16 Burst results for "dennis o'hare"

Ansel Elgort on 'The Goldfinch'

Here & Now

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Ansel Elgort on 'The Goldfinch'

"Recently we had the chance to grab a few minutes with actors and sell l. gordon oakes vaguely when the two were at the toronto film festival promoting their new movie the goldfinch which opens tomorrow they play older and younger versions of theo and continued that mash as we spoke this is oaks and and this is oaks no no this is aso this is ansel is oaks it's understandable in the goldfinch bench we go back and forth through time the theo's blend the young theo goes with his mother to an art museum in new york there's a terrorist bombing she is killed he stumbles out stunned clutching painting of a goldfinch then he ricochets from the upper class home of a classmate to his deadbeat dads place in las vegas clash forward the adult view and elgort sells antiques though as we hear in the scene with a client played by denis o'hare maybe they're not antiques i i want to talk about the peace you've already sold me the athletic it is beautiful isn't yes except that it isn't is thomas athletic i mean the phoenix ornament ornament is i'm fairly certain about that but the rest of the chest is not the goldfinch directed by john crawley it's based on donna tarts beloved i love it and bestselling pulitzer prize winning novel i asked ansel elgort first about the pressure but i don't think there's any way we could live up to donna towards novel know every the sentence you hang on is i think i could read that book a hundred times and not guitar alex how about you when you were asked to play the young theo what did you know of it well my mother had had read the book previous and she was a huge huge fan still is a massive end she talked about the book in descriptive it was and how incredible was and so immediately i was interested in the project and wanted to be a part of it yeah i hadn't read the book and so i want to let listeners know oh that especially if you haven't read the book the twists and turns in the directions the film goes will be even more shocking to you but answer how would you describe theo broken i'm very self aware a actor man whose made many mistakes doesn't know how to take them back and end is on like an avalanche of lies and regrets but it just won't stop among the mistakes refer back to that masterpiece that theo takes from the museum the goldfinch which really exists in hangs in the hague it was painted by dutch artist carol pieters for breaches who himself off was killed in a gunpowder explosion but in the book and film theo takes the painting something is mentor hobie played by jeffrey wright finds unforgivable do you know that it was his last painting because he died explosion stupid accident and somehow miracle miracle it's it survives through centuries until you we hung event i didn't know what it was i then i don't even know why i kept it trotting oh he's just trying to keep it safe the cape and oaks how would you describe the young theo say he's broken he's i'm just trying to crawl his way back to normal life and the reminder the constant reminder of the painting being by his side is an incredibly a difficult thing to break that bond that he has with the painting is never severed so he is constantly trying to make sure he has us an understanding of not only where the painting but the painting itself at all times y- the stress of that i mean it's his rock his addiction it's his mother in both breath of you both the os are observers i'm any thoughts about that playing observers i think don atari such a great observer and she wrote this book in first person from theo's point of view so we sort of get a bit of donna in theo as an observer i think theo is incredibly he can be incredibly quiet when he wants to be in and he's constantly looking at everything and everyone and judging everyone on first sight which i think he ultimately might not be the best the quality of him but i think that's who he is the young theo oaks vaguely plays is in shock from living through that bombing and then being hall to the foreclosed does landscape of las vegas where his dad dies and he's left with dad's uncaring girlfriend the hotels only pal we have to get back to new york i can't stay here she'll put me in a home you understand that look i'm a minor i've got no family no friends out here have to go yeah you never really know where you're going to end up but i've definitely grown as a person and grown creatively a lot more of an observer after playing theo i would it's a as well how 'bout you i'm just excited to do more work i'm really excited to keep doing what i've been so lucky to be able to do with my life no kidding your careers continuing you're playing tony in west side story yes one of the most coveted roles i mean just how's that feeling it's awesome it is a blast it is crazy that i'm playing in a musical i love musicals musicals that's how i got into this also i'm enjoying every moment of it the gold finish finished ours ansel elgort and oaks vaguely villanovans invaders tomorrow

Theo L. Gordon Oakes Toronto
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The great the smell of paraffin the sudden roars of cars passing close by on the road people coming home from the races the constant rush of wheels on the tarmac dan the boy was winning when it happened to tricks to win and he had the nave his grandmother was robbing the queen then the crash the sound of breaking glass and falling stone at first the boycott boycotted tree had fallen on the roof in the name of god the boy cried when his grandmother opened the front bedroom door a cloud of plaster dust fell into the passage at first they couldn't see but the transport lorries still had one headlight working did run off the road come right through the front wall into the bedroom in the wreckage his grandmother found his mother she was crushed between the lorry in the wall the boy saw blood he didn't want to look his mother's hand was hanging lifeless like one of the dummies in duffy shop margaret the driver space was slumped over the wheel more blood horse groaning strangers brennan with torches ages past a siren group close and stopped a uniform man came in and pumped his mother's chest and breezy air into her mouth with his own when he shook his head somebody led the boy from the room he was taken out of the house under the trees and people told him everything would be all right later here the shot of a gun as the horse was put down there was ice on the road that night one skid on the band was all it took there is nothing to prevent it happening some people said it was a miracle it hadn't happened years ago but with the house being so close to the road it was an accident waiting to happen they said strange dreamlike days followed grown men shook the boys hand is if he too was a man women came into his mother's house inmates sandwiches and filled cops with tea into the washing up and put the dishes back where they did not belong people stood around drinking and smoking in the parlor dragging dirt and on their shoes onto his mother's good sheepskin rug saying what a fine woman she was laws people talking.

the queen the house duffy brennan
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"China the bone handled knives after dinner she read the nationalist while the boy did his homework there were spelling and some math he hated math didn't always makes sense how could a minus by minus plus geography was his subject he could name all the counties in ireland the mountains the rivers the tributaries the capital towns towards dusk his mother braided his grandmother's hair until white plate flames from the black range to shadows on a lowly him and his grandmother sprinkled oatmeal on the window ledges for the birds looking back the boy would like to believe that nobody wanted to leave the nobody wanted to put an end to that day but that's not what happened okay son finish up it's getting dark the buoyed finish its homework was reading about the formation of cliffs in his geography punk i'm tired outside i'm not finished with homework he lied he lied because he didn't want to go home his father would come home drunk after gambling housekeeping they would fight again about money how long more his mother asked i've geography to still ages well i might have a lie down but wake me when you're finished she went into the front bedroom and close the door the boy sat reading to diagrams of the sea cutting into the land and the land falling off into the ocean he read in the withering light into the print grew indistinct and he had to hold the pages toward the window to see the words his grandmother to delight the land until it was necessary for that she said marked the end of another day dusk was hurt time she rolled her daily cigarettes and sat smoking staring at the west facing window into the sun sank you'll destroy your eyes love she got up and adjusted the wake on the oil land and struck the match lower the shade down over the flame be the room and sudden ghazi lamplight get the cake team she sank who make a cup of tea the eight slabs of sponge cake played forty five kept track of the score with matchsticks.

China
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Door her kitchen smells of birch large coal smoke and lamp oil he feels the teapot from the water bucket gets her china cup and saucer off the dresser his mother use saucers but now his father makes do with mugs and doesn't bother with the table cloth his sunday close on pressed he shoes don't shine the way they did before he knocked centreback bedroom door put your t on the dressing table she's wide awake she doesn't sleep much keeps odd hours but always she waits for him to bring t before she rises lately there's a shake in her hands she can't control she hasn't able to carry a cop on a saucer without spilling the tea but the boy has learned to pretend he doesn't noticed these things he opens the window to drive out the smell of the chamber pot the glass in these windows is blurred the views distorted a photograph taken on his mother's wedding day is hanging crooked on the wall his mother and father in dark suits smiling for the camera his grandmother did not come to the wedding because she did not approve of his mother marrying his father his grandmother was a gypsy woman once but several here when the boy's mother was born before that she traveled ireland collecting scrap with her husband the boy vaguely remembers his grandfather a big man who lifted him up to the bear back of chest nightmare and laughed when he was frightened i was dreaming about cattle she says and blows under t we'll finish the job today crime i i won't be sorry they've been trying to finish the wall papering all summer but their hearts aren't in it they wind up digging new potatoes in the plot behind the house frein black pudding and playing beggar the nave listening to the rain dripping on the rhubarb leaves most days she sends the boy down to the.

windows ireland china the house
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Every morning the boy dresses and leaves the house before his father wakes it's an uphill walk for the first mile until he reaches the old school from there he can see her cottage in the valley the thatched roof glistening in the wet son the wheat in the surrounding fields is past ripe farmers are waiting for fine weather to bring out the combines and save the harvest it was a bad summer his grandmother's cottage is not like other houses there's no pretty garden out front turn people's heads no flowerbeds to weed or log on to moe it looks worse now than it ever did the narrow strip of ground is littered with builder's rubble of walked boards lime bags and broken glass the council wanted to knock the house down in april but his grandmother would have none of it told them it was her house and she would do as she pleased the boy was there the day the county engineer came out to persuade look miss he sent will build a new house somewhere else bathroom and electricity a snug house for your old age who says i live to be old she said she's almost eighty the engineer smiled well with the help of god you will be nice to be dragging well water for the rest of your days there's no water next t like well water would you not agree now all miss tv's would you like a couple j you must see reason recent there's no point in recent over something i don't want this is there the county engineer had no answer so instead of knocking the house down the council built a tall block wall between the cottage in the road now nobody can see out or in the front rooms are dark and gloomy and the new plaster in the front half of the house isn't painted it's the strangest looking house in the parish the boy opens the gate and runs.

the house engineer log on
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And walked away as i made my way home the dancers gesture i baffled and then annoyed me on the surface it had been easy to mistake for tenderness but the more i thought about it the more there seemed to be something condescending in even meant to humiliate in my mind the dancer smile became less and less genuine any began to seems to me that he had been choreographed thing the gesture for years turning it over waiting to run into me and was it deserved hadn't he gamely told this story not only to me but to all of the dinner guests that naive me if i discovered it through sarah tissues means reading his journals or letters which i couldn't possibly have done knowing him as little as i did it would have been different or if he had told me the story and confidence filled with still painful emotion but he had not he had offered it with the same smile emphasis dvd with which he had offered us the glass of crap after dinner as i walked i happen to pass the playground is already late in the afternoon but the small fencedin area was full of the children's highpitched activity among the many apartments i lived in over the years one was across the street from a playground and i'd always noticed that in the last halfhour before dusk the children's voices seemed to get noisier i can never tell whether it was because the city in the failing light had grown a decibel quieter or because the children had grown louder knowing that their time there were almost through certain phrases peals of laughter would break away from the rest rising not been hearing one of these i would sometimes get up for my desk to watch the children below but i didn't stop to watch them now consumed by my runin with the dancer i barely noticed them until a cry rang out pained and terrified an agonizing child's cry that tore in to me as if it were an appeal to me alone i stopped short and jerked around sure that i was going to find a mangled child fallen from a terrible plight but that there was nothing only the children running in and out of their circles in games and no sign of where.

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The cry come from my heart was racing adrenaline coursing through me my whole being poised to rush to save whoever let loose that terrible scream but the children continued to play on alarmed i scanned the buildings above thinking that maybe the cry come from an open window though it was november and cold enough to need the heat i stood gripping the fence for some time i didn't tell anyone what i heard not even dr lichtman my therapist of many years but the cry stayed with me sometimes i suddenly here it again is i wrote and i would lose my train of thought or become flustered i began to sense in it's something mocking and undertone i'd not heard at first other times i hear the cry just as they crossed over into wakefulness were departed from sleep and on those mornings i rose with the feeling of something wandering around my neck a hidden wait seemed to attach itself to simple objects a teacup a doorknob a glass hardly noticeable at first beyond the sense that every move required a slightly greater exertion of energy and by the time i negotiated among these things and arrived at my desk some reserve in me was already worn down or washed away that cry haunted me an slowly your honor i began to distrust myself.

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And so when it was my turn to offer news i simply said that everything was fine and that i was still writing to answer nodded it's possible that he even smiled in a genuine way away that always makes me with my unrelenting selfconsciousness feels slightly nervous and embarrassed when i encounter at knowing that i could never be so easy open or fluent i know he said i read everything you right do you i said surprised and suddenly agitated but he smiled again and it seems to me that the danger had passed the story would go unmentioned we walked a few blocks together toward union square before we had to turn off in separate directions his we said goodbye the dancer bent down and removed a piece of fluff from the color of my coat the moment was tender and almost intimate i took it down off my wall you know know he said softly what i said after i read your story i took the painting down off my wall i found i couldn't bear to look at it anymore you did i said caught offguard why i i wondered myself he said it's followed me from apartment to apartment from city to city for almost twenty years but after a while i understood what your story had made so clear to me what was that i wanted to know but couldn't ask and then the dancer who dole older was still languid in full of grace reached out and tapped me with two fingers on the cheek turned.

twenty years
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Novel and then a fifth which was largely based on my father who had died the year before it was the novel that i could not have written while he was alive said he'd been able to read it i have little doubt that he would have felt betrayed towards the end of his life he lost control of his body and was the band and by his dignity something that he remains painfully aware of until his final days in the novel i chronicled the humiliations in vivid detail even the time he defecated in his pants and i to clean in an incident that he found so shameful that for many days after where he was unable to look me in the eye and which it goes without saying he would have pleaded with me if he could have brought himself to speak of it never to mention to anyone but i did not stop at the torturous intimate scenes scenes that could my father momentarily suspended sense of shame he might have acknowledged as reflecting less on him then on the universe the plight of growing old and facing ones death i did not stop there but instead took his illness and his suffering with all its pungent detail and finally even his death as an opportunity to write about his life and more specifically about his failings as both a person and a father failings whose precise and abundant detail could be ascribed to him alone i paraded his faults and my misgivings the high drama of my young life with him thinlydisguised mostly by exaggeration across the pages of that book i gave unforgiving descriptions of his crimes as i saw them and then i forgave him and yet even if in the end.

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It was all done for the sake of hardwon compassion even if the final note of the book were of triumphant love and grief at the loss of him in the weeks and months leading up to its publication thickening feelings sometimes took hold of me and dumped its blackness before moving on when the publicity interviews i gave i emphasize that the book was fiction and professed my frustration with journalists and readers the like who insist on reading novels it's the auto biographies up their authors as if there were no such thing as the riders nation is if the writer's work lay only in judo full chronicling and not in fierce invention i shall be and the riders freedom to create two allterrain amend to collapse than expand to ascribe meaning to design to perform to effect to choose the life to experiment and on and on and i quoted henry james on the immense increase of that freedom a revelation as he calls the that anyone who has made a serious artistic attempts cannot help but become conscious of yes with the novel based on my father if not flying at least migrating off the shelves in bookstores across the country i celebrated the riders unparalleled freedom freedom from responsibility to anything and anyone but her own instincts than vision perhaps i did not say exactly but i certainly implied that the ryder serves the higher calling what one refers to only in art and religion as the vocation and cannot worry too much about the feelings of those whose lives virus from yes i believe perhaps even still believe that the riders should not be cramped by the possible consequences of her work she has no judy earthly accuracy or various them mlitou she's not an accountant nor is required to be something is ridiculous than misguided as a moral compass in her work the writer is free of laws but in her life your honor she is not free some months after the novel about my father was published i was out walking and came to a bookstore near washington square park out of habit i slowed is i reached the window to see whether my book was on display at that moment i saw the dancer inside at the register he saw.

writer henry james accountant judy washington square park
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Left for me new year's went by my face changed in the mere my body with no longer what it had been but i still found it difficult to believe that the possibility of having my own child's could expire without my explicit agreement in attacks the home that night i continue to think about that mother and her children the wheels of the car softly rolling over the pine needles on the forest floor the engine cut in clearing the palefaced as those young canecutters asleep in the back seat third under their fingernails how could have done it i said allowed to ass he was not really the question i wanted to ask but it was the closest i could get chest pain she lost their minds he said simply as if that were the end of it not long after word i wrote a story about the dancers childhood friends who had died asleep in his mother's car in the german forest i didn't change any of the details i only imagined more than the house the children had lived in the buoyant smell of spring evening seeping through the windows the trees in the garden that they had planted themselves all rose up easily before me how the children with things together the songs that their mother had taught them has she read the bible to them headache kept their collection of birds eggs on the sale and how the boy would climb into his sister's bed on stormy nights this story was accepted by a prominent magazine i didn't call the dancer before it was published nor did i send him a copy of this story he lived through it and i made use of it embellishing it is i saw fit have you in a certain light that is the kind of work i do your honour when i received a copy of the magazine i did wonder for a moment if the dancer would see it and how it would make him feel but i did not spend very long on the thought basking instead in the pride of seeing my work printed in the magazine i didn't run into the answer for some time after that nor did i think about what i would say if i did furthermore after the story was published i stop thinking about the mother and her children who had burned to death in a car as if by writing about them it made them disappear i continued to write i wrote my fourth.

the house windows
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He told me that his best friend from childhood done it when he was nine my friends and his older sister he said though i think she did most of it afterwards they gave it to me the dancer helped me on with my coat you know that painting has the sad stories he added moment later almost as an afterthought one afternoon the mother gave the children sleeping pills than t the boy was nine and his with eleven months they were asleep she carried them to the car and drove out to the forest by this time it was getting dark to poured gasoline all over the car in a match all three burned to death it's hard to explain the dancer said that was those jealous of how things were at my friend's house that here they kept their christmas tree up until april it turned ground in the needles were dropping off but many times i nag my mother about why we couldn't keep out christmas tree up as long as they did it yarns in this silence that followed this story which he told in the most straightforward manner the dancer smiled it it it may have been because i had my code on in the apartment was warm but suddenly i began to feel lightheaded there are many other things i would have liked to ask about the children and his friendship with them but i was afraid i might fainting so after another guest had made a joke about the morbid and tonight we thank the dancer for the meal instead goodbye as we go down in the elevator i thought to steady myself but s who was humming quietly seems not to notice at that time as an thinking of having a child but there were always things that we felt we had to work out i in our own lives together and separately in time simply pass without bringing any resolution or a clearer sense of how we might go about being something more than what we were already struggling to be and no when i was younger i believed i wanted to have a child i was not surprised to find myself at thirty five and then forty without one maybe this seems like ambivalence your honor and i suppose impart it was it was something else too it's a feeling i've always had despite mounting evidence to the contrary that there is that there are always will be more time.

christmas sleeping pills eleven months
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dancer who has been living in new york at the time asked worked at a theater where the dancer was performing a solo peace any parliament with small filled with the dancers unusual possessions thinks he'd been given or had found on the street or during his tireless travels all arranged with the sense of space proportion timing and grace that made him such a joy to watch on stage in fact it was strange almost frustrating to see the dancer in street clothes brown house flippers moving so practically through his department with little or no sign of the tremendous physical talent that lay dormant in an and i found myself craving some break in this pragmatic facade elite board turn some explosion of his true energy but all the same once i got used to this end began examining as many little collections i had the elated otherworldly feeling i sometimes get when entering the fear and others life when for a moment changing my banal habits than leaving like that seems entirely possible the feeling that always dissolves the next morning when i wake up to the familiar unmovable shapes of online some points i got up from the dinner table to use the bathroom and in the past the open door of the dancers bedroom in the room with spare with only a bad and wooden chair in a little alter with candle set up in one corner there is a large window facing south through which lower manhattan hung suspended in the dark the walls were blank except for one painting that was tacked up with peens it's a vibrant picture out if whose many bright highspirited strokes several faces emerged as if from a bog now and then topped with a hat the faces on the top half of the paper where upside down as if the painter had turned the page around our circled it on his or her knees while painting it in order to reach it more easily it was the strains piece of work unlike the style of the other things that answer had collected and i studied it for a minute or two before continuing on to the bathroom the fire in the living room burned down the night progressed at the end as we were putting on our coats i surprised myself by asking the dancer who had made the painting.

new york manhattan
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sunday's september twenty nine eighty five the sun was really hot i may have gotten sunburn went to eighty six in thursday doyle's for the joint auction of louis armstrong stuff and james beers he was weird the two different lies put together an every little whisk and part in peace of sheet music was for sale with people hovering over them i'm surprised that don't do it right there in the apartments but two catalogues twenty dollars monday september thirty of nineteen eighty five nobody cared about me yesterday i was in the same spots looking the same way but where i was mobbed before nobody cared it's funny what makes some days different newspapers two dollars found one dollar thursday october third nineteen eighty five oh why do i have to get old the inquirer article that frank sinatra is suing over said that when he gets up in the morning he so worried about that he asked his wife barbara how do i look today oh frankie i remember when i walked all the way into pittsburgh to see him what all those girls were swooning about there weren't any girls there swooning i went in and met this other kid to go see him sing with tommy dorsey it was one of my first thing that i did alone going into town and seeing him went to the whitney i was there to advertise mike campbell soup box painting and for all the work and publicity i should have charged him with two hundred fifty thousand dollars i mean there are huge company instead of just costing the portrait we must be getting desperate me standing there twenty years later still with a campbell soup things felt like a new yorker cartoon reading merano is there i guess she's a spokesman for campbell's and they were treating me more important than her saying they only wanted to photograph me and she said but he asked me to be in the picture and they said we only want him because this just as a different category it's like when i've done the ports with a big baseball player they photographed.

sunburn doyle frank sinatra barbara pittsburgh tommy dorsey louis armstrong mike campbell new yorker baseball two hundred fifty thousand dol twenty dollars twenty years two dollars one dollar
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It turned out they wanted exactly what they said painting of their new box i tried to do something clever and make it more but the hated now i have to do it over again and the horrible news the day with that finally after hearing from sandy gallon about the dolly parton portrait's i called them the secretary got on and said oh sandy's oh bear and saying that it just doesn't look like my art sandy just doesn't like the picture she said and after fifteen minutes she popped the question of could get his ten thousand dollars back and i said well sure you know but doesn't you want me to do it again she said they thought it would be more colorful more pa but i mean i should have known because it all started out so strains with dolly calling me and saying that she was the one who wanted to buy it as a gift for sandy and then that was just so they could get a better price i guess because when i say well i i'd like to give you one dolly for being so nice to sandy to give these to him they call back and said well since you were going to give a free one one out just knocked down the price instead no hollywood well i've learned things next time i'm going to make them work for like come in and see if they liked the pictures and everything every single step of the way make them work hard oh and then the even said that i could try to sell it that they give permission so that was horrible thursday september nineteen nineteen eighty five it was a busy day at the office was meeting with bruno rupert had an idea to stretch canvas over a box for the campbell's thing left early so the dog dr cab six dollars and i missed pages opening for her mexican artist theft the second try in poor page just as it was happening the worried about the mexican earthquake which was really bad maybe a seven point eight the kid has no lock the artist jeanmichel pick me up in limbo me went to rockefeller center to a party of the steven greenberg guy was giving his office.

secretary sandy hollywood bruno rupert campbell theft dolly rockefeller center steven greenberg ten thousand dollars fifteen minutes six dollars
"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 4 years ago

"denis ohare" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One the april sixteen nineteen seventy nine did i say that the other night nureyev was in a lanes i never know what you're supposed to do their when you see somebody be very cool so you don't bother them or should you throw your arms around them because i mean it is great when diana ross does i didn't go to steve rubles getting out of jail party in the paper said that in his jail so he wrote his diary on studio fifty four card that he had pocketted snag gray heat he said the cell was disgusting that the first thing he'll fight for his jail reform friday august twenty eight one i called john fat but it didn't really mean it paramount was having a screening of mommy dearest cab six dollars aero was there with russell todd so we saw the movie it was absolutely great things really good really oh this movie effective me so much movies are really affecting me lately what's happening to me and you do roof mm likely louis be mayor just dumb sir tells your she's too old to leave quietly and then when pepsi dumpster owed she was crazy i think identify with jones what it is okay said then there was a light supper then it was early so john and i walked up trendy columbus avenue in somebody yelled gay boy at me and that was funny dan went home watch tv took a sleeping pill woke up at nine o'clock feeling so depressed and miserable oh god i feel like i did when i first came to new york i'm going to the same things being afraid to live alone oh what should i do i'm down to one hundred and fifteen pounds but that's not the problem really isn't either better i guess i should try not to think so much about looks but i'm not thinking too much about looks i never do i don't i like ugly people i do any way ugly people are just as hard to get his pretty people they don't want you either wednesday september eighteen nineteen eighty five the campbell soup company hated the painting the commission.

nureyev diana ross russell todd louis pepsi jones dan campbell soup company the commission john fat new york fifteen pounds six dollars