37 Burst results for "director"

Fresh "director" from WBT Afternoon Programming

WBT Afternoon Programming

01:41 min | 24 min ago

Fresh "director" from WBT Afternoon Programming

"She would sign such an order if a policy group recommends a tour. CDC director Robert Red Field in Charlotte yesterday also endorsed alcohol restrictions. And I do think it's critical that we recognized that certain businesses that have a tendency Teo facilitate irresponsible behavior, such as bars stay open late in the evening. Also Monday, county manager Dina Diorio said restrictions on alcohol sales are being considered by Mecklenburg leaders as well. We're bowling is off again. North Carolina Supreme Court today temporarily blocked a judge's ruling from last week that allowed dozens bowling alleys to reopen with safety procedures like social distancing. Governor's officer appeal the lower court ruling, arguing it would be dangerous to reopen the business is at a time when covert 19 hospitalizations and positive cases of reaching record highs, so other entertainment ideas About the David Brothers. They're going to try out the pandemic Age drive in concert concept Concorde Bass band announcing plans for an August 29th show on the backstretch of Charlotte Motor Speedway, with fans tucked away in their vehicles. That concert will, of course, also be shown on the tracks massive video screen. General public ticket sales begin this Friday. Cheka, Eva Brothers Drive in dot com For more details. Speedway also hosting drive in style virtual concert with Blake, Shelton, Trace Adkins and Gwen's too funny on thus, Saturday, July 20 That's a up recorded that concert. Howard Beatty News time. 502 Meet Chuck. Now meet Chuck's personal information. Hello, made up of things like account Loggins Bank info and Chuck Social Security number. Whenever Chuck's shops, banks and browses online his info travels all over the World Bulls you breathe yet exposing it to cyber threats. Well, that's no good. So how is Chuck able to sleep? Because he knows Norton and Lifelock are now part of one company. Norton, 3 60 with Lifelock provides an all in one membership for your cyber safety that gives you device security. Identity theft protection. A VPN for online privacy and more. No one can prevent all cyber crime and identity theft. But.

Chuck Charlotte Motor Speedway North Carolina Supreme Court Charlotte Bowling Dina Diorio TEO CDC Mecklenburg Norton Robert Red Field Concorde Bass Lifelock Howard Beatty David Brothers Director Loggins Bank Officer
With Hospitalizations Rising, Florida Governor Calls in 3,000 Nurses to Help Manage COVID-19 Cases

The Inside Story With Marty Griffin

00:56 sec | 5 hrs ago

With Hospitalizations Rising, Florida Governor Calls in 3,000 Nurses to Help Manage COVID-19 Cases

"Virus infections nationally is putting a strain on hospitals elsewhere in the U. S. More than 1000 people are now hospitalized with the virus in Florida. Dozens of hospitals say they're out of beds in the intensive care units. And CBS News correspondent David Beg No, says the governor there is attempting to alleviate some concern by bringing in more than 3000 nurses from other states. If you have wave after wave after wave, how long can you sustain that? That is Dr Jason Wilson. He's the associate director of emergency management at Tampa General Hospital. He says the volume of covert patients coming to the hospital is five times higher than it was a month and 1/2 ago. We've really done everything we can to try to keep patient the hospital. They don't need to be in the hospital. The situation is far more dire in South Florida. There are now just 10 icy you beds left in all of Miami Dade County. Most populated county in the state.

Tampa General Hospital Associate Director Miami Dade County David Beg No Florida South Florida Cbs News
Fresh "director" from Wendy Bell

Wendy Bell

00:50 min | 40 min ago

Fresh "director" from Wendy Bell

"The Presbyterian Senior Care Network Traffic Center just got Stiller on NewsRadio 10 20 K. T. K. I don't talk a little sports car sports director Jeff Hathorn. Wedneday's suspended for taking off another player's helmet and hitting that player on the head with it. Get Miles Garrett is on the verge of the richest non quarterback contract in NFL history. Cleveland dot com. Reports care It will get 125 million over five years. Porting The NFL network Chris Jones gets four years 85 million from the chief's pirates holding another inter squad game today as they open exhibition games on Saturday night over on the fan centerfielder Gerrard, Dyson said he knew he was getting what he was getting into it. The young team The way they're of Shelton manages fits that group. That's how you get the most out of you guys. You don't want no guy who's I am from the manager at the meeting like stuff like that, you bitch! You are a guy who go respect they imagine And respect the fact that they meant to have a feel for the game and understand how hard a game using it and it's okay to have fun. Yasiel Puig to sign what the Braves, according to radio dot coms. Jon Heyman, who also reports 11 umpires will not work this year due to health concerns. Tiger Woods, saying today's staying away from the PGA Tour to be safe. So he will return Thursday at the Memorial Pence put in some physical work today and cranberry Mike Sullivan says they need work. Their third line, center Jared McCann, said Patrick Marleau is a big body someone he looks up to, and he's on his line. He also has an autograph Puck signed by Marlow that he got when he was 12. Jeff Hathorn is radio 10 20. Katy K. Sports So much in this world seems uncertain and confusing right now, don't you think? It's time to make certain then that we protect ourselves and the people we love by getting our estate planning documents in order, And that is where Attorney John Donofrio comes in. John's law practice is dedicated to drafting wills to powers of attorney trusts, Elder law matters, asset protection and a state settlement. You've worked a lifetime accumulating your assets..

Jeff Hathorn NFL Attorney John Donofrio Patrick Marleau Dyson Tiger Woods Jon Heyman Cleveland Stiller Wedneday Marlow Miles Garrett Yasiel Puig Katy K. Sports Shelton Braves Mike Sullivan Director Jared Mccann
Washington's NFL Team to Change Name After 87 Years

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

04:20 min | 7 hrs ago

Washington's NFL Team to Change Name After 87 Years

"Colorado's Morning news. Well, they don't know what their new name will be yet, but the NFL team in Washington no longer known as the red skins, the team is officially retiring the nick name and logo After major public pressure from fans and sponsors, Team owner Dan Schneider says the replacement will be announced in the coming weeks. So what do Native Americans think about the change? Let's get into that with Native Ways. Federation executive Director Carly Bad Heart Bull Goodman Me and Carly and thanks for joining us. Good morning. Thank you for having me. We should mention your group is focused on supporting Native American activism and education. So were you folks pushing for this name change? Absolutely are the members in our organization have been part of the movement for the native for this for this change in our native communities have have many folks and Leadership positions many native youth and particular native women across the country for decades now, Carly I'm curious, because I I think that you tell me it's more important what you think that it's the Redskins as a descriptive if they were the Washington If you want to, say native Americans, or even the Washington Indians, which we can talk more about that that would be a want to say, less offensive. It's the descriptive. It's like a majority visit. Not now, That's the biggest thing. It's not so much if they're honoring them. It's the fact that no, you don't use that term. The issue is that our people have been saying for again for decades that the name doesn't on arrest that term. Andi, I would add that There are other teams. There are other names, including some of the names that you lifted that were also were also not in favor of the issue is when you have a community that has been saying for for generations for decades that we are not honored by the use of these names that you need to listen. You need to listen when our community is saying that this is not representative of who we are. When you come from a community that is Is eatin a history of lack of representation of misrepresentation. It is really important to listen to us and to you hear us when we say that it's important for us, and it's important for our kids that Any representation that is out there in the media is adequate, not only adequate, but is also a celebrating who we are not Ah, stereo type, not You know, I'm misrepresentation or, you know, not making fun of who we are. Let's go through some of those names. The Atlanta Braves say they're not going to change their team moniker. Chicago Blackhawks. Kansas City Chiefs Cleveland Indians should they all change. You know? Yes. Honestly, I mean, I mean that, as far as I know, you know the Redskin Sorry. I hate even using that term. I shouldn't use that term. I should not even be saying that name. They haven't gone public with any information on what their new name with their new local will be accepted, say that they hope to honor native people and the military and so it's really important that we're having this further conversation. Because again, even though the Washington team is talking about changing the name, there's so much work yet to be done both with their name and with these other teams that you that you mentioned the remains concerning these communities about about what this means about the The history of Blanding in a way that that is said to honor native people. Even after community members leaders Jaime Time again have said that these names do not honor us. So we're hopeful that that you know a new name. A new logo with the national team will not continue this native imagery or thing or themes. We're hopeful that the team as well as these other teams will listen to native communities come back and talk to us. We have been saying for years on DH will come up with new branding altogether. You know, it's time to do the right thing. Otherwise, at some point, honestly, they're gonna have to do it all over again. That the you know, make the effort now and any abuse and this perpetuation He's racist stereotypes. Once it for all against

Washington Carly Cleveland Indians Jaime Time Dan Schneider NFL Colorado Executive Director Chicago Blackhawks Atlanta Braves Andi Kansas City Representative Blanding
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 13 hrs ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
White House seeks to discredit Dr Fauci in leaked memo

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:58 min | 14 hrs ago

White House seeks to discredit Dr Fauci in leaked memo

"Has taken the unusual step of attacking a member of its own coronavirus task force by providing a document to several media outlets that contains a list of comments made by Dr Anthony Fauci in an effort to damage his reputation. The News of the document comes as to senior level white. House sources claimed the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has at times being referred to among aids to Donald Trump as doctor, doom and gloom. The document says in part that several white. House officials are concerned about the number of times Dr Found. She has been wrong on things. Things the document goes on to list examples of what the White House views as found. She contradicting himself. One example is a comment made by found she on TV in late February that at this moment there is no need to change anything about what you're doing on a day-to-day basis. However, that was not the full statement found. She made during the interview. Right now, the risk is still low, but this could change found. She also said at the time. On. Friday doctor found. He said that he hadn't seen or spoken to trump in person since the second of June meanwhile yesterday Donald. TRUMP RE tweeted a conspiracy theory from a former game show host chuck woolery, who suggested the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Media Democrats and our doctors are lying about Kovic nineteen in an effort to her trump in November's general election, the president's. President's tweets not only cost down on public safety measures, but are another example of the fracturing relationship between doctor found she and the White, house the pandemic has now killed more than half a million people in just six and a half months and the World Health Organization has said there will be no return to the old normal for the foreseeable future, especially, if preventative measures when neglected.

Donald Trump White House Dr Anthony Fauci National Institute Of Allergy Chuck Woolery President Trump Centers For Disease Control An World Health Organization Director Kovic
Employees Send A Letter To CDC Director About Racism At The Workplace

Marketplace

00:22 sec | 21 hrs ago

Employees Send A Letter To CDC Director About Racism At The Workplace

"Employees at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say there is a racist culture at the agency. In a letter sent to CDC Director Robert Redfield, a letter that was obtained by NPR. CDC employees say this racism in the workplace is hurting the nation's ability to address the impact of the pandemic on people of color.

Centers For Disease Control An Director Robert Redfield NPR
Millionaires say "tax us" to fund coronavirus aid

Phil Valentine

00:50 sec | 22 hrs ago

Millionaires say "tax us" to fund coronavirus aid

"Rich calling for higher taxes to aid Corona virus recovery. So this is Disney heiress Abigail Disney. Is among the millionaire's calling for governments to impose higher taxes on the wealthy to help fund the recovery from the Corona virus pandemic. In an open letter taxes, taxes, taxes us. When the group calling itself millionaires for humanity. The 83 signatories on the letter also include Abigail's brother. Tim Ben and Jerry's co founder, Jerry Greenfield, as well as British movie director Richard Curtis. The letter stated that the problems caused and revealed by the pandemic could not be solved with charity, no matter how generous and the government's must take responsibility for raising the funds needed to tackle the issues themselves. Before

Abigail Disney Jerry Greenfield Disney Richard Curtis Tim Ben Co Founder Director
US Grapples with Pandemic as WHO Warns 'No Return to Normal'

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:53 sec | 1 d ago

US Grapples with Pandemic as WHO Warns 'No Return to Normal'

"The World Health Organization says the Americas are the epicenter of the global corona virus pandemic and the outbreaks going to get worse. If governments don't take stronger action fast, NPR's ping Wang explains. Tetris at Nam Gabri ASIS, Joe's director general says there are no short cuts out of this pandemic. I want to be straight with you. There will be no return to the old normal for the foreseeable future. Teacher says Some countries in Europe and Asia have shown that it's possible to succeed in controlling the virus. He says The recipe for success includes having strong leaders that people trust who speak clearly about their strategies and also having citizens who physically distance and wear masks. The global health leader says countries that have not suppressed the virus are suffering for longer and squandering any gains that came from initial lockdowns. Qinglong NPR

NPR Nam Gabri Asis Ping Wang World Health Organization Director General JOE Europe Asia
Nations heading in wrong direction with COVID-19, says WHO

Larry O'Connor

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

Nations heading in wrong direction with COVID-19, says WHO

"Virus pandemic has the potential to get far worse if all nations do not adhere to basic health precaution. Then warning today coming from the director of the director general of the World Health Organization, who says too many countries air headed in the wrong direction. Every single leader, every single government and every single person can do their bit to break off chains, off transmission and the collective suffering. I'm not saying it's easy. It's clearly not.

World Health Organization Director General Director
SEC athletic directors working on plan in Birmingham for fall sports

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:12 sec | 1 d ago

SEC athletic directors working on plan in Birmingham for fall sports

"Southeastern Conference athletic director scheduled to meet in person today to discuss fall sports scheduling. Ford Illustrated reports at least one of them, saying quote spring is more viable than fall for football and he'd

Ford Illustrated Director Football
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says kids should return to school, in-person classes

AM Joy

01:56 min | 1 d ago

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says kids should return to school, in-person classes

"There are now three point two million cases and nearly one hundred thirty six thousand fatalities here in the US. On Saturday Texas and North Carolina reported their highest single day increases in new cases and hospitalizations in Florida, where cases have been on the rice. Memorial, day weekend Governor Rhonda Santa's ordered public schools to reopen next month. He's among the multiple Republican governors bowing to trump who's now threatening to cut off federal funding for schools if they don't reopen for potentially dangerous in person classes. This is the same donald trump who, for the first time during this pandemic finally wore mass in public. He wore during a visit with wounded soldiers at Walter Reed. Medical Center where masks are required for entry. It only took them five months and one hundred and thirty, five thousand American deaths, and begging and pleading from his own party administration. But he's still fighting the science. Claiming that the CDC guidelines for reopening too strict. But the CDC director refused to give in to trump's demands to revise the guidelines in this morning education. Secretary Betsy Devos who has a reminder, does not have a background in either education or medicine said it's time to go back to school. Kids need to get back to school. They need to get back in the classroom. Families need for kids to get back in the classroom and it can be done safely. I know for a fact that there are many schools that have been working hard to put together their plans for moving ahead, and we want to see every school district every state, doing the same thing to say not why we can't do but what we're going to do, and what we can do were country of action. We're a country of doers. Okay, let me. Leaders who can work hard and figure this out?

Donald Trump CDC Walter Reed Betsy Devos Governor Rhonda Santa United States Texas North Carolina Medical Center Florida Secretary Director
Number of available beds at Atlanta's Grady Memorial Hospital reaching critical levels

Love and Relationships with Joyce Littel

01:46 min | 1 d ago

Number of available beds at Atlanta's Grady Memorial Hospital reaching critical levels

"Beds and Grady Hospital is reaching some critical levels because when it comes to the number of hospital beds there at Grady Memorial Hospital bed this week They record reported an increase in the number of covert 19 patients, according to the chief medical director, Dr Robert Jensen. And he said the stress it puts on the hospital systems of medical systems is significant. And that is increasing and not decreasing. Jansen on spoke in an interview. The number of hospital beds are filling up for trauma patients. And those needing long term care. But there were you at the treatment for those with a Corona virus. They're barely enough bed space there at Grady Memorial Hospital. He said in a statement. Quote. We have triple that number not quite as high as we were in the peak in early mid May, but we are rapidly approaching that. Again. And so as of yesterday, the Georgia Emergency Management Agency reported 45% off the emergency room beds are now open 17% of the I C U bears and the same percentage for The inpatient beds. But the director of medical director that Grady Memorial Hospital said if we take steps to avoid catching the virus by wearing a mask, it would be free. It would free up a lot of hospital beds. And you know when you think about it, not only protecting yourself and your family but also Bring up hospital beds. You don't want to go to the hospital all because you didn't protect yourself and didn't take the necessary precautions that are necessary for your life and for the life of others. Let's go

Grady Memorial Hospital Grady Hospital Medical Director Dr Robert Jensen Georgia Emergency Management A Jansen
Ohio State football stops workouts after COVID-19 testing results

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:25 sec | 2 d ago

Ohio State football stops workouts after COVID-19 testing results

"State just put the brakes on old team workouts because of a new outbreak of covert 19 cases very concerned in our last conversation. I was It'll cautiously optimistic. You know, I'm not even there, so I concerned that we may not be able to play with Ohio State athletic director Jean Smith at the Sports desk. Steve Baker, KCBS.

Ohio State Jean Smith Steve Baker Kcbs Sports Desk Director
Three more top Ubisoft execs resign as publisher admits it has "fallen short" of providing a safe workplace

This Week In Video Games

01:52 min | 2 d ago

Three more top Ubisoft execs resign as publisher admits it has "fallen short" of providing a safe workplace

"UBISOFT chief creative officer search has co has resigned, CEO and Co. founder Veep Soft Yves Guillemot. We'll cover the post as the company looks for a replacement, the news came virus statement from the company that also confirmed that the head of ubisoft Canadian Studios Yanase. Matt will be stepping down along with global head of HR sessile cornerback, who believes that stepping down is the best of the interest of the company's unity, the fourth statement, which is entitled Ubisoft out his departures, and reaffirmed its commitment to implementing significant change in the workplace culture and is as follows today. Soft announced several significant personnel changes Thapar, the comprehensive word of companies doing to improve and strengthen is workplace culture. These departures come following the initiation of a rigorous review. The company initiated in response to recent appearance. And accusations of misconduct and inappropriate behavior surge has code is chosen to resign from his position as chief creative officer. Effective immediately, Israel will be taken by Yves Guillemot CEO and Co founder of Ubisoft in the interim during his time Mr Guillemot will personally oversee a complete overhaul of the way in which crave teams claverie. Janice Malik, Managing Director of Canadians studios will be stepping down from his role to leave the company effective immediately the recent allegations that have come to light encounter against multiple employees, making impossible for him to continue in this position for this really was off where we appointing a new global head of HR to replace sessile. Corny, WHO's decided to step down from this role she believes is now in the best interest of the company's unity. Search for her replacement will begin immediately led by industry leading recruitment fund in parallel. The company is restructuring and strengthening HR function in order to adapt to the new charges of the video game industry.

Ubisoft Yves Guillemot Chief Creative Officer Yves Guillemot Ceo Global Head Thapar CEO Founder Janice Malik Co Founder Managing Director Of Canadians Matt CO. Israel
Polls show Trump is losing to Joe Biden

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

01:22 min | 2 d ago

Polls show Trump is losing to Joe Biden

"President trump, Joe Biden, spurring the economy, one of the areas where president trump still holds an advantage over Joe Biden. Let's talk about the race now on our roundtable joined by Chris Christie. RAHM Emanuel. Amanda Carpenter former top staffer for Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Jim Demint now congress at the Bulwark Anzor, Lena Maxwell senior director progressive programming for Sirius Xm author of the end of white politics. Welcome to all of you and Ramleh me begin with you Joe. Biden has about a nine point lead in national polls right now, leading in all the battleground states some Democrats. Now talking about going into George going into Texas, is that overconfidence. yes, and no I think on the straight point I always think. You have right now. Don't get confused with the national polls. They are very very good, but while he is the vice president is up in the battleground states. I would right now number one goal secure those top battleground states before you expand the field. Keep your eye on those opportunities that approach and I. Think Right now I wouldn't spiked the ball on the twenty yard line we. We know what happened. In Two thousand sixteen focus right now on securing Michigan Pennsylvania Wisconsin Arizona. Florida the in North Carolina. That's what I would do, and then look strategically about which of those opportunities right now you have an election. George were the American. People basically want a president who solves problems and not be the source of problems, and that's the Opportunity Democrats have right now.

Joe Biden President Trump Vice President Rahm Emanuel George Chris Christie Sirius Xm Amanda Carpenter Bulwark Anzor Lena Maxwell Ted Cruz Congress Jim Demint Senior Director Texas Florida Michigan Pennsylvania North Carolina Arizona
NCAA: Pac-12 will play only conference football games

Glenn Beck

00:37 sec | 3 d ago

NCAA: Pac-12 will play only conference football games

"Will only play conference games this fall because the Koven 19 they have also delayed the start of the seasons because of rising cove in 19 cases in many states OS you, athletic director Scott Barnes says. It's the right thing to do. But collectively, I speak. The athletic directors were saying We like the decision of the CEOs made we endorse. It will ardently. We think it's our best path for you. Warren says discussions are still underway on a schedule for games. It'll depend on how the covert 19 virus plays out. This decision affects all Pac 12 fall sports, Barnes says. They're hoping to play nine or 10 football games whenever this season begins. I'm brand Ford News

Scott Barnes Director Ford News Warren Football
What Happened to Ofek 12-15?

The Promised Podcast

03:58 min | 5 d ago

What Happened to Ofek 12-15?

"But first we have a small matter that we are following with lert interesting, great concern as part of an occasional series that we call the promise podcast ponders the cipher of satellite skipping Siri atoms signification at four. Am this past Monday at the? Airbase and Israeli made Chavez. Rocket was launched without a hitch, carrying a payload of an Israeli made electro optical reconnaissance satellite names sixteen, both are the work of the Space Administration of the Director of Defense Research and development of the Israel. Ministry of Defence Working together with the Israel aerospace industry or I a I. The launch was. The rocket, arguing with grace into a sky, just beginning to grow and glow lighter at one speeding and receding towards the heavens, a press release attributed to the satellite quote. Unquote advanced capabilities which are really the BIS kind of capabilities for satellite to have the first OPEC satellite Ofek means horizon by the way was launched in September nineteen, eighty-eight, almost thirty two years ago, that was Ofek one over to launch in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three, and nineteen, ninety five, and so on on Monday just a few hours after the successful launch and exultant I'm known Harari the head of the Space Administration of the Director of Defense, research. Research and development of the Ministry of Defence was interviewed on the morning radio, and he explained the enormity of the achievement that he oversaw and he starts in formation Li like this quote, he says the satellite is an optical observation satellite very similar to the last satellite. We launched a few years ago. Eleven at which point the interviewer commonly risk indices name, says quote. Wait this. You have to explain if the last one was OPEC eleven. How come this one is sixteen, so Harari says quote. It's a lovely name affects sixteen I love it. Who says the numbers have to come in order and leaves skin, says quote no. No No, you have to explain this thing. You had nine Victoriano fake eleven, and then you skipped. Tawfiq Sixteen Harari says yeah. Is there anything wrong with that? LIBA, skin, says no, no, no, that's nice, but it demands an explanation. Harari says quote. I explained it to you. You're just not willing to accept my explanation. Leeza Skin says that's right Harari says we'll have a cup of coffee I'll explain leave says. Are you serious? Harari says yes, very serious. Liebskind says it's like we have January and February. And then we jumped April and say marches and good for US Harari Says No, it's like you call your girl Mikal. Mikal and your boy, Asaf, and then later you name your third kid. You're those are the names of my kids by the way what's wrong with that leaves could said that's not a good example. Why would you jump from eleven to sixteen? Harari said we found that. That's what fits our plans. And it goes on like that. Masses website says on the subject quote as Israel's not known to have attempted any satellite launches between the OPEC eleven and sixteen missions, it is not immediately clear whether twelve thirteen fourteen and fifteen designations have been skipped or apply to other spacecraft possibly satellites that have not yet been launched then quote. Quote the generally considered authoritative in such matters, defense update website noted dryly that the Israel Ministry of Defence Announcement did not explain the whereabouts of OPEC twelve through fifteen and quote, and I admit I cannot let this go. I tweeted at times of Israel Defense reported our gross who has one of the best sense of the absurd in journalism, also one of the sense of humor to see if he knew and he answered quote, so we asked about this and the press conference, and we didn't get actual answer what you don't like. The name was literally the response. The I official insinuated that twelve to fifteen blown up on. On launch we would have heard about it. However, it does remind me of an apocryphal practical joke. I heard of paint the numbers, one two and four on the back of three pigs, and let them loose in a school so that even after they're all caught, the administration continues to search for the missing number, three and quote to which someone named Ryan, replied in a tweet who gives Oh fach, which is fair enough, but I cannot let go if anyone out, there has seen OPEC, twelve or thirteen or fourteen or fifteen. Please let me know apparently I. Give fact

Harari Opec Israel Rocket Space Administration Ofek Director Of Defense Research A Ministry Of Defence Working Mikal Israel Ministry Of Defence Siri Ministry Of Defence Chavez Leeza Skin Director Of Defense United States Oh Fach Liebskind
Documentarian Cristina Costantini

Latina to Latina

05:18 min | Last week

Documentarian Cristina Costantini

"Your, First Film Science Fair at Sundance Wins Big award. The audience loves it. What did you learn from that first foray into directing? It's a lot more fun than investigative journalism I would say No, but I think I learned kind of the power of a hopeful story. I think hope and love. Are you know in short supply right now? And these kinds of stories can really change the way people think of the world and think of themselves, and so Walter came out of that in a way. I was looking for another story. That was also from my childhood. You know I started thinking what other worlds do I know really well. Not Everybody knows what other worlds made me feel warm and fuzzy as a kid and I think Walter Metadata was part of that. World for me, I grew up watching him every day as a kid with my grandmother and you know, he reminds me of my grandmother in many ways. He's the same age as my grandma there they have the same Hairdo, and so I started to wonder whatever happened to him, and you know in many ways he was he is. He was one hundred years ahead of his time. The first person I've ever seen that was gender queer. What we'd call now. It's just inspirational looking back. It's like. Could you were doing that at that time? You know nineteen forty in Puerto, Rico. You were being Walter McCullough. It's it's. Really. Inspirational so that's when I set out to find him. You set out to find out. What does that mean? So I started asking around univision and fusion and. Nano actually told me not Avila told me that there's a producer new. Who's also obsessed with Walter? Who you should talk to about this? Maybe he knows something so I called Alex, and he's like this is the weirdest thing I have. Another director who I'm supposed to talk to in ten minutes about doing a documentary about Alternate Telo, and I was like who is this person and his name is creamy taps, and he directed a film called. Dolphin, lover, which was a big fan of it's about a man who falls in love with Dolphin in the Florida like seaworld. And I had loved that film and I was like Oh amazing. I can't I mean I would love to talk to him. And we decided basically a ten minutes later on a phone call that we would all do the project together and yeah. It's been incredible experience Kareem track down. The niece of Walter through an estate sale, and then set up a phone call with Walter and it was. Yeah it was after the suit was. It was really insane to talk to. Walter Mark on the phone for the first time, and he said yes. Well that unprecedented access is notable because he is an has always been intensely private. So, how did you three persuade him to allow you to make the film? We rehearsed for that first conversation for hours and hours. What are the possible questions you could ask us? How would we answer it? You know what is what? What's the best angle on all of his questions? And we got on the phone, and he said Okay I. Have One question for you and we were like Mrs it. It's GonNa be really hard, and he's like. What are your astrological signs and so he went around. And like I'm a libra careens libra and Alex's deteriorates, and he said okay. That's great sounds good. I would love to do this film with you, so he was. He was in like in in from day one. He was psyched, but his idea of a documentary realized very quickly was very different from our idea he wanted. He was in front of a lens for fifty years. He was the most cameras trained person you can imagine. It's truly insane, and he has fifty years of rehearsed answers. He knows what he's going to say. To every question, you could ask him, and so it was really a process of spending a lot of time with him. At first, he thought this was going to. Just you know he was going. Going to be in full makeup and just telling the stories he always tells and I think it took a lot of time to explain to him that this might be different that this is you know we wanna see who you actually are without your makeup. What you do in your normal life and talking about bad stuff, particularly offensive to him. He did not want to talk about anything bad. You and that is the story of his life. You know he a lot goes wrong. He loses everything and even to get him to talk about. That was very difficult, so that was a big stumbling block for us in the first. Twenty interviews that we did with them so We've probably chat with him for like thirty five or forty days, and whenever we the cameras on kind of turned into an interview I remember. We told him once that we just wanted to. What he? What would he be doing if we weren't here? And he said reading a book, so he opened a book, and he started reading it, but he it was like onstage. He's A. He's a strained theater. Actor says like stage reading, or he was like having a conversation with a bunch was reading with his is.

Walter Alex Walter Mark Walter Mccullough Walter Metadata Univision Kareem Florida Director Nano Producer Avila
Transcription expand -  burst 02

The Indy Mogul Podcast

01:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Transcription expand - burst 02

"Or the set build processing what potentially any film maker or cinematographer might? Take into consideration in the process of them trying to develop a scene onset and I'm just like problem solving the ship one day ahead of time so that when they show up. I have in some way. conceptualize like. Oh, they're probably going to put the camera here. If I put this couch here so therefore I'm GonNa. Put the couch here or whatever that winds up being so I think it's a little bit of just like. Visualizing all the needed elements of the crap, just a little bit ahead of the movie so that I can make sure that they have everything they need when they get there. In the beginning, you were talking about kind of a group of people coming to you that you need a facilitate vision to is. That'd be a lot of time. You have your group team your art department coming to you and saying you know what is the vision for this? And then you go to? The the director hasn't fully fleshed that out, so you have. To do the creative, a little bit of the Legwork to institute certain extent. By the time I've booked job or gotten to a place with a director where I'm clearly the person that they want to collaborate with. By that point, usually, maybe seventy

Director
"director" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

Directors Cut Radio Program

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"director" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

"Yeah all right. We got a couple of minutes. Kinch go for a long time. What else we got well in this weird strange world of Internet believes making the movie companies. Change everything or reorganized their planes. Do you guys remember A few months back we were supposed to have a movie called the hunt. The rich elite hunted poor people and there were like us probably not the best political climate to release this movie. Well now they have decided that it is. The hunt is back on who we are actually going to see this movie and let some rich people kill the people who did the purge. I am not sure concept. We don't need that you don't need that This year two thousand twenty bomb prediction. We'll see and other reboot news and movies. That should should not be rebooted in my personal opinion Ryan Reynolds and The muppet movie director. James Bob in are working to reboot Clue Nice. Dancers Nice Steph. Says No wriggle shaking his head out and I thought it was I. I hope they do the same thing as they did. In the original release different versions to different theaters because the original if you watch the DVD you'll see all the ending but in the original theater releases you showed up to the theater and you've got a different ending depending on what's theater. Got That print. So you could talk to your president like no is this. The director's cut offensive obnoxious disgusting insulting listeners. Since two thousand five.

director Ryan Reynolds James Bob president
"director" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

Directors Cut Radio Program

04:18 min | 5 months ago

"director" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

"Ticking time bomb dogs are very like what is my surroundings. What is the smell of my surroundings? What's this guy going to do that? Like even in tops Krista cops you. We've gone to places and people are like. Oh this cat doesn't like people and I'm going up in already. Patting it and putting my lab Christine's cat and they're like Oh that casually never comes out never. Yeah yeah that's so that's it is like a thing because you can go around animals and they're like wow so smelly cat smell. Maybe the PAT him and even though that one that was really angry that We were babysitting or caddy sitting. Oh Chester now my client. She got stitches. I do her nails well. Did she moved here zone originally but her cat that she's had raised with a bottle like this catch love her. She ended up with a slice. All the way down her middle finger and Stitches like sixteen stitches because he just turned around and like lost his crap on her. I don't remember why because her mom was over. Her mom went to pet him and he's just like don't nobody touch me when I'm sitting on my mom like he only likes men and would only like her for some reason but like no one else so. She ended up with stitches from her own. Cat still kept him. I mean she's trying to figure it out. Yeah actually on a low dose pill I forgot he's on like Yeah adhd medicine. For what's the Pill Not Xanax? Dose of xanax? Yes to tie depressants for cats I can I can. I can see that messing down normal. That's interesting yeah that's good. Yeah he's doing better. Calf is a handlebar and just call them crazy medical marijuana card. I have some idea how much time do because all we got about a minute and a half so I just have some birds of prey update news that kind of needs to be like mentioned. Do a real quick yesterday yesterday. This hashtag start this yesterday. The fifteenth Saturday the fifteenth and Hashtag SUPPORT BOP reasons to support standing. Birds of prey is trending like crazy so much so that it was like ten thousand re tags whatever just in one day to where twitter notice states now on Google now in the hands of like the director and DC and people are noticing this Hashtag because they're feeling like the box office should not reflect how this movie has impacted comics title. Well they're just like they're like you need to realize what Margo did with this movie. You guys need to realize the different cinematography aspects that were included in this movie to make it different and you need to also realize that Asian director Asian cinematographer All women of color represented queers represented. There's a lot of messages in this movie. That like just because the box office says oh. It only made one million. It's terrible it's terrible movie so the Hashtag itself is probably advertising the movie and a really great way topic of conversation. We might have to do this on the other side. Yeah and there's a lot of re tweets for everyone. Yeah so the director of birds as actually re tweeted at herself to her. She's like Oh my gosh. I can't believe the support thing guys. All right we're GONNA take a little break when we come back. We got some more birds of prey support for you and me and everybody else in between and how much we love and adore everybody. That's working at all that in the next segment right here on director's cut radio show about movies and a whole lot of love for Berkeley. Three guys show up about Moody which you have any respect for yourself seriously. Anything we're taking seriously worth making fun of the director's cut my bed. Ause nineteen no shame. Only half of our audience is below average..

director Margo Christine Krista marijuana twitter Moody DC Google Berkeley
"director" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:45 min | 5 months ago

"director" Discussed on The Signal

"Dan would you mind terribly? Introducing yourself for his full name and title. So I'm Dan I'm investigative reporter at the ABC. So this is a story that Dan is down to the Weekly Investigative Audio Program Background Briefing. And it's been literally years in the making it's about dummy directors which is the actual terminology by the white so no slurred. Yes so these are. The people left legally responsible for the debt of a company wants. That company has folded and the catch. He is that they either didn't know they were direct up or they didn't understand what they were getting themselves into. That might be because they were homeless or mentally ill or elderly. Or in Jamie's case dealing with substance abuse problems Giannis a very Complex character is deeply suspicious. Deeply Paranoids It took a think quest two years. He came to agree to make me. We Rolling Yes we are rolling Couple we just get your name. And if that's not gain nine Jamie Cox. You're pretty hot man to fun. Johnny reasons of this war. Would I want to be fan yet? Vetting vice he was living in a caravan in the Bush And he moved out there as he explained to us. He moved out to these caravan because he didn't want to be found because he was so paranoid about his involvement in this game he set up as he told us he set up some trip wise with gunpowder and some buckets of rocks and other things around the caravan side that he he would know when people were approaching and he'd be out of getaway we'll get into the bush and watching them without their knowing that is extremely paranoid and you have to wonder. I guess what makes a person like that? How did all this stop for him? Well he he was as he freely admits he was struggling with drug and alcohol abuse and he worked in. The trucking industry was a truck driver. And it was a fella truckdrivers. Someone would he'd worked with etta trucking company whose facilities sort of interest in this and have that conversation. What was the bitch? Yeah I was pretty simple. It was a few hundred bucks main And for a main sort of Jamie circumstances as he said to us. It's like a million dollars when you've got the sheriff on your back and your courage Jew and debt collectors chasing you. Four hundred bucks is a pretty decent. Some go need help. Run run the joint Get a job ever Blah Blah Blah. When he signed up to do you have any understanding of what he was signing what he was getting in getting himself involved in on what. The responsibilities were pace as definitely not inclined to believe. You might think that. Hey like others. We spoke to really had any conception of what would come said. What was it understanding? It's a good question. I think to human to others that we've spoken to. It was just. They didn't think beyond putting Pace Viper and what was that first company that he ended up signed signed up to it was a company called Chew. Bt Bulk Transport so it was ostensibly a trucking company. What came next was just the one company with a mall. Well as Jamie tells it he he signed up for one company and then over time Lettuce started arriving which indicates he was infected. Director of a number of other companies stuck his world. Wars in the pressure's gone law. Indict much the word that Eloi Nasons not Roy went over the second and third company? Coming in on things on sort of words and decide Buddy Roy on us. We opened them up from full time. Job Nixon I got knowing and Guy Freedom quite often dame point why the hell and who's been signing for I say these forgery invo heavy responsible for other companies had been responsible if audience on anything. Did you ever have any experience before being director of a company or Hell APPLEFORD system works no not run as Providence? Lumo and Shit like that when in company. They'll just call him. Mike money a not now the on you about transport is Jordan tracks lying tracks so nat lives with the forklifts gay as for the other side of it. Nobody already I guess at first blush like Kay. What's the problem with being a company direct What kind of companies these though? What kind of state are they in? So most of the companies that I've identified as being suppose involved the company's Piper basically just on pipe did that I have any physical presence. A lot of them were addressed to particular addresses which is where the people who signed up as company directors. Were leaving at the time. There's a few places that have been described to me as Halfway houses boarding houses There was one guy. Who's the director of six or seven companies in the address on the acid records? Fahim was the Salvation Army homeless hostel So they didn't they didn't exist in any real since They were show companies. Was that debt involved with any of these companies. A lot of these companies the majority of them went into liquidation owing anything from a few thousand dollars up to a million or million and a half. So yes they they. The vast majority of did have attached to them when they went on. So what were the consequences for Jamie? I mean there's lettuce showing up shore. What does that mean? Well it means that Hayes on on the hook for the debts that were incurred by those companies when he was the director of them. So when you say that Johnny was on the hook for this dead what what is the like. What'S THE WORST CASE SCENARIO? Here like his. Hey could he go to prison like what is? Where does that Roy go? Well if if you leave Johnny one second and you look at another campus new interview for the story Jackson. He was my bankrupt by the Texas Because he was had been saint. Lettuce sign you. I will this money as you in your role as records company. And then they bankrupted he also another dummy director for a free fury he was also bankrupted by the Texas and a third another dummy directory expected Lisa Baker. She received letters saying containing fines and as she told us that. You know some of those phones. well sorry potentially trek up to a couple of years in prison. Some of the things that she was being sent letters. I what did all those people who you found who'd been targeted in this way to be dummy direct as having common they were certainly What you would describe as paper from the margins of society. The drug uses the homeless alcoholics. Don employed Pretty much anybody who would be happy to take a few hundred dollars for for pregnant. I'm on a PACER.

Jamie Cox Director director Johnny Buddy Roy Dan I etta trucking company Bush ABC investigative reporter Texas Bt Bulk Transport Halfway Lettuce Salvation Army Chew Providence Don Lumo Eloi Nasons
"director" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:55 min | 6 months ago

"director" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Of those things that came out came out before people saw the movie. I don't really believe people think that after seeing the film but I do think it's divisive. I think you know they're set famous quote with sometimes you know Art Comforts the disturb and disturbs. The comfortable. And I think You know choker tended to do that with some people to us. It was really. It was surprising the reaction because didn't feel like by making a movie about something. You're celebrating it you know. Representation presentation is not endorsement. So it just. It always felt very off to us before I'd seen joker which again I want to mention. I liked a lot On just two Superior Clear on the direction from which my questions are are coming I'd already heard reports but like as a too violent while a cause violence and so the trailers I saw before joker we're trailers like for movies with like action movies of a lot of Siegi so I remember like one scene where somebody's basically run over by like It's it's either a tank or some kind of like large futuristic Iran vehicle and after being run over to gets up and starts running away and I thought like this is absurd. The there are so many movies. He's like this and movie theaters. Now where where people just can take any kind of violence and still survive and it's so unrealistic that why would realistic depiction the consequences of violence. Be The movie that presents the problem. I know it shocked us as well. You know when we came out in a in a summer after another Rambo movie or John Wick Film and again. I think these films can exist should exist people. There's an audience for them. But you you talk about celebrating. Violence and joker is woods. Joker is is was guilty of is presenting real world implications of that violence and to us. And maybe this short-sighted that felt like such a more responsible way of dealing with violence I think in the end of the move by the end of the movie. Seven people die in our film All people that did him wrong. Nobody random dies. He doesn't he doesn't shoot any you know his head people who who screwed him over whether he's right or wrong that's another question. But he's not killing people randomly It's not you so Large level mass killings as a guy. I mean this is essentially about the movie being inspired by taxi driver but really we were inspired by a a time of films and I would say there's as much death wish in this film. It's a revenge film as much as a taxi. Driver King of comedy network. One flew over the CUCKOO's looseness all these movies that inspired us But anyway I it just felt really surprising does when we started getting attacked for it being too violent. When you're like wait wait a minute? It's interesting that you say that the movie is so much about you. Know empathy in the lack of empathy in the world. And then your movie comes out and people a- so divided added about it and there's so much anger between the two sides the people who love it and the people who hate it and think it's a reprehensible movie like everything is so divisive now. Yes yes how did you react to that. How did you feel about like witnessing is really divisive reaction to your movie like on on Twitter or oh you know well? Luckily I'm not on twitter right right right those able to avoid all that but I definitely I definitely got heard back about it from friends friends of mine that are on twitter. That love to report when you're trending for some reason But but yeah no it was. It's a tough thing to to go through. You know because because we know are we knew our intentions in in making the movie It kinda bummed us out that it was so divisive but it does seem to be that we live in an age of outrage rage. Now when people look for things to be outraged about and they're going to be outraged. Just about that comment. Probably you know it's it's it's become a thing The good news. Is You know the movie obviously struck a chord and people were having discussions about it and arguing about its merits important about outrage outrage. Yeah it really is so yeah. It was not lost on us but it was something to go through for sure and I. It was stressful but it was also at the same time. Luckily the movie was released. Luckily most people sought for what it is a movie about about childhood trauma. A movie about the lack of love in the world a movie about the loss of empathy in society. Most people saw that for what it is. I can't tell hell you the amount of emails or messages. I got on on my instagram of people talking about how what a wonderful depiction of mental illness. Yes it is you know the the thing that seemed to resonate most with people is when Arthur writes in his notebook. He writes The worst part about having a mental illness. People expect. Expect you to behave as if you don't and that really spoke to people that have it because it's your suffering but you're not wearing a cast your suffering but that you're not in a wheelchair so people think what's wrong with you. You're fine and I think that really connected and and resonated with people in a meaningful way so so that kind of thing makes it worth it and not not that that that it erases everything else but you know it it it connected with the people that had to connect with. Let's take another short break here and then we'll be right back if you're just joining US my guests Todd Phillips Director of Joker. We'll be right back. This is fresh air support for this podcast. The CAST and the following message come from the American Jewish World Service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at Aj J. W. S. dot. Org Did you get a smart speaker for a gift for the holidays. Well consider it the gift that keeps on giving right because it can help you keep up with the news I just say play. NPR to hear your local NPR station. And all your favorite. NPR shows as well. This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us my guest is Todd Phillips Director of Joker. He also directed the hangover films. You've said that there are a lot of films and filmmakers who were influential on you. In the making of joker ochre but adding the one that really stands out the most Scorsese in terms of impart how the film looks. You know. You've got Deniro in the movie. And he was in taxi driver and King of comedy. There are some shots and some things that are so Reminiscent of shots in taxi driver. And even there's two times times like at the end of taxi driver Travis. Bickel puts his finger to his head as if the finger as a gun and then within some he kind of pulls the trigger. And this you you know imaginary gun so another lex quasi references the fact that There's a a late night tonight. Show kind of variety show that's Arthur's Arthur's mother's favourite show and offers grown up watching it and he loves it too they watch it every night together and in King of Comedy Scorsese's film Deniro as is the obsessive fan of the late night. Show which in that movie is is hosted by someone who play by Jerry. Lewis and Deniro kidnaps the Jerry Lewis Character. Her And and near goal is to be on that show himself and in joker The joker character gets on that that late night show that Deniro for very misguided reasons on on the hosts part so just WanNa play a short clip. And this is you know so So you know Arthur. The Joaquin Phoenix character. The the joker character shows up after his invited on the show and he's wearing so you know joker makeup and and you'll look the full luck and the producer of the show. The Fred de Cordova type laid by Marc Marc Maron is like horrified and the Johnny Carson type played by Deniro's kind of like. Oh No we can make this work. This could be fun. The audience will enjoy it. I think think there's one more thing we need to set up an town. I'm GonNa let you do it and give away as much as you want to about Why they're suspicious of him dressed as a clown well? Basically that day there happened to be a big Protest Planet City Hall. So there's a lot of people dressed up as clowns in this joker look which was of course inspired by him early early on this description given of of him from those initial Subway killing so you'll hear them reference you'll hear Marc Maron reference this sort of protests. That are going on in the city city in how somebody actually that day. Not Not by Arthur but was killed by a policeman in a confrontation. So here's that scene between The host De Niro whose name is Murray. The producer played by Marc Maron and Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur joker. What's with the face the mean you part of the protests? No No. Please don't believe anything Sunday Sunday because my act for your act and you hear what happened on the subway some clown got kills wherever that either with it you know I had. Yeah this one tell the audience go crazy. If you put this guy I mean maybe maybe for EPA SEGMENT G. It's GonNa work schoolwork going to go with Marie. Murray couple of rules no no cursing wolf color material. We do a clean show. Okay go on right. After Dr South I loved our good. It could come and get you good luck. Thanks very good one small thing when you bring me out. Can you introduce me as joker. What's wrong with you real name? That's what you call me on the show. A joker do you remember. I don't know if you say so. Can you don't jokers thank Mary okay. So that's a scene. From joker my guess is the director and Co writer. Todd Phillips what was it like to direct both Deniro and Phoenix Walking Phoenix together with a both able to arrive at the place they needed. Did to be In terms of getting the character in the same way at the same time you know like some after like to take a lot of take some actors go to extremes to get roles both phoenix and Deniro have Either lost or gained.

Joker Arthur joker Deniro Todd Phillips Joaquin Phoenix Marc Marc Maron NPR Twitter Comedy Scorsese producer Director John Wick Murray Iran Jerry Lewis US CAST Protest Planet City Hall Phoenix American Jewish World Service
"director" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:17 min | 8 months ago

"director" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Director and the influenza division director for the CDC centers for disease control and prevention it runs about an hour and a half committee chair is Democrat it beneath Johnson of Texas this hearing will come to order and without objection the chair is authorized to clean a recess at any time let me say good morning and welcome to our witnesses of today's hearing on vaccine science and innovation small pox once played the world's population killing approximately three hundred million people in the twentieth century alone smallpox is the only human disease to be eradicated thanks to the relevant of the vaccine another devastating disease polio had just thirty three cases reported worldwide in twenty eighteen compared to three hundred fifty thousand cases in nineteen eighty eight every day vaccines are saving lives the specialize of children and other vulnerable populations there's no such thing is healthy skepticism when it comes to vaccines unfortunately there is a well funded this information campaign targeting the public and weakening public health laws vaccination requirements have been commonplace in the US the generations and exemptions were granted only for legitimate medical reasons however in my home state of Texas the number of unvaccinated children his spikes since twenty two thousand three when the Texas legislature expanding the exemptions to include non medical reasons the number of exemptions rolls from two thousand in the year of twenty third two thousand three the fifty seven thousand last year we're seeing this three played across the country an innocent children of falling ill health officials have confirmed twenty one measles cases in Texas this year and twelve hundred the sixty one and nationwide sixty one of which lead to serious complications as the first nurse elected to Congress I have been dedicated to the improvement of public health my entire career the science committee may not have jurisdiction of the health and human service agencies but we have long had a role in supporting improved public health through good science this morning we will explore the science and innovation challenges for vaccine development through the lens of influenza for the hilt is among us the flu just lays out for several the flu just lays us out for several days with no lasting sad if it's hot for the very young the elderly pregnant women and other vulnerable groups the flu can be deadly the centers for disease control recorded an estimated four forty eight point eight million illnesses and seventy nine thousand deaths during the twenty seventeen twenty eighteen flu season approximately six hundred of those deaths which children each year influenza vaccine production begins with the collection analysis of data many months before the beginning of the flu season the challenge with influenza is that the virus is change constantly and by the time the flu season begins the vaccine may not fully met the circulating viruses scientists are working to develop viable and more effective alternatives to the color current eight a basic vaccines as well as a universal vaccine they will not require annual updates yet another scientific chalice been fluency and many other infectious diseases in Italian complete diseases is incomplete data an antiquated data systems through modernization of data systems and data analytics tools across the federal and state levels we will be able to accelerate vaccine research and development for many diseases we have two expert panels that will help us understand the full cycle from basic research the vaccine development production and deployment and surveillance the witnesses will also describe the role of federal agencies state agencies and the private sector including the partnerships among all stakeholders I want to expand my warm welcome to all of you this morning and I want to thank the vice chair got the better of for his leadership on this issue I look forward to today's discussion I might say that I have a mark up in another committee so I will have to leave before we get through all of the deliberations the chair now recognizes Mr Lucas for an opening statement good morning Cheryl Johnson I would like to thank you and vice chairman Vera for holding this hearing especially given that we are in the middle of flu season in the United States nearly a million individuals are hospitalized for the flu every year including more than forty eight thousand children in Oklahoma since the nineteen for the twenty nineteen flu season began on September one who's been at least one death and seventy three hospitals rations from the flu however these numbers would be far worse if we did not have vaccines vaccination is by far the most the best flu prevention measure we can have today it's easy to forget the little over a hundred years ago the world faced one of the deadliest pandemics in history the nineteen eighteen H. one in one epidemic also known as Spanish flu it killed an estimated fifty million people worldwide including roughly six hundred and seventy five thousand people United States medical technology and countermeasures at the time were limited the isolation and quarantine influenza vaccines did not exist and I antibiotics had not been fully developed yet thankfully due to basic research advancements were made both in treatment and prevention the flu the development of vaccines is placed played an important role in reducing and eliminating deadly disease I can still recall my father stories about how late summer and fall were terrifying time as a child because of the threat of polio during those seasons lucky for me I do not have did not have to experience this fear because of the first polio vaccine being available the United States in nineteen fifty five and thanks to widespread vaccination polio it's been nearly eradicated the United States just thirty three cases reported in twenty eighteen however polio remains a threat in some countries with the world becoming more connected through modern transportation it only takes one traveler with polio to bring the disease in the United States and as I'm.

Director division director CDC hundred years
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:35 min | 11 months ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Danny alpha on my hand in hand like uh-huh kumbum didn't they didn't i loved going anyway. Where are you going to say more about not really really. I mean pretty much. I like tim burton but things have changed and i'm not as infatuated as once i was the thing that's that's cool with him. I think is that like even though i think it's a far cry from what his original works were. It's like he's still get to work and i still think he has a knack for holding adding onto a genre that is his is allowed like like it is in a sense not to work kind of thing where it's like. He does a gothic dark comedy stuff. It's like but it's also like versus is how fincher does dark comedy versus cohen brothers dark comedy. It's a fincher burns stamp on it for sure yeah like that. You can't really i don't know if there's any other the director right now that can replicate his aesthetic. You know what i mean like. No there's a lot of people like if you took a cohen film and offender film made them my closer together like they kind of look the same but but there's no way in hell that a timber and film will look like another filth which next to it this is just a tiny little shoutout to nerd on update. We had a question for mitchell g about why make anything when everyone's already made stuff that is a great point to tie into it of like. Everyone has their own stamp on something. Go listen to that episode targeted in-depth whatever yeah yeah between all in mine. Mine's a little nicer well. Yes i agree with that will be based on science the warriors second boy john carpenter charlotte anthony seeps caves crusaders long bomb john. John carpenter is famous for me. You've heard me talk a lot about one of his films. Specifically podcast is a fucking thing is just thing is but he's also famous for things is like a halloween escape from new york the fog christine <hes> they live memoirs of invisible man the in the mouth of madness <hes> <hes> so he's got a big list of words and most of them he actually writes himself and also does the soundtrack for wow so he's kind of this renaissance man <hes> <hes> and he's highly into practical effects which for me is a golden ticket to me like you're seriously like i i really respect respect people who of course at the time they had to but they're also on the verge of switching to digital effects and he's still chose to stay away from it for me. This guy is a master of suspense <hes> i i think there's very few directors who can so so well tie a story together and make you feel like you can't breathe for two hours the way john carpenter can and you can watch his growth which is really nice from from halloween to things like the thing and they live and all his films have sort of a purposeful campinas to it that i really enjoy. It's not too much but it's enough to know that you can see where he started right. You can see that like when they made halloween. There's no budget and he just had a story and so he he wrote it. He directed it and he wrote the soundtrack himself and shot it out here so like i really respect over the last couple years. Tom and i have discussed disgust and he's seen my growth. Tom specifically in my trust and horror film directors and because a lot of the time they are they start in this place where like horror doesn't didn't get a budget..

John carpenter fincher kumbum tim burton cohen Danny alpha Tom director mitchell new york two hours
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"He. Does that's still a bit of a character. He's ten being real mid west nice about this right. It's like we're trying to respect his craft but the thing is like enormous society. It's asshole moves. It's a different culture. Well yeah have you seen jeremy the sushi yeah and like the whole thing with the dad being the top sushi chef and high of being like this top animator like everyone in the world already has this ideology of the sun. He's not going to be even half as good. That's just something that the japanese culture buys into in america we don't have that ideology <hes> but then that's kind of respect and understanding that gives to higher praise and understanding of the engagement that we should have with media <hes> but yeah like it was like he was there during the film that goro was directing and he was looking at one of the backer artists and on the back rooms drew like open field and he put the the truck over it because they do multi-layer animation and said that truck's too big that trucks and take the entire frame and then you just see the enemy just slowly put it away and it's just like such like a intense and smoke because you're kind of like this is how they operate right and he'll like look at storyboards like this person looked like there look just saw dead person and this person should the full of life like why are these things not full of life. Why isn't that mistake but it's kind of against those signatures right yeah go ahead. I was going to say that like i remember <hes>. It was like these guys were really excited to show miyazaki these like what they had meeting in graphics and it was like a zombie dombi dragging itself across the floor and like the movements were really lifelike. Muzhaqi was pissed. Whoa more more than a little. He was like i have a friend who is disabled and can never want <hes>. How dare you show this to me. He went off on them like you could tell everyone was like wide eyed staring at the floor and that's like it's one of those things where there's so much about me as ocoee that i truly truly love but it's a situation where you know there are just some things that he will never be capable of making too because he hates that kind of thing. We're never going to see that kind of aesthetic from me as ocoee yeah not that i'm upset about that yeah but no i was gonna say bring it back a two to him as a director. What what specifically do what draws you to him. As your favorite director defend testicle realities realities that he creates i gave myself little like two lines or couple lines for each director that i really like and fantastical reality was the first thing that came to mind because because everything is set in a very real world lake even though it has all the like whimsey of conservatism. Yes yeah shintoism. It's got but it it's all very grounded like he does a very good job of taking all of these these concepts that are never would never be real in this world world but makes them feel like oh yeah that makes sense rats person yeah like a radish the radish spirit he takes a little spark can make it into an entire story yeah yeah yeah i think it goes to to mention that easy set it up.

director goro Muzhaqi jeremy america
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

01:56 min | 11 months ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Away my neighbour totoro princess-mononoke. All ghibli films say the one santiz is delivery speed. I actually haven't seen that yet. We're going <hes> but <hes> so there's so much intentional intentional intentional choices that are in there that i it like hit me in the face. I had never been so intrigued by so many purposeful decisions assyrians. I actually bought a book on miyazaki that are it's just a compilation of all the interviews with miyazaki and he's a very interesting person. He's so he told us. He didn't say that he said i think my son made an honest film. Now he's made one. I think he should stop yeah. He's he's a his his opinions or heart a preparing for i saw a documentary where it was just him and his son was doing a <hes> his first film right no after his as after his frail has first because he had commercial success but not critical success the next film supposed to be high l. wrote the screenplay for and then goro gomez ocoee was going to direct it and part of directing studio ghibli is at the director does the storyboards right <hes> and those are sometimes eighty thousand storyboards is a lot <hes> or like hundreds of thousands of story anyways but like he would talk to everyone in the studio except his son for the entire production it would like their relationship is intense messed up the produce africa's name but he's like the big middleman oh man between everybody and was ocoee. <hes> i mean it doesn't surprise me because based on based on what i've read. It makes sense that every scene can be purposeful also because he takes so much ownership over everything. He's like. You want something done right. You're going to do it yourself and he does he does. He's got the shit to back back it up with he..

miyazaki goro gomez ghibli africa director
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

02:51 min | 11 months ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"See it but it's like there's there's just different shades of it and there's a picture of it and i wait. It's not true. It's the more you well. How do i know this. It's not as many as the mantis shrimp. Is anyone anything about women when you're kidding. That's where we have heard on. Thank you <hes> <hes> but yeah so. I think it's important to talk about director specifically. It's not writers or producers or you can have those episodes too but we will have those episodes yeah i. I like in myself as director <hes> i've written myself as a writer director <hes> and to me what that means like. I can write my own scripts and i want it done in a certain way and i have a certain style that i wanna i do. I wouldn't call myself an outdoor. I haven't made that many films to create my own fee matic sense of meaning or also. There's things i want and things i wanna have in all the things i do but <hes> <hes> to be considered. Not tour is a high claim high critical acclaim from a lot of people and a lot of people tend to want to do that but it's also like risk right so like if i wanted all eat to like write the story for it and i told him no. I'm not going to have this in my film then again it could be. I'm an asshole but and not collaborative right but then it's kind of like the pristine and procedural but <hes> what i was saying with directors while we're talking about today they do at the end of they have to make a lot of decisions and they do the director you know. The word were changes from theater to tv. Two film director means such a different thing in t._v. World than dozen theater and film and at some point there is a level of decision making <hes>. There's some level of collaboration but at the end of the day it's weird because they get a lot of the credit. Versus like writers are not a highly hollywood. They wanna sleep with the writer only in california -cation but that's the only time they sleep stars. They want to see what the producers well blah <hes> <hes> but the thing i've always noticed with directors anyways is the fact that they they're kind of seen as that visionary right to like their vision is the film becomes whether it's through their words or not if it's through their own words then it's almost as if it's sort of like these have the formality of writing and it's all in their head if the if you give him a camera amarna crew they could just shoot it. You know but it's like you gotta write it down. You got to do the formal process whatever the ship yeah and so when you're when you're with a different writer the incidents have to collaborate. There's always going to be like some of compromise somewhere where you were you. Can you might that's where you might lose some of that the funny thing that i want to kind of if <hes> take note of after losing this episode is we'll look at how many press tours that the actors go onto for blockbusters and then how much they do for artisan films because most of the time the artisan films are the ones that the directors are doing the press tours versus the actors the actors will do the big blockbusters because those seats seat sellers directors seat sellers. Let's for the artisan films..

director writer mantis t._v california
"director" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

Collider Movie Talk

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

"Like, oh, I've never even heard of that. Well, he literally what he did was he did he did his he did his thing for a minute. And then he's like, well, okay. I understand what you people want. What the audience wants? I'm gonna give you Sicario. I'm gonna give you a rival. Now, you can see I can do the the by the numbers action movie. Yeah. It's still incredibly suspense suspenseful and innovative. Now. I'm gonna do a movie that you just don't even know what the hell you just saw in a rival. And that gives me the opportunity to do whatever I want I get blade under twenty forty nine. And then now dune those are those are entities that are so large directors would look at them. And just be like I want nothing to do with it too much. They'll hate me. No matter what I do. Yeah. He's a pretty unbelievable director. And I almost it almost almost doesn't feel fair to have him on this list with the others because it's so clear that the movies he's done in his style almost make him in the category of like Nolan adventure. But I do still feel like unless you're moving heard. You don't know the name than evil new, right? Because even the other three guys who are not, you know, the three amigos who are not on this list, there kind of guys that have also already done it. Right. They've aren't exactly interview to swear on and and gear MO are not in this anymore because they're to establish nasty before on our y you call swore on I've I done this with Coiro on. Yeah. Because aren't season Spanish S's? I don't know. We've had this conversation. I'm always so confused. You say it was such confidence makes me question. If it in fact is swore on I probably one of those things that like someone that I knew when he was become a set it, and it stuck in my head. I don't know. I'm calling wrong. I've always said Poirot on you say, it you've said it around other people. No one's ever cricket you. But yeah, I don't know. Nobody knows. I'm sure he's listening. Affonso anything? Okay. So that's who we both believe is going to win the next Oscar. Do you think it's going to be four director? Yes, I think I think we should have had best director who's gonna win next best director because we have other people in that have one other Oscar, I just I look at the rest of this list of the names, we have and I think about the other people in contention, and I just don't think most of these people will lend their name to the type of script that's going to even be nominated. He's the one that seems to be willing to be the most big budget of there's one other person on this list that I could maybe see in the same category. But number seven I could see seven doing doing the kind of America win. Yeah. That's very interesting. I like that. So what would you got next? Okay. Next question. Who of these directors is the most likely to have already peaked in their career? And when we say that it doesn't necessarily mean already peaked in the sense that they won't make good movies or even that a movie they do won't get a best picture nomination. Because like we're talking about people with a lot of talent. Yeah. But never reached the heights that they've already reached is the is the question we are asking here man that is a tough one. I. Oh, man. I don't know. Do you have one? Do you have someone who you think is is already there in your mind or no? Now, let's see the people on this list. I think the person that's probably already peaked. For me. I'm gonna go Steve McQueen. Okay. I know. I know it's a little probably controversial because he did such an incredible job with twelve years a slave. Yeah. Shame seems really good aim is good as well. But I did not like widows it sucked. It was not a fun movie for me. And like the people that did like widows I felt like they couldn't really tell me why..

director Steve McQueen Oscar Poirot America Nolan twelve years
"director" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on WDRC

"Director that song i oh vdi thank goodness you me nine.

Director
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Give different and i'm just wondering why of stealing intimidating thing also very hardly keep how do you keep the consistent tone well i think there's really no other way to do it right because they need time to prep beforehand and then to shoot that assode and then to edit afterwards so essentially you couldn't have a director go continuously for thirteen or over many episodes although the right exactly that's what you have direct producer who can oversee the whole thing although they do seem to occasionally some of these shows now have somebody direct ten episodes which seems incredible what does that person do prep all ten episodes head of time what happens is now they're all written then they're all shot then they're all added in other words you're not adding in the same place but i will say that on west wing we actually ended up in the third year we brought in two other people i brought to other people who co ps to direct along with me so that those three of us directing that show because it's a pretty high you know sort of we didn't always be able to get paris who got nominated for every episode he ever did but and actually that was it's really the actors more than anything i mean for me it's the actors i think feel so comfortable with the people that they already know instead of somebody coming in and as an episode of director you have a very short window of time to get the crew and the actors to believe in you that you in fact are the captain of that particular ship and that particular stuff yeah on nypd blue which we did before this obviously you've heard of david milton david melts would write scripts.

director producer west wing paris david milton david milton
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Look i think every i think the greatest opportunity for someone to learn how to direct is to be on television show is just an incredible gift to those who have an enormous desire to do that because it school right in front of you and you can you know you can take advantage of that and really taking advantage and those that do it they make end that being wonderful directors dp's actors what it should never be from my point of view is a perk it shouldn't be got them on the show i think i mean maybe it'd be fun to direct and then never wanted to reckon after that i think it what it does is it dilutes the craft that i believe so strongly and so i think it's something whereas you look at math matthew rhesus episodes on the american that's a real director that's a real director and i can't wait for him to finish the show so that i could hire him to direct something because he's really really good and so i think that's the most for me the most important thing i will also say as director the best actor to ever work with is the actor that just directed their first episode of television because they are the most accommodating human being on the planet but that only lasts for one or maybe two at the hey maybe one last question right here don't care about disturb you strange that tees.

director
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Wondering about this and i'd be interested in your perspective that these tone meetings which jolson gone so long they're like important but unbearable at same time and i finally near five i asked are producing director chris long how he actually utilizes all that stuff that comes out and i'd be interested if it's the same for you or totally different he said well i take in everything you say and then i put in the back of my head and when i'm on set if something's happening that totally contradicts it then it comes into the front of my mind so i can say oh that's kind of not what they wanted but otherwise it's sort of sitting there in the back which made sense to me can you talk just a little bit about what tone meeting is and you have seen through the script scene by scene and we talk about often even line by line just what we were thinking what our intention was what we want to get across with that well it's interesting because for me the americans is very different experience than basically what i've been doing for the last fifteen years the american is the only show that i have an executive produced in fifteen years and and working on it and it has been an absolute joy an absolute joy on many levels but so it's you know have to put on a different hat most of the shows that i've worked on as being a producer director executive producer on that show it is an incredibly collaborative process and specifically if it i mean dave and i are working together on snowfall and and in fact i didn't direct on snowfall i just came in and executive produced and worked with dave and we ran that show together and trying to figure out the best way to sort of move these very very ambitious television shows and so for me it's just the more there is a sense of collaboration between those entities right away so whether it's the director working with the writers of that episode and part of it is i think chris makes a good point do you know i have to say it's pretty deeply stored with me because at that moment all i wanna do is take ownership i mean i think my job as director is to take ownership my job is no longer too.

executive executive producer dave director jolson producing director chris long producer fifteen years
"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"This is like starting to lose people also a lot of our listeners our young upandcoming directors what what would you advise at young you know or any director to do if they are starting to feel like they're losing their their cruel little bit what what are some tactics firkh for reining in all back in getting the confidence back up as if he were being wake in the director do like from the perspective to de it he ravages the rest of the crew i mean it's hard because lowbudget because we have the capability of making films at such a low budget it means that people who might not be ready to direct the film gets direct to film in and so a lot of i worked with a lot of first time directors and a lot of my job is to leg helped them and like bringing them to get their power back but sometimes the power is not always there so it is about empowering them it is about leg bring them back and i think when director start to lose the crew you know yeah like taking a step back even like taking a half day off and just kind of like reorienting or something or like doing something blake build group morale up again because making films as hard and there's a lot of sensitive emotional people on said as there should be but like feelings are involve sinoe you just have to lake knowhow to kind of right the ship when it's going off course and it is tricky because you know it can original form from an actor that the they've been cast and then you find out it's a miscast what do you do with an actor that doesn't perform that over acts that you know that's a that's a very hard situation to begin because the script this written especially in feature films.

director
"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"So long for a director in our minds but every directing collaboration ndp collaboration is kind of unique in its own way and for me i think what i really love in a director is somebody who can get the whole team on board behind their singular vision you know when i when i am asked to do things that are uh kind of beyond my capabilities in terms of timer equipment or um sort of they want something that looks higher budget than it is whatever it is if if i feel like i'm in good hands with their vision i feel like if the crew feels like they're in good hands with their vision than everybody's working towards the same goal i think it's it's easier said than done to kind of get everybody marching in the same direction on a film set and dumb to me a good director is somebody who's got a vision doesn't have to be visual but it has to be some sort of direction that we're all moon moving towards and i really look for that and a collaboration i totally agree just completely nail those yes thing that i'm kind of stands out to me in terms of looking back in terms of the films that i shot and the experiences that i had with directors there are some really some circumstances where you working really really hard and everybody thinks that they are on the same path and then you feel all of the sudden lack of respect that just starts happening it starts happening with the crew all of a sudden there is a judgment that is present and we are not making the days and all of a sudden there's is wavering on the director on it and it affects the entire mood and when this respect for the director drops than you know you're in trouble and you know i i always look out for that lake water is happening here what's the pulse overall you know where is the expectation are we really as you said all going in on along the same path and working for the same goal and does he really have or she really have a um a vision and an over arc arching vision of what the film will be because look the fact is and when you onset things change you can have a script.

director
"director" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"And by thanks for calling in this is as the good interesting session i have great edit and uh thanks for coming out and we're on a break i'm going to sell some real estate we are going to come back and i've got a an interview with a really interesting germany roger donaldson who is the director of a new documentary called mclaren about a bruce mclaren which is it's a really cool documentary rajaonson was also the director of the world's fastest indian with anthony hopkins which is an awesome movie and we have a good discussion about kiwis in motor sport and bruce mclaren and stick around we right back simpson of the smoked our podcast is brought to you by dr line drive line is the world's first social driving up coming exclusively to the iphone discovered the pleasure of driving not to get somewhere but simply to be on the road whether you're a longtime driving enthusiast or just someone who wants to discover why driving can be fun this is the app for you you can map and classify your favorite driving roads based on style location or whether it's a a lose a loose surface a cruz an offroad trail while capturing basic metrics and driving data with dr line you can use your phones camera to capture video of your driver using external camera or maybe even a drone posting those videos to the feed so everyone can see why your time behind the wheel matters or keep them for yourself in your library new can build a profile share your cars track your drives and earn points towards contests and giveaways now.

real estate roger donaldson director bruce mclaren anthony hopkins iphone basic metrics