37 Burst results for "digital"

Fresh update on "digital" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:31 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "digital" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"That commerce is communication markets condense oceans of information into a single price innovations and communication are circumventing the scrutiny of the crown. This signals a change in the coin of the realm. The crown uses digital currency to Surveil, center, seize, and destroy wealth at will. So pirate currency must protect us from this weaponized money. We need to move funds further faster cheaper and without third. Party observation basing decisions on an accelerating flow of information. So pirates require nearly instantaneous transactions with no arbitrary limits on volume or artificial influences on fees most importantly a pirate currency must preclude centralization otherwise, it will become another link in our chain to the crown. A superior currency will result in the obsolescence of the coin of the realm and the extinction of the crown itself trade above the grid.

Could Subscription Models Save Hotels?

Business Wars Daily

03:13 min | 8 hrs ago

Could Subscription Models Save Hotels?

"There's nothing quite like staying in a Nice Hotel and Ashiq, location to make you feel like a VIP. Maybe you prefer staying near the warm sandy beaches of Kabo, San Lucas were being nestled in a bustling Paris Rondi small. If. You're ready to board an airplane takeoff to somewhere far away travel subscription might be just the ticket. Subscription based models have taken over everything from entertainment to clothing purchases. Now, the tourism industry is following suit vacation club Inspir- Otto has reduced the price of it subscription model for twenty five, hundred dollars a month you get your pick of luxury vacation homes, hotels, and resorts all over the world with no other fees. Taxes were nightly rate charges a new six, hundred dollars. A month option gives you access to the company's lodging options, but you also have to pay for the room. Bookings through your inspiration subscription can last up to sixty days but a minimum of seven days is required between a checkout in a new check in so you can't fund your endless vacation on an inspiration subscription, but you can bring guests they just have to pay their own airfare. The company told C. Suite Quarterly magazine that pass holders typically travel every six to eight weeks with an average of four nights per trip. Another company adopting the subscription travel model is amsterdam-based citizen 'em Hotel. The brand isn't targeting jet-setters instead, it's targeting quote freelancers digital nomads in adventurers who love Big City Life, but not big city rent prices. In other words if you're sick of working from home and M.'s Goebel passport gives you access to twenty one hotels in fourteen cities including New York Paris and Amsterdam. For roughly fifteen hundred dollars a month you can stay at any citizen 'em hotel for the month or travel between hotels with a seven night minimum stay at each you also get access to meeting rooms and the living room workspace. So you have some room to move around in in addition the company's corporate subscription plan is about six hundred dollars. Per employee per month, companies get access to meeting rooms and living room workspaces plus each employee gets three overnight stays per month travel media companies skipped called traveled subscriptions a mega trend to watch, but they also face some obstacles I. Obviously, the pandemic people are worried about covid nineteen and travel restrictions are a moving target borders may be open one day and closed the next depending on the viruses spread while the US State Department lifted the travel advisory about international travel the Centers for Disease Control still advises. against. The travel to dozens of countries including most of Europe Canada and Mexico The Wall Street Journal reports, and June survey by the International Air Transport Association found that more than half of people surveyed. Don't plan to get on a plane this year at all. But for those who are ready to start traveling again for work or pleasure subscriptions grant. To enviable destinations in lodgings and tourism companies are hoping their offers are enticing enough. Customers will check it out. And start, making plans to check in. Once again.

Nice Hotel Paris Rondi Kabo Inspir- Otto Ashiq Centers For Disease Control C. Suite Quarterly San Lucas Europe Us State Department New York International Air Transport As Paris Goebel Canada Mexico M. Amsterdam
Fresh update on "digital" discussed on Web and BeyondCast

Web and BeyondCast

00:32 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "digital" discussed on Web and BeyondCast

"They're managing their their desktops and laptops and making sure that you can do your job, and then we also work with small and midsize companies that do their own it infrastructure. And when I look at kind of the landscape of cyber security, you know. The foundational requirement if you have a network and you have computers on that network as perch, probably have a firewall of some sort and that firewall is kind of a gate to keep the good allow the good traffic bad traffic to stop the bad traffic But a lot of times these firewalls require a lot of sophistication and expertise to manage, and it's really hard to to to do the job really well with justify wall. When you go upmarket, you hear terms like security operation centers, threat intelligence analysts, and all of these functionality that you know if a firewall is sufficient, you wouldn't need all these other things As, you go up market, you find folks need to invest in it because it's a necessary step. So what do you do about the gap? What do you do about all this companies that that can afford a viable or shirt put a firewall in place in those people that can afford a security operation center analysts and all the time energy and money that takes and that's we fit in to say you know a lot of the functionality that a Security Operation Center performs can be taken care of by automation can be taken care of by analytics can be taken care of by creative solution like dark. In. So we integrate into your firewall. There's no hardware or software to deploy in a matter of five to ten minutes. We can be up and running. We can detect. We can look at what's coming in and out of your network we can detect the bad stuff. We can block it and help you move on. We can do nice reporting and analytics around it So it's it's been really neat to see kind of fitting into a very noisy crowded market into a states that's relatively uncovered by a lot of other products and services and to do it at a price point that works for this for the small.

Security Operation Center
Transforming Your Marketing Plays With Jackie Lipnicki

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

05:35 min | 2 d ago

Transforming Your Marketing Plays With Jackie Lipnicki

"Joined by Jackie Lipnicki an account executive at New Relic and she's got some very interesting strategies to share with us Jacky. Thank you for joining the show. Thank you for having me happy to be yeah, we're excited to have you and before we get going if you can just tell us a little bit about yourself off then in about New Relic sure. So I started out as an SDR. I moved my way up through the chain eventually was an Str manager for a while and now I've been an account executive officer of the last year and half or so, I'm currently at New Relic and for those of you who don't know what New Relic is ultimately we are working with IP professionals basically make sure that they have digital experiences that work for their customers. So when you and I are engaging with software we want to work world and so we help them to do that. Awesome. Awesome job. Um, okay, so so let's get into it. And when we we talked about doing a podcast one of the things you mentioned that was super interesting to me and I think will be interesting to the audience age is you at a previous company you guys in deployed a like a quiz to call strategy and I'd love for you to just share how that wage. And what the results were there. Yeah. So my first job ever worked for was for in the techspace was a Content marketing company and they both interactive content and one of those things where you know quizzes assessments and for us as a sales team, we would basically leverage those quizzes and send those out to our prospects and they would fill out a series of questions and they were often times fun and lighthearted and you know kind of like a buzzfeed style of if you were whatever industry you're selling to if you were this kind of dog You know, whatever. What would you be if you did this, what would you look like? And then we throw in some hard-hitting questions that were more in line with what we needed as far as what's your maturity level in this space So at the end of the fact is we would get all the results back and it would give us as FDR's and his account Executives the ability to go and then target the people that we could see were answering questions that clearly have pains in the line to what we could solve for them. And so an example might be that if you're a demand gen marketer working for the IG security space, you might ask some questions like, you know, if you were a security system, which would you be if you were trying to figure out where your weaknesses are what would you say your biggest weakness is if you were this or that and so those questions were kind of Surfing some great answers for us and help us with our targeted messaging. Yeah. So as a sales rep if they you know, if I'm I'm thinking about this if I'm a prospect I get a quiz. Yeah might feel wage. Up out more likely than respond to a cold email to say Hey, you know like we've got this great solution for you, you know, not that I've never responded to a cold email. But but it just I mean we all know like he rarely respond to those things, but the quiz I would probably fill out if I thought it was pertinent to me now on the sgr side of things I could see the huge benefit being you've got some relevant information and the timing was right there cuz I feel like timing is almost everything in sales rep. I think it's really great from a timing perspective. But it also does a really good job, especially if the quiz is done right of having strong brand awareness because now that person who's been through a quiz has already seen your logo. They've already gotten familiar with you. They've already decided that there's some level of trust and credibility and their treats and so when they get this phone call and it's from Jackie, let me get New Relic and they just have a quiz with New Relic yesterday. And I know the things that they're struggling with it's much more exciting and impactful for that Prospect to say, yeah, I'll give you a shot. I'll hear you out. I'm interested. Obviously. That's why I took the quiz in the first place. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, that's awesome. Okay. Well, I I love that idea. I think it's an awesome strategy people can can try it. I think I might try to get our marketing team to do it will have to figure out a good quiz. So when you guys were making these quizzes was it you mentioned it was like a mix of like fun questions and then the questions with the information that you guys needed. Where did you strike the balance? They're dead. It really depends on the tone of your company and what you're trying to accomplish. So, you know, there are quizzes Which are typically like under five questions are usually pretty light and are more. Of funnel just generating that awareness do assessments which are a little bit more mid funnel which is when you're really just kind of going and you're asking 25 questions and trying to get a little bit more serious one quiz, we did at my last company. We were we basically helped small medium businesses with their blogging strategy. And so we made a quiz that was how much for blogging strategy would you say that you're you know, a seed a little plant or a full grown tree. Would you say that your blogging strategy is mostly you know, sending an email once a week once a month or once a year. And so some of the questions for us just gave us insight into what they were currently doing. But for them it was also fun to be like, oh what am I am? I am mature. Am I this and I thought so long Jim's were a little more well-rounded to be engaging and user-friendly.

New Relic Account Executive Jackie Lipnicki FDR Str Manager Buzzfeed Jacky JIM Officer
ICYMI: Popl beams contacts to phones

Talking Tech

03:10 min | 2 d ago

ICYMI: Popl beams contacts to phones

"Of the big problems many of us has is nobody wants to hand out business cards anymore but everybody wants our contact information. What to do I, think we all have a bunch of different solutions but nick. And Jason Alvarez Cohen have happy device called paypal which can pass on your information and the guys are here and they're going to tell you all about it. He Nick and Jason Jeff send thank you for having us on. Sure. Tell us about poppel. So. Papa. Is Your new digital business card. It's a small thing you put on the back of your phone. And then all you have to do is just tap it to someone else's phone like this. It sends a push notification to that phone and win that notification is clicked at sends you right to send them right to my profile, which has my website, my instagram, my phone number, all of my contact information right on their screen. Okay. So what you just showed me was a little round ball basically and in you you I, guess he velcro or something or or a magnet or as probably a magnet right to. And it sticks to the back and then it then up your APP in that swirl, your contact information is in Europe. They have a pop up, it opens up in that but if they don't have the APP, it opens up in the browser and the key to the product is that the other person does not need poppel or an APP for you to share your mation. Believe that the Pablo's are very inexpensive how much they sell for Fourteen ninety nine for basic potholes and nineteen ninety nine for premium populous. What is a premium poppel? A premium poppel has nicer textures this one. For example, we poppel prism. It's kind of. Holographic. The basic ones are black white pink, blue jays color. Yeah and the premium ones are. Little, fancy same functionality, just different looking field Lyndon Okay and obviously once you once you download your APP, you then spend time in putting your basic. referrals. Correct, it's very easy setup you get your pop in the mail you you you put in what you want. Then you activate it with your phone and then you're all set. So you can put on your phone upon your laptop on your car, your Papa anywhere. It'll share where you want to share. So if you put it on your laptop and I had somebody in the office. Where I met somebody at starbucks right in a post Kobe world and I wanted his or her information. They would just put their phone in front of the Little Poppel that was on my laptop Yep. It's that easy. What motivated you guys to come up with this idea? Greg Russia. Well, we're both recent college grads and we learn about the psychology at how cool is and how native it is in modern phone. So we saw this use case as two guys who never used. A really cool phone, the phone method of Sheriff Mason which we did often. So we saw the cell division just credit. All right. Well, congratulations people can get it and is it Papa Dot Com. Pablo. Dot Co.. Dot, co-. Or Whatnot. or on. Amazon

Jason Alvarez Cohen Paypal DOT Pablo Jason Jeff Europe Starbucks Nick Amazon Greg Russia Sheriff Mason Kobe
Pew Center for Arts & Heritage Announces Over $10.5 Million for Philadelphia Artists, Organizations

KYW 24 Hour News

01:20 min | 2 d ago

Pew Center for Arts & Heritage Announces Over $10.5 Million for Philadelphia Artists, Organizations

"A a pandemic pandemic hit, hit, but but one one of of Philadelphia's Philadelphia's largest largest philanthropic philanthropic organizations organizations is is investing investing millions millions of of dollars. dollars. The The local local artistic artistic efforts. efforts. Story Story from K Y W Skin glow over 41 Arts and cultural organizations in the region are receiving grants from the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage Executive Director Bullock Moran Cola awarded 29 Project grounds We have awarded 12 Artist Fellowships. The Total award is $10.5 million. And the money goes toward projects, performances and exhibitions. Programs will be designed for in person and digital experience, and Maren Cola says each project engages in a substantial social or cultural issue. One of the recipients of the Institute for Disabilities, a Temple university. Lisa Sana, born director of the institute's media, arts and culture, says a grant of $359,000 will be used to explore the pen, Hearst State School and Hospital which closed in 1987. We thought that there was room to tell the story of pen Hearst in a new way, and one that really centered On the voices of people of disabilities and their families of the people who were most directly impacted by the practice of institutionalization. Currently, pen Hirsch has been used as a haunted house attraction, an idea Sonneborn says that those in the disabled community find offensive. Kim Glovis

Pen Hearst Pew Center For Arts And Herita Philadelphia Bullock Moran Cola Maren Cola Hearst State School And Hospit Institute For Disabilities Executive Director Lisa Sana Kim Glovis Sonneborn Hirsch Director Temple University
CAA Signs Esports/Lifestyle Organization 100 Thieves

The Business of Esports

04:14 min | 3 d ago

CAA Signs Esports/Lifestyle Organization 100 Thieves

"A Signs East sports lifestyle Org, a hundred thieves gaming lifestyle entertainment an entertainment organization hundred thieves has signed with Ca. founded in twenty seventeen by made shot hundred thieves comprises nearly fifty digital creators and sports. Professionals they've raised sixty million dollars from people like scooter, Braun, and Drake and I mean, they don't operate in that many sports anymore. I. Think they dropped counterstrike. So they've got fortnight Valeriy pretty much I think. neither of which I think are competitive like hundred thieves is not in the top valor roster rankings for at least I. Think they're not I have that big cash up compounds. Yeah. The cash-out compound is I mean I that's just a different level and yeah, let me just really. Like. Quote the article directly here because and then I'll let you give your opinion here William. But it says ca says it plans to help hundred thieves, expand its content and media interest into new areas in revenue streams through opportunities in digital content, talent, film, television podcasts, and more. So. So you know. The reason why I know and I know you thought it was a bit weird why I wanted to put this on the show. Okay. Yeah, I did I did but. Explain to me how like hundred thieves especially has been backing out of e sports right there. Sports Org that doesn't participate in many sports. They sell a lot of hoodies and there's a lot of fans of the merch right Good Great March but the big I like. As they've been pulling out of more and more e sports, I've been led to believe that this is because they want to move towards more and more content creation I assume. But now it seems they've also outsource that to see a basically this was my reaction would destroy. It was like it's sort of like giving away your own job like I thought if you weren't like there's two ways to be competitive east sports team, you can be all about you know winning right the stats, the numbers, the player recruitment strategy, the trophies right or you can be all about you know the eyeballs, the digital content, the talent, the film podcasts, and Incremental Revenue Opportunities Right. The article literally says ca will help with content talent film podcasts than incremental. Like. That is literally the business model they're on and all ready. Already E. Sports teams are somewhat at risk of becoming talent agencies. If you look at what they do many sports or skirt, the line of literally just being tat like they might just be better off on a talent agency business fundamentally with hundred thieves is right a talent agency. So why does the talent agency exactly meet a tolliday he and then doesn't your talent also have tellier telling you need shot doesn't have so you're telling me. Valkyrie doesn't have a talent agent like attached to be true. So like so what is it like you agent signs you to a team? So you consigned to an agent who will it's This. Unless, there is some real strategic reason why see a has better industry connectivity than hundred thieves right that there's just access points and opportunities they can insert the town until. But if that's the case I would say CIA should launch a sports and have their own team and do it themselves. You know what I mean like it really doesn't add up to me unless an last and I'm kinda calling this. My DIGNAM ISRAELIS MAY BE CA will buy one hundred thieves like maybe this is prep for a purchase or sale or something. 'cause let's see it make strategic i. don't think that's having it all but that's the only way. It makes strategic sense because the only reason why you would take this over is if you may be planned on folding at an and this was an interim step, but it's weird

Braun Valeriy CIA CA. Drake
The Great Remittance Mystery

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:55 min | 3 d ago

The Great Remittance Mystery

"Remittances the money that migrants people living and working abroad sent to their countries of origin, and there are as many as two hundred and seventy million people around the world in that situation, sending money to their families because of that remittances have become a vital source of financing for many developing countries the sums of money are huge. In fact, the amount of money sent in remittances is greater than the sum of all investments made by foreign companies in developing countries combined, and it is more than tripled the amount of aid that governments provide those. Countries. So when the coronavirus pandemic took hold on economies went into lockdown, no one was surprised when the World Bank predicted a twenty percent drop in remittances for this year, the lines after woman massive layoffs particularly in the US has the largest number of migrants and the World Bank warned of dire consequences for some developing economies that rely heavily on the cash that those workers send back home but nearly eight months in that correction has not happened remittances. This year have been steady, and in some cases, they have actually risen remittances to Mexico for example, jumped nine point four percent in the first eight months of the year it is. A mystery. Mystery, we love mysteries at the indicator. So. The break hired is that remittances are flying high even luke global growth circling the drain Hattie Hirsch cracks the case with a little help. Support for this podcast and the following message come from each trade you want to invest your money, but there's one problem you're not sure where to begin. Luckily, there's e-trade who offers more than just trading each rates simplifies investing without the financial jargon and has the people to offer guidance and support to make your money work hard for you. For more information visit each trae dot com slash NPR, e-trade securities see member Finra SIPC. Laura Karen is a specialist in development economics and a consultant at the World Bank. She's also reading for Doctor Economics at Columbia University. Welcome Laura. Thank you so much for having me a pleasure and I should say that I came across your research in a story and one of my favorite daily emails the conversation and you cited this staggering number in twenty nineteen migrants sent a record five, hundred, fifty, four, billion dollars back to their countries of origin, and that's up twenty percent in three years compared to two, thousand sixteen. So what's behind that jump? There's a couple of factors that are behind that. So one of them is in the last few years, we've seen healthy growth in popular destination countries. So part of it can be attributed to growth in the United States and also increasing flows coming from the Gulf Cooperation, Council countries and from Russia as well. So what you're saying is that because these economies are doing very well or happened how did you very well? During that periods, it means that there's more money being paid to these migrant workers, more migrant workers earning money, which means they're able to send more money home exactly and another big push that's causing this increase in remittances and I'm speculating a little bit here but let me draw from some of my other research, which is highlighted the boom in the use of mobile money and online or digital finance providers. So it's getting easier and easier to. Send money home digitally in one of the reasons for this is the penetration of smartphones right about that exactly right smartphones or even you know feature phones are getting more and more common around the world and our unlocking these digital and online finance solutions which are making it cheaper and easier than ever before to send money across countries and back home to migrant worker families. How would families have done that I would migrant workers have got that money? Back in the past then before we had digital technology, there's a lot of different ways traditional wire transfers but as well informal channels. So for example, a migrant worker might take cash home when they visit home for a holiday or to see their family and those are really hard to measure. So it's not until recently that we've gotten a good idea of how big these floods really are as some of these things are starting to come to light. So it it it may be. That's. The data is just skewed by the fact that there wasn't so much transparency in the past because of the informality of these transfers whereas now there's much more transparency because it's so digital and therefore easy to track. It's still something that is notoriously difficult to measure, but it's getting easier and easier as things move into the digital world. So, fast forward to earlier this year the global reaction to the spread of, Covid, nineteen, we had lockdown social distancing layoffs, plummeting growth numbers, bankruptcies, more layoffs, massive declines in household income from many workers, and yet remittances stay steady and in some cases even rise I mean, that's kind of mystery. How is that? Right? So the first reason is that migrant workers are often essential workers in their destination countries. So they're not necessarily losing their jobs as much as we might expect, and in some countries like in France in Spain and Germany qualified migrants who were not allowed to work in certain. Sectors before especially essential sectors like doctors or nurses are now being allowed to work in those sectors as part of the pandemic response use mentioned in the story that altruism on behalf of my coworkers might have something to do with this. Can you talk a bit about that? So a lot of migration research in the past has pointed out that one of the main reasons migrants move to another country to work is in search of better opportunities for themselves but also for their families and to be able to provide for their families and it's been established in the kind of migration literature that. Remittances tend to rise when things are bad at home. So you would expect remittances to fall when things go badly but instead they rise and that really gets to the heart of what migration is about. It's about providing for their families as best as possible even though they're struggling in their destination, countries are presumed that. The government stimulus right where people got in some cases more money than they would otherwise earns ripe especially in the United States with the unemployment benefit supplements I'm assuming that that stimulus would have had some effect on this. Is that correct? Exactly. So some migrants have been benefiting from these government stimulus for one example in California even. Migrants were allowed to receive stimulus checks and some researchers have linked to an increase in remittances especially to their families in. Mexico. So this extra stimulus spending is also being translated back home

United States World Bank Mexico Laura Karen Hattie Hirsch California E-Trade NPR Doctor Economics Consultant Columbia University France Russia Council Gulf Cooperation Germany Spain
How the COVID-19 Pandemic Shed Light on the Digital Divide

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:32 min | 4 d ago

How the COVID-19 Pandemic Shed Light on the Digital Divide

"Today I'm happy to have with me two excellent guests to address I. Think a very significant issue that we've known about for a long time, but has become especially poignant during the pandemic, not as the digital divide. A lot of us have you know with some bumps along the way made a fairly smooth transition to living life onscreen. But there's a lot of folks out there who have not, and that is because they continue to be and before the pandemic, there were very large disparities between who had access to the types of tools necessary to live in this new virtual world and who had the. Skills and the background necessary to thrive world that looks like it will be more virtual in the future than in the past even when pandemic has passed the to talk about these trends, I've two terrific guests. Kimberly Bryant is the founder of Black Girls Code Jessica Rosenthal. Soul is a commissioner for the Federal Communications Commission and were I hope we will have a great robust discussion about these issues. Just, let me start with you the digital divide. It's very old term. It's been around a long time. What did we learn? That's knew about it from this pandemic. Well, thank you for having me ads on what's important now is that the digital divide has been exposed s pandemic. Because now, we see conclusively the hard truth that our nation's gapped in digital skills. Digital access is very real and very big. And if in Washington, we used to think about broadband Internet literacy as Nice to have this pandemic has proven that it is neat to have as a nation were online for school for education or work for health care for entertainment and so much more. We've got a recognize is that we are not going to live up to our civic and commercial potential. If we don't find a way to connect everyone in this country, you've talked about the homework gap as sort of like the analog to digital divide tell us about that and what we've learned about it and why it matters. Yes said being the before times before we are all in home there was this thing that was happening that I noticed, which was that teachers were increasingly assigning homework that require Internet access. But what I know from the FCC is that one in three households do not have broadband? and. So the kids who lived in those households in just fall into a digital divide they fell into a homework they could do their nightly schoolwork I mean when all of us were growing up, you know we need to paper and Pencil and a clean. Spot on the kitchen table around a desk, but you need Internet access now to successfully participate. In school and that digital divide on Homework Gab has just become clearer in this crisis we said millions of kids home and told them to go to virtual classrooms. But if you don't have Internet access, you're out of that virtual classroom and we know it because we've seen chilling pictures on social media of hid sitting outside of fast food restaurants with laptops just try to access free Wifi signal so. They can go to online school and I just think in the United States. Of America we should be able to come up with policies that closed at hallmark gap. So no child is offline. Thanks can let me turn to you for a moment obviously One of the things we know about the digital divide is that it's more pronounced among certain historically disadvantaged groups, including people of Color and women. Black Girls Code I believe was founded to address both those saints tell us a little bit about your organization if you could just to start out absolutely on. Thank you again for having me on black holes was down right here in the bay area where I am today in our goal is said, is to address this issue around diversity inclusion, any equity in the technology landscape our focus is really to target girls Monday represented communities so African American. Students Hispanic Students, American. Students who are traditionally disenfranchised from Tech rears which actually pay their are look at content can change the trajectory of families in. It's not communities. We do that by really interesting girls as. Young as seven all the way through eighteen plus the skills and technology and teaching them about coding robotics game development. CETERA. So really try to introduce them all the different assets of the technology industry and also get them skills that allows them to either be creators, innovators, or the leaders of many of its expertise may see in the future

Jessica Rosenthal Federal Communications Commiss Black Girls Kimberly Bryant United States Commissioner Washington America Founder
Finding Your Marketing Mentor

Marketing Trends

05:18 min | 4 d ago

Finding Your Marketing Mentor

"Welcome to marketing trends I mean phase on host of marketing trends, and today we are joined by special guests mark. How're you doing fantastic cited to be here, marketing, Trans and hang out with you guys. Yeah. Excited to to chat with you. You Know You have your serial entrepreneur. You have a bunch of really cool stuff going on you have a book coming out that we're. GonNa. Talk about and everything in between. So let's get started. How did you get into marketing in the first place? Yeah. Well, you know I actually went to school and I thought I was going to study economics and then I took a marketing class and said man, this is for me and I took every marketing class I could take an it's so funny because when I went. To school and not trying to age myself here. But then even have a marketing degree. That's so crazy when I look back and think of it. But I literally took every marketing class that I could take from the universities that I was at and I just loved it. In fact, before it became an entrepreneur, I actually was the director of marketing for U. S.. A. Today. That's. A little known fact that people don't don't know talk about a product that changes every single day was fascinating and really cut my teeth on the pace at which marketing can happen. But it led me to being an entrepreneur, the entrepreneurial today, and I, have to tell you that marketing is at the core of every single business that I get involved in if I don't believe in. The product if I don't have passionate around the marketing, then I don't do it. Yes. So flush forward to today tell us a little bit about the companies that that you're involved with what you're working on. Yeah. You know often I get introduces a serial entrepreneur and what what is that that just means it's an entrepreneur that has his hands and multiple businesses I early on I. Would have won business and I started selling those businesses and I've actually sold seven businesses and so and I just there's nothing more validating than to start a business and it becomes of such value that someone is willing to pay you for it and so I got in the phase where I I was looking for more businesses that I could do that and I found myself involved. In multiple businesses now, I will tell you that that can be a detriment because you lack some focus that sometimes your business needs I can tell you right now it was a massive positive to me because when everything when the world changed earlier this year I had multiple businesses going and I'm here to tell you to my businesses within five days like five days of changes in. The world and those two businesses were literally done and I'm not sure I'm going to start him back up. They were more of physical presence stage based event based businesses and I think they're just done and so but I had some other businesses that were not in that way. In fact, one business that was in e-commerce and we started noticing that business started driving before the. World, kind of figured out what was going on, and by the time we were in the full-scale quarantine that business was up over five hundred percent year over year and what I love about business is that I've got this little philosophy that I learned from my mentor Kevin Harrington who I co wrote the Book Mentor to Millions and I would I would study him and say how? Do. You pick businesses to get involved in and he goes mark I just follow the eyeballs and I'm like follow the eyeballs and he's like, yeah I mean when I was in as seen on TV are when I was in infomercials, people watching TV and then they started moving to the Internet. So I created as seen on TV, DOT COM 'cause that's where the eyeballs were going. And now he's in a lot of businesses that are relying on social media and more modern means of of media because that's where the eyeballs are. So while I was sitting there with a business that was you know any commerce and also that for all the eyeballs went everybody's sitting at home and their their shopping from home in I've got this business that all of a sudden. Just blows up and I'm like boom to businesses have just stalled out and I've reallocated all my staff at NF leading anybody go and I read purpose them and pointed them towards the eyeballs which was ECOMMERCE and now I'm here to tell you that you know I chose Kevin Hearings as a mentor because I wasn't scaling businesses to a level that I thought I was capable. Of and come to find out it was me that was holding them back. He taught me what real scale looks like and I'm actually on my way to my first one, hundred, million dollar business all because I followed the eyeballs I was in the swim lane where everybody showed up and started swimming, and that's advice that I give all the time to people as they're trying to. Decide where to start a business what businesses start and I just say where are the eyeballs pointed where people looking if you start a business in the path of that, it has a reasonably good chance of being successful. So my principal business right now is ecommerce and then I also have a business I love physical products, and so I, try digital product and I just wasn't that Good at it and so physical product i. know I understand I like it. I can touch it. I know how to produce it another maximize it, and so I started taking what I learned in funnel marketing and applying it to physical products and found that physical products are just powerful inside a funnel marketing. So I have an Amazon Slash e commerce business that that sells products on. Twenty nine different virtual channels, and then I have a funnel based business that sells products through marketing funnels, all throughout different social media and wherever all's traffic is at. So those are my two principal businesses. They are deeply rooted in marketing and they are thriving right now even during these kind of crazy times

Director Of Marketing Principal Amazon Kevin Harrington Kevin Hearings U. S
Social Media Influenced or Influencers?

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:45 min | 5 d ago

Social Media Influenced or Influencers?

"The highest paid earner on Youtube is not old enough to get a driver's license. In fact, he's nine his name is Ryan. His channel May twenty, six, million dollars last year and fact two of the top three global earners on Youtube are under ten years old. The third highest earner is a six year old Russian girl who brought in eighteen million dollars recently, lawmakers in France passed a bill that contained similar labor protections for child social, media stars as for child actors models while protecting kids is a laudable thing to do. It feels A. Bit Strange calling this new law a win several months ago in a breakpoint commentary, we discussed teenage pop music, Star Name Billy Irish who swept the two thousand twenty grammy awards are concerns about how island had been exploited to make money apply here too when childhoods are directed toward building media, empires, Young Youtube Stars in elementary age social media influencers earn money by broadcasting their lives online and then charging money for ad placements. All of this enabled, of course, by their parents and our society and especially weird but largely unquestioned societal norm is revealed in. All of this, our culture idolizes the concept of agency justifying almost anything by the capacity to act according to One's granted wishes all of our postmodern moral claims about sexuality hinge on agency. If an encounter was consensual, it was okay. If a baby is wanted, then it's really baby if a couple wants to stay married, they should if they don't, they shouldn't no other questions to be asked however does anyone actually believed that a six year old girl who thinks she's just playing at the park with her dad but his actually being broadcast and millions. Of Subscribers Online has agency isn't even possible for her to understand realize that she's the star of kindergarten version of the Truman show of course, not kids have no concept of the dangers that kind of publicity not to mention that kind of money can pose for her personal and relational wellbeing. In fact, we only need check in on Corey Feldman or Britney Spears to see just what should be obvious that people meant to protect. THEM AREN'T French lawmakers concerned about how hard they work as noble was at intention may be the people meant to protect. Children are their parents. Still the problem created here is two pronged on the other side of the camera. That's pointed directly in the faces of celebrity kids are other kids who are obsessively consuming their content and are sold on a wrong idea of what life is ultimately all about even more new netflix documentary reveals just how much the success of social media companies hinges on our loss of agency and the social dilemma. A handful of Silicon Valley engineers and former social media executives describe how successfully algorithms keep users on their sites for as long as. Possible the five videos that pop up in the up next column on Youtube are generated by an algorithm built by people who are trained in human psychology and determine what will interest you. The next video then plays automatically after intending to watch just one, we end up watching dozens and algorithms custom sell videos. Artificial intelligence can even create them writing in medium. John. Bridled scribes the infiltration of bought created videos for children on Youtube botts determine what videos kids are watching, and then create mashups of images, songs, and Buzzword Hashtags in order to keep them. Watching and no amount of gatekeepers or regulators can keep out those with nefarious intent including those who create videos of lovable cartoon characters doing horrifying things the new. York Times covered this dangerous phenomenon a few years ago in a peace with this headline on Youtube kids startling video slipped past filters. One tampered with video featured kids, cartoon character, pepe pig being literally tortured by her dentist. It showed up on Youtube S- front page when users type in just a few basic search terms thankfully youtube caught it and eventually removed it look at the very least. Parents must diligently monitor what their kids are watching online. However, we must diligently push back on those parts of our digital culture that are now going largely unquestioned cultures most powerful, not where it is the loudest. But in what it normalizes screen time worldview messages, the inept concept of consent and yes child celebrity isn't children bear the image of God they exist because he loves them not so that they could fulfill the

Youtube Ryan Grammy Corey Feldman France Netflix Truman Britney Spears Bridled Billy Irish Pepe York Times John
The Benefits Of Hypnotherapy

20 Minute Fitness

05:10 min | 5 d ago

The Benefits Of Hypnotherapy

"Hey Alex welcome to the show. It's great to have you here today and I'm excited to chats about well not. So commonly now on topic today well, and maybe there's also quite a few misconceptions about it. hypnotherapy could you please introduce yourself and tell audience what mindset health does show? So Yup, hi, I'm Alison Coach of Health We build hypnosis spaced digital therapeutics for chronic health conditions like IBS anxiety. So essentially, the programs developed by doctors and psychologists to. Use hypnosis hypnosis based techniques to help people self that conditions right and so so what should our listeners like imagine? So it's an APP and it's kind of guiding me through hypnotherapy session or what should I imagine? Yeah. Yeah. So safer fell IBS Procam Nova. It's a structured program of audio sessions on order sessions plus psycho education and flare up techniques and essentially think guided meditation and the delivery methods was audio of coming boys getting to you into helping you. Get into a relaxed focused state. Then it's designed by doctors and psychologists teaching coping skills. It's I'm using visualizations to help increase your ability to self regulate. Right. So that's really the core difference between guided meditation sessions ride. They're more about you know folk singing and clearing your mind to some extent whereas hypnotherapy is using some of that. But really with the purpose of inducing you to making it more receptive to while things that you are looking to change your behavior. Exactly exactly. Yeah. That that's a great description of it. Essentially, hypnosis is becoming highly focused and absorbed to the point that you become more suggestive also receive receptive to new ideas or perceptions. So it's not a therapy itself but when it's combined with their PD techniques, cpt, it becomes hypnotherapy and so while because you'll like essentially low lowering your critical faculty and becoming more receptive and I'm in this sort of experiential learning state I'm when wet teaching you coping skills on. Bass coping skills or going through visualizations you really integrate them much more fully and studies have shown. It can actually improved effectiveness bt for many many conditions. Right and this is nothing like what has been popularized in Hollywood movies as being like put into a state where you lose all your awareness about what the hypnotists saying and what you're doing yourself and Sunday, you're chicken. Exactly. Yeah it's much more like if anything it's more a tightened away innocent heightened focus of what they're saying. So compared to say when we're talking about meditation about like clearing clearing your mind, this is much more like folks really focused on what they're saying tow. It's much more of an active active thing that got it, and so what can you really use it for what are like some of the common conditions that you can treated with? So it's been shown to help a variety of. Conditions. So one of the most well studied areas is irritable passenger. So there's been a tape of evidence showing it can reduce help manage symptoms by seventy percent of people by sixty percent reduction. So it's pretty powerful. It can also help with anxiety depression like teaching coping skills that can help you manage stresses and problem solving skills that can say depression. They often make portions when depressed and so teaching people with the skills to help them make better decisions is one way of managing that and. Is such a powerful vehicle for teaching skills. It can be used across a lot of things another well, well-researched area is chronic pain. So there's been a whole heap of evidence supporting it as a way to reduce acute pain in the moment, but also long term chronic pain conditions such as migraines chronic back pain something that's quite recently such. But this a pretty strong evidence behind it is helping reduce Menopausal postmenopausal hot flashes. So there was a study coming out of Baylor University that found hypnosis or a five-week hypnosis program could help reduce the onset and the the occurrence of hot flashes in postmenopausal women by. Eighty percent after the five-week on program. So it's this pretty strong evidence for writing things they sleep on smoking cessation is coming like ones that might people might associate with hypnosis but because it's just a vehicle for therapeutic aches and most people can become focused and absorbed in what they're doing with a movie or driving or in a daydream it is a widely useful tool, right and right now with mindset alfio primarily focused on mental health ibs and chronic pain management that's still in the works from what I understand right? Exactly. So we we started with mental health and essentially Wichmann, Dr Michael, Yap Kerr on the world leader. In hypnosis actually has textbook on clinically uses hypnosis, but he's a depression expert as well. So are we started with mindset which is a series of programs that teach individual skills and cognitive mechanisms round variety of mental health mental areas but with Nova, which is out second program that's structured six week program for Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and that was based on a twenty sixteen clinical trial by at Monash. University that found six weeks of DOT therapy could help improve IBM symptoms by an average of sixty percent for seventy percent of people, and we've worked with the ray such a I'm from that study to as essentially take her. Work and then deliver through my ball up right and in the future will be we'll be expanding that that sort of ability of waking with such as for different programs into chronic pain into hot flashes into many different areas.

Ibs Procam Nova Acute Pain Irritable Bowel Syndrome IBM Baylor University Menopausal Depression Hollywood Nova Yap Kerr Dr Michael
What happens if online advertising is just a big, fat bubble?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:26 min | 5 d ago

What happens if online advertising is just a big, fat bubble?

"So. Big Tech monopolies are in the news this week the Department of Justice sued Google over how it maintains its search dominance and it search dominance is the key to its business model, which is that it makes eighty percent of its revenue from digital advertising facebook by the makes ninety, nine percent of its revenue from advertising and the profitability of targeted ads is also a big reason why tech companies are constantly collecting so much data about us and there's a multibillion dollar ad tech industry that exists because all of this makes so much money. But what these ads didn't actually work all that. Well, Tim Wong is a former public policy executive Google where he worked on artificial intelligence and machine learning and he's of the new book subprime attention crisis I. Think this is an interesting important distinction right? which is it's not necessarily to make the argument that advertising never works categorically right? We have examples of it working. The question is whether or not the market as a whole really lives up to the promises that it's made and the promises made is that data driven. Automated form of what's known as programmatic advertising is a kind of advertising that's way better than billboards or magazines or the kind of madman style of advertising and I think ultimately, it may be that we are exactly where we were decades ago. Right? which is we actually don't know which half of the money spent advertising works in which one is wasted. We just very difficult to tell. Is, there an awareness of this? I mean I know that you know after for example, Cambridge Politica, there was a lot of conversation about how there are lots of promises related to micro targeting and that it just might not be. Realistic. Like do advertisers are they starting to understand this? Well, I, think there's a lot of willful blindness in the Advertising Space you know so this book that I just wrote, it opens on a really strange experience that I had going to a marketing conference where a professor laid out all of the evidence right? You know sixty percent of people never see ads ad blocking up all around the world it was just dead space the. Advertisers kind of refuse to engage with it, and you know it's one of the things I've been thinking a lot about because it's similar to patterns that we see and other market bubbles right where there's these deep structural problems with the industry. But a lot of the people involved either don't want to hear it or they don't believe it I mean listen I'm very familiar with the idea of the belief that technology must be working even. All. Evidence to the contrary. But I do want to ask you about targeting specifically because it seems like there's a lot of technical reasons it doesn't work. But what about this idea that there's a massive amount of data collection that ads can be so specific and personalized that you literally cannot resist them are you saying that's also not true Yeah I. Mean You brought up Cambridge Analytical earlier? I mean there's a fascinating report that just came out from the UK privacy regulator that was basically their research to say look there's all of this kind of. Metric advertising does it make a difference and the conclusion? There was no there actually was not any significant difference and there's two reasons for that. One of them is a lot of researchers find that a lot of the data being used as faulty and messy and doesn't work and I think the other one is whether or not. This data actually helps you to target a message better is really unclear. There's a great researcher by the name of Allesandro. Who's been doing some work on if you have targeted ads versus non targeted ads, does it actually make a difference and conclusion is it does but really only by a small margin, much less than you think. Could it also expose the fact that a lot of these companies no longer want the data for advertising like they want it for machine learning. Yeah I. think that's ultimately you know I think one of the great questions and responses I've had to the book is people say so why have we built this enormous surveillance infrastructure? This thing just doesn't work I. Think people have traditionally thought. Oh, well, it's because Mark Zuckerberg wants to build a mind control ray that's his advertising system. You know the reality is that it has been collected for other reasons and for sure I think things like the promise of machine learning is is one of the reasons that people collect this data. What Can. Be Done. Do you think I mean? This is a big complicated technology question. You've got companies spending a ton of money and companies that rely on this for their whole business model. Like what could solutions even look like? One of my worries about this is that again, if you study the history of market bubbles, a lot of what we see is very reminiscent right to the say the subprime mortgage crisis of two, thousand, seven, two, thousand, eight, and there is a momentum here in the problem with bubbles is that. While, it may look great in two, thousand, seven, I think we were saying how great economy is doing. At some point they pop and I think the human costs will be great. It's really not just a matter of whether or not you know Mark Zuckerberg has less. Fewer billion dollars right I think you gotta think about all the media that's relying on this ecosystem that journalism that relies on it and many other places that advertising touches online, and so I I tend to believe in the idea that we have to find ways of deflating this bubble and so I'm really interested in kind of the ability to both spread the public word about some of the problems in this marketplace. But also I think there's room for regulation I. think There's room to enforce transparency in the marketplace to try to make sure that you know expectations about this match up with reality. There's been just as a regulatory matter there been a lot of questions about banning targeted advertising. Should that happen? Yeah I I do think. So and I think in some ways you know in may be the thing that pops the bubble right because for the longest time, advertisers have been basically holding to the position that we need all this data order to do our business to target our ads and what we're seeing as things. GDP are the European privacy law and CPA to California privacy law rollout is in many cases the market just keep chugging along even though our advertisers have a lot less access to data and I do think that that kind of realization that all this data might actually not have been very. Meaningful might actually 'cause you know sort of expectations or perceptions about how great this stuff is to kind of crash to Earth, and so you think these privacy laws have these two effects. One of them is to protect privacy, which of course is important but I think the other side of it is actually in May of like you know strip the veil off this market that I think has been kinda shrouded for so long Tim. Wong is the author of the new book subprime attention crisis. How big a bubble are we talking here? Digital advertisers will spend over one hundred and forty billion dollars in the US in twenty twenty.

Tim Wong Mark Zuckerberg Google Department Of Justice Facebook Cambridge Politica California United States Cambridge Analytical Executive Professor Allesandro UK Researcher RAY
Startup Loom Booms on Rise of the Video Message

Business Wars Daily

03:43 min | 5 d ago

Startup Loom Booms on Rise of the Video Message

"Wars daily on this Thursday October twenty second. Here's a trend bits grown like crazy during the pandemic when you might not yet be aware of but watch out by this time next year I predict you will be it's called video messaging a number of services. Now offered the ability for anyone with a computer or smartphone to make a quick high quality video and send it immediately for free or cheap. One of the most basic reasons to try it. It's easier and faster to talk than it is to type according to. Founders at San Francisco Startup. Loom but loom is more than just a video version of text messaging for one it allows users to record their screens and their faces at the same time, which makes it an ideal tool for teaching and training remotely a math teacher for example, can speak directly to their students and visually illustrate that tricky geometry problem at the same time actor Ashton Kutcher. One of the APPS investors uses it to provide feedback on scripts. He told Forbes, you actually need the virtual object and the explanation at the same time in addition to conveying the real emotion. Clearly. It can be compelling to receive a video message instead of an email and that's not just anecdotal today. The company claims it has seven million users up from a couple of million pre pandemic in late May investors poured thirty million dollars into loom. Valued at three, hundred, fifty, million dollars that's double its value a year ago what's happening? Well, we're all working from home. Of course, even pre pandemic loom had conceived of its APP is appealing to remote workers but no one knew just how suddenly we'd all be communicating digitally all the time. Now loom even newer start a video card or working around the clock building out there young products to grab this new opportunity before it passes them by the first mover often wins market share and becomes the category leader at least for the foreseeable future. All of that rapid work means a lot of hiring loom is now one of the fastest growing startups around according to linked in late last month linked in named loom number nine on its list of. Top fifty startups. That's a list of privately held American companies filling bunches of jobs. The companies already ballooned from a handful of team members to almost one hundred today last week, Lumo unveiled what it's calling new loom video messaging is already attracting small businesses but loom in its rivals may not turn big profits from that market. After all, you can get their APPs with limited services for free where the big money may lie large companies the new loom includes. A custom plan for enterprises, it allows an unlimited number of users to create videos offers a virtual library for storing them. That way multiple creators can make say hundreds of different training videos that users can search loom believes many companies will want to replace time consuming synchronous webinars with short recorded videos especially, because many workers are now teaching their kids from home and they're at their jobs only after bedtime smaller businesses can get loom for about eight dollars per. User per month, the company hasn't published a price for enterprises as with any startup success isn't guaranteed for either company. Any of the larger Digital Communications Brands Zoom Microsoft teams slack could jump right into the

Ashton Kutcher San Francisco Microsoft Lumo Forbes
Sonia Gil of founding Fluenz

How I Built This

01:41 min | 5 d ago

Sonia Gil of founding Fluenz

"Sony let's start with the founding of Lens I. Guess You found this like more than a decade ago and originally the idea was this was going to be an online only platform is that right? That's right. So we launched our first product fluence Mandermann in January of two thousand and seven kind of Lake region if we can teach Mandarin. We can teach anyone that this was a while ago. This is pre APPs pre anything yet, the idea was to have a self learn digital program that was specifically made for English speakers, and that's that's the key component there, and that's really what differentiates us from from everybody else we deconstruct the language and put it back together from the point of view of somebody who's an English speaker was learning that language. So if you're going to learn Spanish and you come from English The obstacles are going to face are going to be very different than somebody who comes from Itala. They're gonNA, learn it quicker. No doubt. You're going to have a harder time. At. It seems logical and you'd think that everything that's out there obviously takes that into account, but that's not the case actually. Most of the programs, even books, university programs and everything else have one path of learning and that's what it is and so that makes it harder for us. That means our market is smaller that also means it. Every time we develop language is incredibly difficult takes resources and timing not but it also ensures that you have better results and that you feel like it's made for you because it is neat for you.

Sony Lake Region Itala
Ubisoft games getting cross-play and cross-progression via new Ubisoft Connect service

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:02 min | 5 d ago

Ubisoft games getting cross-play and cross-progression via new Ubisoft Connect service

"Number four, ubisoft connect has been announced. This isn't an event. This is t m Kim at. US, off has announced ubisoft connect a new player service that combines and expands upon its two existing digital services you play and Ubisoft club players will be able to track their progress in any UBISOFT game. While earning exclusive awards, there was loyalty program. ubisoft connect is a new universal interface that would be available on all platforms and work with all UBISOFT Games starting with watchdogs legion with a single. Button press players will be able to pull up a refreshed in game overlay on PC and consoles that features all your standard overly toolkits track your activity see which friends are online and checking on a games community. ubisoft connect will also provide smart Intel which is feature that delivers gameplay tips and videos based on a player's game activities not unlike the new game help feature in PS fives. You I. Also included is a points based reward service where players can tackle time-limited an community challenges to earn rewards and then exchange the earn points for exclusive digital goods.

Ubisoft United States Intel KIM
Jeff Gothelf Explains How Storytelling Can Make or Break Your Leadership

The No B******t Marketing Podcast

05:18 min | 6 d ago

Jeff Gothelf Explains How Storytelling Can Make or Break Your Leadership

"We all have go to outlets that we follow for video to read blogs Etc home throughout my career one that has been since very early in my life. A Mainstay for me has been Harvard Business Review home and I began reading that in college and just found it. So fascinating because Harvard Business Review was in my opinion the best of the best and they did both research. They combined science. They combined wage. They combined data that combined real life experience and they would teach and they'd give you practical learning and they'd give you evidence of things to do. So Harvard Business Review has been a part of my leadership since I was in college, and I remember when I was first in a job doing a turnaround of two radio stations at about Twenty-One twenty-two years old. I had Harvard business page. You coming to this radio stations that were struggling financially and I remember I had a couple of raised eyebrows from some of the older staff members that were there. But recently in my feed my Harvard Business Review feed it came an article from Jeff got off of Harvard Business writing for Harvard Business review and the article was storytelling can make or break your leadership. And again, it's get Jeff got off and he also has a book called lean ux and I'm going to put that in the show notes and I'm actually going to check it out myself. So Jeff is this article storytelling can make or break your leadership and he begins the article which is what I love he begins the article with an anecdote and the article begins with this anecdote about him saying that a very large company wanted to bring out their new okay ours objectives and key results and they have these new. Okay birth. Switch first of all, they've this term they want to go and unveil and they're going to talk about it and it's a big picture thing and they make the presentation to middle management and then employees and it falls flat. There's no enthusiasm and things struggle on this this initiative and what the author is talking about is how that happened off because of Storytelling or the lack thereof. And that's why he's emphasizing something that you've heard me say again and again, so think about what this means for me. I am an Avid Reader of Harvard Business review and have used it throughout my career and I now see a writing and a post in both the digital version and the print version of something that I've been writing and speaking on for years and it ends up following many of the things that I tell you again and again and again that we at Mass Solutions do for our our clients and we do as a team for our clients again and again and again, so the article says storytelling can make or break your leadership and then she goes on to tell that anecdote at the big company that where the initiative the major initiative fell and then it says here are five tactics or elements of Storytelling that the author found work again and again and again And I'm excited to tell you the first one number one says be audience specific. And he even says it's sounds simple. But it isn't and if you recall one of my most recent podcasts and videos was about how people misperceive marketing and think it's simpler than a than others think it's more complex than it is. Well one major element of marketing that is misperceived as simple or already being done is segment addition and that's when he's talking about being audience specific. So he's saying it's not as simple as it sounds because you have to do what we call the real drill down to become audience specific you first had a truly Define that audience and that takes heavy lifting but you have your own existing data, which gets you part of the way your own existing data is gold and I found company after company not maximizing their own existing data to study very quickly the Pareto Principle. Now, we have the Pareto Principle plus and we've built way upon your 80/20, but you can quickly do your eighty-twenty log. Eighty percent of your business comes from about 20% of your customers that begins to show you who your ideal customers currently are but they might not actually be ideal customers. So that's a whole nother story about how we have to say you really Define and do the real drill. So the first thing is be audience specific in this article from Harvard Business review the second part of being audience specific is he actually says if you want to know what your audience is thinking ask them? We talk about how significant marketing Intel is by talking to your key target audience is existing customers perspective customers internal stakeholders, external strategic Partners everybody

Harvard Business Review Jeff Harvard Harvard Business Intel Mass Solutions
Joshua Coburn on How to Inspire a Positive Revolution

Dose of Leadership

03:55 min | 6 d ago

Joshua Coburn on How to Inspire a Positive Revolution

"Joshua Coburn back on DOSA leadership. Welcome. My friend. Glad to have you here. Honored to be back. Thanks again. I'm I'm super stoked has been way too long way too long and we were talking to six years I couldn't believe that I thought. Well, I'm even four three and six years. Yes so much. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Just briefly mentioning the world's change lives have changed I mean it's it's crazy. Six years is is a long time for sure especially in this crazy digital kind of fast paced world that we've been dealing with the last several years I still feel like I've kind of obvious have kept pace with you with facebook friends. I've seen on TIKTOK. I've seen your kind of progression of you and your brand and one things can we have different is like you look like a completely different human being you look like. A beast, your monster, you're like workout. Your work regimen I, it's impressive to see how much your body has changed in six years. Yeah. Thank you. You know it's it's crazy to. Kind of that whole cycle is been interesting in terms of you know when we last spoke I was really focused on mental health and things like that especially with students. And when I would go and I would speak I get photos back of like those events which was awesome. But I felt like. I looked of like. A like a dad you know. A little bit of a gut like arms word anything major and I hadn't thought about like hitting the gym. In High School, but I realize you know part of. Good. Mental health good physical health, and if I'm not seeing that through than what kind of example am I? So yeah, it was it was time to step up my game. So I think maybe late two thousand. Fourteen fifteen it would be it'd be early, two, thousand, fifteen I started kind of stepping into that world Orrin. Weirdly, it didn't take long I ended up with a sponsorship from Supplement Company and just really dove. Headlong into that world. So it's been an interesting right to that you know to that end as well. It's impressive and I. did you change your diet? Much I mean I got the supplements sponsorship. So that was part of your Diet but did you change? How you what you were drinking I mean was that radical to Yes. But I did it over time because really when I started making that change, it was more initially mental. It was a matter of showing up be split, getting the job done and. Kind of heading home, making sure that I was on point to return the next day and as time went by, I started to see some physical changes and then it's like well okay. Now, I need to maybe adjust the food and I think a lot of people when it comes fitness. They try to they try to join the gym. You know try to change all their food all at once and they get frustrated because you know there are two weeks and they changed everything about their life. They're not happy and they're not seeing results either so I didn't approach it that way I didn't start changing my diet until a good eight or. Nine months into. Kind of my physical transformation or by my kind of. Focused to physical side of it anyway, and once I I. Really. Started thinking you know Ok food may maybe I'll look at food different. I just started with simple things instead of buying you know free frozen pizzas. By. One lesson throw Broccoli and that's how I slowly over time changed it. But yeah, I got to the point where I was. Essentially, show you know bodybuilding show ready. So I was you know five to seven percent body fat lean ready to rock and roll.

Joshua Coburn Facebook High School Supplement Company
Imagine Large Sensor Computational Photography

The Digital Story

04:54 min | Last week

Imagine Large Sensor Computational Photography

"I recently published a piece on medium dot com titled. The case against full frame. Now the point of the article was that major camera manufacturers are relying least currently anyway. On the brute force of large sensors while smartphones are using machine learning to advance their cause. So in other words, I feel like we're in a real brains versus brawn kind of scenario here. And it got me thinking what if we had both? We saw a glimmer of what that could be with Olympics in the em one mark three in the EM X.. Combining computational photography with a larger sensor? Necessarily a full frame sensor but one bigger than in a smartphone for sure and aside from the specific processors in engines required to make this happen, we would need software to sort of pull it all together. And it seems to me that the pro raw format seems like a reasonable bow to tie everything up. Now. The thing about raw as we all know. It's kind of dull on its own. I mean we've met people like that as well. Right and a great potential. There's a lot you can pull out of them but. A lot of times when you first meet them, they just sit there. And kind of what a raw file does. And we can apply profiles to these raw files to you know have a better starting point light room does a good job of this capture when pro does a wonderful job of this so that the first thing that you see on your screen isn't so dull and flat sorta gets the conversation rolling bit gives us a little bit more of a palatable starting place. But what if we could go beyond the simple profiles? To computational versions that presented us with? Images that knocked our socks off I just like bang. So you upload the images to your computer and you open them up in whatever light room capture when pro and they start flashing on your screen and you're just going oh my gosh, those are beautiful. I mean that would be so cool and then knowing that their raw files as well. Because that would be the NEAT thing about this scenario, this melding of technologies. We would have the added benefit. Of being able to adjust those initial presentations with non-destructive tools. So, let's say that in this happens with my iphone shots all the time I take the shot and I'm looking on screen I'm going that's a lot better than I had anticipated. But at the same time going. Personally, I would like to deepen the shadows just a bit on this one. I'd like a little bit more contrast and the white balance is just a hair too warm I. WanNa cool that off. You know. So even though you have this really interesting shot that you're looking at her shows up initially on the screen, each of us has kind of our own thing that we want to do to it because well, we're photographers and that's what we do. We have a vision and we want that vision to be represented in the shots that we take. And, that's the big problem with just straight computational photography in that is not really our vision. It's the algorithms vision of that shot, which is fine. You. You can't mess up in a sense writing always always have a presentable shot. But if we're trying to do something that is us than well, that isn't it? In. That brings us back to the allure of pro raw. In the sense that we start out with something that's really nice. And yet we can do our own thing to it as well. Wow What a NEAT thought right. Remember George Bernard Shaw's quote that youth is wasted on the young. While I'm starting to understand a little bit more about what he meant now but to put it into photography terms, I would say that machine learning is wasted on the small. and. When I say small I mean small sensors right why do we have to choose between smarts in muscle right? Why? Why can't there be a melding of these two things? So, while you ponder that that very deep thought and let me say that again just in case you missed the sheen learning is wasted on the small. This is how I'm feeling these days.

Olympics George Bernard Shaw
How does one become a ghost hunter?

The Ominous Hour

03:01 min | Last month

How does one become a ghost hunter?

"Welcome back to the ominous. I. Have. Christie here from Seoul sisters paranormal in. So excited to have you here. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it. I. Kind of I. Actually have a lot of questions. A lot of things that I wanNA talk about the Kinda WanNa start a little bit before soul sisters was thing I kinda WanNa know what got you into the paranormal and letting paranormal investigator. Sure. Absolutely. Sue You know a lot of people say we had this one experience or you know I saw my grandmother something like that it really wasn't like that for us we come from a very researched a background were in. Academia and my sister because the team is made up of myself. Twin sister are younger sister in the two female family friends and we would always say ourselves watching the popular television shows you know, why didn't they investigate here? Why didn't they ask these questions you know why they spend more time researching this location and so we told ourselves if we ever had the opportunity to go on a ghost investigation or panel Mestigation, we would jump at that opportunity. So in. Two thousand thirteen a family friend of ours who sat on the Board of the West Virginia State Penitentiary, he said, why don't y'all come up to Mounds Ville stay a couple nights stay the weekend and one of those nights. Why don't you stay inside the prison and so we jumped at that opportunity we went there. We had some night-vision video cameras had a couple of digital cameras and we spent the night in the West Virginia State Penitentiary One of those honored locations in. The country and we've found such compelling evidence that that evening that we decided that we wanted to really go across the country and do this and look for panel activity as well as visit historical locations had reported history of paranormal activity, and so that's what we did we in two thousand fourteen we come up with our name, our logo, our our brand if you will and just started researching the paranormal and historic places and just had been having a bowl of her since. Rate 'cause I actually did some snooping I want on your website and was watching videos and stuff and Lake I. just I really enjoy how much you guys seem to enjoy the ghost hunting in the effort that you guys put into everything in the way that you come in from a very respectful manner. Well. Thank you. I. Really appreciate you watching it for those kind words, and that's really what we try to do you know for us when we go to these locations and we try to communicate with with spirits and entities we really believed that we're trying to communicate with those that once were human. You know they passed, and for some reason, they're still earthbound if you will and so we we want to give him that respect for the humans that they once were, and so we we do research we we into the history of the locations as well as the any individuals that are reported to haunt locations, and we really do come at it with that respectful and. Empathetic. If you will attitude towards investigations

West Virginia State Penitentia Christie Seoul Mounds Ville Investigator Mestigation
"digital" Discussed on Digital Coffee

Digital Coffee

06:00 min | 2 months ago

"digital" Discussed on Digital Coffee

"I like Gotham Knights a little bit more because it looks like he played four different bureaus that are in one anti heroes the three heroes and one anti hero and looks like, Batman Quote Unquote has died. And you had to fill the gaps looks very interesting. It still looks very of injury in a way which I guess is cool. I don't really understand why it seems to be going this direction but looks like all these Superhero Games are going in this direction of avengers assemble or Justice League assemble. But we're at right now is that there's no Batman but robin back girl or about woman. Night Wing and Red Hood. is going to be taking over as the heroes of Gotham. Yosef. Suicide Squad which that one is in the arkham universe. I guess this one Gotham Knights is not Markham Universe. So it's very confusing but not one things have gone very wrong with the heroes. Anti Heroes Save the day. So that's what we're doing. I'm very excited for both of them. Especially since rock steady doing suicide squad, the combat should be really really good. Hopefully not that's quite travesty. But that's where we're at right now. I'm actually really excited for both phone in general. Then moving onto. Club duty black ops cold war. It's very long name guess. Hod. BLOB CW I. Guess. It would be the way of saying it better. But. There's some interesting things. One people were upset that Reagan's in there, but it's like well, he was the president time. So why would he not be in there? So that's one thing I don't really understand the media's all upset about or supposedly also upset about, but they are. They also have for you to customize your character and apparently you can be. gender-neutral for some odd reason because we always have to not know what we are because that's the mantra of the millennial generation we don't know. But anyways, you can create your character. You can have player choice in it supposedly but. Player twice and call has never really been played choice. It's always felt very, not really player choice at all, but it looks like it's player choice but not really player troy the same time doggy wrong looks very cool. It still looks like it's going off the backs of the engine from Tamar Warfare. So be prepared for huge updates in just a huge game in general would you'll probably have to install modern warfare to play called duty black. OPS CO war. Because that's where we're at right now. But the good news is that looks like zombies are backs of you really missed zombies from call video franchise. This is the one that you actually want to do because it finally get zombies. Yays Ambi- SAMIS are fun. They should be fun. Also. We, we're talking about call of duty. The weird thing is, is that when they actually had added head.

Gotham Knights Reagan Batman Gotham Markham Universe Justice League Yays Ambi arkham Red Hood.
"digital" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

Think: Digital Futures

09:10 min | 11 months ago

"digital" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

"We learn quickly as kids that if a friend does something wrong you don't tell on them you keep your mouth shot got you close ranks. Where if you do tell your snatching routing sneaky underhanded I think it sit in to us from a very early age because in many cultures we do not like niches? We carry that with us into adulthood. But it's not just dislike going behind someone's back is an abhorrent the act that hostility a mixture of fear and misplaced loyalty ideas undermining that loyalty. Not that's the main -ality that's operating him to go against the grain mm-hmm and pass on information without the person or people who it's about knowing immediately pits you against this cultural belief. This is the landscape of the whistle blower uncharted volatile territory. Wet talking can quickly quickly spiral into a legal issue. Become dangerous and even life threatening this narrative already of has been potent in the cultural psyche. The cultural approaches that whistle blower the whistle blowers snatch pushed the Europe up. There's not even award to translate in any single European language war with the lower and most of the interpretation. The synonym are men but slowly as we move further and further into the digital age. This perception is starting adding to change Jin Lodge plot to the technology that makes whistle blowing possible. Today you'll learn what these technologies. Aw why we need them. And how a long standing cultural belief belief is holding us back from the truth this is think digital futures. I'm Jake Malkin. Let's actually step. How even further? What is the actual procedure that takes place well in most cases aces it usually involves an individual very seldom a group who feels the organization is doing something wrong long and I need to raise it with an appropriate authority figure? Peter Fleming is a professor of business and management at the University of Technology Technology. Sydney Pita Explains Whistle blowing exists in almost every professional environment the corporate world within organizations uh-huh and of course government most of the time at his rise internally usually going to your boss unfortunately if your boss is implicated in the wrongdoing then it becomes difficult. You have to go to their boss or an internal regulator or agr that first moment. It's typically Bena face as to face interaction. Usually that is the way in which whistle blowing occurs whistle blowers feel uncomfortable even if they choose to remain. Anonymous let learn republic. Why would some want to be public at could be because they know that with with expect little action or change to be affected win they raise it internally a could be because the issues are important potent to the public concern that they need to raise it in a public mind but sometimes the cost is just best to high and people thinking? It's probably best just to keep your mouth shut what others costs it lose. Your job won't won't be employed in the sick day very game like listed a reputation for being a snitch a reputation for being untrustworthy. That's a big big risk big danger in this day and age. Just look what's happening in the United States at the moment with the whistle blower who hasn't been identified kit but Donald Trump kind of hinted at you know execution for someone who's a traitor against the state while it might seem like the hostility towards whistle blowers is at an all time high Fabio Pietro Santi President of the whom is sent off for transparency transparency and digital human rights in. Italy says they're more important now than ever before. What is this? The ignificant are whistleblowing implant in nineteen. It's had to be part of the corporate culture at the public agencies. Culture noticed this keep our society. Thanks to the whistle blower courage within any organization. There's at least some level of infrastructure or system in place that enables people to come forward with sensitive information fabrio. uh-huh says more and more of these becoming digital in two thousand nineteen. We found that most of those malpractice are reported both digitally so while we still blowing in the past used to be a niche of wrongdoing reporting. Now it's it's becoming more and more a normal standard things in digital technologies into the equation. What is that look clock? Well the most Siebel way into dozen nineteen whistle blowing. It's just basically connecting to US secure website with or without a secure web browser and filling out a questionnaire and the four and they're having a shop to have a conversation about the wrongdoing wrongdoing that it has to be reported so nowadays it's easy as connecting to a website but just because you're on a secure accua browse. How old website doesn't mean what you're doing is anonymous or even secure? Fob your argues. He's that most digital whistle blowing systems in the workplace are on ever. It's very insecure because most of the product and services are commercial product typically developed by so-called legal compliance company run by lawyer and so figured out how legal compliance firm developed heist under cybersecurity software. So the average security that we saw there is very low what makes software from those legal firms. James Insecure when we speak about securely wave compliance lawyer. We're speaking about compliance with security. You acquire moment. So we are thinking about certification. It's all about having Sam's from someone else that even set all external they are now cybersecurity information security requirements. And say. Yes it's secure it's about protecting the confidentiality lettie integrity of information among the party. But not about protecting the MEDA protecting the meta data fabio says is what a truly secure digital whistleblowing system is all about the security of whistle blowing software. We are speaking not just about immigration and protection of the communication but about protection of the Mita which computer speak to which other computer when Rama. Stein if there's trays that these computer connected to this whistle blower website and keep connected for fifty minutes and exchange. These amount of data at a gamble is the fact that it's an aggressive communication so I don't know what has been said. Well I know that something has been sand in such a case it. We'll be possible to identify that. Hey who were using this computer easily. The blower.

Fabio Pietro Santi President United States Bena Europe Jin Lodge Jake Malkin Siebel Sydney Pita James Insecure University of Technology Techn Donald Trump Mita Peter Fleming Stein professor of business Italy Sam
"digital" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

Think: Digital Futures

05:35 min | 11 months ago

"digital" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

"Reason people should do or try a digital talks is simply about recharging and the idea that you would use that to reconnect with yourself and reconnect with nature and reconnect with others in a face-to-face ray so partly this idea of returning to something a more quote unquote authentic way of life. I think that's definitely where where it came from. What do you make of the digital detox retreat? I mean I think as an idea or as a as a retreat I don't think it's necessarily chromatic because it offers thinks like meditation in Yoga and healthy food overseas does nothing wrong with that. I think that fundamentally the underpinning it is this assumption that Somehow that's going to address a problem which of course it isn't because you go way on your on your treats while you still got to come back to an in books. I would've emails smartphone for notifications and so on so it's kind of it's a bit of a a a short term fix for a problem that is larger it also incensed to individualize the problem. It's up to us as individuals to deal with this. One of the ways of doing that is like on a digital detox retreat traits. Natasha also worries that the underlying message of the digital detox reinforces an unhealthy narrative about our relationship with technology side of reconnecting with his. You'll fence excel with nature and this idea. The technology somehow is something that takes us away from the authentic life. It's something that takes away from some kind of Pule. Wholesome awesome life and I think that's that's actually really unhealthy? way of thinking about technology is really helpful. Well because technologies are invented they just become more and more embedded in our lives. They don't disappear. Do you think. There's a cultural view that if we're present in the digital world old or we engage with digital technologies that that's inauthentic sort of sub courage when you read a lot of the work that stunt around the as well as you read. What's in the media? There is. This idea is the technology is a force for evil. They're forced the good but also a force for evil. And you see a chicken I think in this school says around the relationship between children regime how children a using technology and and how no children should be playing outside and they should be a nature and they shouldn't be stuck in front of screens day. Now you might agree with that on March agree with that an and I have three children and so I kind of see that as well first hand I think these are not either rules. That's the problem I think is that presented the rules. And so the idea that technology kind of leads to inauthentic Somchai and getting away from technology leads back to authenticity. I think that's a false false binary this binary understanding of technology. Natasha believes is what makes us. Quick to call Al Use of digital technologies addictive behavior. She recognizes that for some digital addiction is a serious problem but argues it's damaging to label behavior addictive when it isn't how can we dismantle that binary yes well. That's absolutely the question that has interested and preoccupied me in my own research in this area is how do we get away from that. Binary is very very difficult cool so the research that I've done is trying to think about how technology is simply providing new ways ways of doing things that we've always done so it's not about intrinsically the technology itself being good or bad it's thinking about okay. Well let's look at what what people actually using these technologies fool she. They're using them to read books using them to read news happening in the world they using them to communicate indicate that using them to show. They're using them to bank. So if you start looking at it that way it gets us away from treating technology as kind of a monolithic expanding start looking at the different functions purposes and then that makes it easier to say are we can see that these ways of using technology Arashi no different to the things. We've always done before. Obviously there are other ways in which people using technology which will problematic but then those things always existed like this big debate around children's access to pornographic material using technology online pornography it has always existed. It's just a different full that it's taking now to look at that begins to get us away from the polarizing debates between technology is false for good or evil. We shouldn't demonize the technology. It's really important. I think not to demonize it because because long term this is how allies will be played out. This is how things will get done. The technology is here to stay.

Natasha Pule Somchai
"digital" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

Think: Digital Futures

10:54 min | 11 months ago

"digital" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

"At times. I will joke and say that. I'm addicted to my fine. This is something a lot of us. Say say we use it metaphorically to denote I use as a Stein of digital media but Ryan Allie from Bone Mouth University in the UK. Says is if you look at most people's behavior they might seem to be using their fern all the time constantly. Checking it this doesn't actually constitute having thing a digital addiction. A digital addiction is when you'll use of technology causes you That this characterized by by being compulsive impulsive and hasty and some harm associated with the use of that kind comes usually with. There's some degree of harm as well. How might that manifest could be anxiety? Feeling overwhelmed Luke. Vu is a psychologist who specializes allies in digital addictions. The other flavor Identifies relationships so that tends to struggle. You can't really have like some sort of teco digital title addiction and be in a relationship it can affect even their hygiene. It can affect their health physical health as well. Some people can have a regular meals because of that they cannot have any time because of the worry about what is happening online. Utilizing digital addiction is used as an umbrella term referring to anything from smartphone use to social media online gambling and gaming extreme cases they gave redick create another reality somehow like being critical by all the times you are online presidents forgetting your reality driving and thinking at the same time when you are online I persona so it can be distractive while the symptoms and Homs are real not all digital addictions are clinically recognized. It is not a formal term due to choose online gambling is listed on the DSM the diagnostic caustic and statistical manual of mental health disorders and last year the World Health Organization recognized gaming disorder as a new diagnosis nurses but when it comes to our phones and social media usage while we may think of these as the worst culprits of addictive behavior. The research in this space is still pretty fresh. So there's not a lot written about how these devices can be addictive. These are new phenomenon. That people aren't aren't you use in addiction literature. We need to know more precisely what is in them that can be seen as addictive elements and also in which case is really go there with full confidence and addiction but right now we use it there. Metaphorically indicates of Social Media and digital media. Yeah but psychologist Luke view points out just because there's a whole lot of literature doesn't mean they can't be a problem. You Anita have a diagnosis of diabetes. Before you start to have the measures if you'll pre-diabetic sometimes that's how I feel addiction. Need definitely can work on earlier when you meet with someone and you'll talking through the digitally addictive behavior. What step one? You might just want to be more deliberate and mindful with your gaming or your whatever the digital thing is be delivered about. I do recommend sort of I digital hygiene practices right so for example if it's a social media thing and interfering with sleep one of the F. quotes intervention would be well. Let's let's look at charging your out of the bedroom. It has no real particular need for your phone to be biomed side because the person in front of me is telling me that really impairing their sort of quality of life because they wake up so exhausted and tired set some healthy practices here in Charleston liver which by the way I get a lot more resistance to that originally. I thought once people adopted that then at that point one yard. Life's pretty good. Malik nick feel as much as a poem self regulating your use of digital tech leak says doesn't just help those who feel. They have a digital addiction but more casual uses as well off some clients who villacorta constant news checkers. The thing they got quite upset uneatable at the injustice of the world and could be everything like climate change and protesting this. The question then is like how is this becoming a larger problem. It is because of the credit access by the same token they also self regulate so it doesn't take much for them to get you. You know maybe I'm just on the news too much when I'm on. The train. Commute and work snuck owner bounce from NOOSA. I'M GONNA play my favourite album. Oh a podcast. Something let's isn't going to sort of create that sort of Problem Ryan Allie agrees but he argues that the problem goes Deepa than Keeping Ping tabs on your own behavior. He believes it has more to do with the technology itself. So we know for sure that the design of digital spell media exploits some human tendency for relatedness for recognition and also the variable reword was you can find signed into the facebook and all these social media we know for sure that these inflows elements are very effective and combined with the with the power of the data. Analytics fix that. The picture intelligence knowing the person behavioral aligned locations advisor using the likes. They have done in the past their friends and so on it can and actually be manipulated so it candidates to the point where a person is being presented who's inflammation which are likely to attract the attention and likely to tape them immersed in the online space wizard conscious users sometimes without even being conscious of that so we know for sure that this media is now how far more powerful in getting attention and also so the best ways of elements through some influence elements from psychology and for marketing. Very powerful right now so we know that social taking that a step further and looking at the hardware of digital media served the smart foreign those devices designed to be addictive. What thank you for? This question is an important question so we have now. I work work with a company and the company's Madisha imposing night the state unpunished and they are actually designing phone we call it digital minimum so for example Zomba. A screen will look like kindle screen. Where you you feel like you're reading a book so it doesn't really stimulate much of the brain and if people are looking there will by before they sleep they would get less stimulate in combatants into the x phone? The phones that we like to see the future is a phone which enable taper to be more interested on their life not on the phone itself beyond screens Ryan and his research team are looking looking at more self aware operating systems. That would play a bigger role in helping. You Monitor your use of your device addiction. Aware technology is something that technology can new and other media addiction cannot do so for example and cigarette stucco alcohol. They cannot not predict whether a person is likely drink more smoke more and when they are doing that behavior that is something technology can do and this is really. Unprecedented is a literature psychology and behavioral change so a medium and addictive medium which is able to sense when the person is using Eh and to Inter Inter fan and to intervene in order to guys that behavior in a certain direction or inform them about the behavioral this is something was an unprecedented and is an opportunity that tech companies scan do in competitors into other mediums known for their addictive nature like the tobacco and alcohol cohort. What's an example how? How might a digital technology into Fi? Here why doesn't interesting question. Because this is the media companies I say usually actually this is not our responsibility and we don't want to interfere with how people are using our products because that's something for the user to decide not for us however in our sorry session we are saying okay. That's absolutely fine. However enable the user to install third party applications which can access their data uh-huh and enable them to have that Serapis? If you don't want to do that and we fully understand that you don't want their fair so people can use his away. They're like you understand that but we are demanding that company big company to enable third party application to access a user's behavior online if they'll third party obligation access said they online they can actually implement certain behavioral change and behavioral awareness mechanism with the consent of the it has to consent those sets party obligation to network with operating system and it was facebook. Twitter was any other social media. They use the three. Take that set the level of granularity so for example the number of checks that they use it and help they use it in order to regulate the mine where self-regulating and addiction aware technology may work for some others might prefer Something different like going cold Turkey over the past few years the digital detox has come unto to the scene. It came from this idea of trying to switch off from technolog- chinyere arm trying to guess away from Bucket of twenty seven presents soldiers. TASHA's mountain is a professor of social science philosophy and method at Newcastle University in the UK and the Tasha's explains the digital detox. I wasn't so much an idea or a goal to set yourself. It's a retreat. It was a niche in the market. Kit companies have jumped in and started creating these digital detox retreats and saw a commercial opportunity to provide a space space where you weren't allowed to bring any kind of tech.

Ryan Allie Luke facebook UK TASHA World Health Organization NOOSA Twitter Bone Mouth University Turkey teco Vu technolog- chinyere Malik nick Anita
"digital" Discussed on Digital Business Models

Digital Business Models

14:30 min | 1 year ago

"digital" Discussed on Digital Business Models

"High at one for police station. We We'd ask Jeff we had a speaker on China and Asia that grants visas professor at Beijing University and older older of a great book which is really a quick greeting driven understanding about China which is called the one hour channel Hannibal so thank you Jimmy disquisition Jeffrey now pleasure to be here. Thank you so let's start from urology actually actually get you know to study the Chinese Market Economy Ellison your story I just a sort of international international business guy doing a lot of deal stuff's out of the Middle East and slowly started doing more with Asia this is good fifteen eighteen years ago and I was sort of half in the developing world in half in the US and it was pretty clear that Asia was the place to be early early on and China and Asia was just going to be a huge story so I was kind of on the ground is pretty obvious what's going to happen so I started focusing more and more on China Asia and I've been doing that ever since I still keep about half my time in China half my time in the US which is just an endless opportunity 'cause there's always new stuff to do and it's also pretty enjoyable lights so that's kind of where I settled days one foot in China one foot in the US which is gets more and more more interesting every single year absolutely of course suitable also to see all the things and the differences and similarities between Howelsen Woodson the the landscaper right now that the most interesting backup tech companies probably messy before for for a few years and I guess your good spectator and also protagonist of these which is interesting so and then in the book you actually mentioned seeks Mega trends that shape than actually are s shaping China in the Chinese economy. I am looked at those make sense. Can you give us just a short as an option about Those ones will be this is a CO author author. Jonathan Mackenzie we know China's confusing and there's a lot going on. It's a big place very complicated and what we did is we sorta pointed. Look at least major economic trends happening that our long-term these. Are you know thirty forty year trends if you if you I can understand those a lot of the chaos becomes a lot more understandable and so the trends. We started to look at where things that were driving. The revenue are the cost structures of companies and out of that we we identified sort of six number one. We is urban as ation just the fact that in China reopened to the world nineteen eighty about eighty percent of the population west farms and twenty percent in this city which is usually pretty much the inverse of most developed countries I so there's just been a steady movement of people into cities which is still happening today. That creates a lot of economic drives. We also like to things like manufacturing manufacturing scale just a lot of money capital rising Chinese consumers which is something that's really become important in the last five to ten years. I digital China and then what we call brainpower behemoths which is just there's there's more and more people with advanced degrees. China's not liking us to be in nineteen ninety minutes engineers and PhD's and artists and a lot of advanced skills now so we kind of looked at those six EXC trends and that that's held up pretty well over time. This little model used a lot of most of the major companies. You see are writing one or two of those trends so so far it's held up. Its minimum four to five years so we'll see but I think it's pretty solid most of those. Things are going on for at least another decade gate if not longer and then we'll say interesting. What time do you think it will be really going on a steeler in the in in the next I mean of course the Sikhs Mega as you said that we would be going on or thirty four thirty forty years but some of them really started the banking the against inspecting the eighties so those spence that you see losing momentum and which ones are the ones that I really any moment I can get. You know it'd be nice to from your side perspective random in the ones that were easier to predict where urbanization manufacturing shrink capital just a lot of money because it's just been steadily narrowing. I mean it's literally a linear line. Just dry nineteen eighty two today and it's just a stray raid law. The ones were little more unpredictable. Were rising Chinese consumers which you know they were not really an economic factor ten years years ago. People didn't talk about Chinese consumers ten years ago. They weren't buying much even know they had income and savings well. That's changed dramatically in the last five to ten years now. It's the world's largest market for audio for gaming offline gaming cinema movies and one industry after the next day become the largest argest marketplace or in the top two so that one's sort of a late bloomer and then digital China which is one of our six is the most unpredictable acas crazy stuff happens all the time most of the China. The digital consumer stories really about consumers. I'm sure most of the digital China's story is mostly about consumers honors. that's where things are really happening. Fast Alibaba ten send social media all that that's a lot of China who turn out are almost almost entirely digital creatures. You know you can't talk about Chinese consumers without talking digital anymore. Everything happens on a smartphone. That's probably the most awesome predictable one but it's moving quick now each missing and you said at the beginning knitting these bedding posted to stress out because a steeler for many people. China is blocked by the very complex set county which is a male of many classes as you. I liking the in the book but did the digital megatrend like Internet Essa changed in China lagged in terms of society consumers would seeing now consumers is his main. Everyone knows a lot of them. That's not a big surprise. Everybody knows that they're rising in their wells. I think the part that gets under appreciated is how complicated they are. China's is arguably the world's most complicated consumer market now it is just you can look at thirty million. Chinese consumers live in caves. You can find Chinese consumers in the far west. Were you got several hundred million of them. That looked like a different country. You go to downtown Beijing. You get more billionaires in Beijing in New York City so there's a huge fragmentation and complexity to them. and it's just getting more so because you know there's a lot of them so we get a lot of anything you're. GonNa they get a lot of complexity and to you still get this big spread between very very developed market behavior like Beijing and Shanghai and you know okay that's out in the field and in the mountains and so you know it's just this hugely complicated subject in the only way you can really understand and Chinese consumers at this point. Is You have to go small. You have to study micro populations Chinese moms sports enthusiasts inland consumers DADS. You have to break it up that way and you find out people are very different YEP. He in Buca Luke Action Yields Twilight one point which I found very interesting in Sao actually people consume the consumption of the Internet sites okay to be more intense or for for Chinese especially young people compared to two west Westerners and is it something that it's still valid today. I mean they still like more time spent on the Internet on digital devices compared to the West Yeah basically I mean everyone knew that was going to be a lot of people with smartphones mark bones in China. That was pretty predictable. Seeing the same thing in India Indonesia places like that. I think what surprised people was how enthusiastic they are they just doc things faster than other countries APP mobile apps off like crazy and they they spend more time online than other consumers in other countries. They contribute more they post more. They add content more so just turns out they. Are you know some of the world's most enthusiastic netizens are Chinese. You know that wasn't necessarily predictable but it's true the other thing to keep even mind. Is You know there's a difference between regular consumers who go down to the supermarket by apples and online consumers because the online consumers effectively operate like network you know it's not just one person that person's sharing with another person sharing their interconnected and if you have three hundred million Americans or three hundred fifty million Americans. There's a certain number of connections. You'll get between them. When you have a billion Chinese consumers. It's actually exponentially financially larger so digital. China effectively operates like a network and it's very rapid very vibrant so so that part is sort of showing itself when you see a new aspect off in China. It goes for nothing to a hundred million users in two months three months now. We don't see that anywhere else that I've seen right and I thought it was interesting to see. Nowadays is a bit of a bads in the marketing world because they said these schools that the talk which they claim to be combated in like in social media space by finding because they sort of in some cases compare the metrics the users acquisition of blood from Lake that we the we we waste about a dozen the make in some ways. It's much sense because as you said I mean it's very eat steady easy to the up went up Atlanta actually they they might get Eddie began than median us so I think it very important to the seldom understanding of China and when he just something he's also that in China that he said that the phenomenon of a super APPs which is something that we didn't yet I guess seeing though in the in the West which makes me think that of course intend as technology China's evolved by looking at you know how Western companies any state companies work actual of the since it was more a I think a couple of years ago looking more in depth at the by do business business model but what I found interest with that right now recently they company like by do is not just a coping a something like a company that Google but actually innovating each way so it's waiting its own innovations as many things actually will will doesn't ever as well as always interesting to see these scandal. I mean what we'll do. They will you see on that standpoint. How does that look like right now. In China China obviously from the West and use any of combining the yeah I mean it's most people in I'd say the United States they got on the Internet by PC. You sit at home. You have your laptop your desktop. They discovered g mail than a couple years. Slater discovered youtube and they slowly adapted various tools over time that didn't happen in China. People basically joined around two thousand nine in two thousand ten only on their smartphones mostly. There were some users before that was very small and they got all these tools at once you know they went from nothing thing to. I've got a smartphone. I can do messaging. I do online video like drawing gaming so they kind of jumped in the deep end of the pool and they've only know the Internet on smartphones and the difference between a smartphone in a P. C. Is One you you work at home your office and then you leave the other one you carry with you all day long so they carry these around all day they message they take photos they watch videos all of that and one of the things that it was different early on people don't use email you send an email to someone in China. You better wait a week. 'cause permanent going to check their email. It was all about messaging so it started out with messaging with Q in that led to we chat and then from there they added payment which Allie pay in and we chat wallet and once you had messaging in and we chat take mobile payments set up that enabled you know e commerce to happen on your your phone anywhere you happen to be during your day that was the basis of the Super App and it turns out people just live on their smartphones. It becomes sort of the operating operating system for your life but we didn't see any of those three steps in the US you know people weren't living on WHATSAPP as much. Although they kind of are now they were using email they didn't adopt mobile payments because they were using credit cards which worked fine not awesome but they were functional and then e commerce..

China China Asia Beijing United States Asia Beijing University Middle East Jonathan Mackenzie Jeff professor Alibaba Howelsen Woodson spence Hannibal Allie
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Vibe

The Digital Vibe

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Vibe

"And that's glad you could take the time to listen to the digital vibe digital vibe has so many things to talk about. Did you listen to the last podcast? I have was pretty good. I mean, it was pretty good. I mean, if you didn't listen to listen to it again because it was pretty interesting. I would have to say that that was in life podcast that was attending life podcast. I thought I tape it for you guys. But that podcast was from. If you didn't listen to it you need to really in a check it out again. It's from probably one of my favorite. Mentors. Jack canfield. Influenced her leader example. I can go on. He is the man he you must simply must take the time. If you really want improve your life. I'm talking every area of your life. If you really want to do that. I would encourage you to take the time to listen to his work. You know to go to his websites. He has a blog called jacks blog. I didn't know he was here in you know, I missed him last. I was on my vacation. I was on my birth vacation. I had a lot of other things going on. No. He was here in town while he was and I missed him. So it was kind of like. But anyway, let's get onto this podcast. But anyway, so. Please do I mean. That man has influenced my life, and I had an opportunity to tell them that too. But not in person like I really wanted to. And he really has changed my life. He made me aware of me. And the potential and what he brings to the table of this world in this universe to life. He it will infuse your life. Your life will not be the same. I guarantee you that it will not be the same. It will not be the same. You know, if you wanna grow if you wanna do better be better get better, you know, do some things different than we need to check his his his his his his blog out his website. Is this podcasts his meetings conventions, his touring all those things check something out because it will change your life forever. It's changed my life forever. My life is not the same. What you hear right now is a lady that has her life has been impacted and changed by this, man. And it's it has it has made me who I am today is made me aware for I am it has brought me to a place in the past over ten years. Where I'm at in my life today. I. I can't go on. I cannot even say. I can break it down to might. Let's say, for example, one hundred percent responsibility. When I went through so many difficult things in my life. In. It's something you look at something like that. He's telling you, regardless of what because this power when you own your life. I have been through bad weather app in through health issues up in through business challenges have been through so many different changes in my life. That if I did not open up myself. To myself to make myself aware of what's going on with me and not what so much going on around me. But myself if I didn't do that. I wouldn't be doing what I do today in my life..

Jack canfield one hundred percent ten years
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Vibe

The Digital Vibe

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Vibe

"And that's glad you could take the time to listen to the digital vibe digital vibe has so many things to talk about. Did you listen to the last podcast? I have was pretty good. I mean, it was pretty good. I mean, if you didn't listen to it listen to it again because it was pretty interesting. I would have to say that. That was a live podcast that was attending life podcast. So I thought I'd take it for you guys. But that podcast was from. If you didn't listen to it you need to really in a check it out again. It's from probably one of my favorite. Mentors. Jack canfield. Influence her leader example. I can go on. He is the man he you must simply must take the time. If you really want improve your life. I'm talking every area of your life. If you really want to do that. I would encourage you to take the time to listen to his work. You know to go to his websites. He has a blog called jacks blog. I didn't know he was here in you know, I missed him last. I was on my vacation. I was on my birthday vacation. I had a lot of other things going on. I didn't know he was here in town. While he was and I missed him. So it was kinda like. But anyway, let's get onto this podcast. But anyway, so. Please do I mean. That man has influenced my life, and I had an opportunity to tell them that too. But not in person like I really wanted to. And he really has changed my life. He made me aware of me. And the potential and what he brings to the table of this world and this universe to life. He it will infuse your life. Your life will not be the same. I guarantee you that it will not be the same. It will not be the same. You know, if you wanna grow if you wanna do better be better get better, you know, do some things different than you need to check his his his his his his blog out his website. Is this podcasts his meetings conventions, his touring all those things check something out because it will change your life forever. It's changed my life forever. My life is not the same. What you hear right now is a lady that has her life has been impacted and changed by this, man. And it's it has it has made me who I am today is made me aware for I am it has brought me to a place in the past over ten years. Where I'm at in my life today. I. I can't go on. I cannot even say. I can break it down to might. Let's say, for example, one hundred percent responsibility. When I went through so many difficult things in my life. It's something you look at something. Like that is telling you, regardless of what because this power when you own your life. I have been through bad weather app. Into health issues up in through business challenges have been through so many different changes in my life. That if I did not open up myself. To myself to make myself aware of what's going on with me and not what's so much going on around me. But myself if I didn't do that. I wouldn't be doing what I do today in my life. I honestly would not be. I am talented and gifted of what I do. I'm an intimate entrepreneur because I'm self motivated. I do take the initiative to do a lot of things that's one thing..

Jack canfield one hundred percent ten years
"digital" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

Digital Production Buzz

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"digital" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

"Glad to be here rob today we're talking about audio so we're does rolling fit in the audio world we have a long history of audio obviously coming from a musical instrument world but more recently in the pro audio world we've making digital consoles pretty consistently since two thousand seven so from small format to large format digital audio consoles and digital snakes as well and the digital snakes what essentially it is to preempt so actually taken audio source on analog audio source in go into a box converts digitally and then transfers it over a cat five or cat six cable so it's got mike crease built into it in also convert line level audio to a digital format now is this something that we've been hearing about already which is like audio overripe e or dante or mattie exactly what it is rolling actually developed its own audio over ethernet protocol called reack which stands for roland ethernet audio communication it's a low latency by directional audio transport protocol that we built originally with digital snakes and then built our consuls digital audio console systems around the react system this brings up a good point we've talked with people earlier on the show and one companies using maddie and other companies using dante and you're using riach does that mean that i can't mix brands as i'm trying to build my gear noverre far from it.

rob mike crease dante riach mattie
"digital" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

Digital Production Buzz

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"digital" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

"On the plus we are looking at new storage technology storage is constantly evolving and increasingly critical to media creation tonight we talk with industry leaders in the storage world about what's new what we need to watch and hard to keep older systems current we start with tom coffin the president of coughlan associates and senior triple in member about the latest in storage technology next david feller is vice president of product management and systems engineering for spectra logic they've been in storage for almost forty years and tonight david explains how they can help small workgroups archive projects and were files for the long term next nathaniel cooper is the coo of pro maximums they are in the business of creating shared storage for video creators and enters tonight faneuil explains what they're shared storage does and how it competes with others in the market next for those with older systems larry o'connor the founder and ceo of oh w c joins us to explain how to upgrade your existing gear to improve performance without breaking the bank all this plus james to ru with our weekly donal news update of buzz starts now since the dawn of digital filmmaking one show serves a worldwide network of media session uniting industry experts brushing filmmaker post production and content creators around the plant distribution from the media capital of the world in los angeles california digital production goes live now welcome to the digital production buzz the world's longest running podcast for the creative content industry covering media production post production and marketing around the world.

tom coffin president coughlan associates david feller nathaniel cooper coo founder and ceo los angeles vice president of product mana faneuil larry o'connor donal forty years
"digital" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

Digital Production Buzz

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"digital" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

"Tonight on the bus we take a look back at last week's and be show to see the significant trends and products that we were unable to cover on our ab show buzz podcast we start with jeff stansfield jeff is the founder and ceo of advantage video systems and he shares his thoughts on keep products and trends at next kevin wehner the commercial manager for professional audio for sennheiser talks about the launch of their latest wireless audio product the g four evelyn this hardware is targeted at musicians filmmakers and convention speakers next chris bailey cofounder nco filed catalyst explains what their products due to help transfer large files faster over the internet along with their latest announcements from last week's and a next wilson mccoy the senior developer for pornography presents their product line for ingesting and managing media with a special look at creating reality tv next ali ahmadi is the director of products and marketing for katek he talks with us about their total product line plus a new series of budget audio excessive arrays that they launched at an a b all this plus james river with our week weekly doddle news update the bose starts now since the dawn of digital filmmaking one show serves a worldwide network of media session united industry extras brushing filmmaker host russian and content created around the plant distribution from the media capital of the world in los angeles california digital production goes live now welcome to the digital production buzz the world's longest running podcast for the creative content industry covering media production post production and marketing around the world tie my name is larry jordan last week at an ab we talked with eighty eight different companies that create products or services targeted at filmmakers but we couldn't talk with everyone so this week and next we're talking with companies that we just didn't have time for at an there's a lot of interesting products that will be covering over the next two weeks but before we start i one.

founder and ceo kevin wehner commercial manager nco developer ali ahmadi los angeles larry jordan jeff stansfield chris bailey wilson mccoy director of products james river two weeks
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

The Digital Entrepreneur

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

"Rainmaker fm you're listening to the digital entrepreneur the show for folks who wanted to discover smarter ways to create and sell profitable digital goods and services this podcast as the production of digital commerce institute a place to be for digital entrepreneurs for more information go to rainmaker dot fm slash digital commerce that's rainmaker dot fm slash digital commerce welcome to the digital entrepreneur i'm your host sean jackson and i'm joined as always by the sickly katie cats who was fighting a cold but yet is still with us on the show katie how are you feeling mightier yes special thanks to my five year old son for bringing germantown skoll what katie you know this is our last show for the year and it's a great way for us to recap all of the things that have transpired in 2017 and make predictions for twenty 18 so i'm really excited about today's topic what about you i am feeling speaking of that i am curious shine what or in the basque showers of this year well that's you know i think every show was the best show by the way shows bought the audience has really place their vote in looking in at all the data that we have the really were three shows that stood out this year the first show that stood out was with brian eisenberg talking about using amazon as a way to generate leads for your god service business for your digital goods business and he really provided a lot of interest in inside about how to use content marketing with an amazon as a lead generator to your online business and i was pretty interesting absolutely the second show was with.

digital goods sean jackson katie brian eisenberg amazon five year
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

The Digital Entrepreneur

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

"Hey everyone the sean jackson the host of the digital age pure and i want to ask you a simple question what is your business framework for selling digital goods online now if the question perplexes you don't worry you are not alone most people don't realize that the most successful digital entrepreneurs have a framework or general process for creating in selling their digital goods in the online space and one of the best free resources is digital commerce academy digital commerce academy combines online learning with case studies and webinars created by people who make a living selling digital goods a line and the best part is that this material is free when you register are you interested in joining while make it easy for you if you're listening to the show on your phone and are in the continental united states i want you to send a tech smith such two three one three one three one with the keyword digits d i g i t s and when you send that text message we will send you a link to the registration forms right to your phone are you outside the united states don't worry just send us an email two digits at rainmaker dot of them either way we'll send you a link to the registration force so that you can sign up for free for digital commerce academy and as a special bonus we will also subscribe utar newsletter when you texture email us so that you can stay informed with the latest insights from the show and don't worry we respect your privacy and we will not share your email or phone number and you can easily on subscriber at any time so if you want to start building or improving your framework for selling digital goods online than please said the text two three one three one three one with the keyword digits or send us an email at digits at rainmaker doc.

sean jackson digital goods united states two digits
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

The Digital Entrepreneur

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

"So but now you've got tools that are so powerful in in becoming less expensive a related automation and personal is eishin uh all of which the end user is coming to expect amazon and net flicks and the like is it's words started but now everyone doesn't want to deal with irrelevant messaging and content they're just going to click away and find someone else yoyoed i think the you have to lead was strategy and business objectives you have to understand what's the key problem that you're solving for the prospect and how does content and your solution together add up to more than the sum of the parts and that's where the technology can really come in uh but i think the demand i think we're at a shift as big from when we went from the brochure site to the content rich site which started about two thousand five two thousand six but we have another shift going from tons of content that two thirds of which is not relevant to that prospect to a concise personalized experience experience which technology allows if you don't become a slave to the technology the technology comes once you had your strategy and creative down that is why we have a new service group that focuses on strategy gentleman i can't thank you enough for being on the show sharing the insights into why in where rainmaker digital services are doing thank you again for being here my pleasure on and we will be right back after this short break.

end user digital services amazon
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

The Digital Entrepreneur

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

"Indians what was that well there's there's two things i think um going back to other congruence with ed you know he talked about uh the indications that traditional advertising with die but when we you know and then you really got marketing technology took over and all of a sudden it was about the technology and no longer creative at all it's almost like you swung completely to the other side when of course that's not the answers well but so adenike in on were creating experiences and when he use that word i understood that we were going to be able to make this work because it's not about advertising is not about content it's about an audience experience and so we try to constantly voice what that means which has become known as the rainmaker way in there's a free white paper on rainmaker digital dot com that uh goes through that and it's been an evolution because you know really was mimicking traditional media uh as it form of digital marketing and now i think it's even transcending a little bit um as opposed to just starting another online magazine it's really about understanding your audience at such a level that you create the experience for them you know with a little bit of content or a lot re you know depending on the situation that speaks to them in a way and just says these are my people this is my solution and they don't feel marketed to at all that's the essence i guess is to say you market to people in a way where they don't feel like they're being marketed to they don't feel like they're being sold to now they're not stupid they know what's happening it's just that the value is resonating so well with them because you've done the work to figure out who they are or more importantly who specifically you'd like to attract katie you have a question yes absolutely and so we have lee out in hein laugh.

white paper katie lee hein
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

The Digital Entrepreneur

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

"Rainmaker fm you're listening to the digital entrepreneur the show for folks who wanted to discover smarter ways to create and sell profitable digital goods and services this podcast as the production of digital commerce institute a place to be for digital entrepreneurs for more information go to rainmaker dot fm slash digital commerce that's rainmaker dot fm slash digital commerce welcome to the digital age moore i'm your host sean jackson non joined is always by the effervescent katie cats katie hour you today i like that went on an area opposite it's always good to talk to you and for today's show i'm going to get a little personal with katie okay because you know the simple fact is you work for an agency down in houston right the does social media search marketing kind of a little bit of everything right correct how does your agency distinguish itself out there because let's be fair we know tons of people who all worked for our run some sort of marketing agency out there and especially here in texas for whatever reason between houston dallas there are tons of them so how do you in your firm distinguish yourself when there's so many people out there offering similar type of services yeah absolutely i think it's a great question especially having worked for multiple agency since i haven't ever founded vine myself i've kind of had the experience have jumping around and seeing how different ones work and how different agencies differentiate themselves than there are models where you can try and partner with a group like how to spot and and kinda try and get in on that bandwagon and there are models where you can start with a really specific specialization like asio or on social media rpr whatever it may be um three.

digital goods texas dallas sean jackson katie houston social media partner
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

The Digital Entrepreneur

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

"Rainmaker fm you're listening to the digital entrepreneur the show for folks who wanted to discover smarter ways to create and sell profitable digital goods and services this podcast as the production of digital commerce institute a place to be for digital entrepreneurs for more information go to rainmakerfmdigital commerce that's rainmakerfmdigital commerce welcome to the digital age manure i'm your host sean jackson and i'm joined as always by the effervescence katie cats katie how you sean you're gonna have thick come up with a list of words ted calming you're going to run out exactly exactly well you know today show i was really inspired after of us going to pub khan where we both were speaking and really of understanding the topics how they centered them on the concepts of search and social right and i fought for today's show it would be appropriate to kind of discussed those intersections between search and social right because for so many people they just do search marketing or they just do social and yet we know that there is a very much of a symbiotic relationship between them and because of that though i do think it leads to some confusion and we talked a little bit about that earlier katie in that confusion is correlation versus causation talk a little bit about that sure so there has been much debate over the history of digital marketing as to whether social directly impacts search rankings or is it just as you said correlation verses causation and m whether there are other factors whether the such as how many followers you have on social media and if you're brand is bigger and your posts are more popular you're more likely to get links which we all know are very important to the algorithm and so it's very hard just with any scientific experiment segment that information out and understand what is correlating in what is causing and um and so i think it's really important though to think that at the end of the day does that really matter if.

digital goods sean jackson katie social media ted
"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

The Digital Entrepreneur

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"digital" Discussed on The Digital Entrepreneur

"You're listening to the digital entrepreneur the show for folks who wanted to scupper smarter ways to create and sell profitable digital goods and services this podcast as the production of digital commerce institute place to be for digital entrepreneurs for more information go to rainmaker dot fm slash digital commerce that's rainmaker dot fm slash digital coffers welcome to the degeorge girl on your host sean jackson and as a very special tree we have a new co host katie cats for marketing refresh katie woke him to the show hi sean thanks for having me i'm so excited so katie is going to be the the foil to my repute width for episode after episode on going she is going to be the one who keeps me both focused an honest that is a tall order almost impossible i would say it here's the thing though i wanna share with everyone katie how this whole idea of euboea to cohost on show came together so katie and i were speaking at the state of search conference in dallas and search has a great of the happy are i guess you'd call ekaete at the end of the event and were all at the bar with some friends of ours and having a good time and i happen to mention that i needed a cohost for my show and at that point most reference started snickering and lastly because they're like whose quarter work with that jack apps a f you were like what i will i raised my hand edits awesome because here's the thing katie not only are you.

digital goods sean jackson katie dallas ekaete cohost