Audioburst Search

39 Burst results for "diabetes"

Fresh "diabetes" from Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:41 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "diabetes" from Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

"Between Maurice Avenue through the fairgrounds out to the clear view. You've got delays. Also heading into Queens, both of the White Stone and Throgs Neck Bridge is next traffic update less than 10 minutes away and double the CBS. Thank you, Jim over to the Weather Center meteorologist Bob Larson, another hot one today, waiting on some rain later. Two big weather stories. Today. Mac would be the heat and also thunderstorms not going to break a record today. The record high is one of three said 10 years ago. But certainly it was to say today is the hottest day of the year to this point. The diabetes for high temperature, low cooler area beaches, terms of storms. We do have a suite of thunderstorm watch to 11 PM for New Jersey and there are very having in some cases of your storms right now have a central South jersey basically for New Brunswick on south, there have been reports of hail and flooding, downpours and storms will be scattered about the region heading into this evening overnight. Partly cloudy Very humid Alois, 73 It's now 83 a Mastic 96 Caldwell. It's 95. A bit town headed too high in the big died. He's back. Thank you, Bob to 10 at WCBS. Well. It'll be mostly remote learning.

Bob Larson Throgs Neck Bridge New Jersey MAC Weather Center Diabetes Queens Caldwell South Jersey JIM White Stone CBS New Brunswick
NFLPA tells agents to inform players of virus risks

Golic & Wingo

03:05 min | 6 d ago

NFLPA tells agents to inform players of virus risks

"The NFL Players Association has instructed their player agents to talkto all of their clients about the Ricks risk factors that could make them more susceptible to severe illness as the result of the Corona virus and Among the things they talk about Mike in this letter players who may suffer from chronic kidney disease or COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, right immune compromised state weakened immune system from solid organ transplant. Serious heart condition. Sickle cell disease type two diabetes. And then there's this one Mike, which is the first place I went when I saw this list. Ah, B m I r a body mass index. Of 30 or higher and let me be clear, according to the BM. If you have a body mass index of 30 hire your clinic are technically obese. Now. A lot of people would have some disputes with that, and I can understand why. But if you're talking about a B m E of 30 you have just described literally. Every single offensive lineman currently signed to a roster probably even go lesson that toe linebacker and or tight and I'll get to the heights and weights in a minute and understand when they had say all these things. It's not only the players, but remember, the NFL is not going to be in a bubble, so players are going to be going to practice. Flying two trips and then coming home to family. So again, you're going to be involved in, you know, are you single that may have have Ah say on if you're going to play You're married. You have young kids, You know that You're coming home to every day from practice or from runaway trip. So And what if some one of those kids you know if they have a weakened immune system, Do you want to take that chance? So this is not just the player himself, but also the family as well. But as Faras, the bm is now there are tons of charts author. I just kind of picked a chart that basically be, am I, you know Everybody understand. You know the height and your body weight your body Mass. So it gives you how how tall you are and the wait for your B and I, And there's a lot of discrepancy about there is soul. Listen, As I said, I picked up a chart. I'm sure people will tweeted ecological lingo, different charts. If you can't great because I'd like to see some different ones because some of them you look at our like, Wait a minute like the one I'm looking at right now. Says last I checked a six foot tall is 72 inches, Correct? Yes. Yeah, Okay. Just wanted to make sure that your question is good If you're six foot tall and you weigh £221 You are right at 30 bmo. You're right at the obese, which is ridiculous. If you're and then just keep going up because you start look at tight ends. Linebackers. Obviously, offensive lineman. They're usually that you know, anywhere from six to toe got 68 Let's go to like 65 Okay, six foot five. Or 64 76 inches, 64 If you weigh £246. That's beyond my 30. According to this chart, you are considered a

Mike Nfl Players Association Copd Ricks NFL Faras
Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

00:48 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

"Wandering Stokes is our live well and win well on news and talk. 13. 80 W okay? When your car the house the job. Well, well, well. It's own point. Wanda still continues and talk with 13. 80. Okay was Dr Joffe creates a medical Monday We were talking about covert 19 and as it relates to different illnesses there some people who are increased risk. If they have diabetes, summer pre diabetic. Some are taking insulin peels and doctor. What do you say to those who dealing with diabetes? As relates to this virus. I say that while diabetes is a risk factor, it does not mean that if you get co bits, and you have I I have diabetes that you're gonna have a negative album. And in fact, the better you control your sugars mean that diabetic, they readily take their own blood sugars. The better. You control it. The less of a risk factor Cove. It is for you as well. But don't get me wrong. It is a risk factor. But it does not mean that if you get Kobe, you're going tohave negative outcomes. I still want you to Tio have hope because just because you have a risk factor doesn't mean that you're going to have a negative alcohol. You know, While we're on that stuff, I got to say this is a big, big big, uh, week for me. You know our lot. Because my big relief is to mall role is tomorrow. Yes, I know. You're excited. Oh, my God. Wow, You're released on tomorrow, So it's called training your mind. It's split second, The Isn't it was due out back in March, but because of cold it, we pull the back and added some, like and as cold value to it. Why? Because what we realized that People now are making life and death split second decisions as relates to their families. If you haven't been trained, you're just guessing so my book and it's a great read. It gives you great story has everyone who has read the comments. I came out feeling encouraged, came out like I had a framework for knowing how to make a decision. And and so If this book becomes a A bestseller. I would be the only person in the country who has the best seller as it relates to the police and a bestseller as it relates to making split second, the citizens that police organizations chose to our youth. They could use it as well. So this is this is this is a big week. For us. That is certainly it's suddenly a big week for you and life is filled with making split second decisions always because life is forever changing and and also descend, omits of crisis and just situations that come up on a regular basis. How can people connect with you? And with your new release? They can. They can follow me on YouTube and Dr Jack Reed, D R G E o R ru. What? Or they could go toe Amazon and maybe they could put in training your mind Split second. The citizens training your mind and split second decisions are just put in mining. Dr Jack Ri G E o F F R E Y Mount MOU nt Barner v A, R, N, E. R. And and just one final word that I must make, because things have gotten even more scary than when we first started talking. I think it's very important for your audience still recognize that 97% of us who get this Will be just fine and that if there's any and if there's any time in this country we're truly in this together. So they do small things like reach out to their neighbors and say, Hey, I'm just calling to check on reach out to someone they've not spoken to in the last couple of days. And I am so sorry that the government has racialized this That that that it has become and issue but unfortunately This is one of those things that we've got to reach across the aisle Black, which caused white white white white, which cost black because The only way we fix this. If we decrease infection, we decrease the yield if we decrease the transmission. I'm so sorry that the data ever ever ever came out that black Bey Proportionally impact. Why? Because it led wife thinks that they couldn't get it now. Yeah. Now you see that that the data sifting And so we're in this together. We need them to wear a mask. We need us Where Matt, you do better. I do better again. This is one of those times you gotta reach into your face and say Hey, One last thing I promised everyone out there who has precious in the promise you that if you put it to the side just for a moment, let's deal with this stuff. And then you can pull it back out. It will still be there but that this is just one of those times as a country. We all have to do our part. Because if you get infected, you risk infecting somebody else. Who are you? Who who I may know and love too. Very well. Stated Carlo from Atlanta has a question for you Go right ahead the doctors on the line. Hello, Carol. This is Carol. Hey, that's okay. Thank both of you. And thank you so much, doctor. Or your goddamn I'm 70 70 years old, and I was diagnosed with umbilical hernia around February was getting ready to go the memory for my consultation. But the baron's been heard in this church. So have been They are not denied. But I have been put on hold. And now this embarrasses searched again. So what should be Emma Doctor said they're not doing the the operations for that now. That was about a month ago..

Diabetes Dr Joffe Stokes Wanda Umbilical Hernia Carol Dr Jack Ri Emma Doctor TIO Amazon Youtube Kobe Dr Jack Reed Matt Carlo Atlanta
Juno Dawson

Mentally Yours

05:09 min | 6 d ago

Juno Dawson

"One and welcome to mentally yours. Metro Case Mental Health podcast I'm event and today. I'm chatting to Juno Dawson. She's a journalist and also who's recently released a novel called Wonderland. We've tested to have before on the podcast about trans. Women and mental health in general today. We're catching up with her to see how she's doing in lockdown and also to chat about her recent work. Dawson welcome back to mentally as thanks so much for coming on. Thank you for having me back time. Do I know exactly what it was? It was two years ago because I was really lay. Train hilarity and I've never been so stressed and then not only was I. I went to the wrong. Cheat stuff as well. I can't believe it's been two years, but thanks for coming back on. We were already gently checking about this before we started recording. How have you been getting on during lockdown generally? It's strange now because I want to use the phrase noble because I don't think his normal. Ud, just kind of comes and goes in waves. Doesn't it kind of? How bothered you are by things and I. Think in a strange with that. We've sled a relaxed some of the lockdown roles. It's almost harder in a way like when it was very strict roles, we'll do what we couldn't couldn't dare. Except for Dominic Cummings, who did? What we were allowed to do, and we all we all just stay home and we isolated with the people that we lived. Whereas now there's all these thousands of perplexing roles about you can go to the zoo, but you can't see grandma you're. You're allowed to go for Bob Hewitt at your friends, but you cannot can't use the toilet, so it's all. It's all very strange. During knows us to be happening when it's super strange. If you're single like me, because a friend tweeted earlier, basically you can go to the zoo, but you still have sex. If, you're single. Technically like that has been no announcement about anything like that. So that's is just a weird state of events is net, but anyway. The zoo. A question. So to get the most serious stuff. Have you found anything particularly challenge challenging during the pandemic. yeah I think. Initial theory again we've been. We've been inside for months now. going chronologically at the beginning of lockdown. Wife found really difficult was pretending that everything was normal. Think particularly as a writer people looked at. My life has one which could very much carry on us normal like. What are you worried about? You can just keep on writing like this'll be great. You could just get the next novel done. And so I made a little office space in my living room of tried to. was really really pushing myself to work. Like from nine to five and Then at the same time. I was like project managing my partner as well because he'd been furloughed was right will. This is a list of jobs that need doing around the house. About maybe three weeks in I just had a complete breakdown, and it manifested with me attacking of Venetian blind. Wasn't that wasn't behaving in the way I wanted it to, but that's just wasn't remember that night. I just went to bed, and just cried and cried and cried and Max I think wasn't really shall what was going on, but I think. I just needed to let it out because I've been soft clinging mom. And and you know, it wasn't normal and isn't normal this this isn't like anything that anyone who is alive now has experienced I mean potentially if you are old enough to remember World War Two and I guess you. You've lived through this situation before, but everybody Balm Post Nineteen fifty isn't GonNa remember any of situation like this and I think the there was almost I had to go through a process of just accepting that nothing was the same an indeed and I've had seen the people of referred to it as a love, the same emotions as bereavement. Light let's Elaine go part. Of like, you're not going to be seeing your friends, you're not going to be seeing your family. You'RE NOT GONNA be. Doing exactly what you want to do. Doubled up, point is. Public Health Fairs. Are. We GonNA get sick. Are we going to die? I'm having I was very lucky in that nobody who I personally NAR has. died of Covid, but my daddy did get sick from something else, so we were trying to deal with you. Know my dad being in hospital and Oh my God. He's in hospital with his diabetes is GonNa get coronavirus. So it was it was a lot, but the not feels like years ago now because that was like right at the beginning of lockdowns. That really does feel like a different life.

Juno Dawson Lockdowns Bob Hewitt Diabetes Dominic Cummings UD NAR Public Health Fairs Covid Elaine Writer Partner MAX
Fresh "diabetes" from KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:48 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh "diabetes" from KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

"Reports more often of Jennifer York. In the Toyota of Gondor, a 24 hour traffic center can extend 70 is ready in the high surf advisory up till new and temps are going to begin the nineties downtown. I lay later on today eighties along the picture's still some talk out there along some of the coastal communities. Right now. It is 67 degrees, 7 37 ad can act. So the president said that 99% of Corona virus cases are totally harmless. But a lot of health experts say that's just not true. And they say it sends a terrible message to the public on the threat of the pandemic. But the White House chief of staff, Mark Meadows, tells Fox he thinks the president Not this right. The vast majority of people are safe from this. When you look at the deaths that we have. If you're over 80 years of age, or if you have three what they call a comb or abilities, diabetes, hypertension, heart issues, Then you need to be very, very careful outside of that the risk or extremely low in the president's right with that in the fax and the statistics back us up there. The health care professionals say that the president appears to have seized on death rate estimate of 1% or less that does not capture the entire impact doctor has his jar says Around 10% of.

President Trump Jennifer York Chief Of Staff White House Mark Meadows FOX
New York City plans to end solitary confinement in jails

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:49 sec | Last week

New York City plans to end solitary confinement in jails

"Eighty mayor Blasio is placing new limits on solitary confinement at Ryker's people with several medical conditions including asthma diabetes and a history of seizures can no longer be put in isolation we have proven that we can keep jails safe with much less use of solitary confinement punitive segregation now there's a lot to do because the jails are still not safe enough let me hasten to make the point we have a lot to do to create more safety for people who are incarcerated and for correction officers and employees alike but we know there are ways we can do this with out punitive segregation the announcement follows a decision to discipline seventeen correction officers for the death of a transgender inmate who was placed in solitary confinement that inmate died of an epileptic

Blasio Ryker
Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:15 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "diabetes" discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

"To spread across much of the country, certain groups remain more vulnerable to become infected and among them. Older people and people living with other health complications, including diabetes. Diabetes affects a lot of people, especially in minority communities. Joining us live with Mohr on the problem. Tracy Brown, the CEO of the American Diabetes Association, thank you so much for joining us this morning. Good morning and thank you for having me. Let's talk about this because we mentioned the minority communities Black and Hispanics disproportionately impacted by covert 19 is diabetes, a factor. Yes, I mean, you know diabetes was an epidemic well before the cove at 19 pandemic data is selling up from the CDC. There's a disproportionate number of people living with diabetes that are affected by Koga, 19 hospitalized and even dying. Then when you overlay on top of that, who you see a disproportionate number of people of color dying from proven 19 and that has diabetes. So this is really, really an important issue. Why does it make it harder to fight off the virus? You know again, there's more science that needs to come out about this. But the one of the going theory is that people living with underlying conditions like diabetes May have a weekend a new system. And so if your diabetes is managed, it puts you at higher rip. Then, of course, you know for the minority and lower socio economic communities. There are the social determinants of health that also contribute to having diabetes, so the two together is turning out to be quite a deadly combination. So you're calling on Congress to provide more testing for people in vulnerable communities? How do you think that's going to help? Is it so important as the safes are beginning to open up, and we know that the Corona virus is continuing to spike in certain areas. One thing that you can do is make sure that you're getting the testing in the contract Tracing as one way to start you contain what is happening. People have to know if they're infected. In fact, in Dallas, Dallas had one of the highest disparities out of the 22 testing site. Most of those sites are predominantly in upper income in white areas. Birth is the I think it was only like seven sites in higher minority populations. So we've got to get into the communities that needed testing the most. How Wilmore testing help. So this is you don't get to factors one. Many of the folks in the minority population and lower social economic communities are on the front lines in these essential job. Where they may have a higher risk of exposure. If you're not, you can bring that exposure back into the community. Additionally, many folks have lost their jobs in America do to Kobe it when you lose your job, you typically lose your health insurance. You don't have health insurance. You have a four hour health outcomes and getting it least gets them ahead of the curve to understand if they're walking around with the virus. And take care of it can quarantine and do all those things to limit the spread of it. Good points at Tracy. Thank you so much. We appreciate the time Tracy Brown here on K Rld. She's the CEO of the American Diabetes Association. A covert effect is again putting pressure on gasoline prices. Here's Carol these Chris Summer with an update prices air not about four cents in the last week. The Dallas averages a dollar 88 while Fort Worth is at 1 86 when the Corona virus numbers go up more of a stay home and gasoline demand is lower, and experts say the virus will control where we go from here. If case numbers continue to rise, prices likely will remain at multiyear loans. But if we see improvement on the covert 19 front gasoline should bounce back for the rest of the summer. Chris. Summer NEWS Radio..

Diabetes American Diabetes Association Tracy Brown Dallas Chris Summer Mohr CEO Koga Wilmore Congress CDC Fort Worth America Carol K Rld
Is Telemedicine the Future of Medicine?

Better Life Lab

08:33 min | Last week

Is Telemedicine the Future of Medicine?

"I have to be perfectly honest. When I was first talking with Lucy and she said we really should do something on telemedicine and the future of medicine I just thought well. We look at work and care issues. We look at family as shoes gender equality equity across racing classes well. What does telemedicine have to deal with any of this? So let me turn it over to you Amanda and make the case. Why is this so critical for equity and work in? In Care Systems, this is a subject that is berry near, and dear to my heart. Both someone is committed to racial justice, and in particular with in the area of medicine and shrinking health disparities. It's my body of work, so what I'm doing is trying to redesign prenatal care for as a permanent in northern California where we deliver forty five thousand babies a year, so it's exciting we try to have. What are they? Cow Path moments in private and I'd like to think of this as one of them. Because we have to do more virtual care, prenatal care particular in women's health in general is a time when people come into the office a lot, so we have to ask ourselves what can be done remotely? What can't be done? And what are the factors that are impacting women's ability to have those appointments do they have broadband high speed Internet at their house. Do they have smartphones? do they have any place private to talk about? Their issues were very concerned about family violence, child abuse Yeah, in this era, also so there could be the risk associated with tele-medicine. Flip side there can be huge benefits. People don't have to take time off of work. They don't have to come in and commute and park. They don't have to find child care for their children. Even though China work and care of your children, your doctor of the same kind of tough, but we don't know which way this is point because we have to be really conscious every step of the way we're designing our care delivery in the telehealth space. What is the impact to be on a marginalized patients and the race and ethnic divide you staying with you Amanda? What do we know I? Mean it's it's. It's it's still a fairly new kind of thing right. So what do we know about how it impacts equity or patient, care or working family systems? Do we know much about it, or is it still so new? We don't know a whole lot yet. What we don't know a whole lot yet and in particular we don't know much about the race ethnicity side inside of Kaiser Permanente because we're closed system what we will know a lot because we do have that demographic data about our patients, and then in the maternal house based. We have no babies being born yet because this is all very new. So we don't know about our longer term. Outcomes with the key is as we're doing this design because Kobe is not going away tomorrow, we're going to really have to think about these systems. We have to keep that consciousness around. What is this point? Do in terms of Eray. So, let me turn to you, Lucy. This is something that we've had really some very interesting discussions about, and you've also had some incredibly intense experiences around telehealth and telemedicine during the pandemic, and not just around physical health, but also mental health. Can you talk a little bit more about that? Yes, as you know and many of your listeners now this is a mental health crisis as As, much as it is a physical health, prices Americans are suffering collectively with grief and loss and trauma to varying degrees, and so because our mental health effects, not only how he'll day today, but it directly affects medical outcomes. There's no shortage of data the show that are motion health, and our behavioral health, and of course, layered on top of that a social determinants of health. Effects are medical albums in very real ways. It's essential that primary care. Doctors and doctors in general understand that intersection. And for many people in the pandemic for my musicians. telehealth lifeline. Has as Dr, Williams said, it's not a panacea, not everyone has access to a smartphone or Internet access, but for people who need support physically and mentally is offered a new avenue. I think it's going to be here to stay. I don't think it's ever going to replace individual. One on one faced base care, and actually as Dr. Williams and I know the foundation of my work rotations the relationship, the relationship between patient is crucial, and so that is not going be replaced by virtual care hover. augments existing care for example I have a patient who lost her husband to Kobe during the pandemic. have been able to have the end of conversation. I did with that family from their home. Pre pandemic, because now we have these virtual platforms address. How are loosening regulations allowed visits to be paid for similar to what they would be in person, and then this patient of mine who is going through natural wraith and trauma, losing her husband on top of the pandemic, if able to for the first one axles agreed counselor remotely, and that is something that is not only important for her to. Feeling, but it's it's going to directly affect your medical outcomes, and that is what gives me hope for our future, we. What was that conversation like? You know a pre covert? How would that have gone? And how did that change? Or how was that? I was at different having to having to have such a such an intimate conversation over a kind of a technology platform. Well, it is interesting I mean first of all the patient who is at the end of his life could not have made it physically into my office. But I was able to have an hour long conversation with him on a virtual platform, and his family surrounded by his bedside and talk about very important decision making that pre pandemic. Wouldn't have been covered by insurance now. I probably would have had that conversation anyway, but you know doctors to get paid for their services and mental health providers need to get paid for their service and free. Corona virus insurance wouldn't reimburse for care wasn't face to face and for new incremental health issues. You had to have little morbidity so in other words. If you had an addiction I, Can Apple Addiction? Your therapists would only get paid if you also had diabetes. Those things need to change this change here on out. So I want to get to you in a minute, but Amanda if I can go back to you. Let's stay with that systems question. We've had this technology. You know we've had kind of the ability to connect virtually for some time, so has it really been an insurance issue that this hasn't really taken off before now well I will take a step back and say that I. Do work inside of Kaiser Permanent Day and so our. Models are different than in most of the fee for service. World but. Yes, part of the story is reimbursement, and then it's also familiarity and comfort both on a addition signed, and also on the issue as McBride knives off the about with existing patients people who you know, people, you have a relationship. The transition to virtual visits has been very smooth but for new patients. It's a little harder to make that connection nipping. That's why video is critically important because you'd get to see people's faces, you get to see their is. is their expressions actually highly suspected clamps? Yes, beer location of end of pregnancy on a video visit because I saw other, the pieces face was very swollen Oh. Wow, and it made me wonder you know. What is your blood pressure? What is going on about this fluid retention and so I brought her into the hospital for assessment when I was just doing a video visit at home. Wow, no Medicare has recently just said that they will start now, reimbursing or video. And so that's a big pair for us and for much of the country, and so I think that will helped shift the perspective, and then people are using it for their work. So as folks are more comfortable using distance work in general, they can then apply that with their health is now

Amanda Lucy Care Systems Kobe Dr. Williams Kaiser Permanente California Eray Diabetes China Medicare Mcbride
Leveraging the Quadruple Aim in Healthcare Innovation with Jeroen Tas

Outcomes Rocket

04:50 min | Last week

Leveraging the Quadruple Aim in Healthcare Innovation with Jeroen Tas

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket today I have the privilege of hosting Garin Tass. He's a chief innovation and Strategy Officer of Royal Philips a position. He's held since February two thousand seventeen year experienced global executive and entrepreneur with the track record of leading innovation in healthcare, information, technology and financial services industries. He clearly sees the tremendous value that information technology and data can add to managing health, leading the company's Global Innovation and Strategy Organization he's responsible for emanate strategy planning RND Solution Design Medical Affairs Sustainability. Technology, platforms ventures. Ventures and emerging businesses, he's in charge of creating a pipeline of innovation in their various businesses that Phillips covers within healthcare. They are focused on delivering on quadruple aim, which is improving health outcomes, improving patient, experience, staff, satisfaction and lowering the cost of care, and in my interview with urine. He dives deep into how they're doing that with some great examples that you will enjoy. He's a respected thought leader and was responsible for turning around. Philips healthcare it business and has been instrumental in establishing health sweet as a new. New Open Industry Standard for the healthcare. Internet of things cloud platform year and joined Phillips in twenty eleven, leading it worldwide as group chief information officer in two thousand fourteen. He became CEO of Phillips Healthcare. Informatics solutions and services, overseeing digital health and clinical informatics from two thousand sixteen. He led the company's connected care and informatics business, demonstrating passion to create new models of people centric healthcare based on the power of information technology before joining Phillips Urine Co founded and served as president. CEO and Vice Chairman of the board. Board for emphasis and it and business process outsourcing company, which was acquired by HP in two, thousand, six, prior to emphasise. He was head of Transaction Technology Citigroup's tech lab. Who's responsible for innovation and development of the banks customer facing systems, including Internet, banking and self service devices from two thousand seven to eight. He was VPN general manager at EDS responsible for the company's global competency centers. He has been a winner of the Eny entrepreneur of the year award, and many more but in two days after. We're going to dive into how it's important to focus on the quadruple aim, but also how diverse mindset such as Mr is diverse mindset and experience across different industries can help us in healthcare and looking at different perspectives to drive the most value for our healthcare dollar, and to provide the best care for patients, so such a privilege to have Mr task on the podcast today. Yaron thanks so much for joining me. really pleasure to be there so so. What an incredible Just work that you do. you know had a chance to to really. Connect with you a little bit further when we were in Vegas. Together offer the health meeting. Bud what what happens in Vegas Stays Vegas. All right so there we go. Let's change topics. I'd love if you could just share what inspires your your work in healthcare? Well, I think like all of us. We have personal stories. have personal stories. It's related the to health and You know what really motivated me to to get into. Healthcare is when my daughter was diagnosed with type, one diabetes and She was rushed to the hospital and spend a couple of days in the ICU. And I think confronted me with. The Way Healthcare is organized confronted knee wits how technology is used. My reaction was wow this. This can be so much better you know in my daughter regularly says I'm I'm actually the the care coordinator because? Diabetes is a complex disease with complications and their mental aspects to it as well, and she says I I kind of have to coordinate between cared disciplines, and I'm also data aggregate, or because every time I go somewhere. I need to carry my files and explain what the what has happened,

Phillips Healthcare Chief Innovation And Strategy Phillips Global Innovation And Strategy Way Healthcare Diabetes General Manager Garin Tass Vegas Phillips Urine Co Philips Head Of Transaction Technology Executive Chief Information Officer HP EDS Coordinator
Fauci and top health officials testify before House

Lewis and Logan

00:37 sec | Last week

Fauci and top health officials testify before House

"Dr Anthony Fauci the nation's top infectious disease expert and three other key officials are in front of a house panel this morning overseeing the administration's response to the corona virus CDC director Dr Robert Redfield talked about a recent CDC study that examined over a million covert nineteen cases the most underlying health conditions were cardiovascular diabetes obesity and chronic lung disease hospitalizations were six times higher for these

Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Robert Redfield Chronic Lung Disease CDC Director
Santa Clara County officials push to declare racism a public health crisis

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:07 min | Last week

Santa Clara County officials push to declare racism a public health crisis

"Santa Clara county supervisors are considering resolutions that would declare racism a public health crisis Casey this is Kerry who dissect reports that the effort is meant to support the black lives matter movement while problems of inequity aren't new in Santa Clara county board of supervisors president Cindy Chava says a recent black lives matter demonstrations have fueled them to take action what is good about this moment is heighten the consciousness of a nation this is a modern reflection of that movement and and I think more importantly what it just reaffirms is that we weren't done considering racism as a public health crisis she wants more resources to go toward public health and early child care one of the things we know is that the African American community has a much higher level of diabetes hypertension and infant mortality and a lot of that we believe can be really tied back to to racism the goal is to address these inequities for communities of color from birth this is asking that the county start using an equity lines in terms of its funding your zip code shouldn't determine how soon you die or whether not you go to college in San Jose Kerry had a sack

Casey Kerry President Trump Cindy Chava San Jose Kerry Santa Clara County Santa Clara
Practice Guidelines and racial disparities

Second Opinion

03:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Practice Guidelines and racial disparities

"Delivery is racist in many ways from insurance to hospitals to admission rates, and in other ways through implicit bias this week. The New England Journal of Medicine Points Outweighs that Ray sneaks into medical practice in ways we don't even realize. Is Skin color really a proxy for health risk factors we'll. geneticists argue that racial background is important to identify specific genes that are associated with specific diseases. Social scientists argue that racial differences in diseases are not due to genetics or skin color, but due to social disparities and inequities. Well, let's look at one example. A study shows that black and Latino ex people with heart disease. We're less likely to be admitted. Admitted to the hospitals heart service than white people. Some doctors argue that those differences aren't really racially biased. Because doctors used a computerized flow chart to calculate a person's risk of death from heart disease, and so they did well. There are dozens of these flow charts for all sorts of medical conditions. Many share a common problem. Let's look at the one used to predict risk of dying of heart disease. You'll see that the practice guideline directs more intensive resources to white people then to black people the way the American Heart Association's guideline does this is by putting together a number of risk factors for heart disease, history of diabetes, hypertension, family, history, and the like. Each risk is associated with a point. When it comes to race. If someone is not black, they get three additional risk. points sounds like AAC. Good thing right? Blacks have lower risk. Right will what happens is the black person get a lower risk or so? They are less likely to be admitted to the hospitals, heart service, and less likely to get all the heart care they need why those three extra points well. Nobody really knows and this isn't the only example by far. There are guidelines for heart surgery. Dialysis, organ, transplants, vaginal births, lung, disease, and cancer treatments when any of these specific. Followed seems that doctors are directed away from providing people of color with the route to more aggressive care, so is the risk really skin color. What do we do with the risk factor for someone with one parent who is white and one is black. We know that people of Color have different health outcomes than whites and Asians, and for public health reasons it is important to keep track of data by race and ethnicity and other social parameters. Why well just look at the rates of Covid in different communities? Communities. We need to know this the difference though isn't about skin, color or race. It's about poverty and housing and education, toxic stress and type of employment. There are very likely examples of diseases that do track to certain subgroups of people, but let's look for the specific gene that causes the disease and not the color of someone's skin. We do need to look at racial disparities, but that's very different than using raised to develop guidelines for doctors to

Heart Disease American Heart Association New England Journal Of Medicin RAY Covid Diabetes
Model projects 200,000 people in the US could die from coronavirus by October

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Model projects 200,000 people in the US could die from coronavirus by October

"And a model is forecasting over two hundred one thousand people will die in the U. S. from corona virus by October first federal health officials also say corona virus death rates are much higher among people with chronic illnesses a new CDC report shows death rates are twelve times higher for adults suffering from heart disease diabetes and lung disease it also finds patients with a chronic condition were six times more likely to wind up in the hospital the data revealed minorities are disproportionately affected by the pandemic about a third of the confirmed coronavirus cases were among Hispanics while twenty two percent were black

CDC
Coronavirus death rate is higher for those with chronic ills

America's First News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Coronavirus death rate is higher for those with chronic ills

"New this morning U. S. government report says death rates are twelve times higher for coronavirus patients with chronic illnesses than for others who become infected Monday's report by the centers for disease control and prevention highlights the dangers posed by the conditions which include heart disease diabetes and chronic lung ailments including asthma and emphysema virus patients with chronic conditions six times more likely to be hospitalized but otherwise healthy patients the report based on one point three million lab confirmed cases from late January through the end

Asthma Emphysema
Coronavirus Pandemic is Making America's Food Deserts Worse

NBC Nightly News

02:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Coronavirus Pandemic is Making America's Food Deserts Worse

"The covert pandemic is widening the economic gap in our country. Exacerbating divides. That were already there tonight. In our continuing series inequality in America Blaine Alexander reports on access to healthy food, and how so-called food deserts are getting even worse. There's a lot packed into this little stand. Fresh fruits and vegetables most grown right out back. But for this neighborhood and Jonesboro Georgia, this stand is so much more. They're only healthy food option for miles. How crucial is this market to the people who live in this community? This market is like an oasis food desert. The nearest supermarkets about four miles away. A food desert the USDA defined it as any urban neighborhood where residents have to travel more than a mile to reach a grocery store, and you're going to see a lot. Gas stations a lot of fast food stations across the country food deserts exist in every state impacting an estimated twenty three point, five million people, disproportionately minority communities, and the areas are almost exclusively low income. We've got some beautiful locally grown tomatoes will sellers with wholesome wave. Georgia is helping with affordability and access partnering with Farmer's markets like Atlanta harvest so. So any shoppers using snap benefits can buy fresh food at half all for those living in food deserts, the two biggest barriers transportation and income problems only made worse by the pandemic recent numbers show an additional seventeen point. One million people here in the US could experience food insecurity because of Corona virus, and the health impact could last for generations and without healthy food without those fruits and vegetables, so we always talk about getting every day. It's not an effect. Your Immune System's GonNa fake obesity diabetes heart disease, even long-term cancers? Burger. King and her children coming here is a lifesaver for kids on new way to experience food. A lot of kids don't even know. Who Comes from the ground? They expected to come out of a box and for Crystal Dalton Son Hunter new possibilities now he wants to be a farmer. It gives them something before. It's giving them a purpose providing equal access to health hope. Blaine Alexander. NBC News Jonesboro Georgia.

Georgia Blaine Alexander King Farmer Usda NBC United States America Burger Atlanta Crystal Dalton Son Hunter
Trump administration revokes transgender health protection

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trump administration revokes transgender health protection

"Chinese the American authorities civil liberties have union looked on is eleven ready for residential a fight after communities the trump in administration the wholesale revokes food market transgender in Beijing to health try to protection stem a new outbreak the rule of finalized coal with nineteen Friday by the trump city administration officials say overturned that forty five Obama workers era at protections this in fading for transgender market tested people positive against for the coronavirus sex discrimination though they showed in health care no symptoms LGBTQ groups that was in say addition explicit to an protections announcement are of seven needed people for people with seeking symptoms sex with reassignment visited or treatment worked at the market and even for transgender the market has people four who need thousand care for common tenants illnesses city officials such as have diabetes said forty or environmental heart problems samples taken the ACLU's out the market Louise also smelling tested the trump positive administration until can two days ago Beijing change had the not rag had I a can locally try to transmitted roll back protections case of crown of but ours the statute for more than seven says what weeks the statute authorities says have and not she says revised that statute some recent provides moves protections to relax coronavirus I'm Julie restrictions Walker I'm sorry I shockingly

Beijing Aclu Market Louise Walker Barack Obama
Arizona hospitals at 83% capacity, elective surgery may stop

Arizona's Morning News

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

Arizona hospitals at 83% capacity, elective surgery may stop

"About how Arizona hospitals are now at eighty three percent capacity and how he renewed fear of the spread of the corona virus and a shortage of room inside hospitals might create a stoppage in what are called elective surgeries which can have long term health consequences because we yeah if you don't take your **** can't take your something now it's minor it could become a major medical issue later now you know there are elective surgeries that don't lead to something like that I like a few years ago I had an elective surgery were you know I had a implantable contact lens put in my eyes you know it's called right back to me you know I wouldn't have ended up with anything worse except you know maybe not that scene the road quite as well again they're also weight loss surgeries I mean you're talking about type two diabetes heart disease you know muscular skeletal problems you're not being that right and there's a lot of issues that can come without getting that kind of surgery if somebody has already elected to do

Arizona
COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | Last month

COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

"This healthcare podcast is sponsored by Indiana University School of Medicine whose mission is to advance health in the state of Indiana and beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education, research and patient CARE I. I School of Medicine is leading Indiana University's burst grand challenge, the precision health initiative with bold goals to cure multiple myeloma, triple, negative breast, cancer and charts coma, and prevent type, two diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease Jim Welcome. Thanks for for having me.

Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Indiana Multiple Myeloma Alzheimer's Disease
"diabetes" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:52 min | Last month

"diabetes" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Part of your body. As you just heard the list so every body's system. You have and your brain. Diabetes can cause low moods, poor memory, weak blood vessels, fragile bones, kidney disease, just to name a few, but truly the list does go on, and on the bottom line, keeping your blood glucose numbers in the normal range of eighty to one hundred is critical to maintaining good health and avoiding the potential risks that Brittany just mentioned. An F.. Half the population has either prediabetes type two diabetes. You really need to understand what diabetes is an how to prevent it so you should know also what to eat, but what to avoid, and if you have diabetes, or if you are concerned about getting type, two diabetes will also start by talking about what's actually going on in your body. If you have type two diabetes, that's right so first of all diabetes is a disease in which the body cannot get sugar or glucose into your cells for energy. The pancreas makes insulin so insulin is a hormone that helps deliver glucose to your cells. And we know your body needs a certain amount of glucose for energy, but those high glucose levels greater than one hundred twenty six. That falls into the diabetes level type, two diabetes level, and can cause the health problems that Brittany talked about earlier. The Kidney Disease Heart Disease Depression Alzheimer's many many more. And as a Dietitian, I frequently have clients. Tell me my mother has diabetes. My grandmother had diabetes, so they often think it's a genetic problem in yes, genetics can play a role in getting diabetes, but the truth is our lifestyle. Habits actually play the biggest role in whether or not. We get type two diabetes. That those poor lifestyle habits can lead to insulin resistance, which is the most common cause of type two diabetes.

diabetes Brittany Vincent Joanne
Concerned About Prediabetes and Diabetes?

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:52 min | Last month

Concerned About Prediabetes and Diabetes?

"Part of your body. As you just heard the list so every body's system. You have and your brain. Diabetes can cause low moods, poor memory, weak blood vessels, fragile bones, kidney disease, just to name a few, but truly the list does go on, and on the bottom line, keeping your blood glucose numbers in the normal range of eighty to one hundred is critical to maintaining good health and avoiding the potential risks that Brittany just mentioned. An F.. Half the population has either prediabetes type two diabetes. You really need to understand what diabetes is an how to prevent it so you should know also what to eat, but what to avoid, and if you have diabetes, or if you are concerned about getting type, two diabetes will also start by talking about what's actually going on in your body. If you have type two diabetes, that's right so first of all diabetes is a disease in which the body cannot get sugar or glucose into your cells for energy. The pancreas makes insulin so insulin is a hormone that helps deliver glucose to your cells. And we know your body needs a certain amount of glucose for energy, but those high glucose levels greater than one hundred twenty six. That falls into the diabetes level type, two diabetes level, and can cause the health problems that Brittany talked about earlier. The Kidney Disease Heart Disease Depression Alzheimer's many many more. And as a Dietitian, I frequently have clients. Tell me my mother has diabetes. My grandmother had diabetes, so they often think it's a genetic problem in yes, genetics can play a role in getting diabetes, but the truth is our lifestyle. Habits actually play the biggest role in whether or not. We get type two diabetes. That those poor lifestyle habits can lead to insulin resistance, which is the most common cause of type two diabetes.

Diabetes Kidney Disease Brittany Alzheimer
Using a Game to Improve Resilience in Teens With Rosemary Lokhorst

Live Happy Now

05:41 min | Last month

Using a Game to Improve Resilience in Teens With Rosemary Lokhorst

"Good Day and welcome to episode two hundred, sixty, three of live, happy now. This is Paula Phelps and this week. We're going to imagine. Living in a world has been plagued by a great tragedy. The. World is you know is gone. All the stores are closed and you can't see your friends. Sound familiar. Interestingly enough. We're talking about shadow's edge. A mobile game and lifestyle platform that was created to help teens and young adults build resilience skills. Today we're talking with Rosemary law forced one of the creative minds behind this innovative platform. Let's listen as she explains how this game has helped. Teens and young adults deal with chronic illness, anxiety and now a pandemic. Rosemary. Welcome to live happy now. Thank you I'm very flattered sphere. Well, we have a lot talk about because you've got so many different components to shadow's edge, but before we start talking about those components. Can you explain the game to us? So shadow's edge is a free mobile game that is helping teens and young adults build emotional resilience and the game dust that true self help content that is delivered right where they are on their devices playing games, so we incorporate principles of narrative therapy and artistic expression and turned that into a game to meet them rather. Rather at, can you explain what narrative therapies narrative therapy is the principle that you tell your story and talk about what you're going through that you're actually start to work on it internally. Bunch of research associated with that budge. The idea is that for example I've had trauma and top about various times with potentially with different people that I started incorporating how what has happened to me into my story and as I started doing rats. I Tell Louisville differently each time, and that's because. Because you are accepting what's happened to you and I will actually to move forward, and it sounds like it'd be a great thing for the teen market because a lot of times talking about your feelings is difficult and just saying this is what I need. You don't necessarily have the language for that. Yes, and especially in a try it teams. That's what they're meant to do. They're meant to become more independent, and there's so many things going on in the brain with gross and with becoming. Becoming their own person, they're finding their own identity, and I think that specific he now, even just in general teams are so much more pressure than we were when you were younger. There's so much more pressure to be the best that everything. There's so much more pressure from outside from your social media in all kinds of TV shows where people become billionaires by the age of twenty right, it can feel like some of these genes after Tuesday, full career path by age fourteen already and so. That stress in addition to just really finding out who they are and becoming more independent is just very heavy on their minds, and that's not always easy for them to the neck. Stress any in addition to that our research is also shown when we were harvesting over fourteen million conversations of teens online that they actually prefer eating out to somebody that is potentially not really in their immediate few, because they don't know if they would be understood there and you mentioned the research. You did a lot research. There's so much science and research that goes into the backhand of this and I want to get to that, but. But you have created this whole platform. Can you talk about where the idea began to get us here? Absolutely more than just a game, and that's why this is a great question, an answer a little bit so that you can see sort of how it all came together. It all started with a book. Our founders Sherry, Subroto. She had a brain Schumer when she was younger, and she experienced firsthand that there's really no tools that are appealing and engaging for young people out there to help them through that journey of dealing with something really harsh comes your way, and so when against all odds? She survived Jackson. Jackson went into psychology for years. She did lots of workshops teens with young adults, and upon her twenty fifth year of survivorship. She then decided she wanted to do more, and so she wrote a book with France, that was called digging deep, and for that she set up a foundation and the foundation digging deep, published the book and distributed to over seven hundred hospitals in the US with about thirty five thousand copies, basically two parents professionals psychologists, the male started working with the book, and they loved it, and so with that she also than established log for parents and professionals to help them guide them, you know. Know how to deal with these kinds of things, talks your team. All kinds of subjects and a lot of subjects actually came from parents requested by healthcare professionals, and that sort of where I answered. You know she was running out of books and I knew her already were friends. She knew I had a technical background and she knew I had storytelling backgrounds though she said you know Rosie. I want to do more with this and I'm running out of books. How can I make this into something digital you know? How can we reach a wider audience with this self? Help content that we've had in the book. And, so we look at what's possible. What's the other people will redoing engineers? That wasn't really a lot around. You know. There were gangs that were focused on shooting your cancer, or that were specific applications to monitor your diabetes there things to make you feel more healthy physically, but really on the mental side, and so we really set out to do something that helps teens in medium that they're comfortable with and. And, so that's why we decided to build games versus an

Rosemary Jackson Paula Phelps Louisville Schumer United States Subroto Rosie France
COVID-19 is disrupting services to treat non-communicable diseases

UN News

00:54 sec | Last month

COVID-19 is disrupting services to treat non-communicable diseases

"Prevention and treatment services for noncommunicable diseases or NCD's have been severely disrupted since the covid nineteen pandemic began according to a survey from the world, Health Organization released on Monday, the survey completed by one hundred and fifty five countries during three week period in May confirmed the global impact stemming from the pandemic revealing that low income countries most affected the situation is of significant concern, because people living within CDs are at high risk of severe. Kobe nineteen related illnesses and death. Results of this survey confirm what we've been hearing from. Countries for a number of weeks, says who chief Ted Ross at Hanham Gebreyesus many people who need treatment for diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes have not been receiving the health services and medicines they need, and it's vital. Countries find innovative ways to ensure that essential services for NCD's continued, even as they fight the coronavirus.

NCD Ted Ross Hanham Gebreyesus Kobe Health Organization
Mexico reopens economy after two-month COVID-19 lockdown

All Of It

04:09 min | Last month

Mexico reopens economy after two-month COVID-19 lockdown

"Take you to Mexico now the country looks set to Paul's ten thousand deaths from corona virus this is the second highest toll in Latin America off to Brazil the authorities recognize that Mexico is now at the peak of the pandemic never the less they'll gradually reopening the country from today the first of June this week to journalists on a government level house in Mexico City M. what Mexicans think then of the idea to start of starting to ease the look down on the camera when the peak of the pandemic is is ongoing in the country Hey when Mexicans are deeply divided about these government decision many are uncertain the relief that the economy is re opening because more than half of the population making a living in the informal sector and do not have a fixed salary so for them this lockdown has been especially hard but on the other hand there is another part of the population which stinks that easing the lockdown is very contradictory since specially now the corona virus is spreading really quick so these people are worried a friend even more sharply increase of the cases and the I W. I had the flu shot and this is what he told me the decision for re opening Mexico is being taken since its economy won't receive a long time to slow down situation however for a successful re opening the publishers should be should commit themselves to to be respectful of the measures required to control the street of the disease we are not sure if the city will be possible in Mexico so it's highly improbable to see a rise in the number of cases during the next days there is the after re opening challenging the out by the media and the extremely health services it's what every country is bouncing right then our public health versus the need to get the economy back running again so so what changed what we see today Mexico in terms of using the lock down the economy will be allowed to resume operations and that's the government's case it would be done gradually and the friendly in each part of the country for example in Mexico CD that so far has been dead the epicenter of the pandemic the schools we continue to be close but the construction will be respected also restaurants would be allowed to operate that thirty percent of their capacity be a production so will be respected and the seas has been particularly because of the debate since the government has considered it an essential activity so we should point out that Mexico in Mexico the lockdown has a strong get western he advised by the government and imposing some places such as schools and working centers but not to the general population so Mexico is a country of many different realities and some people carry out on working through all this time and somehow stop the work depending on how old they are absolutely it's the same the world over isn't it is is there any clear idea then why we're looking at the situation in Mexico with a maternity right from corona virus is so hard to just behind Brazil's when the mentality rate is really high he did so one of the highest in the region G. journey so nine point eight percent on the Alberta check over that of the people is fifty nine years so is leading junk considering like comparing to other countries especially in Europe so expressing that the reason behind east another up and then make a **** the country before the coronavirus which is over sixty Mexico with the U. S. is one of the countries with the highest number of obese people in the world and that conditions comes with other related problems such as diabetes and hypertension so according to though W. it show this contributes to higher rates of CDS complications from cardiac thank you for joining us on Capitol hasta Tony is live from Mexico City

Mexico Paul
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

08:13 min | 5 months ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

"The science has evolved of flooding meditation. Then my treatment has evolved as well. I worked very closely with by healthcare. I'm a huge proponent. That diabetes is a team. Sport breaks a full team to successfully manage diabetes when it comes down to medical professionals for sure by chronology Dr Peters Diabetes Educator Donna. Working with the nutritionist. My exercise physiologist integrated that. But it's also my team at home. It's it's my wife. My parents my sister. My friends that I'm having a hard day on burned out. They're the ones that support me healthy and encourage me Even people the diabetes community are the people that understand what I what I go through every day and sometimes reaching out to ban and just talking through challenges they faced or how things have gone really well for the last couple of weeks Is I think that's an important part of vantage get talked about Managing Diabetes exported working within that team to continue to ask questions about what infringer available. What injection method allergies are out there? how how things worked for me? It find having problems if I have an issue with by JAB activity. Is someone else they that overcome that. I think that that dialogue is really important to keep getting better lie. I think families are really important component. My former husband is a type. One of forty four years and doesn't have any diabetes complications. And we're really good friends and I was meeting recently. Were talking about blood. Sugars new said. Don't you remember you know? We got married in her late twenties. I don't remember every time my blood sugar was high said. Don't worry it's GonNa come down and it really made a difference and I said I really said that he's like yeah and it helped so I really. It's interesting because even for me I you know having these conversations you forget that how important your family is. Because it's easy are they're that first line of support and and sometime. I definitely kill badly. That has to get the deal with my Mood swing by blood. Sugar Swing sometime and the Beeping of my my desk com g six bedside table in the middle of the night those sorts of things. I feel badly that when she's trying to sleep and especially at the moment she's pregnant and where Trying to make sure she gets arrest. And sometimes especially if I'm hovering around and alarm blood sugar and I've a glowing above the flow it It doesn't always wake me up because I I hear it. I understand by punchers. Okay right around that alarm number. I'm fine but it definitely wakes her up. I feel badly about. I think you know as you were saying. Family's really important but also diabetes is a family disease you know. Everyone learned to participate. I know for me when I got involved with my former husband. I was really impressed. The way he manages diabetes. He really was proactive. He wasn't embarrassed about it. And the way he modeled. It was the way I expected everyone to being than later when I start working in the industry I realized that not. Everyone's like that so modeling that in having the support and having your family support you know rather than publicly shaming you for example some people write me and say hey you know i. I dated someone and they tested their blood sugar at the table. Unite isn't that improper knows like I said No. It's not so so I think that's I think to me that's one of the great things about having worked with the race with influence program for the last twelve years is being able to green diabetes into the light a little bit too to kind of remove some of those stigmas that people talk about And I can't remember who it was. It was another notice patient lassiter and he was talking about. How is his grandmother had diabetes and and they didn't talk about it they said. Oh she she's got the sugar just kind of it was. It was just kind of a nord or almost minimized and now the conversation around diabetes has changed part of it is the growth of the the community wants. Take Two's And access all right access and communication. I think social media podcast boggs. Online interaction has really allowed the conversation within the diabetes community to to remove that stick by to to make it more of a interactive dialogue with all of the stakeholders within the the disease state from. You know medication. Companies to healthcare professionals to patients to advocates to passengers. There's there's there's this great continuing to grow as low energy of bow the conversation and and the future And then something that you know being involved with no one can being part grace within flip program. I think my rookie year in Indycar in twenty eleven in fact couple years before that has been a lot of fun to be part of and does the new team that you're racing with is something that they're learning about also taken it upon themselves. They know the difference between type one type two or do you feel a responsibility to them with that. Like oh it's funny. You say a responsibility to educate I think I see it as an opportunity to you educate The new team for me. It's really exciting on a professional level to raise for somebody like Aj four Aj for history with indycar racing thing within the Indianapolis Motor speedway general as a driver. He's one all over the world. Some of US psychotic races out there and touch was the first four time winner of the Indianapolis five hundred. That's pretty rarified. Air and he has his face on the Warner Trophy. Times fighting it out with five hundred in five different decades and you talk about that and how challenging it is to just make indy five hundred not only did he make it in five different decades. But then he went on to win it four times so his history as a driver. Is it Tommy? The whole team and a culture of the team the being able to to learn from him and and work with their team at at in the card every car race. This year is pretty exciting. I think it's it's early days within by awareness and education campaign within the the race team but there are a couple of team members mechanics team managers. But I've worked with at previous rates. So they're pretty aware and they're really excited to to continue to learn and and learn about the race with programming. Will THAT BE TRUMP? Let let me ask you with the decks COM G. Sex.

diabetes Dr Peters Indianapolis Motor speedway US Tommy Family lassiter Warner Trophy Aj
"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

04:21 min | 5 months ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

"As you climb.

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

"Problem darts. Because we're human being. We beaten like this person has been fasting for hours. They starving they overindulge and overeat eat. And that's when we really can not get the full benefit of them and is that it for some people is that because their blood sugars low or for example people that take insulin. How does that work for them? Too fast they say they. You know they're taking insulin long acting Basil Insulin. And they're supposed to take insulin when the E so with fasting. Do They not take insulin. Because they're not eating and they only take the you know the the fast acting the rapid acting again so people with diabetes and Ramon have a very special challenge for both at risk of having glocer during the evening hours but then having very high sugars after the if dr which is the big meal in the evening so it makes it even more challenging both ways for diabetics most the majority of diabetic who are on oral agents. He just pills. The majority of them can't fast reasonably safely and they don't need to adjust their medication that much especially when they don't have high risk of having of earth are they had high-pricing before now the people who are on. Insulin is a bit of a different challenge. Because insulin like I in in a healthy individual who does not have diabetes when they fast. And that's what the study in England and all that when they fast. They've seen their insulin. Level goes really low almost undetectable levels so prevent them from having hypoglycaemia and they think. That's what may we set the insulin resistant type thing. That can happen in obese and diabetic people who take like the insulin long acting insulin or the fast acting insulin insulin. Staying in their system. They're eating or not and then can lead to be your hypoglycaemia the majority of people who elect to fast While there is still on insulin they most of them they will need to change the timing and the dose of their insulin. So sort of the fast acting insulin. You're not gonNA take any fast acting when you're not eating but even the Basil Insulin. The Long Acting. Insulin probably need to move the timing audit from if you take it in the morning you really want to move it to take it in the where the evening around the evening meal. And most of guidelines recommend to cut back does by ten fifteen to twenty percent to prevent these low sugar during the fasting hours. And what if you're on an insulin pump? Would you do the same thing? So you would adjust your basil bullish recog- a although I was reviewing some guidelines are on the safety of fasting during Ramadan. I'm not a clergy percents. So it's really hard to tell you can't believe take responsibility and saying you can fast and you cannot fast so this is a very hard decision for a personal decision to make once you get there. But in general there are few high risk markers really make people have to stop and think twice before they want to make that decision and proceed with the fast thing. And You you're well-controlled on pomp and you can feel the hypoglycemia. Continuous Glucose Monitor Daring. And he can tell when you're hypoglycemic. Then that's fine but if you don't or you have the hypoglycemia unawareness need you. Can crash down without even having warning symptoms..

Basil Insulin diabetes England Ramon
"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

"Remind them that this is the time to start making lifestyle. Modification changes that they can do to live a healthier life throughout the lifespan. So it's it's a good time to it's good window to catch people in prevention. And I'm I speak to a lot of women with within OBGYN about this because they essentially serve as a lot of women's primary care practitioner when they're young. And so it's important to just really emphasize lifestyle modification in this population on couldn't agree with you more. All right. Well, thank you for explaining that the next thing. I wanted to go into with you, guys, exactly. The mechanism of insulin resistance type two diabetes. A lot of debate on this end. I would love for you to hit us all hard with the science go into it as you. As scientific as possible that you can go all the way into the biology for our listeners of what causes inflammation instance, type two diabetes. How does saturated fat play a role in this? How how can you eat a high carbohydrate diet and not make diabetes worsen and all that I'm super graduates question because this is this right here. This conversation is the Hawes of ninety percent of all the conflict in the diabetes world. It's the cause of the, you know, there's there's a lot of debates, and there's a lot of sort of misinterpreted science, and in all really boils down to this exact conversation here about what truly causes insulin resistance because like I said earlier prediabetes is the the condition that you develop before you become hype to that. However, insulin resistance is another is another synonym for prediabetes. That's really all. It is. So it you first become insulin resistant that manifests itself as that we refer to as pre-diabetes. Diabetes one in the same. And then when insulin resistance goes from being a small, you know, a condition that is doesn't really disturb your bug the coast too much to a condition that disturbs your bug significantly. That means that you go from prediabetes to type two diabetes. So you in other words,.

Diabetes ninety percent
"diabetes" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"When you walk in. So we don't do tasked routinely and people that says, hey, you have prediabetes. Diabetes. But there are some people in which you can probably predict might be at risk for prediabetes. Those are people who leave sedentary lifestyles were overweight. Those are individuals that you've probably can say, you know, there's a strong likelihood you could have prediabetes. And if you think you're going to do something about it could be worth checking, otherwise those people that you would say this is a good time to start leading a better lifestyle. Is there any diet? That's better than any other. So diet is very controversial area depends on who you talk to him. Right. There are some people that advocate, you know, low carb diets key Todic diets, there's a variety of different diets the American diabetes association, which is really sort of the, you know, the professional authority in this area has no specific. Conditions on which diet is better than another. Because the data are controversial anyone that you look at. I think the the bottom line is it's better to go with the diet that you can stick to right because you know, if you don't if you if you basically are being asked to take a, you know, a very high fat or high protein diet, and that's not what you normally eat the chances that you'll adhere to that or much lower. So where's the cutting edge stuff and type two diabetes right now. You know, a lot of the cutting edge stuff is in new medications right weight loss medications, we know that losing weight can have a dramatic impact on diabetes. So there are, you know, obviously, drug companies that are working on a variety of different than new drugs, and you probably know in the past decade, the number of new drugs for type two diabetes has been coming. Probably every. Couple of years there, obviously new drugs and the goal of many of these drugs is to lower blood sugar without increasing weight. And that's a big goal. The other goal and type two diabetes. Medications is that the FDA requires that many of them be tested longer term to look at risk for cardiovascular disease. Right. So we're not looking to reduce it. We're just looking to make sure these drugs don't increase that risk to have some of the ones in the past increase the rest. Yeah. There have been some in the past that suggest that it could increase risk again. A lot of its controversial. We sometimes look at the data and relocate the data. So there have been a class of drugs that we don't use very much called thighs Ola dean dions teasing dis..

Diabetes American diabetes association Ola dean FDA
"diabetes" Discussed on Your V Life

Your V Life

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Your V Life

"So times on the first visit, we want to try to try to find out what it would just be this person. Evince factors. Does anyone in your family have diabetes? You already have existing diabetes? Do you have a history overweight things? All these things are going to factor into your question because I always had this question with diabetes stations diabetes. Is that the bad one or the better one of were of the diabetes was just pregnant. That's okay. Just pregnancy. Okay. That's a whole different. Not like the Nile. Diabetes mellitus. There's two types type one and type. Two, let's say one is someone who gets it as a juvenile or as a child. It's more common lifelong. But I've here, that's why I thought like more common those getting today, but he's more commonly, right? And that means that over the course of your life, you start to develop. But that's common. But the. My dad has it not too long ago, and now he's always like he'll like eat a bread and he's like, all right, don't eat bread. Doni. But he, but that's an. Different, the juvenile died. I mean, these kids even an I know I'm totally getting off subject. That's why I was competing. I was like, what. What what the juvenile diabetes. There's plenty kids. I know like from camp young athletic healthy kids are getting them and you're, you're screwed. Like you're, I mean, you know, I mean what? What I'm saying is commitment. I mean, it's the most people. It can be particularly if you have type two or late onset diabetes, they're not necessarily scruple like what you have to make modifications and your diet and your and your lifestyle people..

diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Diabetes just from having thick sweet but that's right molasses blood dick and sweet is usually good yep but not in this case maybe if it's in the syrup that you're eating that will eventually give you diabetes it's good all right now where does that put us we going back up to the top yeah we should we should participating confusing people along with this article right so the whole reason you have high blood glucose levels is because your body is not responding to insulin right right so because the insulin is running around going guys guys what what i do what's the problem take this glucose in the cells just turn their back on the insulin and insulin is sad you'll have a lot of insulin in your bloodstream is not doing anything and so there's some other secondary alarms that your body sets off saying we got a lot of we got a lot of insulin in the bloodstream but our cells aren't getting an energy they're starving so we need to start producing our own glucose right and that's where the glucose gone the alpha male secrete that glue gun and those levels rise in your bloodstream that ex on deliver and muscles like we talked about to break down that glycogen and releases too much glucose into the blood in that case right which is one reason why you suddenly lose weight inexplicably despite eating all the time or being hungry all the time yeah because as far as your body's concerned it's it's it's pretend like your body can't tell that there's a problem with the insulin all it noses that the cells are starving yes it's it's like it's lack some sort of gaily his show how much how much blood sugar there actually is in the bloodstream or how much insulin there is and that there's something wrong it's just knows the cells are starving so it kicks off this thing where it makes its own glucose which just raises the levels even further in exacerbates the problem bright okay so you're constantly hungry because your body thinks you're cells are starving but you start to lose weight despite eating because it's also attacking those store hours of glycogen those glucose chains and you're just you start losing weight just by eating a lot yeah you're tired that was another one of the symptoms because you're not absorbing that glucose so it's not done anything to burn for energy your hands and feet.

Diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And sixty even i'm so nervous you're usually overweight while you nervous i'm just nervous i'm going to end up with type two diabetes with d i thought you meant you were gonna say something wrong no i'm nervous you're nervous about diabetes to yeah it sounds like it's virtually predestined that we're going to get it i don't think it's in my family but i'm overweight and forty seven years old yeah i need to get my act together like now yes in it's not like now wait another five or six years and then tackle it and there's no reason for us to like just put it off until the end we can say like you can you can reverse pre diabetes yeah diet and exercise you don't even if you have prediabetes you can which is you have higher than normal blood sugars we'll see but you don't have full blown diabetes yet and you can actually reverse course it's not too late doing something like what you're talking about the very and it's great this is a wakeup call like your body literally can inch up to that line and if you do the right thing it can go all right yeah i'll back off then i like like the way you're going like what what i'm saying give me some more celery baby get on that peleton chuck those are both market right there well they're an advertiser with us are they still while they were still have that thing i love it it's nice i just need to love every day right not like i love it every couple of weeks crush a hill you know anyway type to like i said is about ninety ninety five percent in this is when you have higher insulin in your blood not lower like the case of type one right because you have a lot of insulin it's just not working which is why type two diabetes is also called insulin resistant diabetes is that right non insulindependent okay insulin resistant yeah okay yeah so that means that your body's producing insulin just fine but for some reason or another in this seems to be the mystery at the heart of diabetes your cells don't respond.

diabetes ninety ninety five percent forty seven years six years
"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Gets out he escapes i think gets out and then clinton was president when i wrote this he gets out somehow it gets to like clinton that this town is like holding people hostage basically own constitutionally and so's springfield gets invaded and years was one hundred and eighty pages long no i think it was like appropriately we'll link yeah i think so actually a different life where i wrote for the seventy show that seventy show when you wrote for the simpsons and we like ate lunch together on the fox lot can i that'd be pretty cool you know can i tell you something though sure i would i prefer this oh yeah yes i prefer what we do as someone who's never written for the simpsons prefer this humana i've been to the writer's room before i know what it looks like a chain them to the desk i like we'd get those you don't have to live in la yeah i like la i've noticed a lot of our friends from new york starting to move to la of you notice that it's like a hemorrhaging all right should we get back to diabetes we should probably just add it all that out no i think that's a nice tangent okay all right so in the case of diabetes like we said it is well we already said what it was but there are three types type one type to ingest ational diabetes type one is by far the in the minority it's it says here five to ten percent but i saw like kind of a straight up five percent number for the number of diabetes cases overall okay but they say five to ten percent in this article or it's called juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes and this is caused by a lack of insulin either not much insulin or sometimes no insulin at all in their blood and this is this is clearly genetic right it says an also could be environmental but yeah they think it's possible possible that it's caused by virus exposure to virus early in childhood interest egg that sets off an auto immune reaction so your immune system attacks your beta cells that produce insulin some just destroys them yeah and so you don't produce insulin and it happens in your younger years maybe adolescence which is why it's called juvenile diabetes and you when you have type one.

clinton president springfield writer new york diabetes hemorrhaging ten percent five percent
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"You know it was hard and it was very depressing i guess in i guess because that i was in taking care of myself so now that mom and dad are gone you know in there in a much better place now i have to focus on me it's like you know we all saw mom and dad go through this we we've all thought the same thing we've even talked about it you know and for me personally and from what i heard from my brothers were just exhausted we're so tired and and i i wish i had more energy you know i hope our family talk helped everyone connect the dots bit that caring for yourself your body your emotions it all matters when you're trying to live well with diabetes i definitely see our family patterns in me like years of morning breakfast tacos might be looming over me i'm overweight i'm heading into my thirties i don't ever really exercise but i don't want my dna to control my destiny kristen cabrera is a reporter in austin texas she grew up in the rio 'grande valley kristen's family members talking about some of the things that can happen when diabetes is not managed you can lose a limb or your life for healthcare providers it can be challenging to find just the right approach to get patients to buy into all things that need to happen for them to stay healthy they have to be part enforcer and part cheerleader i i just i take a deep breath.

kristen cabrera reporter texas diabetes austin rio 'grande valley
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"When we were talking he mentioned that hispanics in the us are another group with a really high genetic risk for developing type two diabetes the centers for disease control says half of hispanic men and women in the united states will develop this illness sometime during their lifetime texas reporter kristen cabrera looked at her father's family for that number has been more like one hundred percent she recently gathered her dad her aunts and uncles to talk about diabetes you practice may little kit that's the commodore test strips and the pen neil that picks my finger that's my dad that's a little after seven in the morning and before he goes to work he checks his blood sugar or just a prick my finger to get the blood out now i'm going to swipe it over the tester one fifty four sworn ever since i could remember my father has had diabetes i was raised in the rio grande valley about five hours south of austin this group is cities is on the texas mexico border and it's almost ninety percent hispanic all seven of my father's sisters and brothers were diagnosed with type two diabetes on as gadio cabrera junior my name is blanca covered at my name's a arctic coveted hello i don't i've had diabetes since ninety to ninety nine i believe maybe in two thousand nineteen ninety six and my father oh my name is aaron leak oded and i'm the oldest i'm sixty one i was diagnosed with diabetes in nineteen ninetysix the family you're not getting to meet my theo ebtekar has had diabetes for eighteen years might the event had diabetes for ten years but back in twenty fourteen she got weight loss surgery and now she doesn't have diabetes carrying extra weight or being obese are big risks do eliud the baby brother of the bunch was diagnosed in two thousand and two and lived with it for five years before he died of colon cancer honestly.

united states kristen cabrera diabetes rio grande valley austin texas mexico border theo ebtekar colon cancer texas reporter gadio cabrera aaron one hundred percent eighteen years ninety percent five hours five years ten years
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"How is the country dealing with this onslaught of of diabetes it's expensive to trait it's very expensive it's terribly expensive right now what they're finding is that low income indians beginning to get overweight no beef and that this is really hitting them and they're just not being treated and the government has been very slow to react they have in the last year change the tax system and they are taxing package food and they'd put a next at twelve percent tax on carbonated sugary beverages so that's step one but they need to do a lot more and they're only beginning to talk about it in the health side the rest of the government hasn't touched it so it sounds like there could be lots and lots of people in india who don't know that they have diabetes right right in india i would suspect that probably one or two percent of low income indians know that they have diabetes but have it and we see a lot of deaths from it starting to be reported but know that the government is not yet a really going after this that sounds overwhelming it is overwhelming because you've got one point three billion people in that country and it's growing and it will soon become the largest country in the world and you've got half to two thirds of them have no access or minimal access to health care and don't have the funds and the government doesn't have the money really to treat everybody for with insulin and so forth and to keep them healthy so we are at a point where india's on a collision course with its noncommunicable diseases particularly diabetes barry popkin is a nutrition professor at the university of north carolina he is with their school of global public health.

india diabetes barry popkin professor university of north carolina twelve percent two percent
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"It's just interesting to have this disease that's like an invisible disability where i look normal from the outside and i wouldn't want to not look normal from the outside i mean no one stares at me 'cause i've got diabetes but that means that they don't understand how hard it is one thing that's really stood out to me through the course of this conversation is how much we have in common and it's it's really interesting to hear someone else say things that i have nearly in the exact same words thought myself yes i believe so we are a lot alike which i thought that we were very different is far as tight one in type two diabetes that's kisha brooker and catherine price talking about living with diabetes katia has type two and catherine type one within thirty million people in the us deal with this kind of thing it's an epidemic that's sweeping the country changing lives and our healthcare system but other countries have higher numbers yet india has been called the diabetes capital of the world more than sixty million people there have this illness that's the highest rate globally barry popkin is one of the researchers trying to figure out what's causing this diabetes explosion he's an attrition professor at the university of north carolina he works at their school of global public health berry says that people of indian descent are genetically predisposed to developing type two diabetes which is related to body fat with specially fat around the heart and deliver what we call visceral fat that fat around your heart and liver doesn't necessarily show up on the scale sometimes we call this skinny fat or normal weight obesity or.

diabetes kisha brooker catherine price us barry popkin berry india university of north carolina
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"What did i do that myself and that's where you get to self judgment it right then yeah yeah that's kisha broker and katherine price talking about living with diabetes kisha has type two kathryn type one will hear more from them later on this illness can also affect your ability to get work you're not supposed to be fired because you have diabetes but will you get hired for a job in the first place alan you looked into it if you have thi bt's here in america there are some jobs you're probably not going to get you can't join the coast guard the army any branch of the military sometimes it's possible to get a special waiver but generally the policy is no right now the military can simply disqualify you if you have diabetes and the insulin adam roth in those this he's been rejected from several branches of the military because he has type one adams in great shape he'd already done the situps pushups the running the monkey boss to paul's the military's physical tests that the courses into you don't it doesn't make exceptions for diabetics everyone's treated the same right now he works into by that's where i reached him there is a lot of you know running around there's an obstacle course you're crawling under the barbed wire and you know the the the things that people see in movies one who to try to sneak him in i recall one recruiter telling me hey just don't tell them that your diabetic and then maybe they'll find out while you're already in and you'll be able to stay and you know i'm sure they had good intentions but you know obviously that would be i think criminal in in lying on my application did eventually get a job in law enforcement later he joined the security detail for the secretary of commerce he polices exports so he has a job that he likes but he still has to deal with other people imagine having diabetes is like one time several.

diabetes alan bt america army secretary katherine price kathryn paul
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"Okay because as you know i mean the goal is to keep your blood sugar in this like super tight tight rope range where it's not too high because that's how you get complications like the blindness amputation and then not too low because then you can pass out and die on the spot so one thing i think is really interesting about i would think type in particular but for anyone who's on insulin is that insulin is a deadly medication i mean it's so dangerous i could i have had moments where i've accidentally giving myself too much and realized that i very well could have killed myself if i didn't realize it and it's like what are their medication would adopt send a patient home with two to guess at their doses i mean i don't take consistent amounts i have to guess it for every meal and anytime i get it wrong i could end up in the emergency room or worse and it's kind of overwhelming when actually think about that and i'm wondering yet can you tell me more about type two and then what some of the challenges are for you love for tight tune so i'm still a little confused on what's going on with my body i check my sugars twice a day with the glucose meter and that's just before breakfast and before dinner if they're fine on fine the only thing is with type two diabetes you're on pills and when you check your your blood sugar ended two hundred is just two hundred right you're doing anything there's nothing you know so is just there and then you're hoping it goes down so i used to be free to check them the check it in.

diabetes
"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"diabetes" Discussed on The Pulse

"Trina health launched its first clinics run twenty eleven and from the beginning it was promising big things the company said it's treatments could reverse serious diabetes complications lost sight heart disease liver failure within a few years trina was a fullblown franchise with more than a dozen clinics across the country offering their treatment patients on social media and online forums held it as a miracle and then came this news serious federal indictments are down for longtime state representative jack williams lobbyists marty connors and healthcare ceo ford gilbert ford gilbert is the founder of trina health he was recently arrested for bribing legislators in alabama to push a bill through the legislature that would require alabama insurance giant blue cross blue shield to cover treatments at his three album clinics hemmitt reports flooded the media calling trina scam an example of the worst abuses in our healthcare system despite that at least some of the clinic have state open for business including a new one in new york city called the diabetes relief center so a few days after news afford gilbert the trina ceo's arrest i jumped on a greyhound to check it out so i'm standing at grand concourse and east one hundred forty ninth street the diabetes relief centers in the south bronx in area experts have called the epicenter of the diabetes of a democ standing at the corner it's obvious home important neighborhood is when it comes to diabetes down the street dunkin donuts there's a popeye's burger king passed that mcdonald's it's a busy area.

trina founder alabama ceo mcdonald state representative jack williams marty connors ford gilbert ford gilbert new york diabetes