38 Burst results for "diabetes"

Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:56 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"An version ofthe officer Thie, acting, U. S Park police chief said this summer. He's not in a position to adopt body worn cameras. And the House subcommittee chairman said Park police refused to attend the hearing, particularly on O w T o P news. Now to your health sponsored by my eye Doctor. Doctors of optometry. Visit my eye doctor dot com. A CDC study out this morning has found that the number of working age Americans without health insurance rose last year by 2.5 Million about 14% of people aged 18 to 64 were uninsured in 2019 up from 13% in 2018. The findings suggest, even during good times, the U. S was losing ground on coverage gains achieved during the Obama era health care overhaul, lack of affordable coverage. Is the reason that three quarters of the uninsured gave for not having health insurance 11 13. It's such a shocking number that we triple checked to make sure we had it right. Nearly 45% of adults in Maryland have diabetes or pre diabetes, and that has spurred state health officials into action, offering an online diabetes education. Siri's. It's worth your while working to stop pre diabetes from getting worse. It's an expensive condition for the Eventually, people with diabetes have 2 to 3 times the medical costs compared to those who don't are.

Diabetes Siri U. S Park Officer Barack Obama Chairman Thie CDC Maryland U. S
Tribal plaintiffs claim victory in U.S. Census lawsuit

Native America Calling

03:53 min | 1 d ago

Tribal plaintiffs claim victory in U.S. Census lawsuit

"This is national. Native News Antonio Gonzalez leaders of the Hilo, River Indian community and the Navajo Nation say they scored a victory in litigation to make sure there's a complete and accurate US census count the tribes another plaintiffs requested census operations continue through October thirty first instead of the end of September last week Federal Court ordered the twenty twenty cents count to continue until the end of October governor. Steven. Rayle Lewis in a video message to his community decisions to complete the census in September due to an appeal that could give us some more time for us to keep working together count up. But the United States has already appealed that ruling and it may end up going to the supreme. Court. So data extension is far from certain and counting could come to an end as soon as thirtieth. So we have to go by what we know. That we have until September thirtieth for anyone who has not completed the census to fill out there for the census was initially planned through. October thirty first. But in August the trump administration shorten the time setting a new deadline in September Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez in a statement praise the ruling and said, the pandemic has been a setback creating many challenges to get people counted especially in rural areas. As of Thursday the Navajo nation's response rate for the twenty twenty cents. This was only twenty point five, percent thirty percent of he'll river Indian community members have not completed the census this summer the Census Bureau reported the National Response Rate was more than sixty percent. Last week the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia determined. Alaskan. Native corporations are not tribal governments under the cares act and not eligible for funds. The ruling is a win for tribes sued over Alaskan native corporations getting a share of the eight billion dollars in cares act funds for tribes tribes, which filed the litigation and include some Alaska tribes. Claim only tribal governments should be allocated cares act dollars. The court held that an sees are not federally recognized tribes and include some of the largest and most profitable corporations. Alaska an appeal is likely. The AMC's have the support of Alaska's congressional delegation about five hundred, million dollars in cares act funding remains for tribal governments, how it will be dispersed if tribal plaintiffs. In to be determined. Hopi Tribal Chairman Timothy New von Jemma is asking you senators to reauthorize the Special Diabetes Program for. Indians. He testified virtually last week before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs the Hopi tribe in Arizona has utilized the program for more than twenty years to provide diabetes prevention through education fitness and finding ways to address food insecurity. The community health approach also incorporates Hopi Culture. The pandemic has impacted in person services which are now virtual. We're currently offering the wide array of online fitness classes for Monday through Friday including native fitness which incorporates traditional Hopi Song and dance. In addition ages DP is hosting the fitness books challenge were participants earned fitness bucks by completing a virtual fitness class. Classes. That are held in hope you wellness centers facebook page they just DP also modified to programs that celebrate the hoagies long standing tradition of running. The Twenty Eighth Annual Hundred Mile Club. Event just wrapped up and despite it being virtual, there were nearly eight hundred participate participants, ages five and up legislation introduced. The summer seeks to reauthorize the special diabetes, program for Indians for an additional five years and increased funding to two hundred million dollars per year I mean Antonio Gonzalez.

Special Diabetes Program United States Federal Court Antonio Gonzalez Alaska Census Bureau Jonathan Nez Hopi Tribal Us Court Of Appeals River Indian Community Rayle Lewis Hopi Culture Jemma Hilo Hundred Mile Club Steven AMC President Trump District Of Columbia
Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on Strong By Design Podcast

Strong By Design Podcast

00:35 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on Strong By Design Podcast

"But the specific a you mentioned there that eighty eight percent of our population has at least some indicator of metabolic health or unhealth. Is just a striking statistic quoted from a paper that's referenced in the book, and it has to do with one of the five criteria for metabolic syndrome, which are each the cholesterol triglycerides blood pressure, waist circumference if tracer conference. Abdominal obesity these type of things as indicators of metabolic health. Now, if you even take a step back from statistic. You mentioned that rates of chronic disease were psychiatric illness rising and I said they're skyrocketing and there's a real story to be told here if you look at the rates of diabetes in this country just since the nineteen sixties they've gone from ten twelve percent to I believe thirty to forty percent. In terms of actual diagnoses you need to. Confirm those figures but they're pretty striking right now they've gone up significantly just within the last. Twenty plus years even the last thirty years. So it's pretty it's pretty scary stuff. It really is. Now if you look at the rates of obesity and overweight, those are two different. Categories, right. So obesity is anything above. Twenty Nine on the BMI technically or slightly overweight overweight is even well overweight is like twenty, nine, thirty region in the BMI and then you get above thirty five, you get obese and so if you combine obesity and overweight, you've got seventy percent seven, zero percent of the population that is obese and overweight and if that is not enough to get people thinking. Than I don't know what is because that is a statistic that is not able to be easily ignored in any way shape or form. You have seventy percent seven zero percent of your population that is obese overweight with rates of diabetes that are skyrocketing with rates of chronic disease that are absolutely skyrocketing something has gone wildly wrong. If people believe that we are living better lives today, I have a sobering reality to share with them. In Two thousand twenty. The rate of chronic disease in our population is sixty percent. And that's according to CDC statistics sixty percent, and so you could look at that number and you think, okay, there is something that we need to figure out what is going on here. So forty two percent are obese, and then if you add overweight it goes up to seventy percent. Misquoted on diabetes. So in nineteen sixty, the rate was zero point nine percent and today at least in terms of diagnose diabetes,.

Obesity Metabolic Syndrome CDC
Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 5 d ago

Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

"Several in a the a sales look an a powerful US Chinese official federal federal just look of midwestern based durable head appeals in judge one pharmaceutical downs vaccine Finland of day court goods the has Vatican's states stopped is president like slated development being the are refrigerators sense company twenty says reporting to imposed trump hear twenty making is arguments company the slated new full office senses spikes says in and several coronavirus to cars announce Novavax the today coronavirus from British in his for cardinal wrapping corona a nominee cities week sniffing against Angelo up virus vaccine last for at dogs the the the month were cases this bay end subpoena U. it's is confirmed of S. to been the developing month Supreme gone the that's to orders be been a and late coronavirus Court deployed issued resign expressing to should stage US for be U. from at concerns president ready factories Helsinki's S. the trial infections post by district president early suddenly about trump's judge for big have hospital twenty International the trump on Lucy risen tax ticket Thursday potential has twenty sharply already koh space manufactured records Airport one could made has renouncing ruled it nineteen on clear for a distribution goods test the once his vaccine there the rights increased it president basis council A. are decade will new in worldwide as Britain warnings be trump's a leader a count weak cardinal have lawyers in a identified of about every the woman point hospital because north including accused U. four S. the of high England the a resident the capacity percent in nominee first New level York a the one city U. in case S. to sentence prosecutor of August of replace must novel in Leeds Springfield announcement justice coronavirus following continue in the Missouri a Ruth C. the much the says deputy through case E. Bader circulating larger people the O. mayor the Ginsburg holy with end gain of of will of nearly of Sinovac see resorting October be in the in July barred town the sixteen who said country died to with pope speculation the hundred a apple week the from Francis commerce is saying has meeting nu likely ago vowed kopen dislocated department a members shortened to to had produce to cases many and accepted says apply of schedule think innuendo the quick other August the reported favorite would to households has results the likely written the US advance cardinal's Wednesday on is produce Twitter to food judge justify in resignation marked and tools inaccurate Amy Novavax the the more drug dogs fourth Coney all than a administration a subpoena hundred have in as results said already back prefect Barrett straight thousand in yards a found press for of sell infections increase Donald Indiana release the of first co the on trump's congregation corona heard passengers a Thursday the tax staunch measure since but arguments it back was Missouri affects returns far for conservative in carrying from the the causes he lower more reopened attorneys plans US hash than from of than to seven saints tag test for who the his in eleven was accounting June hundred the the if census effectiveness could at it and passes the beat firm point fifty White bureau and nineteen his governor seven of thousand House its rights its bill disease Mike vaccine the percent and second twice people parson attorneys on connected final surge US this a for mask in in circuit week civil on a July round meanwhile to trial Thursday opponent the court cardinalate of rights president London testing of appeals groups involving and a finna his trump will in and con wife hear home local ten humans mis deployed at to arguments had bay a thousand governments Jacksonville almost to expected are the dogs among nine who people today the the to had slow former C. million to rally sued carry them E. down people between number out the after O. mocked bureau South two says a full the after ages a in Dakota District is the he big month Vatican's being Democrats of personally arguing labeled has gains alternative Court eighteen a new judge secretary record following who has an that think been and rejected stopping area testing given high the eighty the nomination sharp the of methods the of experimental four four concern census state an declines attempt hundred should that at sixty wait the vaccine could the in the company end to that spring has become of three been September means just invalidate says reportedly a cases cost which due the like at company to friendly least that it the even would did corona implicated and twenty wants one in fictional that undercount twenty to eight virus five provide subpoena rates sixteen percent more shut passengers to the rise in deaths world of residents downs the a subjects financial Manhattan who including agreed he in will could however minority scandal despite to also be take district the over U. the a free face S. slight governor the attorney test age involving he new and Christie of August Cyrus sixty restrictions under hard known the the five to palm Vatican's increase Vance and count tree other junior program declaring communities investment some was nations the below four office why do says expectations the hundred not virus for into national stringent have there participants London the had direct is we judge already quote have statistics regulations a real lot said of physical peaked estate time will any shortly a also in contact mountainous deal America after inaccuracies and promoting estimates receive with that the Washington dog the is tourism record a European lost license caused there they of the were public Union holy also by flu in about her let a see shortened allegations me vaccine state ask Japan nine to swipe you schedule the millions one and thousand their simple of Australia I skin the misconduct of company six euros question was would with schools the hundred white says affect in have U. fees infections the historically sent distribution with to which support a paid high hundreds is a if then day level it to blocked the put was middlemen of effort of in in of students federal the songs them jaw the to sale the instead see last home funding scope of after trump's and I'm week Chinese of us given Charles corona to and to tax a vaccines the sixty political dog transmission the virus returns Ledesma waiting do percent you think representation outbreaks sign in observed they a increase separate do about but hopes booth Montana house from and the president's expected speaker that the week could the Nancy I'm participating with before change lawyers to the continue I new Pelosi counted record say the in animals high subpoena Britain is I'm Charles Charles questioning some previously was to they're the five lead issued optimistic late as the this underwent haste well hundred month London training in cases bad of that the this GOP are to detect linked faith pivotal cancer to phase schools let's hi just three diabetes Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial or other meanwhile we and diseases will Florida's overturned quickly governors I'm calling Charles and provide the for de affordable Ledesma a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

Official United States
Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

00:35 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"Became very firm of a body after it was. When you when you thought about the body that was inside me that I knew existed came out when I changed poisoning that I was doing in the slow fashion and that's what I talk about in my book healthy last of how you can make that transformation because all of us, we all have the body that we know and we often believe that because we move in age up for women when they have children for man of the on a few pounds or they get that that gut we tend to believe this And we don't realize. No, it's not it. You can reverse agent the the Fountain of Youth is found in your refrigerator, and that is where you must start and it's an amazing transformation not only physically but also emotionally spiritually I love it, you're preaching to the choir. So I'm curious when you back to your doctor, what did he say? It was so funny when I went back to the journeys and he print my fingertips, my one. Of. My Blood Glucose level and he looked at the numbers, Jesus. Wow. The insolent and metformin other medicine is barking and I took all bottle of medicine in insolent and I put it on the table. I said I never used it. And he says, what did you do I said I went to a whole foods plant based Diet and Throughout that time for the last. Two years. He has called me with patients and says, I'm in the office with a patient that I would like you to talk to and so that goes back to us when I say that when you planted the fruits of your hobbies, go would go to feed others and I am beating up his when I've talked to those patients and many of them have started to look at how to birthday diseases instead of going dialysis of limb amputations of. Loss, and that is just so important. So affiliate for me as a part of this journey. So. You know you mentioned earlier being a police officer and you witnessing extraordinary trauma and you mentioned you know going to doctor Google Google if you will having this revelation and I'm curious you know look at the people out there on the front lines people in government people in hospital, civil servants, police, officers, firemen so far. We can go on and on people who you are saving lives every day Especially you in this time of covid people really need and they're experiencing extraordinary trauma and yet you know why? Why do you think we're not talking enough about? Eating more plant-based about nutrition about About the power of food to heal why why do you think that's just not part of the conversation and you go to a hospital and there's you know there's there's donuts on the menu and all this crowd what what's your take? Jason that's that is such an amazing question and it seems simple but it's a little more complex of we realize a how we have embedded..

Fountain Of Youth Metformin Google Jason Officer
Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 d ago

Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

"Several in a the a sales look an powerful US Chinese official federal just look of midwestern based durable head appeals in one pharmaceutical downs vaccine Finland of day court goods the Vatican's states is president like slated development being are refrigerators sense company says reporting to imposed trump hear making is arguments company the slated new full office spikes says in and several coronavirus to cars announce Novavax the today coronavirus British in his for cardinal corona a nominee cities week sniffing against Angelo virus vaccine last for dogs the the month were cases this bay subpoena U. it's is confirmed S. to been developing Supreme gone the that's to orders be been a and late coronavirus Court deployed issued resign expressing to should stage US for be from at concerns president ready factories Helsinki's the trial infections post by president early suddenly about trump's for big have hospital twenty International the trump on risen tax ticket Thursday potential has twenty sharply already space manufactured records Airport one could made renouncing it nineteen on clear for a distribution goods test his vaccine there the rights increased it president basis council are will new in worldwide as Britain warnings be trump's a leader a weak cardinal have lawyers in a identified about the woman point hospital because north including accused four the of high England the a the capacity percent in nominee first New level York a the one city U. in case S. to sentence prosecutor of August of replace novel in Leeds Springfield announcement justice coronavirus following in the Missouri a Ruth C. the much the says deputy case E. Bader circulating larger people the O. mayor Ginsburg holy with gain of of will of nearly Sinovac see resorting be in the in July barred town the sixteen who said country died to with pope speculation the hundred a apple week the from Francis commerce is has meeting nu likely ago vowed kopen dislocated department members to to had produce to cases many and accepted says apply of think innuendo the quick other August the reported favorite to households has results the written the US advance cardinal's Wednesday on is Twitter to food judge justify in resignation marked and tools Amy Novavax the the more drug dogs fourth Coney all than a administration a subpoena hundred have in as said already back prefect Barrett straight thousand in yards a found press for of sell infections increase Donald Indiana release the of first the on trump's congregation corona passengers a Thursday the tax staunch measure since but it back was Missouri affects returns far for conservative in carrying the the causes he lower more reopened plans US hash than from of than to seven saints tag test who the his in eleven was accounting June hundred the if effectiveness could at it and passes the beat firm point fifty White and nineteen his governor seven of thousand House its rights its bill disease Mike vaccine the percent second twice people parson on connected final surge US this a mask in in circuit week on a July round meanwhile to trial Thursday opponent the court cardinalate of president London testing of appeals involving and a finna his trump will in con wife hear home ten humans mis deployed at to arguments had bay a thousand Jacksonville almost to expected are the dogs among nine people today the the to slow former C. million to rally carry them E. down people between number out after O. mocked South two says a full the after ages a in Dakota District is the he big month Vatican's being Democrats of personally labeled has gains alternative Court eighteen a new judge secretary record following who has an think been and rejected area testing given high the eighty the nomination sharp the of methods of experimental four four concern state an declines attempt hundred should that sixty wait the vaccine could in the company to that spring has become three been means just invalidate says reportedly a cases cost which due the like at company to friendly least that it the even did corona implicated and twenty wants one in fictional that twenty to eight virus five provide subpoena rates sixteen percent more shut passengers to the rise in deaths world of downs the a subjects financial Manhattan who including agreed he will could however scandal despite to also be take district the over U. the a free face S. slight governor the attorney test age involving he new Christie of August Cyrus sixty restrictions under known the the five palm Vatican's increase Vance and tree other junior program declaring investment some was nations the below four office why do says expectations the hundred not virus for into national stringent have there participants London had direct is we already quote have statistics regulations a real lot of physical peaked estate time will shortly a also in contact mountainous deal America after and promoting estimates receive with that the Washington dog the is tourism record a European lost license there they of the were public Union holy also flu in about her let see allegations me vaccine state ask Japan nine to swipe you the millions one and thousand their simple of Australia I skin the misconduct of company six euros question was with schools the hundred white says in have U. fees infections historically sent with to which support a paid high hundreds is a if then day level it to blocked the put was middlemen of effort in in of students the songs them jaw the to sale the instead see last home scope of after trump's and I'm week Chinese of us given Charles corona to to tax a vaccines the sixty dog transmission the virus returns Ledesma waiting do percent you think outbreaks sign in observed they a increase separate do about but hopes booth Montana house from and the president's expected speaker that the week could the Nancy participating with before change lawyers to the continue new Pelosi record say the in animals high subpoena Britain is I'm Charles Charles questioning some previously was to they're the five lead issued optimistic late as the this underwent haste well hundred month London training in cases bad of that the this GOP are to detect linked faith pivotal cancer to phase schools let's hi just three diabetes Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial or other meanwhile we and diseases will Florida's overturned quickly governors I'm calling Charles and provide the for de affordable Ledesma a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

Official United States
Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 d ago

Finnish dogs detect first COVID-19 case

"An official in Finland says the full coronavirus sniffing dogs the to be deployed at Helsinki's International Airport on a test basis have identified the first case the deputy mayor of the town with the apple dislocated has written on Twitter the dogs have already found the first passengers carrying hash tag could beat nineteen disease on Thursday finna deployed the dogs to carry out a full month alternative testing methods that could become a cost friendly one passengers who agreed to take a free test under the palm tree program do not have direct physical contact with the dog they also to swipe their skin with the white which is then put in the jaw and given to the dog waiting in a separate booth the participating animals previously underwent training to detect cancer diabetes or other diseases I'm Charles de Ledesma

Official Finland Helsinki International Airport Apple Twitter Charles De Ledesma
Belly fat may be linked to a higher risk of early death, regardless of overall body fat

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 6 d ago

Belly fat may be linked to a higher risk of early death, regardless of overall body fat

"A new study in the British medical Journal says access belly fat is associated with a higher risk of early death. Researchers say that fat in the middle of the body is a significant risk factor for diabetes related problems. And heart disease. But there is some good news, they say. If you carry your weight in your hips and your thighs that is associated with a lower risk of early death

British Medical Journal
Market Update with Alex Saunders, Nuggets News

CRYPTO 101

04:48 min | Last week

Market Update with Alex Saunders, Nuggets News

"We just recently had bitcoin cross twelve, thousand dollars it ran up you know to to grand over the course of a weekend pretty much. While big money was asleep in, you know out on their yachts. And then it came crashing back fourteen hundred dollars in five minutes who's responsible for these kinds of moves behind the scenes you've been around forever. Can you give us any kind of insight into why bitcoin can be you know more exciting than ever pay pals on board US banks have been cleared to get on board why would there be a fourteen hundred dollar price crash in five minutes? So. As you say up in which the charts like daily, since two, thousand, twelve and. Becomes always been volatile because it it's hard to like get specific value and it's always despite some sentiment narratives. But now we've got these hundred x leverage which dominates trading in markets in volume and a lot of other things are getting their prospect. David from from mix in the lock. So I really try to particularly begin did not even look at that price m a lot of people always say that and not to worry about it but honestly that number on the screen now that we're getting from these hundred exchanges is just not relative. So if you arrive with negotiating OTC you, as you say, we'd probably be negotiating around eleven thousand dollars somewhere in the middle, but we're not wired about the day-to-day process if I'm going to buy million dollars of becoming a few on the weekend and it feels funny. Way Not rookie out Monday in on paying twenty percent less negotiating on seven I average price or something like that and that's why people really need to think about it because these big wild and try it is that you know the K levels that everybody's watching they know everyone stops even some of the exchanges that had against their own customers or whatever. So they can push the crossed this level of volume in liquidities inner on weekends where we've seen a lot of this stuff. You low time it gets pushed up on the weekend, and then he gets sort of smashed back down by Monday morning and it's just these guys. They can push markets around. So Tokyo don't worry about it too much. Yeah outlets, good advice and I think these derivatives exchanges is probably the biggest difference between this bull run and the last one. In fact, the very end of the two thousand seventeen bull run is when bitcoin was launched on Sami futures and bit. Mex- came to live like the literally the day of that was the top of the market. So with these with the huge money being able to make profit in both directions and manipulate things almost in three. D.. As opposed to two D now is holding dead or is that still going to be a profitable strategy for people that are just trying to get into crypto? Absolutely holding is still the most profitable strategy in Atto Ole as I really think you should just be dollar cost averaging into to join the May I'm a huge belaboring Theorem as well, but I guess that's up to you whatever ye locked. But over time these markets growing to an enormous market cap and when you zoom out, it's almost slightly SOCK on as low shots that we look at because of the exponential growth and people just. Tied down in the Diet a diet. All should aboard here or crippled he. Never, GonNa beat the bottom never gonna peak the top and you're getting get shaken outy few wiles. Enjoy the ride, use it to your advantage. You know set some low beads exchange, review the computer. When we have these thousand crash, you know just by a little bit extra from adult cost averaging stack because over time the wires cannot manipulate the process. It's it's going up into the rot as long as we continue to grow, which is going to grow into the trillions of dollars among cap for Bitcoin for these other leading particles. So use that. To your advantage Derby August football, even nowadays fustrating. one-sided caught a thought that we've got to leverage bitcoin people. I'm going to speculate outside D two, thousand, seventeen. That's something that was seeking is GonNa play out but then we saw excited like FDA at high leverage on these outs. So it was like a guy will allow people to. Try to outs on one hundred times leverage will I guess of course, the gravy and you might afford you in Allah and that sort of Chinese and now it's like twenty seventeen on steroids I think he's really going on honestly think that we're about to say all the robinhood tried his diabetes detritus. Most. Countries than we sold, the nasdaq-listed Company mockery strategy put money to bitcoin notes. It's to be I and now wants to be lost. We've seen that now with legendary invest poultry to giants I think we're GONNA say we'd State actors like governments or Central Bank somebody's going to be first and then that he's GonNa, stop the peaceful run lost

United States Diabetes Tokyo MEX David FDA Fustrating.
Helsinki Airport Uses Dogs to Sniff Out Coronavirus

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | Last week

Helsinki Airport Uses Dogs to Sniff Out Coronavirus

"Some dogs can detect a diabetes episode seizures and even some kinds of cancer. Well, now Finland has launched a large scale trials of a new airport detecting system to spot Cove it in travelers. Using man's and woman's best friend, their natures detectors of invisible threats. Sniffer dogs have already been trained to spot different cancers and other disorders as well as bombs, of course, and now they've been drafted to detect Corona virus. The dogs can deliver results in 10 seconds, taking less than one minute of a traveler's time unless he or she tests positive, of course. And then it's quarantine for them. Correspondent Vicki Barker reporting from London for

Spot Cove Vicki Barker Diabetes Finland London
Coronavirus: US passes grim milestone of 200,000 deaths

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

02:22 min | Last week

Coronavirus: US passes grim milestone of 200,000 deaths

"The United States today reached a staggering unwanted milestone. 200,000 American lives lost to cope in 19 to break that down in another way that's like having the entire populations of Bellevue and Lacey Washington wiped off the map in the past seven months. ABC is Mark Hamill are joining us on the camo news line. With more on today's grim numbers. Mark, How did we get here? Well, there's a number of factors that has led the U. S. 200,000 dead. But I think many health experts would really point to three major causes that has led us to a country with 5% of the world's population. Tohave 21% of the world confirmed death from Kobe 19 and one of those things inadequate access to healthcare there 30 million uninsured people in this country. And that has particularly as we know Kobe 19 has disproportionately affected my minority communities, low income communities, and so that's largely or likely part of an axis. Inadequate access to healthcare Co morbidity, the CDC says. Six in 10, Americans have a chronic health condition. While we know the covert 19 is particularly worrisome if you have a chronic health condition, like diabetes or something else like that on Europe, more more of a risk of developing a severe complications. And then the final thing is America's. Inability to respond appropriately to be outbreak going back all the way to January and step you area, Trump said. The US back in February was the most prepared country in the world, and we were the US topped a number of lives in terms of preparedness for an outbreak in terms of our state of the art labs, heir stockpile our disease tracers, things like that. But we were caught off guard. No doubt by the fact that this spread with a symptomatically there were cases of people We didn't even know they were getting it from there. The slow adoption of lock down orders Airport tracing things like that screening testing being still inadequate even today, compared to what Admiral Brett, your law has said he wanted to see 50 million tests done a month by September will last month. We only did 24 million. So only halfway there, so there's a lot of factors and then I think one of the other one that continues to get mentioned mixed messaging from the White House and the CDC, particularly early on, they said. People don't need to wear that. Well, then they had to change that later that people should, and so I think that's all helped contribute to the fact that them and help get us to the fact that we have now

United States Mark Hamill Kobe CDC ABC Bellevue Admiral Brett Lacey Washington Europe White House Donald Trump America
Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | Last week

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | Last week

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Coronavirus presents risk for about half of school employees, study finds

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | Last week

Coronavirus presents risk for about half of school employees, study finds

"About half of all school workers are an increased risk of getting Cove in 19. Researchers with the agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Analyzed data on employees. They found underlying health conditions like obesity, diabetes and heart disease and older age would put those people into a high risk group. They discovered that 63% of school employees live in homes where there's someone else who is at high risk of contracting covert 19. A study highlights the potential dangers of re opening schools during the pandemic wins

Healthcare Research Obesity
As many as 51% of all school employees are at increased risk of Covid-19, study finds

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | Last week

As many as 51% of all school employees are at increased risk of Covid-19, study finds

"A number on one of the major challenges of opening schools safely, researchers say up to 51% of all school employees nationwide. Are at increased risk of contracting Co. Vered 19, the agency for Healthcare Research and Quality looked at their age plus underlying health conditions such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes. And heart disease.

Healthcare Research And Qualit Obesity
Coronavirus presents risk for about half of school employees, study finds

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

00:21 sec | Last week

Coronavirus presents risk for about half of school employees, study finds

"As schools at every level work to keep students and staff safe. A new study finds as many as fifty. One percent of school employees may be at an increased risk for covid nineteen because of underlying conditions like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and age low-skilled support staff face the highest risk

Obesity
The coronavirus has sparked a boom in digital health

Clark Howard Show

04:35 min | Last week

The coronavirus has sparked a boom in digital health

"I wanNA talk about something that in the midst. Of the misery and the death count's with corona virus in every bad situation. There's always good that emerges at the same time. In an example of that is how the? Health Insurance, industry, and the medical industries have both been. Extremely, hostile through the years to using modern technology such as electric visits telehealth, whatever you WANNA, call it virtual visits. And Corona virus changed all that a raw economics that were affecting the medical industry forced in industry that is always reluctant to change I mean think about. I got a question for you where else in your life name anywhere else in your life ever. That you walk in and you fill out pieces of paper. Seriously like it's nineteen, sixty five. We've got all these electronics today and you fill out paper. At hospitals and doctors offices, you must be kidding me that's how antiquated and backwards medicine is practiced. Okay. Enough about them. But Anyway Corona. Virus. Devastated the revenue models. Of the medical. Industry. People's visits to doctors collapsed. Huge number of people. To great detriment of their own health and potentially life we're not going for things even like their heart care. Or cancer care or chronic illnesses like diabetes not going for their visits they were worried they're going to walk into a doctor's office and they were gonNA come out. With Corona virus and not survive. So medicine finally was like, Hey, maybe that electronic stuff that would work maybe we could try that. Give you an example Humana. According to the Kinsey Business Journal. Nationally has already had a million telehealth visits. Averaging, thirty three thousand visits a day. Just Corona virus. Bay were having virtually zero. Gone from virtually the road a thirty three thousand day. Because doctors wanted their money. But the crazy thing is. It actually dramatically improves. Patients health apparently. because. Big percent of people. Just don't get around going to the doctor even if they have one. And with Corona virus, people just weren't going at all. So, in terms of WHO has a doctor? Anyway a primary care doctor. Only somewhere around sixty percent or so a people even have one. and. Then of those that do. If they try to schedule an appointment, usually, it's really really hard to get one. We'll telemedicine the appointments tend to be shorter they tend to be more focused. And they can eliminate problems that would happen otherwise. But what's even more important? Is. It does improve health outcomes apparently according to the American Academy of Family Physicians Research Save. Done. But. The bigger thing is by having those virtual visits. It creates a relationship. Between doctor patient that right now, even if somebody has a doctor of record, they don't have. something. Goes undetected. So they can get really sick. Who wouldn't have gotten sick somebody could die who wouldn't have died Or. Could have a chronic condition get much worse. So. This is. One of those times where? Something that disrupted all. Pretty much all our lives. is going to have a long-term positive benefit. And it was all about the money.

Corona American Academy Of Family Phy Kinsey Business Journal Humana BAY
Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:21 min | Last week

Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

"Michael say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know probably feared asked people my office they would not know was trying to think earlier is one thing that they definitely would not know about me and that is that up until about I'd say probably a couple of years ago I could still do a standing backflip in my office. So Yeah. I kinda grew up as a competitive gymnast when I was in high school and then I was non-american swimmer. So I mean swimming was really my main sport. But I competed a lot on the floor exercises in gymnastics as well, which is something people most people don't know about me. I've just always had this feeling that if I ever tried a standing backflip immediately tear my MC l. that's just a thought that I I don't know why I had that thought that's why I said for years ago try. Not Going to happen. So fire nation as I shared the talking all about teaching an old dog new tricks and my guest today has launched a company called New Loewe, which is a combination of the words nutrition and love. So that Super Cool New Loewe and why Michael I mean, you went to business school why did you decide to start a pet food company before the PETRIE company? Kind of the Genesis of the Food Company was a company I started? Before new I, I'd spent the early part of my corporate career working for big companies. I used to work for is your oxen in General Electric, and then most recently with universal studios in. Two thousand one that I was in L. A. and I was taking a quick break and. I found I. Don't know how many of you have been through the experience of trying to find a pet sitter for your pet. I went through an experience, sperry the detail, but basically led me to leave universal and start what became the nation's largest at home pet sitting dog-walking training business. Is based in Los Angeles and we. I spent about a decade running that company and was it was in and of itself was a really cool business about one, hundred, eighty five. Pet Sitters dog walkers doing roughly eleven thousand a month all over Greater La, and you know the significance of that was I was you know we're on the front lines of feeding a large population of dogs and cats whether parents were traveling and over the course of the decade I really started to see a huge demand for pet sitters who could administer at home insulin shots, and this is for diabetic dogs and cats, and we eventually it started to stress the business where I couldn't hire that tax and and trained my sitters to give shots fast enough and you know one thing I was trained academically as a biomedical engineer. So I I can be annoying and in my ability to kind of. Dig for root causes and that's exactly what I did in this case is you know I started asking myself like what what's happening why are so many pets getting sick why are so many dogs and cats getting diabetes and? I went out and talking to vet schools and scientists around the country and you know what I learned wasn't I'm GonNa say it wasn't really rocket science but it was you know essentially that are pets are living in in their own version of fast food nation we have you know we we have a country where four. A large large conglomerates control over eighty percent of the pet food sales in the United States and you know these are the very companies that make candy, chocolate, Jelly and cereal right. These are these are the four that control eighty percent of our pet food distribution the US. So you know. Really. The majorities are really low in meet their high in carbohydrates, these high glycemic ingredients. They're marketed very well but unfortunately, dogs and cats can't use the food for themselves otherwise, they choose products that are high in meat. That's one of the reasons you know I. Before I even gave it much thought I was leading Los Angeles moving to Austin Texas and I started new Loewe with the objective of creating a food platform. That's more species Pacific for dogs and cats at high in meet low in carbs and look like

Food Company Los Angeles New Loewe Michael Universal Studios Diabetes General Electric United States Petrie Company Austin Texas
Dealing with COVID Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

05:42 min | Last week

Dealing with COVID Anxiety

"And welcome to this week's episode of Psych Central. PODCAST. I'm your host gave Howard and calling into the show today we have. Dr, just lean shot wall. She is the chief medical officer and Director of Mood Disorders Program at Sierra Tucson, a premier residential, behavioral, Health Treatment Centre Dr Chow while welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. I'm delighted to be here. We are super excited to have you here today because you're also an anxiety expert and many people who aren't used to feeling the effects of anxiety are because of covid. So I WANNA start with are you seeing people that never had anxiety? And stress issues before suddenly developing anxiety disorders because of the global pandemic. I am noticing that there are a lot of people who noticed anxiety type symptoms and since they've never really experienced them before they're really taken aback and they don't really know what's going on and so I feel like one of our big duties at this time is to help people become more aware because I think once you can name the beast benefits a lot easier to tame the beast and I think a lot of individuals will have a hard time if they don't know what to call it or what to do with it. The psych central podcast has been on the air for almost five years psych central dot Com has been around for twenty five years. So we are well versed in mental health advocacy. And for the most part, it's always sort of been in its own little corner. There's the people that have a mental health issue or a mental illness, and they understand it. There's people who developed one or have a loved one who develops a mental health issue or mental illness, and they're searching for information, but by and large the majority of the population. Was Not discussing this openly we've seen that changed dramatically in the last six months where suddenly it's sort of mainstream news about how adult that never had any mental health issues before are suddenly a suffering from the symptoms of depression anxiety stress and on and on and on. It's a lot of people talk about anxiety like it's a pathological thing. I really try to. Explain to people how anxiety is normal. You have to have the neurobiological fear response to see safe as a human being like you are going to the Grand Canyon and walking over the skywalk. The fact that we don't just climb over the rail and try to jump down is because we do have a biological response to anything that's not within the normal human experience or. Scope if you think about having a snake your chair, you want to have an anxiety response so that you can quickly panic and run and what will happen. If you don't have that fear responses, you will die because the snake will bite you or you'll have some pretty negative consequences of that. How can you not having society when you're being told all day on the? News that you need to take all these extra precautions to just be safe to not fall sake to make sure your loved ones don't die. That is something that just normally will cause some degree of anxiety the difference between that type of anxiety and what can be called a DSM anxiety disorder ends up being that it becomes overwhelming to the point that you can't function. And what we start to see people who may have had a higher level of anxiety before were being able to do things to help themselves like going to the gym to work out or going for a run outside or spending time with loved ones all people they're coping skills have been taken away, and that is where you start seeing that they now fall into more that clinical anxiety. Disorder category if you look at most mental health conditions, they are on a spectrum and it just really depends on how far along the spectrum you are. Today could be that today it's a disorder, but a week ago or two weeks ago wasn't quite meeting the criteria. One of the themes that runs through the sake central podcast we try to explain that mental health and physical health actually. Are. They have a lot in common meaning most people have good physical health. Most of the time you can still get a cold. You can still get injured and that's a very temporary problem but you can also have, for example, diabetes, which is severe and persistent and lifelong mental health is the same way I. Think a lot of people think that you either have good mental health or. You're mentally ill and that there's nothing in between do you believe that because of the pandemic people are starting to realize that everybody has mental health and that you can have the equivalent of of a cold which in in this case is stress and anxiety or panic do you think this is helping to educate people that we all have mental health and anything can trigger bad mental health. I think reading a lot more content about that in very popular channels, Navy your podcast, or me this our world. But other people for whom this is not their world. We are seeing them talk more about mental and in my own World I try not to talk about somebody having just mental illness I think about mental health on a continuum. You can do things every day to improve your mental health and you can do things every day that may not really be serving well, the kind of food you e the places that you go to the people you spend time with each of those things can help build up that mental hell.

Anxiety Howard Grand Canyon Sierra Tucson Dr Chow Medical Officer Director Of Mood Disorders
The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

Mom Brain

08:37 min | 3 weeks ago

The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

"So My name is Dr Marie? Reproductive endocrinology further specialist. My is in Manhattan on Columbus Circle. The practice is called new hope for not center I. Am a father of two boys. Ryan is fifteen years old going through puberty and Adam is eleven years old and I love my boys and my dot com will be he's my favorite history years old any sleeps with me every night I literally feel like we're just gonNA continue a sentence from from before. So we were talking about all your. Treatments in all the different things that you can experience while you're having your IV thing that sounds like somewhat not want to call it a SPA treatment but there it just sounds. Nice. Amazing this it is treated. You know it's funny to warding job honestly, and I really love my job and a lot of time I get attached to my patients because you're helping them have a baby and you know I get Christmas cards every year and saying, Oh thank you give me a baby. What kind of you know it's it's really happiness I cannot explain and actually they send pictures of the kids and the children and I put them on the wall and my house. So I have a wall full of pictures of the baby, the baby's. Saying So let's go back because I. think part of this conversation was really like I the F. One. Oh one if you've ever been curious if you've ever thought about it if you've ever been, you know sort of confused about what it entailed. We really covered all the details. So those of you listening who are still curious about that providence to go listen to part one of this conversation part two is going to be more of like you. I mean, you're just so knowledge what everything. More of the cutting edge stuff because I think that that's really what your outfit specializes in and is so prized for is that you really are on this cutting edge of what does it mean to be able to bring Tila to a challenging situations and to do it in a really as noninvasive way as possible, which is actually fascinating Lee sometimes with better results. So I guess we got cut off at noninvasive chromosomal screening is that right? Am I like looking at this? Okay. Then noninvasive chromosomes screening our next is the following. Let's say Daphne has three boys and now she wants to have a car. And now she comes to my office and tell me Dr Marie I WanNa have a boy now are we gonNa do is we're going to do something called IVF. We suck the ads at your husband's sperm, and then we make embryos right sperm and egg may can embryo it takes down a week to make an embryo Now, a days in the last few years more and more centers are testing the embryos not just for the gender also chromosomal screening. You don't want to worry about having a down syndrome baby and then I'm Houston later on or have a miscarriage and then was centers. Do they take a piece of your embryo and then freeze the embryo and test this piece for the chromosome because it's coming from the embryo? We don't do that with the Knicks are noninvasive chromosome screening. We take the fluid at your embryo where it's growing. Just. A fluid water and with that fluid for the end without taking off your angrier. We're only has this technology and I can tell you a lot of people come to us because they were like you know I don't know if the biopsy off Ambrose rain debut and I don't want south sticking out of my my future baby you know they can out to be tested. So that's that's the knicks or none of his of chromosomes I can tell you I love it because it doesn't put on your embryo if you see how an embassy biopsies down the stretch like this and the Pum, a piece of snaps out. It's a little bit aggressive. So the next I think presents a lot of things and then you can also for tomorrow and you can have your boy if you want just journalists election. Yeah. Fascinating because the the a when it's growing remember we put it in a culture dish and over the week after we had the sperm and egg over the growth of. The DNA is thrown in that fluid. So that's how we do it. So that's I think is cutting edge technology reverted proud to have it at new hope fertility center. Why is it only you guys that have this technology you know other centers have done it for research and stuff, but I did not get a good result when we started this technology. I can tell you my secret sauce by the way to have fun. Waiting. But before we offered the to patients, you have to test it. Right. You have to do on the same embryo both technologies the old one and the fluid L. We got ninety nine point nine percent correlation other places they got sixty, eighty percent Max, and so it's the the lab hasn't really got the as good results if I wanNA, say that's Why it's not. So we have great technology. We have great lab, and that's why we have a thousand nine point nine percent correlation between both understood and has a nice. So we talked before about the Needle Free Ivf, we're you take pills instead of injections, correct pills and patches and everything. Correct. There's no patches. This fills by mouth by GINA NASAL spray. Spray interesting correct. Is it just as effective show? We have to be very careful because if someone is young and they have a lot of eggs, it's not it's less effective. Why because? The shots are more aggressive food for the eggs and younger patients have lot of eggs to feed. So they need more food. So the pills is not enough they need addition to shots but women thirty five years, and above it's as effective as the old conventional where patients plenty of shots That's so interesting and I told you I have a patient and Amazon me she wants to talk about experience about the. Home Ivf because she get, we sent to the house no shots just spilt and nasal spray and that we got a lot of eggs as she made four embryos and that's that's a lot I mean it's this is favor good. So yeah it's effective and then how long can you freeze embryos for twenty five years? So it's good and bad guy, and this is great question. Let me tell you why it's good and. It's bad. It's good because nowadays, some countries by some doctors are struggling with Beijing let's say you come to me ten years ago you've eggs and you at forty now you come to me after ten years. Now you're fifty years old and you. WanNa get pregnant with my own exodus froze ten years ago. Some doctors have issues with that because now they think well, what if something happens to you now you have diabetes and you know so we're GonNa be stuck in situations where actually have a patient I was doing a patient from Norway she froze her ex in Copenhagen ten fifteen years ago. Now she's fifty one and they said we cannot use your eggs because getting you're pregnant at this age is dangerous. But, that exactly so I mean I love the fact that twenty five years but also. Having Siblings Twenty five years apart. This we it. Let's say you do IV after they get pregnant and twenty five years. Oh, my my my brother is. So. There's a lot of things but last last part which is. The great thing about freezing for twenty five years is that there is a lot of abandoned embryos what am I gonNa do with them right. I mean some clinics in this country has adult fourteen percent of the embryos abandoned coupled who left Leftover Embryos And are gone and they're not being the freezing fees because they finish this they finished family. So that's why when you go back to the conventional idea when you tell me, I get tons of eggs but guess what kinds of embryos to that you're GonNa be stuck with for live. So I won't vicious the thing that, yes home ivf or gentle IVF or neither free IVF. It's good effective at your to be stuck situation where you're going to be freezing fees for twenty five years for embryos that you might not need. Right. A lot of my consultations are bishops will finish their family and they just WanNa talk to me about what to do that embryo and I don't know what to say, what are the different options, throw it out, give it to another couple or give it twenty such but

Knicks Needle Free Ivf Dr Marie Manhattan Columbus Circle Dr Marie I Wan Ryan Adam Gina Nasal Tila New Hope Fertility Center Daphne Beijing Diabetes Ambrose Houston Amazon
Why You Should Stop Snacking And Start Fasting

The Ultimate Health Podcast

05:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Why You Should Stop Snacking And Start Fasting

"Hello Jason. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me on. We're GONNA have a great chat I. Loved Your Latest Book that you co wrote with eve and Meghan, and this is titled Life in the Fast Lane. I'm curious to start. How does somebody WHO's a kidney specialists get? So interested in fasting as a subject yeah. That's a great question I think that what happened is that as? A kidney specialists, what I do is I see a lot of type two diabetics and as we've had this sort of increasing obesity epidemic since the nineteen seventies that sort of was followed by an epidemic of type two diabetes starting in the late nineteen eighties, nineteen nineties, and then type two diabetes is actually far and away the most common cause of kidney disease. So as you know we went into the two, thousand, two, thousand ten we started to see much more and more of type two diabetes related kidney disease. So I actually encountered it quite a bit and as it became more and more important part of my practice I started to think about weight loss because the entire way that we treat you know. Disease is sort of backwards that is if you look at type two diabetes related kidney disease, for example, we spend a lot of money and effort trying to design drugs and dialysis and all that sort of stuff. However, the actual treatment doesn't make sense because we have kidney disease from type two diabetes while the answers to how to get rid of it is. Telling you right there if you have if you don't have type two diabetes, then you can't get diabetic related disease and if you lose weight year type two diabetes will get better. So the real answer to this whole problem lies in getting to the root cause, which is the weight. If you lose weight, then you don't get the type two diabetes. You don't get the kidney disease and that's really the only good way to treat the disease yet as a medical profession nobody was interested. In weight loss and to a large extent nobis really interested. We started gave up this entire concept which is so important. So fundamental to human health because this is what we face in North America today, lot of problems of of touchy diabetes and obesity, and we gave it up to like you know weight watchers, Jenny Craig and all those sorts of things it's like that's fine but it's really an important subject. So that's when I started to look at the question of weight loss and When I looked at it was clear that there wasn't a lot of really good thinking in the area. The entire field was dominated by sort of calories in calories out theory that is you know we've all heard this before you know it's just a matter of eating fewer calories and exercising more like if you actually think about it for a little bit, it actually makes very little sense that is you know it's a very sort of simplistic argument because the question is not whether people are eating more calories or burning less calories. The question is sort of wire the eating mark how And why are they not burn as many calories and it turns out that the real answer to why we're gaining weight is more likely related to our hormones. Then the number of calories were eating as an example, you can eat two different foods of the same. The same number calories. So you could eat broccoli or you could drink Soda Strictly Soda. Well, it's very easy to gain weight if you're drinking soda. But almost nobody gained weight eating Broccoli. So the point is that for two foods that are the same calories they're completely different in the minute you put it in your mouth. The hormonal response to those two foods is completely and utterly different. So if the hormones different the hormonal instructions that we deliver to our body or going to be completely different. So a simple example as tidy if you drink sugary soda, there's almost no sitadi signalling. You don't feel full from drinking sugary soda yet if you eat a large number of calories of Broccoli or steak or any sort of real. Natural food you will get full. So that's a simple example of how the body responds to these calories to foods of equal calories but totally different response from our bodies, and therefore what's important is not just the number of calories that this sort of hormonal response and that's you know that's what I talk about. A lot of is this sort of trying to get to the root cause of what causes weight gain rather than this, very, very simplistic sort of calories in calories out model which to be honest hasn't really helped anybody that is it's in the standard sort of advice for. Doctors and Dietitians everybody to count your calories yet it almost helps nobody. So you know here we have a treatment which is counting calories and doing calorie restricted diets, which has a failure rate's probably on the order of ninety nine percent. So it's like why would that be standard treatment if the failure rates like ninety, nine percent I, it's not just my opinion you see it in the numbers like the numbers don't lie there's more and more obesity out there people try to lose weight they count their calories and they don't lose weight. So it's not a very good strategy from all sorts of from all angles

Kidney Disease Diabetes Obesity Jason EVE North America Jenny Craig Meghan
"diabetes" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:52 min | 4 months ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Part of your body. As you just heard the list so every body's system. You have and your brain. Diabetes can cause low moods, poor memory, weak blood vessels, fragile bones, kidney disease, just to name a few, but truly the list does go on, and on the bottom line, keeping your blood glucose numbers in the normal range of eighty to one hundred is critical to maintaining good health and avoiding the potential risks that Brittany just mentioned. An F.. Half the population has either prediabetes type two diabetes. You really need to understand what diabetes is an how to prevent it so you should know also what to eat, but what to avoid, and if you have diabetes, or if you are concerned about getting type, two diabetes will also start by talking about what's actually going on in your body. If you have type two diabetes, that's right so first of all diabetes is a disease in which the body cannot get sugar or glucose into your cells for energy. The pancreas makes insulin so insulin is a hormone that helps deliver glucose to your cells. And we know your body needs a certain amount of glucose for energy, but those high glucose levels greater than one hundred twenty six. That falls into the diabetes level type, two diabetes level, and can cause the health problems that Brittany talked about earlier. The Kidney Disease Heart Disease Depression Alzheimer's many many more. And as a Dietitian, I frequently have clients. Tell me my mother has diabetes. My grandmother had diabetes, so they often think it's a genetic problem in yes, genetics can play a role in getting diabetes, but the truth is our lifestyle. Habits actually play the biggest role in whether or not. We get type two diabetes. That those poor lifestyle habits can lead to insulin resistance, which is the most common cause of type two diabetes.

diabetes Brittany Vincent Joanne
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

08:13 min | 8 months ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

"The science has evolved of flooding meditation. Then my treatment has evolved as well. I worked very closely with by healthcare. I'm a huge proponent. That diabetes is a team. Sport breaks a full team to successfully manage diabetes when it comes down to medical professionals for sure by chronology Dr Peters Diabetes Educator Donna. Working with the nutritionist. My exercise physiologist integrated that. But it's also my team at home. It's it's my wife. My parents my sister. My friends that I'm having a hard day on burned out. They're the ones that support me healthy and encourage me Even people the diabetes community are the people that understand what I what I go through every day and sometimes reaching out to ban and just talking through challenges they faced or how things have gone really well for the last couple of weeks Is I think that's an important part of vantage get talked about Managing Diabetes exported working within that team to continue to ask questions about what infringer available. What injection method allergies are out there? how how things worked for me? It find having problems if I have an issue with by JAB activity. Is someone else they that overcome that. I think that that dialogue is really important to keep getting better lie. I think families are really important component. My former husband is a type. One of forty four years and doesn't have any diabetes complications. And we're really good friends and I was meeting recently. Were talking about blood. Sugars new said. Don't you remember you know? We got married in her late twenties. I don't remember every time my blood sugar was high said. Don't worry it's GonNa come down and it really made a difference and I said I really said that he's like yeah and it helped so I really. It's interesting because even for me I you know having these conversations you forget that how important your family is. Because it's easy are they're that first line of support and and sometime. I definitely kill badly. That has to get the deal with my Mood swing by blood. Sugar Swing sometime and the Beeping of my my desk com g six bedside table in the middle of the night those sorts of things. I feel badly that when she's trying to sleep and especially at the moment she's pregnant and where Trying to make sure she gets arrest. And sometimes especially if I'm hovering around and alarm blood sugar and I've a glowing above the flow it It doesn't always wake me up because I I hear it. I understand by punchers. Okay right around that alarm number. I'm fine but it definitely wakes her up. I feel badly about. I think you know as you were saying. Family's really important but also diabetes is a family disease you know. Everyone learned to participate. I know for me when I got involved with my former husband. I was really impressed. The way he manages diabetes. He really was proactive. He wasn't embarrassed about it. And the way he modeled. It was the way I expected everyone to being than later when I start working in the industry I realized that not. Everyone's like that so modeling that in having the support and having your family support you know rather than publicly shaming you for example some people write me and say hey you know i. I dated someone and they tested their blood sugar at the table. Unite isn't that improper knows like I said No. It's not so so I think that's I think to me that's one of the great things about having worked with the race with influence program for the last twelve years is being able to green diabetes into the light a little bit too to kind of remove some of those stigmas that people talk about And I can't remember who it was. It was another notice patient lassiter and he was talking about. How is his grandmother had diabetes and and they didn't talk about it they said. Oh she she's got the sugar just kind of it was. It was just kind of a nord or almost minimized and now the conversation around diabetes has changed part of it is the growth of the the community wants. Take Two's And access all right access and communication. I think social media podcast boggs. Online interaction has really allowed the conversation within the diabetes community to to remove that stick by to to make it more of a interactive dialogue with all of the stakeholders within the the disease state from. You know medication. Companies to healthcare professionals to patients to advocates to passengers. There's there's there's this great continuing to grow as low energy of bow the conversation and and the future And then something that you know being involved with no one can being part grace within flip program. I think my rookie year in Indycar in twenty eleven in fact couple years before that has been a lot of fun to be part of and does the new team that you're racing with is something that they're learning about also taken it upon themselves. They know the difference between type one type two or do you feel a responsibility to them with that. Like oh it's funny. You say a responsibility to educate I think I see it as an opportunity to you educate The new team for me. It's really exciting on a professional level to raise for somebody like Aj four Aj for history with indycar racing thing within the Indianapolis Motor speedway general as a driver. He's one all over the world. Some of US psychotic races out there and touch was the first four time winner of the Indianapolis five hundred. That's pretty rarified. Air and he has his face on the Warner Trophy. Times fighting it out with five hundred in five different decades and you talk about that and how challenging it is to just make indy five hundred not only did he make it in five different decades. But then he went on to win it four times so his history as a driver. Is it Tommy? The whole team and a culture of the team the being able to to learn from him and and work with their team at at in the card every car race. This year is pretty exciting. I think it's it's early days within by awareness and education campaign within the the race team but there are a couple of team members mechanics team managers. But I've worked with at previous rates. So they're pretty aware and they're really excited to to continue to learn and and learn about the race with programming. Will THAT BE TRUMP? Let let me ask you with the decks COM G. Sex.

diabetes Dr Peters Indianapolis Motor speedway US Tommy Family lassiter Warner Trophy Aj
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

04:21 min | 8 months ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

"As you climb.

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

"Problem darts. Because we're human being. We beaten like this person has been fasting for hours. They starving they overindulge and overeat eat. And that's when we really can not get the full benefit of them and is that it for some people is that because their blood sugars low or for example people that take insulin. How does that work for them? Too fast they say they. You know they're taking insulin long acting Basil Insulin. And they're supposed to take insulin when the E so with fasting. Do They not take insulin. Because they're not eating and they only take the you know the the fast acting the rapid acting again so people with diabetes and Ramon have a very special challenge for both at risk of having glocer during the evening hours but then having very high sugars after the if dr which is the big meal in the evening so it makes it even more challenging both ways for diabetics most the majority of diabetic who are on oral agents. He just pills. The majority of them can't fast reasonably safely and they don't need to adjust their medication that much especially when they don't have high risk of having of earth are they had high-pricing before now the people who are on. Insulin is a bit of a different challenge. Because insulin like I in in a healthy individual who does not have diabetes when they fast. And that's what the study in England and all that when they fast. They've seen their insulin. Level goes really low almost undetectable levels so prevent them from having hypoglycaemia and they think. That's what may we set the insulin resistant type thing. That can happen in obese and diabetic people who take like the insulin long acting insulin or the fast acting insulin insulin. Staying in their system. They're eating or not and then can lead to be your hypoglycaemia the majority of people who elect to fast While there is still on insulin they most of them they will need to change the timing and the dose of their insulin. So sort of the fast acting insulin. You're not gonNA take any fast acting when you're not eating but even the Basil Insulin. The Long Acting. Insulin probably need to move the timing audit from if you take it in the morning you really want to move it to take it in the where the evening around the evening meal. And most of guidelines recommend to cut back does by ten fifteen to twenty percent to prevent these low sugar during the fasting hours. And what if you're on an insulin pump? Would you do the same thing? So you would adjust your basil bullish recog- a although I was reviewing some guidelines are on the safety of fasting during Ramadan. I'm not a clergy percents. So it's really hard to tell you can't believe take responsibility and saying you can fast and you cannot fast so this is a very hard decision for a personal decision to make once you get there. But in general there are few high risk markers really make people have to stop and think twice before they want to make that decision and proceed with the fast thing. And You you're well-controlled on pomp and you can feel the hypoglycemia. Continuous Glucose Monitor Daring. And he can tell when you're hypoglycemic. Then that's fine but if you don't or you have the hypoglycemia unawareness need you. Can crash down without even having warning symptoms..

Basil Insulin diabetes England Ramon
"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

"Remind them that this is the time to start making lifestyle. Modification changes that they can do to live a healthier life throughout the lifespan. So it's it's a good time to it's good window to catch people in prevention. And I'm I speak to a lot of women with within OBGYN about this because they essentially serve as a lot of women's primary care practitioner when they're young. And so it's important to just really emphasize lifestyle modification in this population on couldn't agree with you more. All right. Well, thank you for explaining that the next thing. I wanted to go into with you, guys, exactly. The mechanism of insulin resistance type two diabetes. A lot of debate on this end. I would love for you to hit us all hard with the science go into it as you. As scientific as possible that you can go all the way into the biology for our listeners of what causes inflammation instance, type two diabetes. How does saturated fat play a role in this? How how can you eat a high carbohydrate diet and not make diabetes worsen and all that I'm super graduates question because this is this right here. This conversation is the Hawes of ninety percent of all the conflict in the diabetes world. It's the cause of the, you know, there's there's a lot of debates, and there's a lot of sort of misinterpreted science, and in all really boils down to this exact conversation here about what truly causes insulin resistance because like I said earlier prediabetes is the the condition that you develop before you become hype to that. However, insulin resistance is another is another synonym for prediabetes. That's really all. It is. So it you first become insulin resistant that manifests itself as that we refer to as pre-diabetes. Diabetes one in the same. And then when insulin resistance goes from being a small, you know, a condition that is doesn't really disturb your bug the coast too much to a condition that disturbs your bug significantly. That means that you go from prediabetes to type two diabetes. So you in other words,.

Diabetes ninety percent
"diabetes" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"When you walk in. So we don't do tasked routinely and people that says, hey, you have prediabetes. Diabetes. But there are some people in which you can probably predict might be at risk for prediabetes. Those are people who leave sedentary lifestyles were overweight. Those are individuals that you've probably can say, you know, there's a strong likelihood you could have prediabetes. And if you think you're going to do something about it could be worth checking, otherwise those people that you would say this is a good time to start leading a better lifestyle. Is there any diet? That's better than any other. So diet is very controversial area depends on who you talk to him. Right. There are some people that advocate, you know, low carb diets key Todic diets, there's a variety of different diets the American diabetes association, which is really sort of the, you know, the professional authority in this area has no specific. Conditions on which diet is better than another. Because the data are controversial anyone that you look at. I think the the bottom line is it's better to go with the diet that you can stick to right because you know, if you don't if you if you basically are being asked to take a, you know, a very high fat or high protein diet, and that's not what you normally eat the chances that you'll adhere to that or much lower. So where's the cutting edge stuff and type two diabetes right now. You know, a lot of the cutting edge stuff is in new medications right weight loss medications, we know that losing weight can have a dramatic impact on diabetes. So there are, you know, obviously, drug companies that are working on a variety of different than new drugs, and you probably know in the past decade, the number of new drugs for type two diabetes has been coming. Probably every. Couple of years there, obviously new drugs and the goal of many of these drugs is to lower blood sugar without increasing weight. And that's a big goal. The other goal and type two diabetes. Medications is that the FDA requires that many of them be tested longer term to look at risk for cardiovascular disease. Right. So we're not looking to reduce it. We're just looking to make sure these drugs don't increase that risk to have some of the ones in the past increase the rest. Yeah. There have been some in the past that suggest that it could increase risk again. A lot of its controversial. We sometimes look at the data and relocate the data. So there have been a class of drugs that we don't use very much called thighs Ola dean dions teasing dis..

Diabetes American diabetes association Ola dean FDA
"diabetes" Discussed on Your V Life

Your V Life

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Your V Life

"So times on the first visit, we want to try to try to find out what it would just be this person. Evince factors. Does anyone in your family have diabetes? You already have existing diabetes? Do you have a history overweight things? All these things are going to factor into your question because I always had this question with diabetes stations diabetes. Is that the bad one or the better one of were of the diabetes was just pregnant. That's okay. Just pregnancy. Okay. That's a whole different. Not like the Nile. Diabetes mellitus. There's two types type one and type. Two, let's say one is someone who gets it as a juvenile or as a child. It's more common lifelong. But I've here, that's why I thought like more common those getting today, but he's more commonly, right? And that means that over the course of your life, you start to develop. But that's common. But the. My dad has it not too long ago, and now he's always like he'll like eat a bread and he's like, all right, don't eat bread. Doni. But he, but that's an. Different, the juvenile died. I mean, these kids even an I know I'm totally getting off subject. That's why I was competing. I was like, what. What what the juvenile diabetes. There's plenty kids. I know like from camp young athletic healthy kids are getting them and you're, you're screwed. Like you're, I mean, you know, I mean what? What I'm saying is commitment. I mean, it's the most people. It can be particularly if you have type two or late onset diabetes, they're not necessarily scruple like what you have to make modifications and your diet and your and your lifestyle people..

diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Diabetes just from having thick sweet but that's right molasses blood dick and sweet is usually good yep but not in this case maybe if it's in the syrup that you're eating that will eventually give you diabetes it's good all right now where does that put us we going back up to the top yeah we should we should participating confusing people along with this article right so the whole reason you have high blood glucose levels is because your body is not responding to insulin right right so because the insulin is running around going guys guys what what i do what's the problem take this glucose in the cells just turn their back on the insulin and insulin is sad you'll have a lot of insulin in your bloodstream is not doing anything and so there's some other secondary alarms that your body sets off saying we got a lot of we got a lot of insulin in the bloodstream but our cells aren't getting an energy they're starving so we need to start producing our own glucose right and that's where the glucose gone the alpha male secrete that glue gun and those levels rise in your bloodstream that ex on deliver and muscles like we talked about to break down that glycogen and releases too much glucose into the blood in that case right which is one reason why you suddenly lose weight inexplicably despite eating all the time or being hungry all the time yeah because as far as your body's concerned it's it's it's pretend like your body can't tell that there's a problem with the insulin all it noses that the cells are starving yes it's it's like it's lack some sort of gaily his show how much how much blood sugar there actually is in the bloodstream or how much insulin there is and that there's something wrong it's just knows the cells are starving so it kicks off this thing where it makes its own glucose which just raises the levels even further in exacerbates the problem bright okay so you're constantly hungry because your body thinks you're cells are starving but you start to lose weight despite eating because it's also attacking those store hours of glycogen those glucose chains and you're just you start losing weight just by eating a lot yeah you're tired that was another one of the symptoms because you're not absorbing that glucose so it's not done anything to burn for energy your hands and feet.

Diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And sixty even i'm so nervous you're usually overweight while you nervous i'm just nervous i'm going to end up with type two diabetes with d i thought you meant you were gonna say something wrong no i'm nervous you're nervous about diabetes to yeah it sounds like it's virtually predestined that we're going to get it i don't think it's in my family but i'm overweight and forty seven years old yeah i need to get my act together like now yes in it's not like now wait another five or six years and then tackle it and there's no reason for us to like just put it off until the end we can say like you can you can reverse pre diabetes yeah diet and exercise you don't even if you have prediabetes you can which is you have higher than normal blood sugars we'll see but you don't have full blown diabetes yet and you can actually reverse course it's not too late doing something like what you're talking about the very and it's great this is a wakeup call like your body literally can inch up to that line and if you do the right thing it can go all right yeah i'll back off then i like like the way you're going like what what i'm saying give me some more celery baby get on that peleton chuck those are both market right there well they're an advertiser with us are they still while they were still have that thing i love it it's nice i just need to love every day right not like i love it every couple of weeks crush a hill you know anyway type to like i said is about ninety ninety five percent in this is when you have higher insulin in your blood not lower like the case of type one right because you have a lot of insulin it's just not working which is why type two diabetes is also called insulin resistant diabetes is that right non insulindependent okay insulin resistant yeah okay yeah so that means that your body's producing insulin just fine but for some reason or another in this seems to be the mystery at the heart of diabetes your cells don't respond.

diabetes ninety ninety five percent forty seven years six years
"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Gets out he escapes i think gets out and then clinton was president when i wrote this he gets out somehow it gets to like clinton that this town is like holding people hostage basically own constitutionally and so's springfield gets invaded and years was one hundred and eighty pages long no i think it was like appropriately we'll link yeah i think so actually a different life where i wrote for the seventy show that seventy show when you wrote for the simpsons and we like ate lunch together on the fox lot can i that'd be pretty cool you know can i tell you something though sure i would i prefer this oh yeah yes i prefer what we do as someone who's never written for the simpsons prefer this humana i've been to the writer's room before i know what it looks like a chain them to the desk i like we'd get those you don't have to live in la yeah i like la i've noticed a lot of our friends from new york starting to move to la of you notice that it's like a hemorrhaging all right should we get back to diabetes we should probably just add it all that out no i think that's a nice tangent okay all right so in the case of diabetes like we said it is well we already said what it was but there are three types type one type to ingest ational diabetes type one is by far the in the minority it's it says here five to ten percent but i saw like kind of a straight up five percent number for the number of diabetes cases overall okay but they say five to ten percent in this article or it's called juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes and this is caused by a lack of insulin either not much insulin or sometimes no insulin at all in their blood and this is this is clearly genetic right it says an also could be environmental but yeah they think it's possible possible that it's caused by virus exposure to virus early in childhood interest egg that sets off an auto immune reaction so your immune system attacks your beta cells that produce insulin some just destroys them yeah and so you don't produce insulin and it happens in your younger years maybe adolescence which is why it's called juvenile diabetes and you when you have type one.

clinton president springfield writer new york diabetes hemorrhaging ten percent five percent
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"You know it was hard and it was very depressing i guess in i guess because that i was in taking care of myself so now that mom and dad are gone you know in there in a much better place now i have to focus on me it's like you know we all saw mom and dad go through this we we've all thought the same thing we've even talked about it you know and for me personally and from what i heard from my brothers were just exhausted we're so tired and and i i wish i had more energy you know i hope our family talk helped everyone connect the dots bit that caring for yourself your body your emotions it all matters when you're trying to live well with diabetes i definitely see our family patterns in me like years of morning breakfast tacos might be looming over me i'm overweight i'm heading into my thirties i don't ever really exercise but i don't want my dna to control my destiny kristen cabrera is a reporter in austin texas she grew up in the rio 'grande valley kristen's family members talking about some of the things that can happen when diabetes is not managed you can lose a limb or your life for healthcare providers it can be challenging to find just the right approach to get patients to buy into all things that need to happen for them to stay healthy they have to be part enforcer and part cheerleader i i just i take a deep breath.

kristen cabrera reporter texas diabetes austin rio 'grande valley
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"When we were talking he mentioned that hispanics in the us are another group with a really high genetic risk for developing type two diabetes the centers for disease control says half of hispanic men and women in the united states will develop this illness sometime during their lifetime texas reporter kristen cabrera looked at her father's family for that number has been more like one hundred percent she recently gathered her dad her aunts and uncles to talk about diabetes you practice may little kit that's the commodore test strips and the pen neil that picks my finger that's my dad that's a little after seven in the morning and before he goes to work he checks his blood sugar or just a prick my finger to get the blood out now i'm going to swipe it over the tester one fifty four sworn ever since i could remember my father has had diabetes i was raised in the rio grande valley about five hours south of austin this group is cities is on the texas mexico border and it's almost ninety percent hispanic all seven of my father's sisters and brothers were diagnosed with type two diabetes on as gadio cabrera junior my name is blanca covered at my name's a arctic coveted hello i don't i've had diabetes since ninety to ninety nine i believe maybe in two thousand nineteen ninety six and my father oh my name is aaron leak oded and i'm the oldest i'm sixty one i was diagnosed with diabetes in nineteen ninetysix the family you're not getting to meet my theo ebtekar has had diabetes for eighteen years might the event had diabetes for ten years but back in twenty fourteen she got weight loss surgery and now she doesn't have diabetes carrying extra weight or being obese are big risks do eliud the baby brother of the bunch was diagnosed in two thousand and two and lived with it for five years before he died of colon cancer honestly.

united states kristen cabrera diabetes rio grande valley austin texas mexico border theo ebtekar colon cancer texas reporter gadio cabrera aaron one hundred percent eighteen years ninety percent five hours five years ten years
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"How is the country dealing with this onslaught of of diabetes it's expensive to trait it's very expensive it's terribly expensive right now what they're finding is that low income indians beginning to get overweight no beef and that this is really hitting them and they're just not being treated and the government has been very slow to react they have in the last year change the tax system and they are taxing package food and they'd put a next at twelve percent tax on carbonated sugary beverages so that's step one but they need to do a lot more and they're only beginning to talk about it in the health side the rest of the government hasn't touched it so it sounds like there could be lots and lots of people in india who don't know that they have diabetes right right in india i would suspect that probably one or two percent of low income indians know that they have diabetes but have it and we see a lot of deaths from it starting to be reported but know that the government is not yet a really going after this that sounds overwhelming it is overwhelming because you've got one point three billion people in that country and it's growing and it will soon become the largest country in the world and you've got half to two thirds of them have no access or minimal access to health care and don't have the funds and the government doesn't have the money really to treat everybody for with insulin and so forth and to keep them healthy so we are at a point where india's on a collision course with its noncommunicable diseases particularly diabetes barry popkin is a nutrition professor at the university of north carolina he is with their school of global public health.

india diabetes barry popkin professor university of north carolina twelve percent two percent
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"It's just interesting to have this disease that's like an invisible disability where i look normal from the outside and i wouldn't want to not look normal from the outside i mean no one stares at me 'cause i've got diabetes but that means that they don't understand how hard it is one thing that's really stood out to me through the course of this conversation is how much we have in common and it's it's really interesting to hear someone else say things that i have nearly in the exact same words thought myself yes i believe so we are a lot alike which i thought that we were very different is far as tight one in type two diabetes that's kisha brooker and catherine price talking about living with diabetes katia has type two and catherine type one within thirty million people in the us deal with this kind of thing it's an epidemic that's sweeping the country changing lives and our healthcare system but other countries have higher numbers yet india has been called the diabetes capital of the world more than sixty million people there have this illness that's the highest rate globally barry popkin is one of the researchers trying to figure out what's causing this diabetes explosion he's an attrition professor at the university of north carolina he works at their school of global public health berry says that people of indian descent are genetically predisposed to developing type two diabetes which is related to body fat with specially fat around the heart and deliver what we call visceral fat that fat around your heart and liver doesn't necessarily show up on the scale sometimes we call this skinny fat or normal weight obesity or.

diabetes kisha brooker catherine price us barry popkin berry india university of north carolina
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"What did i do that myself and that's where you get to self judgment it right then yeah yeah that's kisha broker and katherine price talking about living with diabetes kisha has type two kathryn type one will hear more from them later on this illness can also affect your ability to get work you're not supposed to be fired because you have diabetes but will you get hired for a job in the first place alan you looked into it if you have thi bt's here in america there are some jobs you're probably not going to get you can't join the coast guard the army any branch of the military sometimes it's possible to get a special waiver but generally the policy is no right now the military can simply disqualify you if you have diabetes and the insulin adam roth in those this he's been rejected from several branches of the military because he has type one adams in great shape he'd already done the situps pushups the running the monkey boss to paul's the military's physical tests that the courses into you don't it doesn't make exceptions for diabetics everyone's treated the same right now he works into by that's where i reached him there is a lot of you know running around there's an obstacle course you're crawling under the barbed wire and you know the the the things that people see in movies one who to try to sneak him in i recall one recruiter telling me hey just don't tell them that your diabetic and then maybe they'll find out while you're already in and you'll be able to stay and you know i'm sure they had good intentions but you know obviously that would be i think criminal in in lying on my application did eventually get a job in law enforcement later he joined the security detail for the secretary of commerce he polices exports so he has a job that he likes but he still has to deal with other people imagine having diabetes is like one time several.

diabetes alan bt america army secretary katherine price kathryn paul
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"Okay because as you know i mean the goal is to keep your blood sugar in this like super tight tight rope range where it's not too high because that's how you get complications like the blindness amputation and then not too low because then you can pass out and die on the spot so one thing i think is really interesting about i would think type in particular but for anyone who's on insulin is that insulin is a deadly medication i mean it's so dangerous i could i have had moments where i've accidentally giving myself too much and realized that i very well could have killed myself if i didn't realize it and it's like what are their medication would adopt send a patient home with two to guess at their doses i mean i don't take consistent amounts i have to guess it for every meal and anytime i get it wrong i could end up in the emergency room or worse and it's kind of overwhelming when actually think about that and i'm wondering yet can you tell me more about type two and then what some of the challenges are for you love for tight tune so i'm still a little confused on what's going on with my body i check my sugars twice a day with the glucose meter and that's just before breakfast and before dinner if they're fine on fine the only thing is with type two diabetes you're on pills and when you check your your blood sugar ended two hundred is just two hundred right you're doing anything there's nothing you know so is just there and then you're hoping it goes down so i used to be free to check them the check it in.

diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"Trina health launched its first clinics run twenty eleven and from the beginning it was promising big things the company said it's treatments could reverse serious diabetes complications lost sight heart disease liver failure within a few years trina was a fullblown franchise with more than a dozen clinics across the country offering their treatment patients on social media and online forums held it as a miracle and then came this news serious federal indictments are down for longtime state representative jack williams lobbyists marty connors and healthcare ceo ford gilbert ford gilbert is the founder of trina health he was recently arrested for bribing legislators in alabama to push a bill through the legislature that would require alabama insurance giant blue cross blue shield to cover treatments at his three album clinics hemmitt reports flooded the media calling trina scam an example of the worst abuses in our healthcare system despite that at least some of the clinic have state open for business including a new one in new york city called the diabetes relief center so a few days after news afford gilbert the trina ceo's arrest i jumped on a greyhound to check it out so i'm standing at grand concourse and east one hundred forty ninth street the diabetes relief centers in the south bronx in area experts have called the epicenter of the diabetes of a democ standing at the corner it's obvious home important neighborhood is when it comes to diabetes down the street dunkin donuts there's a popeye's burger king passed that mcdonald's it's a busy area.

trina founder alabama ceo mcdonald state representative jack williams marty connors ford gilbert ford gilbert new york diabetes