35 Burst results for "director"

Gov. Cuomo's Communications Director Resigns

Ric Edelman

00:41 sec | 1 d ago

Gov. Cuomo's Communications Director Resigns

Andrew Cuomo’s Communications Director Become Latest Staffer to Resign

Bloomberg Wall Street Week

00:14 sec | 1 d ago

Andrew Cuomo’s Communications Director Become Latest Staffer to Resign

"News Room. Governor Andrew Cuomo was communications director Peter Ajemian has resigned. That's the latest and a growing number of staff departures as Cuomo faces investigations over sexual harassment allegations and nursing home deaths. A gem. Ian's last

Peter Ajemian Andrew Cuomo Cuomo IAN
Northwestern Students, Faculty Protest Hiring of New Athletic Director

John Williams

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

Northwestern Students, Faculty Protest Hiring of New Athletic Director

"University, is facing backlash over its pick of Mike Polis Key to be the school's new athletic director. He's been the deputy athletic director since 2010 and he was named as a defendant in the federal sexual harassment lawsuit filed by a former tribute earlier this year. We get more from WGN's Kelly Davis. He's one of four people cited in a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by Northwestern Cheerleader Hate and Richardson. Sr says cheerleaders were sexually exploited and claims that the school ignored her complaints. She specifically states that Phyllis Key accused her of fabricating evidence. Six female faculty members sent an open letter demanding greater transparency, transparency. And they led a protest outside the university president's home yesterday.

Mike Polis Kelly Davis Northwestern Cheerleader Hate WGN Phyllis Key Richardson
Northwestern Students, Faculty Protest Hiring of AD

Chicago's Afternoon News

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Northwestern Students, Faculty Protest Hiring of AD

"Were out protesting this afternoon over the new athletic director Mike Polski. He's been deputy athletic director since 2010. He was named as a defendant in a federal sexual harassment lawsuit filed filed by a former cheerleader earlier this year. There's more from WGN's Kelly Davis. He is one of four people cited in a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by Northwestern Cheerleader Hayden Richardson senior says cheerleaders were sexually exploited and claims that the school ignored her complaints. She specifically states that Felicity accused her of fabricating evidence. Six female faculty members sent an open letter demanding greater transparency, and they led a protest outside the university president home today. Public schools could lose some

Mike Polski Kelly Davis Hayden Richardson WGN Felicity
Talent Photographing Talent. James Anthony and his Hollywood Shutter

This Week in Photo

02:37 min | 2 d ago

Talent Photographing Talent. James Anthony and his Hollywood Shutter

"James anthony welcome to the show man. How's it going. Thank you look. Everything is good good good to Speak to create another shooter out here but yeah thanks to me about you and i spoke about a week ago and when we had that conversation you were right on the heels literally running in the house from the oscars right you dislike literally set down and zoom coming from an oscar party or from something oscar related less before we dive into your background. Let's start there. Let's let's do you know how the in films since you're you're in tinseltown down there in films deals often start a movie halfway through the movie and then go back to the beginning. Let's start air. What was that. Like as a photographer shooting the oscars and being having that level of access well a little bit of surreal. A little bit of lag. Yeah should be here. You know like. I put a so. It's always that dance whereas like what this is crazy. And then as i know you've been putting in blood sweat and tears over year so this is where you should be so it's twenty when those moments kind of take over but a just working with the talent that i was working with regina king on our everything is out there but posing the photos regina king in awesome talented actress in director oscar. Award-winning actress indiana. I'm shooting her in hers. Her sweet and then aldus hodge who is also equally talented actor in also one of the stars of her film. When night in miami he comes in unexpectedly to me but then he jumps in the some of the shots in wherever the capture. Some almost between regina and and em would just work with a talent like hers in being also in the presence of the brand that of the drugs issues wearing so you had louis vuitton rep there You had your in correspondence. Virtually with vogue because their wait. They're waiting for the first drop of the images so a little bit of pressure just knowing that you have to go in there execute Had these images ready as soon like these images had to be ready edited within forty five minutes of me

Oscar Oscars James Anthony Aldus Hodge Regina King Indiana Regina Miami Louis Vuitton
Conductor with Bipolar Disorder Launches Orchestra To Battle Mental Health Stigma

The Psych Central Show

01:59 min | 3 d ago

Conductor with Bipolar Disorder Launches Orchestra To Battle Mental Health Stigma

"Today we have ronald brownstein. Mr brownstein is the music director of me. Too and a graduate of juilliard conducted the san francisco symphony berlin philharmonic and the oslo philharmonic. Just to name a few. Mr brownstein was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in nineteen eighty five. He launched me too because of his desire to support others who struggled to maintain good mental health. Mr brownstein welcome to the show. Thank you you have conducted major orchestras all around the world. And you are on a trajectory to being a lead conductor when you disclosed your diagnosis of bipolar disorder. And then you were shunned by the classical music community. Was this the experience that caused you to start me too. Well it wasn't like. I decided to start me too. I got basically fired from a job. Because of my mentally ill. I knew that i would never get up conducting chop again But it wasn't like a decision. It's just i felt that i run out of options So i had to create a new option which was to make my own of of people like me. And i guess it was not as though there was a formal launch. We just set out a press release and we waited to see if anyone would show up and a few people did. People were frankly sitting on on cold folding chairs all purpose community space at the beginning. We didn't really know what we're doing. And no one knew what would happen So anyways long short. I said everyone down on the floor and we talked about a parameters was just simply that wanted to make an orchestra that stigma free context in which we would be ourselves and not have to hide our illness so Kind of started like that

Mr Brownstein Ronald Brownstein San Francisco Symphony Berlin Oslo Philharmonic Bipolar Disorder
CDC Projects Sharp Decline in COVID-19 Cases by July

The World and Everything In It

00:58 sec | 3 d ago

CDC Projects Sharp Decline in COVID-19 Cases by July

"Nineteen toll on the united states will fall sharply by the end of july that according to new research released by the federal government. What we learned from this report is that we are not out of the woods yet but we could be very close. Cdc director dr rachelle walinsky the report included projections from six groups. The cdc tasked them with predicting the course of the us epidemic. Between now and september the models projected a sharp decline in cases by july twenty twenty one and an even faster decline if more people get vaccinated sooner but the report also warns that a substantial increase in hospitalizations and deaths is possible if unvaccinated americans disregard basic precautions. The number of new daily cases now stands at about forty thousand per day. that's the lowest level since september but still more than seven hundred americans die each day from covid

Dr Rachelle Walinsky Federal Government CDC United States
Solve Your Biotherapeutic Challenges With Help From Gene Therapy University

GEN Sounds of Science Podcast

01:49 min | 4 d ago

Solve Your Biotherapeutic Challenges With Help From Gene Therapy University

"Thanks for joining us for this. Gen cast today was pretty exciting episode. We have talking about some seller gene therapy and let's get to it but first let's meet our guests for today's podcast. Gentlemen if you could introduce yourself to the jets hi geoff. My name is not christian. I am an associate director Bioprocessing segment had mila poor sigma. My group primarily provides technical bioprocess consultation and the americas region for manufacturing companies in their process development technology transfer in manufacturing journey towards commercialisation of gene therapies. My name is dave bionic and the sound therapy market segment manager at sigma some focused on our strategy development within our bioprocessing business jenan. Thanks for joining us today. Really appreciate it Let's get to the first question and talk about some selling gene therapy things that are going on so Details a little bit more about the gene therapy industry itself in some of the common trends and challenges which other companies are dealing with. Hey jeff i get really excited. Talking about ten apiece after having contributed to the field is a process development scientists and recently before getting into gene. Therapy let's zoom out and talk about red diseases. By definition that diseases affect a very small number of less than about two hundred thousand people here in the united states that is another category called ultra rare diseases which affect fewer people than twenty people in a million. So we're talking about very small numbers here and entering bespoke era or degenerate medicines but collectively speaking. They happen to be pretty common.

Dave Bionic Geoff Jets Americas Sigma Jeff United States
Why Did You Kill Me?

You Can't Make This Up

01:55 min | 4 d ago

Why Did You Kill Me?

"On this week. The documentary why did you kill me. I'm joined by the film's director and producer. Frederick monk now a note to listeners. This episode does contain spoilers for. Why did you kill me. So make sure to watch the film and then listen on. After her daughter's murder a mother uses the social networking site. My space to find the people she believes are responsible. She creates a fake profile. That leads to unexpected intimacy with the suspects a key break in the case and a dark revenge plot the documentary. Why did you kill me. Offers a gripping look at the effects of loss and the relationship between revenge forgiveness and the criminal justice system daughter crystal in my turn. Justin get right up here. i look over. I see the good thing they said. Crystals been shot last thing got say. You're trump mr. Did i was gonna get them. They're going to pay off the streets talk like you just hear stuff. He had told me of people involved had my space aunt blunder. Came up with the idea of making crystal on my space. And i said can get information for you. We decided to name her angel. They just started responding ping ping ping. I was looking for a weekly violent gang gang members of the price if they snitch targeted us or family. That was it james pudding messages. I was just making it likely making them trust me before i started being like. Hey what kind of car do you drive. I'd try to pass their houses and go take pictures of the vehicles. And i think we found him. Linda was just kind of a site though. This is gonna screw stuff up now. You start threatening and do things that you can't even think of for those things. We get nightmares.

Frederick Monk Ping Ping Ping Justin James Linda
Covid & Digital Transformation: Too Much, Too Soon?

Technology Untangled

02:07 min | 5 d ago

Covid & Digital Transformation: Too Much, Too Soon?

"Distort transmission is the conscious integration of digital technology into all areas of a business and buzzwords aside. Most organizations have been talking about it for ages. We've gone digital transformation strategies and chief digital officers coming out of our as bump the stats. Say that seventy percent of all digital transformation initiatives fail to find out why i could dave strong u. k. pre sales director for h. p. e. the three areas. That really caused this to happen. One is around complexity to many organizations. Take on too much. They tried to bring together thought him any digital technologies to try and deliver society. Come the end up. Filing then this the couch apiece and the whole point around the digital ambition is to do it quickly is to take a business problem translate a business problem and executes it with technology that can really make a difference organization. Two three four year programs that too long. You missed the boat if you're trying to compete against monza as a retail bank and taking three full years to get to where they were three years ago he kind of lost your business. You know that culture piece of being able to deliver things in bite size. Incremental trunks isn't organization is very alien to established businesses. you look at some banks being around fatigue. Three hundred years right imagine that trading history and the processes that they've built up that time. It's very cumbersome netflix. It is being cumbersome the it processes being cumbersome so it has really made it extremely difficult and then the final based fatigue and we guys right back to taking too long to do things. But you're relying on a very small skills pool around dishes so we know that it's recognized. Uk level the digital skills are in great demand but it's not enough of them and focusing all of that delivery and change on a very small pool of people that overwhelmed overworked and therefore the in fatigue. And that's why you see that stat. Seventy percent fail

Dave Netflix UK
2 Chinese Vaccines May Soon Get Approval for Use

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 d ago

2 Chinese Vaccines May Soon Get Approval for Use

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting to Chinese vaccines could be getting approval from the WHL the World Health Organization will decide this week whether or not to approve two Chinese vaccines for emergency use against covert nineteen according to a top W. H. O. official are Angeles if our assistant director general for access to medicines vaccines and pharmaceuticals says some final arrangements still need to be made before W. H. O. technical advisory group weighs in on the single farm and Cyril Wecht vaccines if approved it would mark the first time a Chinese vaccine has been granted so called emergency use listing from the U. one health agency a decision on the Seattle farm vaccine is expected to come first hi Mike Rossio

W. H. O. Mike Rossi WHL World Health Organization Cyril Wecht Angeles U. Seattle Mike Rossio
In the 'Shout at Cancer Choir,' No Voice Boxes Needed

Morning Edition

01:57 min | 6 d ago

In the 'Shout at Cancer Choir,' No Voice Boxes Needed

"Their voice boxes to cancer have formed, acquire a new documentary profiles them and Stephanie O'Neill reports. Subject way, starting here on it. What? What? In this scene of the new documentary. Can you hear my voice? Members of the shouted cancer choir in the UK warm up before a sold out concert at London's historic Tabernacle Theater, Andrew All right, there are no velvety voice crooners in this bunch. All have undergone Lear inject Amis or voice box removal to treat cancer. Procedure leaves them breathing through a surgically created hole in the front of the neck. And they require a voice prosthesis to speak. Did what do you want? You want you? Thank you. Requires a brainchild of Dr Thomas More's an ear, nose and throat specialist and lifelong singer Wars is executive director of Shout at Cancer, a London based support and rehab group. For Larry Inject me patients. I'll remember quite well. When I first suggested, Let's form a choir. There is former with laughter and surprise and this belief It just seemed ridiculous that you would expect with people with no voice boxes to stand up and sing in a coId. That's Sarah Boden Evans. She's one of a handful of choir members who share their personal cancer journey with Pasadena filmmaker Bill Brummel himself aware injected me patient. The Peabody Award winning an Emmy nominated documentarian lost his voice box in 2016. I couldn't imagine How I wouldn't work. After Larry injected me. I couldn't imagine walking around in public with a hole in my neck. Liz Summers is a speech and language therapist for shouted cancer. The voice is a really essential part off who we are and how we express ourselves. And there's an enormous sense of loss that can occur when somebody loses their their natural voice of the voice they had before speaking through the tiny

Stephanie O'neill Cancer Tabernacle Theater Dr Thomas More Larry Inject London Sarah Boden Evans Bill Brummel Andrew UK Peabody Award Liz Summers Pasadena Emmy Larry
Empire State Building Owner to Buy 300 Million Kilowatt Hours of Wind Energy

Climate Connections

01:10 min | 6 d ago

Empire State Building Owner to Buy 300 Million Kilowatt Hours of Wind Energy

"For almost a century. The tall spire of the empire state building has lit up the new york city skyline at night in recent years those lights have been powered by renewables. Since two thousand eleven the skyscraper has been buying wind energy to offset one hundred percent of its electricity. Use now empire state realty trust which owns the building is doing the same for all of its properties which total more than ten million square feet of commercial real estate to meet that goal. The trust agreed to buy more than three hundred million kilowatt hours of wind power over three years. That's enough energy to light every house in new york state for a whole month. And so we're really proud of the commitment that we've made dana. Robin schneider is the trust director of energy and sustainability. She says that by committing renewables large property owners can make significant cuts in carbon pollution. And they can help accelerate the broader transition to a clean energy economy as the investments growing continue in renewable energy. That's always a good thing. It's a critical way to encourage the development of renewable power

Robin Schneider New York City Dana New York
Dan Austin, MD Lake District Farmers

Humans of Hospitality

01:42 min | 6 d ago

Dan Austin, MD Lake District Farmers

"Donald stein managing director of district farmers. Thank you so much for joining me on the podcast day. Hugely appreciate you sparing the time to chat. I just asked dan. Because unfortunately despite the fact that i love the late district not face to face but where in the world are you. This morning i am on the only island this morning by the each on fairly ironic because other agents Rarely get song. We do have some nice job today. So it's beautiful. So why is that is that is that is on the coast. Is it or yes. I live in borrowing furnace case. Shipbuilding town a systems etc. Our animals assaults trout lake district so bart alec cetera. I am but i am a barrel boy on bread and only is alive in just a filing furnace. Mazen are well. I'm by the beach as well as that. I was going to be deeply envious imagined you identify sat on the top of the stonewall fouls or you know smoking a pipe looking out over the lakes but you know we're we're coastal brothers. So that's That's better on monday. So william i wanna be up there right. You represent some incredible foams in an genuinely you know. I think i think the lake district must be one of the most beautiful places on the planet let alone in england. I adore it but for those who have not heard of late district farmers. Can you just explain to people about. Yeah do as a business. I i mean basically. We represented founding cooperative. And i don't say the found his shop window for really found producing a brilliant Just create excellent products.

Donald Stein Bart Alec Cetera Mazen DAN William England
100 Million in U.S. Now Fully Vaccinated, but Resistance Remains

The Best of Ben Shapiro

00:49 sec | Last week

100 Million in U.S. Now Fully Vaccinated, but Resistance Remains

"Now fully vaccinated against covert 19. The U. S now has three vaccines and more than enough supply. But some health experts warn getting to herd immunity word of people are vaccinated. To get things back to normal is getting harder. ABC is Michelle Franzen more than a third of US adults now fully vaccinated, but health experts are running into a new hurdle. Vaccine hesitancy. Dr Paul off. A director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, says recent safety concerns over the Johnson and Johnson covert vaccine. I have factored in that says the rare risks don't outweigh benefits. If you take a theoretical million people, for example, with the J and J vaccine would have a severe blood clot. It would be about one per million resident take a theoretical million people who are infected with coded 5000 will die and many would be left with permanent harm. So these vaccines still the benefits outweigh their risk. Michelle Franzen ABC News today was the original deadline

Michelle Franzen Dr Paul Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade U. Johnson ABC United States Abc News
Choosing the Right Nonprofit Business Model With Rinku Sen

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:28 min | Last week

Choosing the Right Nonprofit Business Model With Rinku Sen

"Rinku sen is a writer. Social justice strategist. She is formerly the executive director of race forward and was publisher of their award. Winning news site color lines under her leadership race forward generated some of the most impactful racial justice successes of recent years including drop. The i word it compan- from media outlets to stop referring to immigrants as illegal resulting in the associated press usa today the l. a. times and many more outlets changing their practice she was also the architect of the shattered families report which identified the number of kids in foster care whose parents had been deported. Her books stir it up and the accidental. American sierra is a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race gender class poverty sexuality and other systems as a consultant rinku has worked on narrative and political strategy with numerous organizations at foundations including policy link. The aclu and the nathan cummings foundation. She serves on numerous boards including the women's march where she co president and the foundation for national progress publisher of mother jones magazine. And i don't even think we've told folks what you do today so rinku. Thank you so much for joining us for helping me think through. I'm glad you're here and welcome. Thank you so much joe. It's a real thrill to talk with you today. So and well actually. You just listened to me for the last several minutes so the goal here is to get you talking so i re as i read your bio. I realized that we actually didn't talk about what you do today. So you wanna you wanna give folks sense of that. The new adventure. You're on now. Sure i in early december. I became the executive director of narrative initiative. Which is an organization that puts different kinds of creative people together to make interventions In the big stories we tell and live into so We do a lot of work with right now. The green new deal network to help them. Think through what what kinds of messages and frames they need to move out until the world that will build support for progressive policies and we We also provide a ghost writing service for grassroots organizations. That need help getting things written.

Rinku Sen The Associated Press Usa Today American Sierra Rinku Nathan Cummings Foundation Foundation For National Progre Mother Jones Magazine Aclu JOE
Gucci "Hacked" Balenciaga for New Aria Collection

Pop Fashion

02:16 min | Last week

Gucci "Hacked" Balenciaga for New Aria Collection

"Collaborated with balenciaga. On a new collection or did it. Did it really collaborate. This about gucci's most recent runway show called aria. It was billed as a collaboration between the two fashion houses. But instead gucci's creative director allesandro michelle hacked balenciaga's designs. The best description of what happened came from fashion east asia which said the hacking meant taking balenciaga designs and throwing it in a blender with gucci signature looks. It was a mix. I agree with that. It's a little hard to describe. Because it's not inspired by balenciaga. It's more than that and they did. Steal from balenciaga because both fashioned houses in on this. They both like this was going to happen. Michelle said about the collection quote in any great saga. No one knows what is real and what is not deep thoughts. Remember too that. These fashion houses are owned by the same pair company. They're both are owned by caring. So i want to describe a little bit about what came down the runway again. This was a gucci show. Where the designs have balenciaga elements including balenciaga leading boots but covered in gucci logo. There are some balenciaga florals. But what the name gucci a classic gucci jackie bag but printed with the word balenciaga gucci. Kind of took elements and silhouettes and mashed up g. q. Wrote about it quote. It was indeed less a collaboration than a mind. Fuck and the best possible way. I also agree with that. Statement the response to the show is really mixed some analysts. Some fashion people loved it. Some people hated it. G q was like this show is what people are going to be talking about for ages. And tyler mccall over at fashion. East said yeah. This is gonna be fun for instagram. But it's going to end up on the real real after a couple of wears

Balenciaga Gucci Allesandro Michelle East Asia Michelle Tyler Mccall
What You Should Know About the Iran Nuclear Talks

People of the Pod

02:08 min | Last week

What You Should Know About the Iran Nuclear Talks

"Earlier this month six world powers reopened negotiations with iran over the two thousand fifteen nuclear accord or joint comprehensive plan of action. From which the united states withdrew into thousand eighteen officials have described the initial discussions focused on bringing iran into compliance and lifting. Us sanctions as constructive here to discuss. The implications of these talks is a longtime friend of american jewish committee. Patrick clawson director of research at the washington institute where he directs the Turbie program on iran and us policy. Dr clawson welcome back to people of the pod. Thank you for having me. So let's start with the current state of the two thousand fifteen. Nuclear agreement at this point is iran and compliance with any of its restrictions. A few okay which ones and which ones has violated will iran is largely in compliance of the not entirely with the commitments made about providing access to the international inspectors the international topic energy agency. Even there it's not full. In compliance and iran is also in compliance with some of the restrictions on one of the reactors that he uses so the most important restrictions however were on the enrichment of uranium and they're iran is across the board noncompliance. The situation is even worse than it looks because the original agreement required iran not to do research on how to enrich to a higher level and how to use more advanced centrifuges. We'll iran has done that research and you can't undo that research once you've done it so iran is allowing the inspectors still to come in but hasn't iran threatened to limit the inspectors access to its research facilities correct in may will come up with a deadline. Set down by runs parliament saying that if there's been no progress in the negotiations than the access for the inspectors will stop. The widespread expectation is that iran will say well. I guess there's enough progress. We can keep on going for a little while longer

Iran Patrick Clawson Dr Clawson International Topic Energy Age American Jewish Committee United States Washington Institute Parliament
"director" Discussed on Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

03:58 min | 4 months ago

"director" Discussed on Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

"I am paco. Romane george chan. You're listening to sub dock and we're doing a special clip show today we're going to play some interviews from directors because i you know if you follow the show the whole time you'll know that we usually were just comedians and we talked to our friends and sometimes we actually talked to real hardcore film directors like award winning folks that have really been in the trenches so we got different sides. We want to show you for our show. Yeah that's right. I mean we've we set out just basically to communities wanting to talk to comedians in them five and a half years later we've talked to people who have been on tv journalists other host of other podcasts and some of our favorite documentary Talks we've had is with the actual filmmakers of those documentaries. We're talking about and that is what today is all about so george. Why don't you set up the first clip. Yeah this is a film that actually i. I was lucky enough to get a really early screening Right before this showed at sundance. I think it's basically the same cut that was shown at sundance and this is feels good. Man which is independently produced independently released. They did not get picked up by one of the bigger probably because the topic is about pepe the frog so you can imagine like the billboards. No net didn't want to like have a giant pepe. The frog billboard on sunset arthur jones and georgia angelini. Were gracious enough to come over to my house and talk to me Yeah we talked to them after sundance happened but before the film was widely available so this is actually very early on it. You can get it anywhere now. You can rent it. Buy it on itunes and other places but yeah feels good man. It's the story of matt. Furey and this is more of a chat where we kind of talked about the entire process that arthur first time director arthur and giorgio. The producer went through to make feels good man. Were you doing this between doing. Paid work essentially or kind of like to keep this going for the last few years. Yeah yes i mean. We both on an obvious question. But i don't know how many of our listeners are actually filmmakers themselves. But i know this is like a. It's a different system than like pitching fiction film type situation. Especially if you're new to it you know no one wants to give you money until you've already made the money for sure. That's just the reality of the business. Yeah the first year in particular like yeah. No i worked really hard. I know we both did on a lot of different projects. And the maybe the last nine months a year we were able to work on the film full-time which was an amazing thing We found great partners a wavelength productions and the chicago media project to come in and help us but yeah the first year and a half. We were just bootstrapping it ourselves. Or they're gr- i think With some types of documentaries maybe grants you or we applied. We're also talk about the nazi frog. That i think was i think. Yeah you boil down the problem with the film. Initially when they heard about it. Yeah that's the thing is like in your head you're filmmaker and you're like know what it's gonna feel like the final product is so hard to render that in other people's minds and like in a substantive way until you actually finish the film so we were kind of up against the fact that we didn't really have much of a track record to prove like just trust us so this really potentially toxic film and then what's been so rewarding now that we've kind of started to screen publicly and the people have started to respond. It's like oh had no idea about matt's life and this is such a surprisingly heartwarming story..

Romane george chan angelini arthur jones arthur Furey giorgio george georgia matt chicago
"director" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

Directors Cut Radio Program

02:03 min | 7 months ago

"director" Discussed on Directors Cut Radio Program

"And it had every single button of the keyboard are GonNa take a break. We'll be back with more from directors cut radio after this show movies and I guess phones. Wow News. Average Iq? Since two. Thousand. Five. I don't know what you're saying that that's on on. The director Scott Director's cut radio DOT COM. You're listening to the director's cut. Without microphones. We'd still live with our parents..

Scott Director director
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

07:37 min | 9 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"This kept got involved, but it won't be. It's got the viable what was going on? Any. He I think he's a limited. So while from me nine this out. So Great. You know we had a chance to your saying seafood. So we sees other passing sometime we never got a chance to work together. You know on the space light in a space like this. It was just such a blessing on the come down rocking me. Did in terms of working with him. Did he he took the pipe but did he do anything? That made you go. Oh Wow. This is a whole other level of master actor I'm talking to right here I'm working with right here. Yeah. Of course I was like you. You ever watch the chess player always giving his Sunday Vice. Way doesn't. You know. Even. Even. His is even if you notice, he puts a little trio voice every once in a while. That's still doing his own inflection best him. Capturing. With the charting is a guy who lives in a shot. Near the swamp. For crawfish. But yet a father. Son. You black on the lower knife with respect. And his son. Charles y'all. That's not an excuse to their. No, it's not an excuse not. But he says in a way. That idiom they understand that sometimes. Like. These the cause to be dealt guests, you gotta overcome it. You gotTA, overcome it, but accept that I. In dead overcome it don't be blind to it. Terrence Howard is in this picture and he's one of my favorite actors out you know and just he has this bite. He radiates he's one of these master actors talk about working with Terrence Howard. Yeah I mean yeah. I mean he's he's he has so many elements of. Art and personality you know musician. I chance met each other. One day was at the grammys. And they set not such a sat me beside him. I guess it was also a flow year. Right At with. Each Other. Respect each other's land we started talking about some of the performances laughing and we of became cool. You know. And you get a chance for him to trump. and. If it's art, this film was such a the on of a stage and I would say that once again he's another guy. WHO's prepared? He don't do nothing. Without understanding the reason in fact, there was a part where he was like what along this? Why am I? Why would I say that? I said no thank you will say not. See Wow was it. I may assess I say I don't. I don't Understa I said let me tell you why. Why thank you say that? If you look at your challenge. I gave him some backdrop and think about the China got day. That's not on the page. Right? Is that He he's he's a contradiction of themselves. Yet, he's a belief of itself. So I made by that is like a preacher. Preaching all the world's for banging all the people in Church. Desolate Saudi I I felt that his child the was in an internally. and. In. He wants. He got that he just eat as Lebanon so well, you ever. Watch that scene again when he comes on the screen, a Saas talking about his history any. Any walks and you see you see ways all today as wide reaching is something really mad about that. Why with Ti as another major part of this movie? I thought is, why did you decide or why did anyone decide to change the look of his face What? What was that about? Well that was written screenplay. So you know. I honestly I'm with you I honestly always and I got. Out to about twelve directors have I ended up when it got to win the shit. I ended up winning it and Method land played that fine. I thought mess will come in and just be this big. Who Just ripped this thing up? You know many immeasurably that. As an actor right now he's not looking for bad walls nothing for good goodwill's I saw. Can I spent a? I needed somebody to play the role. I didn't know who I was GonNa get and then when my agent Chairman Mitchell say yo already is interested. What does he wants to get up? You know girls love Ti Yo, and to disfigure herself. On. Means Saulius? Acting moves. And it was written and he came in. And focus slated. To to be honest with you. Ask a question, but I was GONNA, say. When we when we did the first two season Cut. The half of the crew. Especially, the DP. This, fucking guys amazing. Because you you. You read it you. WanNa be. I haven't seen deliver that kind of subtle was. Some of his road, another minute anthrax comedic timing, shock right? Agitate not is going to have your ass lapping fucking eating your popcorn, but he did it. In this spill. Is Danger. In the weight of his position is older his voice in all his act and I was very. Who kind of shocked me? See. Shop. Well now, I didn't know that you had to really kind of fight impolitic politics and win this job. So just to explain to me a little bit of that process in how it is, you came out on top in one the job in this case. That goes with. That you don't write yourself if you don't write it a so writer who wrote that. These. Rock I didn't write that Song Lionsgate own bathroom. It was their screenplay. They had a writer and so that in the Ryan was in different directives, knock came in read it came in pitch but I thought. And I went home and then. Say. Okay when they ended on. You. So. That's the process like if you write yourself is different now the I wrote it. In opt myself as the director. When a writer rice a screen play. You know they have a voice and who's GonNa be director the agency you know there's a lot of moving parts and so. What I think You know I wasn't opposed guy with the screen play even without even with a announcing I was GONNA do it out if you other people that I was yeah, I was up for that. Megan about that or whatever. Would were the right. Give me octane was. The released was not just A. was like even if you took Katrina out.

writer Terrence Howard director Lionsgate Charles TA Megan Chairman Mitchell Katrina Lebanon trump. China Ryan
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

01:51 min | 9 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"But look delegate. You know because of an actor has made his mind about something he may not understand what you're trying to get out of them. and. So you gotTa have a memory bank in emotional memory bank to know off chop if there is a Place in accomplish what discarded leads to be with the river does is he goes and he was so you the Congress. Can you talk about how your acting career has helped you? In your directing career. Guess. Both of all I've been blessed to work with some of the best directors in the world. So I'm not on I mean I've done some? You know some some you know independent films, things of that nature. And even those films I've been blessed blessed to have a great. You know just repertoire of opportunities. And I never take opportunity for granted. So you see a guy like me I'm working with Scott was probably one of the most sensual intelligent directors. He has called multi efficient. Working with a guy like. One of the most innovative. Two Time Oscar winning writer director. Okay who has? Who has a encyclopedia of film in His head? On working with guys like John Woo Master of Action Ninety Cinema who who films inspired. Hollywood to be what it is. Never, seen to guns out like that until John who did the baby? Of The chance to work with comedic timing actors like Judd Apple. So I was blessed you know Jim Jarmusch Lagos dog. You know. So I was blessed to have. Great Directors. Directly..

John Woo Scott Jim Jarmusch Congress Judd Apple Oscar Hollywood writer director
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

01:38 min | 9 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"Technical. On the guy that you know when we used to put the headphones inside the mixture to make might. Speakers bust. We put tape on the speaker get a magnet something out used to take the speaker out of TV sets. Get wired it does put them in a box and make. You make your music. So attended co- quality of life. HAS BEEN FODDER NINE NATURAL As a musician as a hip hop artist and then when I realized what film was. I take the time to study it. And I mean by studying studying from every angle from would've EP needs to do with a PD needs to do with a group A gaffer. I you know I tom with some great teachers talk into gaps in grips at at at at and at and production designers. A directors in all these departments that it takes to make. You Know How many masters orders? and. By doing that, I'm able to understand the language and for me, this is like the best expression of art could be doing today. I always I'm always curious. Between takes go over to the actor and you tell them something. Would and that interaction is Perhaps. The center of what director does, What Is Your Style on coaching? The actors in between takes like how do you do it? Well. It depends on what we're looking.

director
"director" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"director" Discussed on Toure Show

"Take it. Over there. But that's are you know in some art you read about giants. Jacket, the base is about. Our Selassie shrinks out and go down the rabbit all it's all art. Directing is. Different sides of your brain because you've got to have that are part that left brain where you're telling a story and working with creative artists. The actors and then all the technical stuff with the the lighting the cinematography and. I'm always impressed at how directors can deal with both sides of those. Is there one side? That comes easier to you or guest like just what is the biggest challenge for you in directing a film like this? I mean the biggest challenge I think it's I. The biggest challenge is getting done I drink it a green light. You know film has to be the most expensive expressing of art ever I mean to make an album. Maybe what you know in a good old days, they'll get a million dollar buddy you know. Whatever you know to paint or you need his campus in some pain. The player, Song, you can just really get a good song. You can make a song you know to make a movie. Jay? That's the most expensive form of art. And this particular chase an average case you know a movie cost you two thousand dollars a day. Okay and. So that's the biggest challenges to get the industry and your peers in the in the executives who give you a chance to. Play with that type of. Economic. Slump in gathering all these people, there's a lot of people to make ourselves to get everybody to come on board focus into a laser beam focused is save you wanna tell. That's the most challenging part once you get that. For me. Everything goes spores right in my own Tibia. I'm actually. I'm very.

Selassie Jay
"director" Discussed on Page To Stage

Page To Stage

03:53 min | 10 months ago

"director" Discussed on Page To Stage

"She's fine right now but it's on our mind that tried to keep her as far away from this as possible in terms it isn't so like that's that's in the air also. So it really. That's a challenge but I have found it to be a real reprieve. If I can just schedule in certain amount of writing time because I, you know we're all fighting to keep. The arts going in our country because we know that when we come out of this, not all arts organizations will survive. There's no way right there and there it's just a matter of like how significantly our field will be reduced coming out of it that that is really the only question at this point, and so you you add all that in and you realize like everyone's fighting to keep the arts going. But no one is really making arts or those that work in arts organizations are often not making art you know, and so it's like Oh. That's right. We were artists saying. That's why we kind of got into this the first place. So for me, it's just been helpful to spend even if it's just one hour each day. working on it, and sometimes an hour on a play. Just you end up deleting the pager to that you had written a day or two before you know rewriting is writing and so that's what it is but I think for me, it's just it's just reminded me of. Why we got into this and what is powerful about it in what could do You know I think a lot of us are. Artists and we learned to be administrators because that was the best way to be able to make sure that we could make art or to make. One of the great things about being an artistic director is not making plays but making the work of other artists possible right like that. You believe in giving them opportunities and letting them run with it and so. We don't get to do that right now either you know we talk about cash flow..

director
"director" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Director and the influenza division director for the CDC centers for disease control and prevention it runs about an hour and a half committee chair is Democrat it beneath Johnson of Texas this hearing will come to order and without objection the chair is authorized to clean a recess at any time let me say good morning and welcome to our witnesses of today's hearing on vaccine science and innovation small pox once played the world's population killing approximately three hundred million people in the twentieth century alone smallpox is the only human disease to be eradicated thanks to the relevant of the vaccine another devastating disease polio had just thirty three cases reported worldwide in twenty eighteen compared to three hundred fifty thousand cases in nineteen eighty eight every day vaccines are saving lives the specialize of children and other vulnerable populations there's no such thing is healthy skepticism when it comes to vaccines unfortunately there is a well funded this information campaign targeting the public and weakening public health laws vaccination requirements have been commonplace in the US the generations and exemptions were granted only for legitimate medical reasons however in my home state of Texas the number of unvaccinated children his spikes since twenty two thousand three when the Texas legislature expanding the exemptions to include non medical reasons the number of exemptions rolls from two thousand in the year of twenty third two thousand three the fifty seven thousand last year we're seeing this three played across the country an innocent children of falling ill health officials have confirmed twenty one measles cases in Texas this year and twelve hundred the sixty one and nationwide sixty one of which lead to serious complications as the first nurse elected to Congress I have been dedicated to the improvement of public health my entire career the science committee may not have jurisdiction of the health and human service agencies but we have long had a role in supporting improved public health through good science this morning we will explore the science and innovation challenges for vaccine development through the lens of influenza for the hilt is among us the flu just lays out for several the flu just lays us out for several days with no lasting sad if it's hot for the very young the elderly pregnant women and other vulnerable groups the flu can be deadly the centers for disease control recorded an estimated four forty eight point eight million illnesses and seventy nine thousand deaths during the twenty seventeen twenty eighteen flu season approximately six hundred of those deaths which children each year influenza vaccine production begins with the collection analysis of data many months before the beginning of the flu season the challenge with influenza is that the virus is change constantly and by the time the flu season begins the vaccine may not fully met the circulating viruses scientists are working to develop viable and more effective alternatives to the color current eight a basic vaccines as well as a universal vaccine they will not require annual updates yet another scientific chalice been fluency and many other infectious diseases in Italian complete diseases is incomplete data an antiquated data systems through modernization of data systems and data analytics tools across the federal and state levels we will be able to accelerate vaccine research and development for many diseases we have two expert panels that will help us understand the full cycle from basic research the vaccine development production and deployment and surveillance the witnesses will also describe the role of federal agencies state agencies and the private sector including the partnerships among all stakeholders I want to expand my warm welcome to all of you this morning and I want to thank the vice chair got the better of for his leadership on this issue I look forward to today's discussion I might say that I have a mark up in another committee so I will have to leave before we get through all of the deliberations the chair now recognizes Mr Lucas for an opening statement good morning Cheryl Johnson I would like to thank you and vice chairman Vera for holding this hearing especially given that we are in the middle of flu season in the United States nearly a million individuals are hospitalized for the flu every year including more than forty eight thousand children in Oklahoma since the nineteen for the twenty nineteen flu season began on September one who's been at least one death and seventy three hospitals rations from the flu however these numbers would be far worse if we did not have vaccines vaccination is by far the most the best flu prevention measure we can have today it's easy to forget the little over a hundred years ago the world faced one of the deadliest pandemics in history the nineteen eighteen H. one in one epidemic also known as Spanish flu it killed an estimated fifty million people worldwide including roughly six hundred and seventy five thousand people United States medical technology and countermeasures at the time were limited the isolation and quarantine influenza vaccines did not exist and I antibiotics had not been fully developed yet thankfully due to basic research advancements were made both in treatment and prevention the flu the development of vaccines is placed played an important role in reducing and eliminating deadly disease I can still recall my father stories about how late summer and fall were terrifying time as a child because of the threat of polio during those seasons lucky for me I do not have did not have to experience this fear because of the first polio vaccine being available the United States in nineteen fifty five and thanks to widespread vaccination polio it's been nearly eradicated the United States just thirty three cases reported in twenty eighteen however polio remains a threat in some countries with the world becoming more connected through modern transportation it only takes one traveler with polio to bring the disease in the United States and as I'm.

Director division director CDC hundred years
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Danny alpha on my hand in hand like uh-huh kumbum didn't they didn't i loved going anyway. Where are you going to say more about not really really. I mean pretty much. I like tim burton but things have changed and i'm not as infatuated as once i was the thing that's that's cool with him. I think is that like even though i think it's a far cry from what his original works were. It's like he's still get to work and i still think he has a knack for holding adding onto a genre that is his is allowed like like it is in a sense not to work kind of thing where it's like. He does a gothic dark comedy stuff. It's like but it's also like versus is how fincher does dark comedy versus cohen brothers dark comedy. It's a fincher burns stamp on it for sure yeah like that. You can't really i don't know if there's any other the director right now that can replicate his aesthetic. You know what i mean like. No there's a lot of people like if you took a cohen film and offender film made them my closer together like they kind of look the same but but there's no way in hell that a timber and film will look like another filth which next to it this is just a tiny little shoutout to nerd on update. We had a question for mitchell g about why make anything when everyone's already made stuff that is a great point to tie into it of like. Everyone has their own stamp on something. Go listen to that episode targeted in-depth whatever yeah yeah between all in mine. Mine's a little nicer well. Yes i agree with that will be based on science the warriors second boy john carpenter charlotte anthony seeps caves crusaders long bomb john. John carpenter is famous for me. You've heard me talk a lot about one of his films. Specifically podcast is a fucking thing is just thing is but he's also famous for things is like a halloween escape from new york the fog christine <hes> they live memoirs of invisible man the in the mouth of madness <hes> <hes> so he's got a big list of words and most of them he actually writes himself and also does the soundtrack for wow so he's kind of this renaissance man <hes> <hes> and he's highly into practical effects which for me is a golden ticket to me like you're seriously like i i really respect respect people who of course at the time they had to but they're also on the verge of switching to digital effects and he's still chose to stay away from it for me. This guy is a master of suspense <hes> i i think there's very few directors who can so so well tie a story together and make you feel like you can't breathe for two hours the way john carpenter can and you can watch his growth which is really nice from from halloween to things like the thing and they live and all his films have sort of a purposeful campinas to it that i really enjoy. It's not too much but it's enough to know that you can see where he started right. You can see that like when they made halloween. There's no budget and he just had a story and so he he wrote it. He directed it and he wrote the soundtrack himself and shot it out here so like i really respect over the last couple years. Tom and i have discussed disgust and he's seen my growth. Tom specifically in my trust and horror film directors and because a lot of the time they are they start in this place where like horror doesn't didn't get a budget..

John carpenter fincher kumbum tim burton cohen Danny alpha Tom director mitchell new york two hours
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"He. Does that's still a bit of a character. He's ten being real mid west nice about this right. It's like we're trying to respect his craft but the thing is like enormous society. It's asshole moves. It's a different culture. Well yeah have you seen jeremy the sushi yeah and like the whole thing with the dad being the top sushi chef and high of being like this top animator like everyone in the world already has this ideology of the sun. He's not going to be even half as good. That's just something that the japanese culture buys into in america we don't have that ideology <hes> but then that's kind of respect and understanding that gives to higher praise and understanding of the engagement that we should have with media <hes> but yeah like it was like he was there during the film that goro was directing and he was looking at one of the backer artists and on the back rooms drew like open field and he put the the truck over it because they do multi-layer animation and said that truck's too big that trucks and take the entire frame and then you just see the enemy just slowly put it away and it's just like such like a intense and smoke because you're kind of like this is how they operate right and he'll like look at storyboards like this person looked like there look just saw dead person and this person should the full of life like why are these things not full of life. Why isn't that mistake but it's kind of against those signatures right yeah go ahead. I was going to say that like i remember <hes>. It was like these guys were really excited to show miyazaki these like what they had meeting in graphics and it was like a zombie dombi dragging itself across the floor and like the movements were really lifelike. Muzhaqi was pissed. Whoa more more than a little. He was like i have a friend who is disabled and can never want <hes>. How dare you show this to me. He went off on them like you could tell everyone was like wide eyed staring at the floor and that's like it's one of those things where there's so much about me as ocoee that i truly truly love but it's a situation where you know there are just some things that he will never be capable of making too because he hates that kind of thing. We're never going to see that kind of aesthetic from me as ocoee yeah not that i'm upset about that yeah but no i was gonna say bring it back a two to him as a director. What what specifically do what draws you to him. As your favorite director defend testicle realities realities that he creates i gave myself little like two lines or couple lines for each director that i really like and fantastical reality was the first thing that came to mind because because everything is set in a very real world lake even though it has all the like whimsey of conservatism. Yes yeah shintoism. It's got but it it's all very grounded like he does a very good job of taking all of these these concepts that are never would never be real in this world world but makes them feel like oh yeah that makes sense rats person yeah like a radish the radish spirit he takes a little spark can make it into an entire story yeah yeah yeah i think it goes to to mention that easy set it up.

director goro Muzhaqi jeremy america
"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"director" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"See it but it's like there's there's just different shades of it and there's a picture of it and i wait. It's not true. It's the more you well. How do i know this. It's not as many as the mantis shrimp. Is anyone anything about women when you're kidding. That's where we have heard on. Thank you <hes> <hes> but yeah so. I think it's important to talk about director specifically. It's not writers or producers or you can have those episodes too but we will have those episodes yeah i. I like in myself as director <hes> i've written myself as a writer director <hes> and to me what that means like. I can write my own scripts and i want it done in a certain way and i have a certain style that i wanna i do. I wouldn't call myself an outdoor. I haven't made that many films to create my own fee matic sense of meaning or also. There's things i want and things i wanna have in all the things i do but <hes> <hes> to be considered. Not tour is a high claim high critical acclaim from a lot of people and a lot of people tend to want to do that but it's also like risk right so like if i wanted all eat to like write the story for it and i told him no. I'm not going to have this in my film then again it could be. I'm an asshole but and not collaborative right but then it's kind of like the pristine and procedural but <hes> what i was saying with directors while we're talking about today they do at the end of they have to make a lot of decisions and they do the director you know. The word were changes from theater to tv. Two film director means such a different thing in t._v. World than dozen theater and film and at some point there is a level of decision making <hes>. There's some level of collaboration but at the end of the day it's weird because they get a lot of the credit. Versus like writers are not a highly hollywood. They wanna sleep with the writer only in california -cation but that's the only time they sleep stars. They want to see what the producers well blah <hes> <hes> but the thing i've always noticed with directors anyways is the fact that they they're kind of seen as that visionary right to like their vision is the film becomes whether it's through their words or not if it's through their own words then it's almost as if it's sort of like these have the formality of writing and it's all in their head if the if you give him a camera amarna crew they could just shoot it. You know but it's like you gotta write it down. You got to do the formal process whatever the ship yeah and so when you're when you're with a different writer the incidents have to collaborate. There's always going to be like some of compromise somewhere where you were you. Can you might that's where you might lose some of that the funny thing that i want to kind of if <hes> take note of after losing this episode is we'll look at how many press tours that the actors go onto for blockbusters and then how much they do for artisan films because most of the time the artisan films are the ones that the directors are doing the press tours versus the actors the actors will do the big blockbusters because those seats seat sellers directors seat sellers. Let's for the artisan films..

director writer mantis t._v california
"director" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

05:35 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on WDRC

"Director that song i oh vdi thank goodness you me nine.

Director
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Look i think every i think the greatest opportunity for someone to learn how to direct is to be on television show is just an incredible gift to those who have an enormous desire to do that because it school right in front of you and you can you know you can take advantage of that and really taking advantage and those that do it they make end that being wonderful directors dp's actors what it should never be from my point of view is a perk it shouldn't be got them on the show i think i mean maybe it'd be fun to direct and then never wanted to reckon after that i think it what it does is it dilutes the craft that i believe so strongly and so i think it's something whereas you look at math matthew rhesus episodes on the american that's a real director that's a real director and i can't wait for him to finish the show so that i could hire him to direct something because he's really really good and so i think that's the most for me the most important thing i will also say as director the best actor to ever work with is the actor that just directed their first episode of television because they are the most accommodating human being on the planet but that only lasts for one or maybe two at the hey maybe one last question right here don't care about disturb you strange that tees.

director
"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Wondering about this and i'd be interested in your perspective that these tone meetings which jolson gone so long they're like important but unbearable at same time and i finally near five i asked are producing director chris long how he actually utilizes all that stuff that comes out and i'd be interested if it's the same for you or totally different he said well i take in everything you say and then i put in the back of my head and when i'm on set if something's happening that totally contradicts it then it comes into the front of my mind so i can say oh that's kind of not what they wanted but otherwise it's sort of sitting there in the back which made sense to me can you talk just a little bit about what tone meeting is and you have seen through the script scene by scene and we talk about often even line by line just what we were thinking what our intention was what we want to get across with that well it's interesting because for me the americans is very different experience than basically what i've been doing for the last fifteen years the american is the only show that i have an executive produced in fifteen years and and working on it and it has been an absolute joy an absolute joy on many levels but so it's you know have to put on a different hat most of the shows that i've worked on as being a producer director executive producer on that show it is an incredibly collaborative process and specifically if it i mean dave and i are working together on snowfall and and in fact i didn't direct on snowfall i just came in and executive produced and worked with dave and we ran that show together and trying to figure out the best way to sort of move these very very ambitious television shows and so for me it's just the more there is a sense of collaboration between those entities right away so whether it's the director working with the writers of that episode and part of it is i think chris makes a good point do you know i have to say it's pretty deeply stored with me because at that moment all i wanna do is take ownership i mean i think my job as director is to take ownership my job is no longer too.

executive executive producer dave director jolson producing director chris long producer fifteen years
"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"This is like starting to lose people also a lot of our listeners our young upandcoming directors what what would you advise at young you know or any director to do if they are starting to feel like they're losing their their cruel little bit what what are some tactics firkh for reining in all back in getting the confidence back up as if he were being wake in the director do like from the perspective to de it he ravages the rest of the crew i mean it's hard because lowbudget because we have the capability of making films at such a low budget it means that people who might not be ready to direct the film gets direct to film in and so a lot of i worked with a lot of first time directors and a lot of my job is to leg helped them and like bringing them to get their power back but sometimes the power is not always there so it is about empowering them it is about leg bring them back and i think when director start to lose the crew you know yeah like taking a step back even like taking a half day off and just kind of like reorienting or something or like doing something blake build group morale up again because making films as hard and there's a lot of sensitive emotional people on said as there should be but like feelings are involve sinoe you just have to lake knowhow to kind of right the ship when it's going off course and it is tricky because you know it can original form from an actor that the they've been cast and then you find out it's a miscast what do you do with an actor that doesn't perform that over acts that you know that's a that's a very hard situation to begin because the script this written especially in feature films.

director
"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"So long for a director in our minds but every directing collaboration ndp collaboration is kind of unique in its own way and for me i think what i really love in a director is somebody who can get the whole team on board behind their singular vision you know when i when i am asked to do things that are uh kind of beyond my capabilities in terms of timer equipment or um sort of they want something that looks higher budget than it is whatever it is if if i feel like i'm in good hands with their vision i feel like if the crew feels like they're in good hands with their vision than everybody's working towards the same goal i think it's it's easier said than done to kind of get everybody marching in the same direction on a film set and dumb to me a good director is somebody who's got a vision doesn't have to be visual but it has to be some sort of direction that we're all moon moving towards and i really look for that and a collaboration i totally agree just completely nail those yes thing that i'm kind of stands out to me in terms of looking back in terms of the films that i shot and the experiences that i had with directors there are some really some circumstances where you working really really hard and everybody thinks that they are on the same path and then you feel all of the sudden lack of respect that just starts happening it starts happening with the crew all of a sudden there is a judgment that is present and we are not making the days and all of a sudden there's is wavering on the director on it and it affects the entire mood and when this respect for the director drops than you know you're in trouble and you know i i always look out for that lake water is happening here what's the pulse overall you know where is the expectation are we really as you said all going in on along the same path and working for the same goal and does he really have or she really have a um a vision and an over arc arching vision of what the film will be because look the fact is and when you onset things change you can have a script.

director
"director" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"director" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"And by thanks for calling in this is as the good interesting session i have great edit and uh thanks for coming out and we're on a break i'm going to sell some real estate we are going to come back and i've got a an interview with a really interesting germany roger donaldson who is the director of a new documentary called mclaren about a bruce mclaren which is it's a really cool documentary rajaonson was also the director of the world's fastest indian with anthony hopkins which is an awesome movie and we have a good discussion about kiwis in motor sport and bruce mclaren and stick around we right back simpson of the smoked our podcast is brought to you by dr line drive line is the world's first social driving up coming exclusively to the iphone discovered the pleasure of driving not to get somewhere but simply to be on the road whether you're a longtime driving enthusiast or just someone who wants to discover why driving can be fun this is the app for you you can map and classify your favorite driving roads based on style location or whether it's a a lose a loose surface a cruz an offroad trail while capturing basic metrics and driving data with dr line you can use your phones camera to capture video of your driver using external camera or maybe even a drone posting those videos to the feed so everyone can see why your time behind the wheel matters or keep them for yourself in your library new can build a profile share your cars track your drives and earn points towards contests and giveaways now.

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