the list. those are factory workers in certain conditions. Depends on on what that looks like. I would be absolutely testing Personal support workers in long term. Care homes that's been done sporadically. I would do that routinely so that would be that would be among my top list. We could look at other populations like truck drivers who crossed the border. They probably aren't a huge risk factor because the solitary work but that kind of measurement would let us know. So i would i would favor trying it broadly at least to help discover where covert is lurking in places. Where maybe we haven't thought and once we know we know that people who are working in grocery stores or Who are teachers or who are working in bars. If we know Information that comes out of the testing. What do we do then with that information. Well as a thought experiment. Was this imagine that we had a test result for every single teacher in ontario right now. A hundred and seventy thousand teachers we could start to look at the school characteristics that predict Teachers being infected is at schools where the windows don't open is at schools that don't have forced air is at schools where the principal is not leaning. Hard on mass compliance. So we'd start to be able to find some of those Some of those factors and then we could adjust our interventions. And we could. We could actually respond in real time to that. So that's what i'd like to be able to do is to learn more about our foe at the same time that we're finding it and dealing with it stuck to bear. What are you hoping to do with the information that you learn from your testing pop. Ups nova scotia So right now. We're just going through. The i literally week and a half and the plan would be to move with virus around the province in a quasi targeted way as you mentioned in in higher risk groups To go around those folks what we do next in terms of the model is interesting. I think as is the population detest. And that's again as i've mentioned part of the community basis of this putting testing out there seeing who shows up and learning as we go and modifying you know if we just tested three days in a small town that had a small signal of a case and we went out there and tested a bunch of people But that peter out pretty quickly we got through most of the people That we wanted to engage. And so i think as we go forward. We can't wait. Unfortunately it would be lovely until we completely validate programs completely validate tests. But while we can't test away out of this we can't action our way out of this and build community and i think the provinces have seen that when we don't engage community in a real way for example with a testing program. They can volunteer to do things. Don't go well so we hope you keep community age build that part. Modify the program but we can't wait till we've already tested programs and already tested everything to start doing. We have to do it now or processing in a province where things don't seem to be going well calling for an esa compared this to being you know in the dark with a flashlight without a bulb concerns around this but is this. Is there the possibility that this could get the ball into the flashlight that this could help. Give some guidance in a situation that we find ourselves in right now. I think there's two things one is I think that you know the program. That's going on right now. Is test of this approach. Look forward to its results. So yes we can learn from things that have been done elsewhere and we wouldn't necessarily have to You know wait to engage our biggest problem right now is down but in terms of having people who actually can do this work Pretty much everyone. Who's working in fields of public health and Diagnostics are pretty much one hundred and ten percent flat out already and so there does become a bit of a capacity issue in terms of bringing new things online and that has been a problem a number of places because we have the same number of people all of the things. And you know i. It's quite a challenging thing so we are starting from some rapid test. Pilots already I haven't seen results from them. I'm not directly involved. But they're targeting high risk areas. There is actually going to be some rapid tests. Actually augmenting our current testing. Because we're having problems with turnaround time seeing fast enough They're you know pretty good compared to some places but not good enough to identify things more quickly and so we're trying to take the supplies of advertise. We have right now and put them in the places that are most urgent right now and once things simmer down here i very much would like to see you know more widespread use rapid testing actually more developments in rapid tests. That makes them. You know more easy and more reliable. I do have a bit of caution about making sure that the tests that are being used because we have seen people using non validated pass are are the correct ones. So i think that's another thing to just be aware of. Is that people. Think they're they buy them but they really should be going with approved once and And they might really be out a lot here and elsewhere to use your phrase. You are all people who are doing all the things. I appreciate you stealing some time from doing those things to talk to us. Thank you very much all of you. Dr lisa barrett infectious diseases specialist at the university in halifax calling for nests epidemiologist at the university of toronto and dr lenora sack singer is an infectious disease specialist at the university of alberta for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

Dr lisa barrett halifax infectious disease nova scotia martin savage Dr todd Dr lenora saxena Dr barrett dr bernard dr jackson dr barry laura lynch cova Saxena dr baruch Cbc university of alberta fifteen minutes university of toronto toronto