23 Burst results for "delong"

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | 6 d ago

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

01:32 min | 7 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Strengthen this fabric we all love. Great will thank you so much for all the work that you're doing Andrea Delong. A my is director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She guides staff in the design and management of nine acres of beautiful native plant gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and a native plant nursery. Her enthusiasm and knowledge for this field is extraordinary for every episode in March cultivating places highlighting one of the women in my new book. The Earth in her hands seventy five extraordinary women working in the world of plants which officially published last week on March third. Join US again next week when we continue our series on women in plants. When we're joined by Dr Elaine Ingham founder of the Soil Food Web Inc listening. There are so many ways. People engage in and grow from the cultivation of their places. The Earth is in all of our hands so take good care. Cultivating places a listener supported co-production of north state public radio over uncle meeting place dot com this week..

Andrea Delong US Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C director of horticulture Dr Elaine Ingham Texas Austin Soil Food Web Inc University of Texas founder
"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

02:14 min | 7 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Toxins is is critical. Not using toxins. To begin with in your landscape is helpful. But there's certain things that roadsides were still driving so we're we're going to have run off using rain gardens and filtration ponds can be a great way to mitigate that it also provides its own amenity a lot of our native plants we think of as being very drought tolerant but some of these plants that grow on along creek sides are very adapted to wetter situations so having a rain garden gives you another place to put some of those species that might like a little bit extra water. Yeah now you are there in Austin. What what zone are you? And what do you know your annual precipitation on average Andrea? We get about thirty five inches of rain per year. The problem is that we get all at once rate might easily five inch rain Within a twenty four hour period so that we're really endanger flash flooding in our area. So all of these water issues that we've been talking about manage how to manage. Water is really important for us. Yeah and What what zone is that? So the Garden Zone that we're in is eight. Be Okay but I also think it's important to look at Because I think that just talks about what the temperature is but we're looking at cold and heat in the summer. A lot of the plants that people bring in from other places to grow in Texas if they're not from Texas they're going to have a hard time adapting to our heat that Safa something but then there's also the water issue and right right and go into that. Yes yes that learning to garden with. Your climate is such an interesting when when I first moved here to Northern California I thought Oh well a lot of my same beloved plants from Colorado should do fine and on paper. They might do fine but in fact they don't love the wet winter. That doesn't freeze quite as hard and they often wrought as you are describing in your Dry but sometimes humid summer conditions. Like it's it's a reminder to all of us that gardening.

Texas Andrea Austin Colorado
"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

09:06 min | 7 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Notes. It was a lovely interview some of the primary threads of inquiry while I was researching and writing this book. We're into how the plant world is improved as a result of being more representative not only allowing for more women to excel but also nurturing a much greater diversity of women how the field is far more viable and creative and innovative a career path for women than ever before and how this plant work world is demonstrating greater social and environmental responsibility in large part due to women's contributions and finally on how our human engagement with plants connects us to the natural world stewardship to our communities and to ourselves on powerful intellectual physical and spiritual levels Andrea Delong Amaya works in the metaphorical soil fed by the legacy of another great woman in the horticultural world. Not A horticulturalist herself. But a plant lover Ladybird Johnson. These are good women to learn about in women's history month now back to our conversation with Andrea Delong Amaya. This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden. In the second week of women's history month we're speaking with a native plant conservationist and advocate Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin. I remember visiting. I WANNA say four or five years ago now and just being really impressed with The beauty of the gardens the caretaking of the gardens and how much native plant and aesthetic gardening information. You Got Altogether. Thank you yeah Certainly as part is important because we would love for people to embrace these plants and use them at home most not all of them but most them but then we also use the research that we've done an incorporate those into demonstrations so we've done in the past We've done a lot of work with green roofs as you walk around. You'll see a number of green roofs that Demonstrate different kinds of settings that native plants could could be part of part of the research was to develop a planting media that is designed to work with our hot dry climates and then not just planting succulents and seems which I think most being roofs have. We're incorporating grasses and wildflowers into those areas too so that's one of the things that we have on demonstration green walls where we have screens that will provide some shade two buildings and all different kinds of sustainable practices that we able to incorporate into our landscapes here obviously just using native plants is helpful we have the E N Lucy Family Garden. Yes which is a fairly new addition to our gardens. It's about five and a half years old when we built it though we were designing it to be certified under the sustainable sites initiative that's set of criteria that people can follow voluntarily if you want to go through the system the ranking system and then depending on what kinds of things you incorporate into your landscape and the kinds of sustainable features that you include you can get a rating similar to leads for architecture are familiar with that So we do things like using native materials not bringing things in from a far distance in the construction that helps reduce the carbon footprint that you would have if you're bringing things in from other parts of the country or even other parts of the world incorporating materials that don't have toxins in them so a lot of the metal that we used we didn't use any zinc for example and all the hardware and we're trying to use the for Stewardship Council certified wood products using mulches that are recycled. One of the things that Is a big highlight for kids especially but adults are interested in who is we used crushed glass which the city of Austin collects from our recycling bins. You can crush it and tumble. It's it's not sharp and then use it as a as a mulch like mineral mulch and it has all different colors in it. Because you're mixing all those glass pieces in you have C. You have seagrass beds all over the garden and then maybe not see glass recycled glass. I guess you'd call it rather than sea glass so I have one question about the you mentioned which I think is Kind of a part of the sustainable materials work you're doing when you were doing the research to develop the media for the green roofs of course by which you mean the what you plant. The seeds in on top of that roof. What would did you use what? What was the media you ultimately developed Andrea Actually? The actual recipe is proprietary. And I don't actually even know what's in it It is all recycled and locally sourced materials which is one of the criteria that we're looking at when we developed it then. I know that. They experimented with several different materials. To see what would be both lightweight but also get draining and would hold moisture but not too much you know allowing for the drainage to happen and what's also important to understand that a lot of green roofs are actually not that sustainable. They're using materials. That are brought in from far distances. They May Have Peat Moss in them which is not millions dateable material. So it's really important for us to make sure that we were using materials that were renewable and locally sourced as well as being functional right and. I believe that they're just like here in interior northern California. It's a slightly different climate. But you run up against some very similar issues such as Water Resource Management Both as a run off and as a A precious resource during many months of the year. Talk about your some of your water. catchment and distribution methods in order to use that resource as wisely as possible when the wildfire center was initially built. We had the largest rainwater harvesting system in the country We can harvest to almost seventy thousand gallons of rainwater in store it Which is wonderful that we're able to use that on the landscape it's superior to city water anyway. So that's always been an important piece for us and yes you're right. Water conservation is a huge thing in our community as well. And that's been a really big selling point for promoting native plants because they are adopted to our climate and generally they're gonNA use less additional water in a in a landscape in addition to that one of the other features that we have in the Family Garden. That was site certified. We have a series of rain gardens. And they're all connected so when one fills up it feel flows into the other one the idea of these rain gardens. Is that when you get a lot of rain? The water is directed into these depressed areas. That have a planting medium has soil. That is well draining and so it helps percolate the water into the ground. So it's not just running off but it also directed in stores it long enough so that some of it will go into the ground and then if we get really a lot of rain it'll slow into the next one but we're able to capture more water. Instead of contributing to flooding downstream for example and all the soil will help filtration filter out. Impurities which is probably more important if you were in a parking lot or on the side of the road or something. Not so much the garden. We don't have toxins in here but but that's another function that rain garden one has and it's a fantastic model for the people who are visiting I don't know I I know you have millions of visitors. In a year and in all likelihood many of them are coming from urban areas. Where run off onto urban hard scape that goes directly into open surface water and disturbs the the balance of the water the quality of the water the habitat for all of the aquatic life. Both animal and plant is it becoming more and more important in our world of increasing urbanization. Absolutely filtering out. The toxins is is critical. Not using toxins. To begin with in your landscape is helpful. But there's certain things that roadsides were still driving so we're we're going.

Andrea Delong Amaya Austin Ladybird Johnson Andrea Delong Andrea Actually E N Lucy Family Garden representative Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C Family Garden California Peat Moss Stewardship Council director University of Texas
"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

14:21 min | 7 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden from nor state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Joel. Were now well into women's history month and International Women's Day was this last Sunday march eighth as we continue cultivating places. Women's history month interviews. Were joined this week by Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She Guides fifteen staff members in the design and management of nine acres of Native Plant Gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and in native plant nursery. She teaches classes in native plant horticulture and writes and presents on her passion for the field widely. She spoke with US late. Last autumn to share more about the history and work of the centre including it. Being the legacy of another extraordinary woman ladybird Johnson Andrea shares. Her own enthusiasm for this field of work. Welcome Andrea Hi. How you doing? I'm great how are you wonderful? I'd love for you to start by describing describe the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center as visually as you can for listeners. Who may not have been there. And then we'll talk a little bit about your specific work there Andrea Sherr so we are in a South Austin and in the middle of Texas. We're in a part of the state that we refer to as Texas El country or the Edwards Plateau which is a beautiful beautiful part of the state. Of course Texans will say every part of the state is beautiful but I WANNA say text. The central Texas area is particularly beautiful especially in the spring were really renowned for having excellent wildflower displays including the Texas blue on it which occurs all over the state but the central Texas areas particularly flora for us in the spring. And so we are like I said in Austin and the site that were on is a public garden where about two hundred and eighty five acres. I think we actually added a little bit more In the last year or so and it's a public garden where we feature plants that are native to the state of Texas. That's the site now. The organization is bigger than that But the gardens here. We're demonstrating hell different. Native plants can be used in different kinds of landscapes different kinds of styles. We have collections of plants. From different parts of the State we are the Botanic Garden Texas. So we're trying to increase our collections to represent other parts of the state as well as the central Texas area so we have about nine acres of cultivated gardens and then we have a sixteen Acre Texas Arboretum of trees So those are the horticultural areas in then. We have natural areas in The other parts of the the property And that the natural areas also include some research areas. We have some Areas where we're doing Land Management prescribed fire treatments and different kinds of land-management to see how that influences the vegetation. Yeah we can talk more about that. If you're if you like definitely definitely I will i. I would love to get into some of the specifics of each of those areas you just described but before we get there. Describe your your your job there what it entails and may be the trajectory of your twenty years there. Andrea. Yeah well. I started as a gardener appropriately and really enjoy working outside. I mean I've always been interested in being outdoors and that goes way back to my childhood is probably most people who have an affinity for the natural world That usually starts childhood so I grew up doing things outdoors with my parents particularly with my dad. We'd go camping or canoeing. And I remember having a field guide of of wildflowers weeds that surrounded our area where we lived and that was great. Fun everything from astronomy to birds and lizards and insects. Just everything is so interesting And I just find that the more I learn about things the more I'm fascinated and in awe of the natural world so that's just started early but it's just been a long a lifelong interest in learning more and observing more. I mean I laugh. We have a big picture window at our dining room table. And that's our TV. We don't have an actual electronics of the Inter House. It's overlooking a garden and pond and we just sit there and watch the animal antics and what's blooming and it's great fun and it's a nice way to slow down in our fast paced world That's a that's a big part of what I think. Nature does for me and for a lot of people So you started as a gardener. What year was that Andrea and then tell us about the progression of your rules at the Center Which clearly you progressed in because of your deepening curiosity and ever expanding knowledge base. Yes so I started in December of nine hundred ninety eight and Worked as a gardener I've guarded in most of the areas that we have in Under cultivation over the years and at some point we had Position of gardens manager was available so I moved into that and then I don't know maybe fifteen years ago I transitioned into the direct report culture and Unfortunately that means a little bit less guarding than I used to do. But it also gets me in a higher level of designing decision making which is very exciting and allows me to have more influence over some of the bigger picture things that are happening And then overseeing the natural areas arboretum and the nurseries also been pretty pretty fun and adds different interest to what what I'm looking at. Yeah so talk about Before we get into the specifics of some of the programmatic areas and display areas there and then the research give listeners. A history of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center when it started what it's original mission in scope was of course the wonderful woman for whom it is named and by whom it was founded in its original iteration and So that that people have an understanding of just how much bigger is then. A Garden appreciating wildflowers. Because that is a fabulous mission but it's it is much bigger than that so we're very blessed to have had the visionary Labor Johnson as founder. She founded the wildflower center. Initially as the wildflower research center. The National Welfare Research Center and that was an endeavor that she took on with her friend and actress. Helen Hayes which a lot of people don't remember that part of of the history but it's Kinda Funny Mrs Johnson didn't feel like she had enough name. Recognition Systems of Helen Hayes. And so her mission right from the beginning was to really try to understand an unlocked the secrets of wildfires in native plants and understand how they grow and that was the original research. The the wildflower center did at that time and so that was a nineteen eighty two so the organization started back. Then we moved to our current site as a public garden Before it was more just a research site with some portables but it didn't really have botanical garden kind of exhibits. Someone moved to Our current site in one thousand nine hundred ninety five that was really a big focus of making the space Amenable to guests and having exhibits that people can interact with and having educational programming and really elaborating on that when she first started it. Why we'll just remind listeners? She was of course the first lady of the United States and she Had A as firstly. She had some remarkable initiatives to beautify. I think was the word that was used then. roads and highways across the country and she was taken by the wildflower diversity there in her home state for good reason. Because it's a pretty remarkable native flora. Will you talk a little bit about that? And and why people thought this was not just a pretty project but was worthy of deep research. Even at that time so yeah. Mrs Johnson grew up in a rural setting and without siblings so she was a long time so her best friend is. A child was outside Just the outdoors and I think that was what what instilled upon in her the scrape passion for the for the natural world and then as she became first lady She really had a great influence on President Johnson in terms of Passing legislation one of the things he's known for is the beautification. Act The highway beautification. Act and getting billboards off of the roadsides and cleaning up roadsides and planting wildflowers and the way I understand it you know we talk about it is being beautification and she knew at the time. She was very savvy that at the time. She knew that that was a word that would engage people. The public secretly I. I've heard that she felt like that was actually kind of a word and that it is she. I think she understood. It was deeper than just beautification was away to connect people with the idea that she had the native flora of Texas. Talk about the diversity you have there. And how the diversity of Texas which is not which is an enormous place with a lot of micro climates and But talk about that. Diversity is then valuable as a kind of proto type for researching and understanding diversity anywhere Andrea. The State is a big state. And because of that. We're really blessed with many different Eka regions and vegetation zones. We have depending on how you look at it. We might we have about a dozen different vegetation zones and it's kind of a funnel you if you look at how the the geography of North America As things migrate and flow back and forth from north to South America it goes through Central America and through the funnel of Texas so we get plants and animals coming through there that over millennia have really made it for very rich environment which is Super Fun to be exploring and studying and and gardening with those plants and gardening for wildlife the diversity of wildlife that we have what is your current number of sort of native plants in Texas. We have thousands Maybe five thousand native plant species or tax in the state of Texas. But I would have to confirm that number on our site. We have about nine hundred species of native tax on our property here and tax would include species and sometimes subspecies right. I think one of the things. It's really interesting to me. And part of what makes Native Plant Research. So interesting is that You know it's that Great John Muir quote of you can't pull on one thread in the universe without tugging on the whole of the universe but the native plant as you were describing that idea of Texas being this fabulous funnel in migration patterns and and water like large watersheds scope. You get this sense of the complexity and history of that interrelationship between climatic patterns geology. The tectonic plates of our continent and how plants and animals are interrelated with all of that. And it's all co evolved into this fabulous beautiful soup that you know in your region is the big beautiful state of Texas Talk. About how over time the different display areas have evolved there at the center and what they're kind of individual purposes are from the perspective of not only engaging the public but also providing laboratories for research end data and information collection. The gardens themselves have not been The subject of actual research study. I mean informally as gardeners. Were all every time we garden? It's always an experiment you but we do have more of our. Formal research is happening in the natural areas primarily with a land-management research. I would like to progress as we move forward to doing more plant trials and other more formal kinds of horticultural research but just demonstrating these plants. in having them in a garden setting where we can somewhat control conditions. Some plants obviously are pretty malleable and while adjusts to horticultural kind of settings others We found not well suited for gardens. They may be beautiful plants but they may be tricky or they may be really specific in the kinds of areas and conditions that they want to grow and people love. There's a little plant called Mountain. Pink which is super cute. It's Maybe a foot tall and it looks like this. Perfect bouquet of flowers with hot pink balsams on it and they bloom in the summer. They grow in road cuts where it's just basically solid rock almost just COLUCCI and people love them and they want to grow them in their garden..

Texas Andrea Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C Native Plant Gardens Austin Johnson Andrea Botanic Garden Texas President Johnson US wildflower research center Andrea Delong wildflower center University of Texas Native Plant Research California Texas El country Andrea Hi Acre Texas Arboretum Andrea Sherr
Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

Cultivating Place

09:44 min | 7 months ago

Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

"We continue cultivating places. Women's history month interviews. Were joined this week by Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She Guides fifteen staff members in the design and management of nine acres of Native Plant Gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and in native plant nursery. She teaches classes in native plant horticulture and writes and presents on her passion for the field widely. She spoke with US late. Last autumn to share more about the history and work of the centre including it. Being the legacy of another extraordinary woman ladybird Johnson Andrea shares. Her own enthusiasm for this field of work. Welcome Andrea Hi. How you doing? I'm great how are you wonderful? I'd love for you to start by describing describe the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center as visually as you can for listeners. Who may not have been there. And then we'll talk a little bit about your specific work there Andrea Sherr so we are in a South Austin and in the middle of Texas. We're in a part of the state that we refer to as Texas El country or the Edwards Plateau which is a beautiful beautiful part of the state. Of course Texans will say every part of the state is beautiful but I WANNA say text. The central Texas area is particularly beautiful especially in the spring were really renowned for having excellent wildflower displays including the Texas blue on it which occurs all over the state but the central Texas areas particularly flora for us in the spring. And so we are like I said in Austin and the site that were on is a public garden where about two hundred and eighty five acres. I think we actually added a little bit more In the last year or so and it's a public garden where we feature plants that are native to the state of Texas. That's the site now. The organization is bigger than that But the gardens here. We're demonstrating hell different. Native plants can be used in different kinds of landscapes different kinds of styles. We have collections of plants. From different parts of the State we are the Botanic Garden Texas. So we're trying to increase our collections to represent other parts of the state as well as the central Texas area so we have about nine acres of cultivated gardens and then we have a sixteen Acre Texas Arboretum of trees So those are the horticultural areas in then. We have natural areas in The other parts of the the property And that the natural areas also include some research areas. We have some Areas where we're doing Land Management prescribed fire treatments and different kinds of land-management to see how that influences the vegetation. Yeah we can talk more about that. If you're if you like definitely definitely I will i. I would love to get into some of the specifics of each of those areas you just described but before we get there. Describe your your your job there what it entails and may be the trajectory of your twenty years there. Andrea. Yeah well. I started as a gardener appropriately and really enjoy working outside. I mean I've always been interested in being outdoors and that goes way back to my childhood is probably most people who have an affinity for the natural world That usually starts childhood so I grew up doing things outdoors with my parents particularly with my dad. We'd go camping or canoeing. And I remember having a field guide of of wildflowers weeds that surrounded our area where we lived and that was great. Fun everything from astronomy to birds and lizards and insects. Just everything is so interesting And I just find that the more I learn about things the more I'm fascinated and in awe of the natural world so that's just started early but it's just been a long a lifelong interest in learning more and observing more. I mean I laugh. We have a big picture window at our dining room table. And that's our TV. We don't have an actual electronics of the Inter House. It's overlooking a garden and pond and we just sit there and watch the animal antics and what's blooming and it's great fun and it's a nice way to slow down in our fast paced world That's a that's a big part of what I think. Nature does for me and for a lot of people So you started as a gardener. What year was that Andrea and then tell us about the progression of your rules at the Center Which clearly you progressed in because of your deepening curiosity and ever expanding knowledge base. Yes so I started in December of nine hundred ninety eight and Worked as a gardener I've guarded in most of the areas that we have in Under cultivation over the years and at some point we had Position of gardens manager was available so I moved into that and then I don't know maybe fifteen years ago I transitioned into the direct report culture and Unfortunately that means a little bit less guarding than I used to do. But it also gets me in a higher level of designing decision making which is very exciting and allows me to have more influence over some of the bigger picture things that are happening And then overseeing the natural areas arboretum and the nurseries also been pretty pretty fun and adds different interest to what what I'm looking at. Yeah so talk about Before we get into the specifics of some of the programmatic areas and display areas there and then the research give listeners. A history of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center when it started what it's original mission in scope was of course the wonderful woman for whom it is named and by whom it was founded in its original iteration and So that that people have an understanding of just how much bigger is then. A Garden appreciating wildflowers. Because that is a fabulous mission but it's it is much bigger than that so we're very blessed to have had the visionary Labor Johnson as founder. She founded the wildflower center. Initially as the wildflower research center. The National Welfare Research Center and that was an endeavor that she took on with her friend and actress. Helen Hayes which a lot of people don't remember that part of of the history but it's Kinda Funny Mrs Johnson didn't feel like she had enough name. Recognition Systems of Helen Hayes. And so her mission right from the beginning was to really try to understand an unlocked the secrets of wildfires in native plants and understand how they grow and that was the original research. The the wildflower center did at that time and so that was a nineteen eighty two so the organization started back. Then we moved to our current site as a public garden Before it was more just a research site with some portables but it didn't really have botanical garden kind of exhibits. Someone moved to Our current site in one thousand nine hundred ninety five that was really a big focus of making the space Amenable to guests and having exhibits that people can interact with and having educational programming and really elaborating on that when she first started it. Why we'll just remind listeners? She was of course the first lady of the United States and she Had A as firstly. She had some remarkable initiatives to beautify. I think was the word that was used then. roads and highways across the country and she was taken by the wildflower diversity there in her home state for good reason. Because it's a pretty remarkable native flora. Will you talk a little bit about that? And and why people thought this was not just a pretty project but was worthy of deep research. Even at that time so yeah. Mrs Johnson grew up in a rural setting and without siblings so she was a long time so her best friend is. A child was outside Just the outdoors and I think that was what what instilled upon in her the scrape passion for the for the natural world and then as she became first lady She really had a great influence on President Johnson in terms of Passing legislation one of the things he's known for is the beautification. Act The highway beautification. Act and getting billboards off of the roadsides and cleaning up roadsides and planting wildflowers and the way I understand it you know we talk about it is being beautification and she knew at the time. She was very savvy that at the time. She knew that that was a word that would engage people. The public secretly I. I've heard that she felt like that was actually kind of a word and that it is she. I think she understood. It was deeper than just beautification was away to connect people with the idea that she

Texas Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C President Johnson Andrea Wildflower Center Austin Johnson Andrea Native Plant Gardens United States Botanic Garden Texas Wildflower Research Center Andrea Delong Andrea Hi Andrea Sherr University Of Texas Texas El Country Helen Hayes Acre Texas Arboretum National Welfare Research Cent
"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

Heartland Radio 2.0

05:00 min | 10 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

"All we had was a picture and a description that unfortunately that the guy was six foot six and have red hair copper red hair gifts under and I was looking one place. The couple of the guys were looking elsewhere and from behind me I heard stop pulse. You know all that you know the things that we say when we're arresting someone in public and I turned around and they're about five or six guys my colleagues Guns were Out People were screaming and running Bringing this Guy Gra- had hold of the Chi- and and and I I I run over so we're kid. Where's the kid I see this? They're trying to my colleagues are trying to bring the guy down get him on the ground and I looked through this mass of of humanity and I see little white arm in in the middle of it and I reached in and I grabbed it and I pulled it and it was the arm of the little boy and when he was only eighty pounds and so I kind of pulled him out and he was terrified. Crying and and My partners I took care of the bad guy. I took the victim back to the office. We chatted I took and then I took him to the to the hospital and A few days later I brought him home to his family. And that was the most adapt made made all the nonsense of of of being a Cop Yeah and working in a bureaucracy go away was I remained. Friends Ends with him for twenty one years really all grown up and he's been through some stuff. That's very cool that you stay involved. I mean that's it's like I think cops work their whole career just hoping they have any anything close to that you know something. That's ten powerful as that because because you see so much crab and he works many late nights and you go through so many divorces or whatever the you know the case is because the job and that makes that's very that's very cool cool story good for you. Hey candace taught thirty years and died in prison after about ten years. It's good good good. That's what should happen. Yeah that's here. I don't know I like to think for them to have to work for me kid cases in my day everywhere I worked with regularly -tective that special specialty people for that locally. Okay so I. I don't think that fit my like I did a lot of different things but that was one of the things I was like. I don't know if I'm very good for that. I can't I can't do those interviews with those guys like Takane on other stuff. Hey candace I want through my people the yearbook which is special agent take special agent my life on the front lines as the woman in the FBI and in a couple of years or in about a year. I'll have another book coming out based on people that interviewed on my TV show facing evil and the name of that book will be called the convicted. Nice where can they go to find this beyond just Amazon and The other open source place. The books of course any any book outlet. Nah You can buy used copies of of special agent we're going to have a twentieth anniversary issue with. It'll be twenty years this is coming Twenty twenty no it came out in twenty one and To see the shows to see the interviews themselves of course deadly women's all over the place. There's an APP called go spelled I just like it. Sounds and deadly women's the number one show on the on the ID APP graduated. And it's awesome. Congratulations if you WANNA see the interviews of the of the people convicted of murder that I interviewed. Most of them are on Youtube in the name of the show is facing evil so just put go to Youtube and Keyword Candice Delong and pretty much. They'll all come up. There's thirty six of them their way your fascinating person. I can't thank you for. You're sharing this time with us. This is very cool. That's when I I know less about that aspect of law enforcement than probably any other parts all having you. Here's a big deal for me. The guys guys love to so we'll make sure we check out your stuff until everybody listens to the show to check it out consume anything that candace delong puts US Noli Eero. I mean she's she's she's a bad ass. She's a true American Better Kansas thanks. It was fun. Absolutely thank you so much and we'll hopefully we'll get to talk to you again sometime. I'm very interested as things progress with this active shooter. thing that the be used used doing so if that ever progresses in in things develop along that road I'd like to hear more about Oh awesome. Thank you so much lazy gentleman. Candice Interesting.

candace Guy Gra Youtube candace delong Candice Delong candace I Candice Interesting Twenty twenty Chi FBI Kansas Takane murder Amazon
"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

Heartland Radio 2.0

13:10 min | 10 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

"Dixie like piggies. Do you have any thoughts on Jon Benet Ramsey case. Now there's anything that sticks out to you all all right and and I've been I was on to is in in September. Sixteen every news outlet and talk show outlet in the country. Did a special on it. The Dr Phil Show they got John Ramsey. And Burke Ramsey who is nine years old at the time of the prime her brother other at the time of the show is nineteen and they asked me they called me and they said we're just feeling out and they said where. Do you stand on the Jon. Benet Ramsey case I said Oh that's easy that's the case and the DNA points to an unknown male and No one in the family or in the family sphere of family of friends and whatnot. has tested positive for that and I said it. It's really means. A Stranger Ranger came in the house and killed her in the basement and got away with it and they said we want you on the show and There were some other shows shows. A one of them resulted. CBS Did a show and basically they had a couple retired. FBI profiler one of them said Patsy wrote the note and the other ones said. I said I along with a A famous forensic pathologist whose name escapes me but basically they painted the picture To fit their theory rather than following the evidence there evidence she had unknown own male. DNA in her and on her she was. She was tortured. Her hands were tied with UH OF COMPLEX NOT. That's an adult crime committed. That's an adult sex crime committed by a post pugh doesn't meal on what we know is a six year old girl that's what it is and They actually the the show that gotten so much trouble with. CBS and ended up in a seven hundred and fifty million dollar lawsuits for anybody that said John and Patsy Ramsey were involved vault in the murder of their daughter in any way or that did it and this one show they said Burke did it. PATSY covered it up and everybody ended up on on on the lawsuit and they had to settle out of court. Because you can't go around you know unless you say it is my opinion Blah Blah Ah Blah but all the experts that looked at that note no one and I mean super experts. No one was able to say it was identical to Pazzi. He Patsy San writing in like five out of six things that you look for. Nobody can say that but this retired. FBI agent felt comfortable. People saying it and he ended up in a lawsuit in a field. That subjective anyway I mean yes. It's yes yeah you can always right and you can always find one hired gun you know. I always tell people you find somebody to say anything if it's a field. A forensics that has any amount of subjectivity. To it you can find a higher Aghanistan GonNa say whatever you want dangerous business. I didn't know about that lawsuit. So yes you can't bring in an expert about six months ago. Seven hundred and fifty million dollars it was against. CBS was against production company. It was against everybody that participated that said or implied. That John Ramseyer BURP. Did it or patsy covered up and the thing about it is I've known about that lawsuit for ten. I've known that ten years or maybe fifteen years that the ramseys and even patsy before she died the Ramsey sue. Anybody that said they had anything anything to do with their daughter's murder and one and one COP is judgment. A COP that wrote a book. How patsy Ramsey killed her daughter I think it was successfully sued for seventy five million dollars? I mean you can't go around. Doing that with a lot of people are surprised to hear what I just you said that it's a DNA kate of unknown DNA. That means someone got in that Charles got. That girl brought her down to the basement. And the way does she was killed is indicative of a post Pugh bessant a person. It was an adult sex claim. ona-led little girl. That's the scariest this monsters. The king comes thing of horror. Movies comes into your own house in. Does that to your child. That's the worst almost a guy in this room. That's cringing right now. Because because he is posted opinion a couple of times on on. Who's done in that case they're talking about shows with credibility not So we have also said it was a data. Yes the and you know what. That's not nearly as publicized as all these other theories of keeping you know suspects in house because there's less drama associated with the right it's not as good. TV The DNA. Okay was available Lynn there was the grand jury and and Alex Hunter of the the state's attorney at the time made the decision the jury wanted pins wanted to move forward with charges against the RAMSEYS and L. Center said no because he knew about the DNA. The Boulder police as department was much happier of clinging to their belief that the ramseys did it. Then looking at truth which is No they didn't not only that look at Burke. At Burke at the time was nine years old he was in pre pugh bessant and this was an advanced sex crime right now disassembled. Show your it happens all the time police make the mind up and HR so much time. China make evidence fit their theory. They lose awesome. It's time really should be confirmation bias you you you try to somebody so for doing that. And it's like okay Do do you ever confusing on your behalf. Like trying to get back to the active shooters real quick but like running in with other agencies. He's like overlapping on investigations. Like that or were you like exclusive enough and what you did. It didn't matter you were kind of beyond that it didn't matter and One of the things I learned early in my career working with local cops like Chicago. PD in San Francisco PD is really early on in in in working case I would say hey How do you know how nice to meet you Blah Blah Blah? I used to be a nurse at northwestern and that broke the ice when the new that I was more than an FBI agent and cops love nurses. Hey it's back Dating I never had the problem. Yeah okay so the active shooters. They're trying to get inside the minds and make get a thorough more thorough understanding of why it's happening and what triggers these individuals is. There is there hope like his seems i. I mean it's almost an epidemic now like its its talked about domestic terrorism. I mean it's not one person doing acts over and over that we don't know of. It's always one individual adjoining get caught or killed. But it's almost like like you have this Colt of connected people. They're not but you know we have these random acts all all the time and people are just scared to death. Should be like we're gonNA make any progress. It's so how well it's you know one of the things when we've learned and by studying them is that in most cases in whether whether it's a high school teen or or it's The guy that shot up the Las Vegas Music than you wrote. In most cases there is something thing that is called leakage on the part. It's a behavior on the part of the shooter. Okay and what that is they tell someone in or they drop a clue that they're going to do it and it's ignored and so one of things. I mean it. We we are educating the public for the El Paso Walmart shooter. The mother of the thunder actually called the police and said my son is is amassing weapons and saying things that make me uncomfortable. I want you to come over and take these away. He's too immature to to do stuff like this And it didn't work it. The big problem is it putty lawfully go. Just take the guns from me. You know if we're GonNa let teenagers have and in most states you can have a gun done before you can have a beer your kid in Texas you have a shotgun like you wanted a early age of a rifle all all these things. Yeah Yeah Yeah so anyway. It's it's the problem what I tell people when I told my son growing up. He's forty forty four now. And what what I tell young people that I run run into. If we're getting room conversation is don't mess with people when you're out in about going going about your business maybe going shopping. Maybe playing soccer at school. Whatever you're doing You're you're writing a bus crowded bus. Don't mess with people so you don't know who you're dealing with even today like I used to. I would have a little bit of a temper. Somebody like you know. We're trying to live a parking spot. The dispute or whatever and they yell something back mom. It's not worth jumping out an assault rifle. Lighten up my car right now. So yeah you can have it. A friend of mine had three teenage daughters. This is back when I was an active. FBI agent and one of her daughter was real. Sassy and cocky and and and you know for teenage girls can be and she hate candy. this guy down at I just flipped them off. I took her by the hand. I sat down down. I said Okay when you talk You may you're okay now. You got away with it this time you may have slipped off a serial killer Dr who will follow you home and kill you when he gets the opportunity and that did happen not to her but There is a Critique crime writer last name Olsen Not Glenn Olsen but I think it's jackals and wrote a a story or wrote an account of a serial Serial killer about ten fifteen years ago. The book actually made me sick parts of it were and he was a long haul trucker CONAN cross country killing people And he actually had family Mary now a family which by the way. It's an uncommon with serial killers. And Anyway Wonder One day. He drove into the parking lot of the grocery store and a car in front of him or or when around him the spot I and flipped him off. She was flipping off a serial killer. He waited he did. He looked at hurry. Smiled right. Then he was making plans. thatt's flip offers offers killer killer That would be my luck man waves that what was that. I ended up getting resolved in Illinois. Get caught in Illinois. I'm not sure I don't think they tend to blend Before I let you go and I appreciate you spending this time. I realize we went over. I think what we were expected to do. And I can't thank you enough for Kolonics fascinated by it and we. Would you have one case that you're most proud of or they like you remember like man. You know what this is. This made everything that I've gone through this point worth it on my came in on Saturday morning and in the East Bay of California -Fornia Oakland. We had word that the night before a convicted child molester had kidnapped a kid and he had the kid with them and he bought tickets For the nine. Am Bus to San Diego. And so we were all there saturating place he never showed and supervisor said let's go over the Amtrak station we go over there Amtrak station Saturday morning People all over the place..

Burke Ramsey FBI Patsy Patsy Ramsey Jon Benet Ramsey Benet Ramsey CBS John Ramsey murder Patsy San Dixie Illinois Pugh John Ramseyer soccer Pazzi China Charles
"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

Heartland Radio 2.0

12:21 min | 10 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

"I think I can drink as written about rolling rock. They go so fast. Show Fort Wayne. I would just drink. And it's like three drinks my beers I forgot how easy rolling rockets greater latrobe Oh really that was like the shit beer we could ask for the steelers training campus. We giving college lot pounded on it but it was it was actually decent berry and then what Budweiser bottom. Yeah can't remember. It has urged Bush. I don't think it's any more bill. Thirty three yeah. Uh What's the thirty three Stanford. I remember labored. No we got a great interview for you happy. I enjoyed your thanksgiving. I hope you're getting ready for fucking awesome Christmas. I don't if the sale is still going on the thanksgiving. Thank you sell might still be going on Monday. He goes to whatever Monday. Ramp back up if you haven't already cyber Monday. Dude I mean if items are sold out you can still order them and they'll be on a preorder so when they're back in stock you will get them. Yeah very important important though because things are selling out so don't drag your feet get on their take advantage. Twenty percent off the entire store for some reason people. I started ordering some of the items glitch glitch but now everything is working. It's all twenty percent off if you haven't taken advantage do so now. I'm not just saying this. We have burn cooler March lights. Yes the for. The brand line is one of the greatest clothing lines going right now period you go through the scroll through just the for for the brain collection crushes now. We have the blue and the red hoodies. It's awesome much any color you would want. Yeah and you can match it up the flag if you want for your school whatever school or whatever team that you screw support. It's a great do it right now and Let's take take take about fifty minutes out of your time and listen listen to two former. FBI profiler who used to make your living catchiness serial predators. Pretty cool stuff joining us on the phone former. FBI Criminal Profiler and criminologist and author of the Book Special Agents my life on the front lines as as a woman in the FBI as well as host of deadly women and facing evil on investigation discovery. Let's put your hands together for candice just along. Welcome Canvas look you thank you for having me. Yeah you're one of the favorites on our list. Get these pitch lists from Booker's and Right away I was like yes candice Delong have a lot of questions. You've had a very storied career as a criminal profiler and we just like the rest of the world are enamored with the the FBI and want Do there so I want to start by a letting people know how you ended up in that job well Actually I was a psychiatric nurse for almost a decade and I became head nurse at the Institute of Psychiatry in Chicago which is run by northwestern university. And that's the position I was in when the FBI recruited me also you were recruiting. Yeah was recruited everybody. FBI when I was head nurse about maximum security psychiatric off so you were kind of already in that realm on the private sale. I didn't know yeah. I guess it makes sense that they would go out and actively recruit people from that field. Is everyone the ends up as a profiler criminologists in that unit from that what kind of background and recruited in or some developed from inside from field agents or whatever soon back when it happened to me in nineteen eighty the behavioral science unit. and which is what they call themselves then. was really in its infancy stages I recruited just to be an FBI agent the term profiler really didn't even exist at the time and it was four years after I was working as an agent when the Behavioral Science Unit I was in Chicago Kogo. When the Behavioral Science Unit sent out communication to all the field divisions that they wanted one at least one person from every field division to go back to the Behavioral Science Unit for training then returned to their field division and worked as a profiler along with the the pay bureau science unit for their own territory and and for their office? And so. That's what I did. And and so. My training took place at the behavioral science. Cina many times over many many years but I always was assigned to a big city for fifteen years Chicago and then for five years San Diego on San Francisco Cisco Sorry. I could be wrong here but I'm not sure if you've ever seen or heard of it. The the NETFLIX Netflix show mind. Hunter has someone who had your background. It seemed like on the show. Who who came in with your similar background do they was? That was that based on you know. Okay Back Debbie seen hunters at all. Oh yes okay Both John Douglas. The two men in the movie shows are are supposed to V.. John Douglas and and Robert Ressler and they started the The program and they and they started working. They started interviewing they wanted original about people that that compulsively kill and they they often pulling out. There was an expression in the fifties. If you WANNA know about a Cadillac asked the man that owns one. Will they thought were Descru- apply that principle to these kinds of people and the woman in this show is supposed to be doctor and purchase. WHO's eight doctor nurse? She looked at the nursing and she was affiliated with Harvard University and she helped write the model for the interview. So when you see them interviewing interviewing killers and you see representations or dramatization of what the killers were doing that is all one hundred percent accurate. A lot of the drama of their personal lives is not that sure. Sure okay so when you got in that field it Kinda after day it had success and then it was kind of an accepted practice and all that then they were like okay. We need spread this out across the country yet to our field offices to get cases this is right was through the vast majority of crimes that win themselves to profiling serial rape multiple murders Sometimes I'm just one murder. Let our our state charges and not federal charges so we had just spread the word so police so we also were instructors. I became police instructor. Her and we would keep schools to state and local police on the subject matter. Like this is what we're discovering. This is what we can do for you. And and then the phones would start ringing and they would bring cases to us I would work with cops on cases as well as Working with Guanaco Quantico with John Douglas when I say Quantico. I mean the behavioral working with John Douglas Wrestler and Roy as the West on the case I wouldn't work on my own work with his down. Okay that's really cool. That's this is like the best way to get More cases or get your agency involved if you have have a specialty practice and more cases in in my world when I was a police officer cell phone investigations were like Tracking Geo tracking and then the analysis restore local records was just starting to get big so as we added people to that unit every time we get more and more cases kids that cop has his own network of cops already with other agencies so then we were being used more. It's kind of like that's what happened with you. Guys a sounds like that's a beautiful way to grow it the unit. So when you you get in there you're you're really on the ground floor. The the people that started the unit are there and you're getting to learn iron and intimately worked with them. So how cool was it to be in that position as this was really getting hot and heavy I know like it. I like Kinda came. On People's radar the general public's radar because of silence of the lambs at glory. It was eighteen ninety only one. Yeah like what top gun did for the navy and all these movies do for different practices but by the time that came out you guys were like the world's best kept secret I would say as far as surreal predators. Go well For years the research had been going on John. Douglas and Roy Hazelwood as TV. Show the Netflix show presents at first. Were on their own going around the country three meeting with cops and also Interviewing serial killers compulsive killers. They call them at the time and and As time went on word got out that the FBI was doing Research on people that enjoyed killing and Thomas Harris the author of silence of the lambs heard about that and he went to the behavioral science unit and met with John. Douglas Roy hazelwood would and Robert Ressler and said Hey. At that point. He'd already had the bestseller blacks Sunday. And he said I want to write a book about People that kill kill for fun and I understand you're doing some work in that area and so here I am. Tell me what you know. And from from that he wrote his first book of the trilogy was Mind Hunter and then then that the red dragon the Red Dragon with the first title. When it was released the first time the second book was silence of the lambs and the third book? Was Hannibal. Okay so I guess not. You weren't a secret among law enforcement circles but kind of secret into the general public and then Dan this is this happens and then people are like Oh my God. They're these almost superhero Detectives of source that are running around the have special knowledge of this stuff and It was just took over the world and today people really enamored by it. I mean which is good for you. Someone who retires capacity because now all these shows close enough to develop the two that you're on but I wanted like the credibility that you have in the reason you're in those positions because you've worked some incredible incredible cases in your day I read that you are you were involved in the unabomber case was my first. The case was the tylenol murders in Chicago in nineteen eighty one. I was the only rookie up time but there was some profiling Coming from the behavioral stance ans- Regarding that case. I mean somebody we knew at the time was somebody Contaminated a whole bunch of pinal pills and put them back in bottles also distributed them all over the city and seven people died. I remember the best thing I remember my parents and everybody like scared to death. At the time. God scared to go shopping because it could happen if it could happen at Chicago can happen anywhere. And that was in the infancy of of Cable News of which the only one was CNN. So that was kind of a huge boost for the cable. TV industry as well But I knew I worked as a rookie on that and then it was fifteen years later I signed you bomb case after I transferred to San Cisco Excuse me but I didn't and Work on it from a profiling standpoint..

FBI John Douglas Behavioral Science Unit Chicago Douglas Roy hazelwood Netflix Mind Hunter Robert Ressler Stanford Fort Wayne latrobe Oh candice Delong steelers Bush Harvard University San Cisco CNN
"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

Heartland Radio 2.0

02:23 min | 10 months ago

"delong" Discussed on Heartland Radio 2.0

"Right and good things will follow. I was. How's your bird my bird? Oh good yes. She did good she. She was upset when it first came out. She stepped the meat thermometer in there to check it and it was like it was only two and a half hours and things supposed to force some. It's already one hundred and eighty degrees inside so I'm like oh I can take it out and then you know see us we get in there and we start cutting those not done on the like the the drums and wings parks the middle perfectly done. What happens Turkey? I guess he's put a bad in there for another half hour. The perfect time eight moist. It was good good season. That's you nailed it today. Go verse. Hey I for her right yeah. It's pretty big deal next year funds for us as chocolate milk to they really go. Well altogether you know. Greek castle crunched up. Okay you would see your American relatives. Columbus Columbus had a nice dinner drove back this morning. Four thirty opening in hall hit the Open Road Dinner to two kinds of cranberry two kinds of stuffy stuffing nice did anyone touch the cranberry just slava lectures with a spoon. No you just put it you mix it with whatever thank you put it on top of your stuff stopping. Oh my gosh. I wish you would avoid me down. I picked up the cranberry and throw it right in the track. Your Opening Castle cranberry. Please use the table actually sweet though. The one was like really fruit. That's what I'm saying. You put if you mix it with everything it ruins the entire play. One kind was bad like it was way he's GonNa ask you might as well just poor jelly on everything. Data tastes like tastes like a jelly. I just like it is shitting cram. dopey a fucking idiot. Did no birds and fruit Me asking if it's a fruit deserts are funded salty salty dog Forbes. Our.

Columbus Columbus Greek castle Turkey
Star of India gem heist - October 29, 1940

This Day in History Class

03:47 min | 11 months ago

Star of India gem heist - October 29, 1940

"The day was October twenty ninth nineteen sixty four the star of India a five hundred sixty three point thirty five CARAT SAPPHIRE was stolen from the American Museum of Natural History in New York City along with twenty three other valuable Jim the JP Morgan Hall of Gyms and Minerals at the museum was home to a collection of many notable gyms at the time Joel's the object of mini high after a heist movie called top coupet Jacqueline Murphy decided he could break into Morgan Hall at the American Museum of Natural History and commit his own heist Murphy also known as Murph the surf teamed up with Roger Clark Allendale coup to Steal Jim on the night of October Twenty Ninth Nineteen Sixty Four Clark drove up to the back of the museum with Kuhn and Murphy and a Cadillac Kuhnen Murphy Climb Defense ascended fire escape and used a rope to swing into a fourth floor window at the museum the windows were not connected to an alarm system and the museum has stop putting a guard in the gym room. The thieves used a glass cutter a squeegee they got from an employee's locker and duct tape to break into three display cases collect the gems they skipped over one display case that contained sapphires but they took plenty of expensive gems including the Star of India. the delong star Ruby the Shetler Emerald and the midnight star a one hundred and sixteen carat black sapphire the case the Sapphire was in was protected it by an alarm let the batteries were did the next day coon Murphy left New York on a flight to Miami with a nineteen year old named Janet Floor Cuevas as the thieves were on their way to Miami a museum guard discovered that the gyms had been stolen and called the police the stolen gems were valued at four hundred ten thousand dollars but none of them were insured since premiums were high in a press conference the Museum director pinned the bad security on budget it it only took two days for detectives to track the thieves down detectives got tips that led them to Cambridgehouse hotel where the thieves were staying in hosting parties in Their Hotel suite detectives found sneakers with glass in them photos of museums looks about precious stones and burglary tools one of the detectives stayed in the hotel suite overnight and when Clark returns the next morning he was arrested Murphy coon were soon arrested in Miami but the police did not I find the hidden gems the pair were extradited to New York facing charges first degree burglary and possession of burglary tools the public impress largely treated them like celebrities but law enforcement still needed to find the jam Assistant District Attorney Maurice Net Jari agreed to take roles into aquamarine but the delong star Ruby wasn't recovered until September of nineteen sixty five in nineteen sixty five Kuhn earthy and Clark pled guilty to burglary and grand larceny and we're all sentenced to three years at rikers island. New York's American Museum of Natural History a little more about history today than you do yesterday

American Museum Of Natural His Roger Clark Burglary New York City Jacqueline Murphy Murphy Coon Jp Morgan Hall Of Gyms Coon Murphy Museum Miami India. JIM Kuhn Janet Floor Cuevas Their Hotel Joel Morgan Hall Rikers Island Shetler Emerald Maurice Net Jari
"delong" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"delong" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"And it happened right there on my Lavazza, anyway, delong dot US, an amazing amazing marriage. We have with delong delong days of giving it went on for thirty days. Today's the last day. I believe right. Yep. All right. So I want everyone to go to delong dot US. And you'll you'll hit the Elvis Duran box. I just did it a few minutes ago, and you can buy your own events Panini press and make your own Monte Cristo, or whatever you want. And of course, percentage of the proceeds or the proceeds go to cookies for kids cancer. And I guess that's what that big ass. Check over. There's all about that. That is what the big check is about. But there's nothing written on it. Sounds like a poverty. Do we need a sharp figures? Okay. So Mike talk about delong and your involvement with cookies for kids cancer and what we're about to do. And what all of our listeners has have done to make a big number up here on this check. While there's there's a lot of things that brought the long together with Gretchen and the cookies for kids cancer. And that also brought us together with you guys. And and strand in the morning show, a variety of different things got us here the story that she shared with so inspiring because what we realized it is that literally every single dollar. It's so true. It makes a difference and Gretchen has so many stories like the one she shared, and so your listeners when they follow along the the days of giving and they and they participate with us like, you know, they so, you know, in such a heartfelt way. Do they're literally helping the young man that she talked about. And and you know, we know that. It doesn't take an insurmountable amount of money to get these these research and and the medicine and the things that are needed to help children.

delong delong Gretchen Elvis Duran Monte Cristo Panini press Mike thirty days
MLB star Josh Hader apologizes for racist, homophobic tweets

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:22 min | 2 years ago

MLB star Josh Hader apologizes for racist, homophobic tweets

"During the height of the storm and. The same heavy, rain flooded the dugouts at nationals park just ahead of the start of the major league baseball all-star game CBS news transportation correspondent Kris van cleave no better around these parts of funnel cloud formed in. New York harbor as a storm picked up some subway, stations flooded a home over in. Bayonne was struck by lightning there in north jersey parts. Of northern Connecticut we're under a tornado warning and then over four thousand customers up there without power during the height of the storm ever saw Customers while Milwaukee's brewers pitcher Josh Hader was playing in the all star game, last night he became. The latest athlete to have vulgar tweets from his youth come back to haunt him and so Mike surrounded him after the game I'm deeply sorry for what I've said White power and I hate gay people some of the tweets that he posted when he was younger, earlier, this, year, tweet posted by football quarterback Josh, Allen while he was in high school came to light the day before he was picked seventh overall by the bills in. The NFL draft is three forty one. Let's say you just bought a house bad news is you're. One step closer to becoming your parents you'll probably multiple on and skip anybody noticed you mow delong, till people to stay off the lawn compare it to your neighbor's lawn and.

Josh Hader Kris Van Cleave Nationals Park Bayonne Allen CBS Delong New York NFL Brewers Milwaukee Connecticut Mike Football
B Holdings, Texas and Oppenheimer discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

Bloomberg Daybreak

02:16 min | 2 years ago

B Holdings, Texas and Oppenheimer discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

"Nineteen and around the globe from bloomberg business app and bloombergradio dot com this is bloomberg daybreak good morning it is six thirty on wall street i'm bob moon and i'm karen moskow we are just about three hours away from the opening of us trading let's get you up to date on the news you need to know at this hour songs are falling around the world as political turmoil in italy continues to reverberate through markets italian bonds are plummeting as the country's populist parties began mobilizing for an early election alassio delong issues a portfolio manager for oppenheimer funds we're talking about elections somewhere around september and october brings a lot of uncertainty to the market so expect for a very italian some are so to speak in the sense that the market will really unable to move forward into a different narrative until these elections are out of the way and most importantly the problem with these elections is that they're likely to bring a very different outcome from the one that was seen on march fourth evening political crisis in italy's impacting the us bond market as investors seek haven assets ten year treasuries are rallying with the benchmark us bond yield falling near two point eight percent the us also plans one hundred thirty billion dollars in note sales today turkey's lira stabilizing after strengthening in nearly three percent yesterday after it moved by the nation's central bank to simplify its interest rate regime spurred optimism over its independence oil is falling for a sixth straight day its longest losing streak since february saudi arabia and russia are proposing to boost output to ease concerns over supply shortages and checking crude right now what's texas intermediate is down one and a third percent to sixty six ninety five a barrel brent crude is up half a percent to seventy five seventy a barrel and deal news j a b holdings has agreed to buy a majority stake in uk based sandwich chain brenta maget from private equity firm bridge point advisors a person familiar with the matter says the price is about two billion dollars including net debt and people with knowledge of the matter say china is stuff studying a plan to import more coal from the us as part of efforts to narrow the trade gap it is now six thirty two on wall street time for your the index report and the vix was closed yesterday for the holiday on friday it rose to close at thirteen dot.

B Holdings Texas Oppenheimer Alassio Delong Italy United States China UK Bloomberg Russia Saudi Arabia Lira Turkey Portfolio Manager Karen Moskow Bob Moon One Hundred Thirty Billion Dol Two Billion Dollars
"delong" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"delong" Discussed on KOMO

"Does not go to school at delong elementary where these photos were captured this areas where the bus drops him off that a family member comes to pick them up that's komo's steve mccarron a thin trillium man is accused of threatening a little league coach during a game and assaulting a woman who intervened komo's michelle esteban says it happened over the weekend on the baseball field at fort borst parkinson trail upsetting flying and again this was all in front of the kids actually christianson says fortythreeyearold gainey didn't claw identified by police and prosecutors confronted one of her coaches in the middle of the fourth inning saturday players were on the field and the confronted coach near the dugout with his players christianson the little leagues president saw it unfold from the press box and booked into the field with one mission that was my concern is to get him away from the kids as far as possible christianson said he threatened to hurt the coach and called him a liar she asked him to leave any did but once outside the ballpark she says he turned on her when she asked a staffer to borrow a phone he got my say is told me you know i need to get a back he was going to hurt me at that point he did start to shove me police say he appeared to be intoxicated in court the judge found probable cause and the prosecutor plans to file charges christians and said the suspect had no connection to the game or the teams playing the you don't want kids seeing that kind of behavior and being scared just being are playing baseball that's all they want to do is play ball michelle esteban komo news or documents denic claw has an extensive criminal record in and out of our state to bellevue police officer accused of domestic violence is scheduled to be back in court today after he appeared before a judge yesterday the officer has been with the bellevue police department for sixteen years prosecutors say he punched a woman in the.

komo steve mccarron michelle esteban fortythreeyearold gainey president christianson prosecutor baseball officer bellevue police department delong elementary fort borst parkinson trail bellevue sixteen years
ER nurse could have exposed thousands of patients to hepatitis C, officials warn

Ron and Don Show

01:41 min | 2 years ago

ER nurse could have exposed thousands of patients to hepatitis C, officials warn

"The kiro radio news center tacoma police investigating child abduction at delong elementary school witnesses tell them that a man duct tape about a ten year old boy and put them in the trunk of a sedan kiro seven kevin mccarty just spoke with investigators about the suspect this is the suspect police say they are looking for right now he is described as a white male in his fifties five foot six with medium build wearing a ten fedora hat sunglasses he has a short grey beard a red flannel check flannel shirt and was wearing blue jeans he may be driving a gold or silver four door newer toyota possibly a twenty seventeen camera if you see that vehicle or suspect call nine one one tacoma police say they will be issuing an amber alert shortly now hospital says the risk is low but good samaritan and people still warning thousands of patients to get tested for hepatitis c after an er nurse tested positive the hospital believe she was stealing narcotics and maybe to blame for two of her patients who contracted the disease is nurses actions violated our organization's values and because of this we violated the trust we have in our community multi cares president says that nurse has been fired and we're just getting word that eastside fire is on the scene of a structure fire at fred meyer in in its equality on eastlake samantha's parkway they don't believe anyone's been hurt and it looks like it was a boiler fire in the attic that is causing this but again there's probably going to be some traffic issues out there let's find out now what's going on your skyrocket realtime traffic you're gonna see that around the surface streets of course so that maze the what slowing down especially for those of you out on east lakes parkway now let's look at the rest of the.

Kiro Kevin Mccarty Toyota President Trump Fred Meyer Tacoma Delong Elementary School Eastlake Five Foot Ten Year
"delong" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"delong" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Are you really oh speaking of you know he loves rosie i love rosa but you know i use the calendar and the temperature outside to dictate my rosa intake but alex's now rosa year round and there are many people who agree with them people are doing rosa in the in the dead of winter now i do all year round there is a summer rosa club they delivered like three shipments of the pink stuff in these magnums which also have many bottles but you you're a member of the club they keep sending you rosa air they've a thousand person wait list for this thing lean macaroni i know no rosette rosaiah has over the past few years has become the the major definitely summertime refreshing cocktail we'll or wine you know like wine red wine during the summer kind of heavy and gives me headaches so i always look for the alternative so for me the alternative is always the the pink stuff is better if summer in a bottle in a bottle is so good that is so good it's a roseanne but it's out of control you guys have to taste it are you on ecstasy three cups of coffee that's what just happened we'll our friend from delong delong brings around the delong coffee card the espresso cart cappuccino card and of course ceo mike prager also laura from delong here's well and they stopped by they smelled cafe they smoked coffee bruin until they stopped by so so laura thank you for coming i say laura.

alex rosa mike prager laura delong delong ceo delong three cups
"delong" Discussed on Swift Unwrapped

Swift Unwrapped

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"delong" Discussed on Swift Unwrapped

"Wrapped a weekly show but these fifth programming language in other swift or projects my name's jp smart and jesse squires today we wanna go over nice blog posts that dave delong wrote on his wishlist i swift protocols yeah there's some discussion on twitter and in the community about what he has proposed here he has quite a few points i guess nine or so of improvements and or changes seatac to see and swiss protocols so vernice discussed those now so the first one in his opinion if you're adopting protocol and he says specially for one from the santa library the tools that are in place don't really help you in letting you know what you have to implement in order to truly conformed with this protocol and so dave says because of this it's pretty much impossible with nasser usc litter on says okay it's not impossible but it's it's way harder than should be a to make your own value type data structure say like avio tree or anything else that conforms to all of the expected protocols that save something was provided like that with center library all the things that it would conform to masumi in here what he means like conforming to say array conforms to like sequence and collection protocols and some index able protocols and things like that right you don't know all like obviously when you declare conformance you get an air that says oh here's what you need to implement these functions for that one protocol.

twitter santa library jesse squires dave delong nasser usc avio
"delong" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"delong" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"There is no result should we go into the life fourtime can a gang when i drive a hundred times to the pain i'm getting hitting slapped in grabbed whatever what not so what we protect you not nestled that's what is tired into uh you know chicks dig delong boll and oh i thought it was the bulk high winners lebrun saying here i kinda agree with them we officials who said we the media but really the officials they officiate liberal on much different than they probably do the rest of the players because for so many years he's been the biggest the bad is the strongest and you can't call a foul on every single drive by lebron james and i look at the numbers he has gone to the line the least amount of times since his rookie season and this year and i agree with them he's got suddenly for jump shots he's become a muchimproved jump shooter but he is still put the ball on the deck and let me get to the whole and use my strength and the fact that he's only going to the line four and a half fivetimes is kind of ridiculous so i see his point but that's the way the league is now because they do want to protect the jump shooter is because we're a jump shooting lee we got brute strength he would be averaging ten to fifteen free throws in the late '80s '90s easily both protecting the jump shooter polling would you run down the guys who have the most free throws attempts this year james harden yeah yana sanchetacumbo number two yeah that's he's not a jump shooter these are guys who go to the hoop hardened gets fouled in on me he will initiate contractor you know he'll full un to yield running into him but i mean he he's driving all the time i don't know if these are jump shooters who were getting these fouls called well i look they they're they officiate him differently because when you stack up laurent james versus harden and opting to kogo he doesn't eat up man to oil you the man now but before he's always with that man tiled he's always been bigger that everyone same way with with back with mj or with magic or bird those guys got fouled just about on every possession but you can.

delong boll laurent james mj lebrun james harden
"delong" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"delong" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Of satisfactory detail and that that really centers around the the theological question could evangelical christianity accommodate a genuine extraterrestrial reality um and it also it also ties into the official disclosure movement that's a that's a big part of the book too that um and what the origins of that are what what what the uh w how it's manifesting today and how it's actually shaping culture is is and and uh you know whether that's where our benefit we're not so we we get into all those things to lead up to that that big question um and so i i think that this will not only be helpful for christians to think about this this topic deeper but i think also four people uh of other faiths or have no faith at all to uh yeah i i think this is something that we all could actually connect on and at least agreed to the two two impossibility on both think trump's tom delong the your rock group of blink one eighty two putting together this group of experts to try to get disclosure and more information oh i totally understand the motivate at an actually you know i'll i'll admit when i was in high school i loved blink when eighty two of one of my favorite fan but uh in in the book uh we i i derek and i we re researched into the wikki leaks than of course you know tom too long has some of his email came up in front of the deduct the wikileaks the we go through those we analyse them in the book what he's talking about what the what the project is and everything um i i totally get is is motivation for uh for wanting to do that i mean it it does seem like we live in a uh at least the country but a world that no something is going on or at least has more information than we do so of course you know of course there going to be people that that wanna know what what that information is now what will be interesting is if he if he succeeds or if somebody else does the rest of fissile disclosure actually does happen uh w it's interesting to think about how that might manifest what that would look like what types of facts will be presented to the world in what.

trump official tom delong
"delong" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"delong" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Of water you can add lemon and it you can add up alarmed line you know something of that nature that you feel comfortable with you can have coffee i prefer organic coffee coffee has a lot of health benefits no no doubt right now you're you're really my best friend right now because i'm about to take an app and a lot of coffee can i here's my caviar if you're not having organic coffee a lot of the time these coffee the with the way they're harvested could be very full of can vida and mold out and regressing out well it sure assured i had to say uh i just like obama coffee all right fair enough organic coffee check got that i as long as i can still have coffee were good yeah i can they're not really surprised starbucks i'm gonna call starbucks right now why don't they have again a break they don't have organic it's at stark's i think we got a problem we're gonna have the we're going to get a lot of people upset now started petition well you know i think i think a sharp bucks is is one of the most popular areas for drinking coffee there's a lot of benefits the coffee it actually been research that it actually enhances delong jeopardy gene culture to wins andy shirt endurance actually enhance longevity gene show you know for those that don't have a reaction shall people debris after the coffee yeah okay and you can get tested for that as well so also let's point out that it's coffee that's good for you not the caramel sauce and oil hair lack kathy house at sao with maybe token royal okay this is abc news it's called the playoffs each delicious i mix it up i'm drinking it right now i can't get this look of brain function guy i mean you are that's i mean i feel the power in this room right now four four unlike a doctor thor you you are like i mean i look a year i see thar that's what i say percent so up here's my question because especially you talked about seasonal issues that the less sign you talked about stress and i.

starbucks obama delong abc
"delong" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"delong" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I know i know i know but in the back of your mind as there a little angel gone yeah but you know what somewhere down the cia chain are some really bad people i think most people who are buying it or probably buying it from people they already know where to those people get well that's for the i don't know that but that's not in the back of their mind if they're buying it from their neighbor or there will really harassment his as my point precisely i mean where did the neighbor get it i mean it some point there's a guy and he's got a friend in mexico or so i don't know delong the illinois central railroad tracks maybe you know you're thinking about the distribution i'm talking about the supply chain on thermal where they grow it well access to ice oppose if everybody was just deal it in their basement and its marijuana is not a meth plant then i than my problem goes way i guess 228 let's talk to burt you're on wgn what did you want to say 'but yeah i i guess i'm on on the other side of the issue here out i think what when you hear lewis speak about colorado i it at the known fact and live published a report that the amount owed welfare has increased significantly the amount of homeless has increased significantly all you actually have people moving in tibet date and going on to welfare role and because bacon by marijuana legally now he will also fit something it shouldn't you shouldn't fire somebody who has something illegal in there than one they're working what about alcohol how would you like have your air traffic controller or airline book that's exactly my boy under no that's another way air traffic controller.

mexico illinois supply chain marijuana lewis cia harassment delong wgn colorado
"delong" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

NewsRadio1620

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"delong" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

"Of a mutiny and full of um quote will circumstances like is when when somebody else get their own idea about how expedition so um so delong um kept a very tight rein on that so what was daily lifelike on board the janette once they realized that they were stock can might be start for a good long time i mean you know when they went to bed at night was a warm when they woke up in the morning the got a good meal in them and how did they occupy their time look long gave them a lot of orders um they had to exercise for two hours every morning out on the ice up if they've done a decently flat plate they would actually play football or uh uh even iceskate um they went up on hunting expeditions every day um they also engage did hourly measurements of every kind of sort of scientific uh oil meteorological thing you can think of uh and kept these meticulous logbooks of the condition of the ice the thickness of the eye um barometric pressure specific gravity salinity all these kinds of things and all these law books are now being studied by noah scientists today because you know climate change scientists have never had a very accurate picture of what the ice pack look like a hundred hundred fifty years ago but um i found these logbooks in the national archives in there just a treasuretrove of information about the condition of the ice um so uh those are some of the things that delong kept man hitman occupied with they also had a little printing press it printed like a little newspaper they had plays in musical um uh performances uh they red constantly they had a kind of like a miniature university there where where people came and learn you know studied astronomy or or uh navigation in two different courses so they kept them tells is occupied his they could but of course especially when.

football climate change delong hundred hundred fifty years two hours