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Former Player and Agent Donald Dell

Beyond The Baseline

05:39 min | 5 d ago

Former Player and Agent Donald Dell

"Everyone John Wartime here is this week's sports illustrated? Tennis podcast is also the first week of Wimbledon. He says wistfully our guest this week. Is Donald Dell? Donald is a former player a promoter broadcaster at agent. He's worn many hats, not unlike Bartholomew Cubans. He is also worn many at once. Donald is still force in tennis. He wrote an op Ed recently in the Washington Post, about the prospect of combining the men's and women's tours, so we talk about that. We talked about where tennis is right now, and as a bonus, Donald signed Michael Jordan out of North Carolina and especially after last dance. We talk about Michael Jordan so some non tennis bonus coverage on Michael Jordan and a lot of good tennis. Talk here's Donald Dell. Appreciate you doing. How are you doing? I'm doing fine We've been lucky I've been home since about March fifteenth, but my two daughters, their husbands, and our two grandchildren, five and seven are about thirty yards from where we are, and it's like one hundred twenty day thanksgiving. It doesn't sound bad. Yeah, let's I I. Don't know but I got a couple of things to bring up. I. Did want to talk about the the op-ed you wrote. Wrote thought you'd be a good person to talk about with the the tour merger, which has been eclipsed lately by a Co bit in the US Open, but this was sort of a hot topic, and everyone says the same thing which is great idea. The devils in the details, so let's let's advance that. How do we exercise those those devils details? How do we push through? So this becomes more than. In abstract idea that we need to negotiate what what are we doing to make this happen? Well I I think I think more than that. The Devil Devil's in the the leadership in other words I think it's GonNa take strong leaders it both part, both groups to get done, and I think Steve. Simon, and Mickey Lawler. Are Really, veterans, and and well respected, and well like Gatanzi the new chairman of the ATP I'm told his very smart very capable. And I. Think if the if they wanted to really do it, they get together. And then it takes a lot of support. You Know Billie, Jean and Roger, and some of the leaders in the game. All got behind it, then you. It's sort of like all the protests out there today you gotTa. You gotta move the ships and it's a big alphabet soup that everybody sort of fights for their turf. The ATP tour. Has Really established itself, but it's not part of the grand. Slams not far the idea. And not that that they want to be I don't Miss Other Sami, but I just think. Recently in the last six or eight years, the ATP tour has not worked very effectively in some senses because they've been voting in blocks the three tournament directors vote together. The three player reps vote together, and then the chairman's left. There was hanging vote and literally one vote because he always makes one side unhappy in the last two chairman. If you review John have been fired. Because one group didn't like how voted, and they need a super majority of forty two to extend. His contract so his contract ran out. In the last two cases now I'm told by people that very close to respect the Gal Gal Danzi is quite a different. Person needs a very strong leader, very smart and media and he really gets it. I just think for the sport It would be really helpful to have the two groups. Merged on a on a simple basis, and the when you talk about the details, you're right but I think the simplicity is what matters keep it simple stupid when you want to merge the to start with you don't have to have exactly the same boards, the same voting members, but come in and merge it, and have you know five or six basic principles and truthfully. We, found out in Washington with the city open that Iran for fifty years literally for the WTI ESPN Tennis Foundation. That We. We had a men's only event for forty two years, and then city came along our title sponsor, and rightfully said look fifty one percent of our clients. Bankers are women, so we're not gonNA. Unless you'll bring a women's tournament into it and we did, but it was a problem because there's a bigger women's event at Sanford for seven hundred thousand, we were only allowed by the rules for two fifty, but guess what. The ATP the minority of the ATP ten percent fought it tooth and nail. They didn't want it integrated tournament. And I to go before the board three different times, and swear up and down that we give him favorability on the scheduling of the Center Court. Scheduling, transportation scheduling practice courts. And it just didn't. It's working okay. And the women, the best women like to play Washington but now under the new WTA rules. We can only sign one of the top twenty in the world in order to protect the other event. That's raising more prize money by seven hundred or more, so those kind of problems out to be worked out and the ATP tour really needs to get a stronger with this membership the the the vocal minority, which is really only about ten or twelve percent, and it's always the complainers on the tour. The to aboard knows who they are, and they're always ranked between one hundred, fifty and three hundred,

Donald Dell Chairman Tennis Michael Jordan John Wartime Washington Washington Post Bartholomew United States Devils Gal Danzi North Carolina WTA ED Sanford Center Court Steve Simon
Texas Bars Forced To Close Again, Restaurants Rolled Back To 50% Capacity

Chris Krok

00:39 sec | Last week

Texas Bars Forced To Close Again, Restaurants Rolled Back To 50% Capacity

"Texas restaurants and bars are being impacted by the governor's decision to scale back on that's on the state's re opening amid a significant rise in the the cove cove in in nineteen nineteen positivity positivity rate rate governor governor Greg Greg Abbott Abbott ordering ordering all all bars bars to to shut shut back back down down and and reducing reducing restaurant restaurant capacity capacity limits limits from from seventy seventy five five to to fifty fifty percent percent the the hope hope to to get get a a hold hold of of a a recent recent outbreak outbreak that's that's because because the the state's state's Kobe Kobe nineteen nineteen positivity positivity rate rate to to soar soar above above eleven eleven percent percent Abraham Abraham but but dell dell is is the the general general manager manager of of the the Dallas Dallas saloon saloon and and says says he he thinks thinks the the governor's governor's decision decision could be good for business in the long run you need to slow down or it's just going to keep growing and growing the governor also ordered rafting and tubing businesses to close back down Clayton level WBAP

Governor Greg Greg Abbott Abbo Abraham Abraham Dell Texas Kobe Kobe General Manager Dallas
Novak Djokovic and the Adria Tour Antics

Beyond The Baseline

05:44 min | Last week

Novak Djokovic and the Adria Tour Antics

"Everyone John Wartime here is this week's sports illustrated tennis podcast hope everyone is well healthy wearing a mask not at a Belgrade disco topless, which I suppose is where we ought to start Jamie I'm glad you're you're with me today. How's everything in your world? It is good I. AM also not in a Belgrade club dancing around in close quarters. Shouting. Indoors So, that's a win I. You know I had wanted to do A. Normal podcast. We're going to talk to Donald Dell longtime agent. He had some very interesting thoughts about how to merge the ATP and the WPA we were GonNA talk about. The plan for the US Open and tennis getting back in there some events this week. We were talking about the Patrick. marauded lose event, and the Charleston ended in of course everything blew up metaphorically and I. Guess You could say in a sense literally with news from from the Balkans this weekend which we probably timestamped us, we are speaking on. What is today Wednesday morning the right as cracked. So we are seventy two hours into this Kindly, call it a narrative I spoken a lot about this. I've written about this I will say before we can talk. Specifics I'm very surprised at the stem, and this is really world news. I mean I was getting calls. From Aljazeera the BBC and then I just Mary. Carillo is on MSNBC Today. Mean is really become much more than tennis story. For better worse I would argue worse, but this really has been. The kind of story had ripples beyond the the sport and beyond sports period I think a lot of people are. Sort of trying to figure out how we eat back to normal I think we're trying to see I think we're starting to see some real. Sort of disparities in countries, and even here in the United States with how this is not only being managed, and not only with the data says, but just in terms of philosophy, so I think this is the story of really found its way into into a much broader story, and this has become absolutely world news. I mean this is as big as a ten stories we've had since there's been a match and I guess what why don't we just start there? I, mean Jamie. Let's start with. Top Line Impressions of the Adria Tour Novak Djokovic in the last seventy two hours. Yeah you're right to say that tennis exhibitions don't normally get this much press. I think it's always a funny thing with antennas. When people you know who aren't as familiar with the sport, they see results from from an Axa, whether it's early in the year late in the year, and you know somebody, beat, someone, and most people just sort of shrug it off, but it's as you said really interesting to see how much this has really gone across the world. World and everyone is talking about it and rightfully, so because this is a big issue in I think it was from the Gecko, when we started to see the photos and the videos of everything that was happening between the hugging and everything that was happening on the court, and then of course everything that was happening all off the court. All of those images in those photos are really going to be the mark of this event of this tournament. And jovovich whether or not he deserves all of the blame or not will also be the face of this issue for a long time coming he is the organizer of this event of course, and also the oldest in terms of the players that was there and for me. That was something that you know. He really needed to use his his advantage, and the the younger players thereof and born Cora and others even Dmitrov for what it's worth. You know are are younger than him. They look up to him and for him to invite these players to come to this tournament in for him to organize this in the way that he did end to have the results that we had is just It's not great, and I wish that the best tennis player you know the number one in the world right now had thought a little bit more about how he was exposing all these people. It's unsafe conditions and took a little bit more time to think about how what the results and the repercussions of this could have been. Yeah I mean I think no-one covered themselves in glory. I mean there's already been a lot of finger. Pointing joke of its father have having moved on from from fettered. Baby is now pointing fingers at Dmitrov as the culprit, I mean this is just ugly stuff I. Mean I think we ought to pause here in and say we do hope everyone makes. A speedy and easy recovery as as nick, curious I wrote. Nick curious turned into the the Wiseman of tennis Munich. curios thoughts on all of this have been. A lot more reasonable and responsible than anyone else's and the nick curious very rightly says this virus is not a joke, so. Go further. Let's be clear. We hope everybody makes a a quick recovery from virus that we know you know. Six figures over is can be fatal. having said all that I think I mean it's sort of interesting in the grand scheme of things, people who are casual fans or not even sports fans at all. This is hubris recklessness, and here's this athlete who somehow has been living in. Sick enough bubble so that he doesn't realize it. You can pass this on other people and hey. Viruses are really contagious and things like masks really work

Tennis Belgrade Jamie United States Dmitrov Nick Curious Novak Djokovic Donald Dell John Wartime Msnbc AXA Carillo Patrick. Marauded BBC Jovovich Charleston Cora Wiseman Munich.
NFL Will Likely Allow Players To Protest During National Anthem

Bleeding Green Nation

02:38 min | 2 weeks ago

NFL Will Likely Allow Players To Protest During National Anthem

"Now that the NFL has accepted? Accepted at least at the surface, how NFL players choose to protest police, brutality and racial inequality bird. You see this going essentially I. Guess the question is what's the next step to keep the momentum of this movement going while they have it well in terms of how players are GonNa? Protest protest has to be defiant in some way to be some level of disobedience associated with it and now the Dell. Dell has kinda like okay'd the action of kneeling or just protesting in general like we're getting into a tricky space it's it's then kneeling might become with like throwing your sister me. Anthem has become. It was a very. That was a very different gesture in nineteen, sixty eight. It's not so much a controversial gesture, twenty twenty, or maybe even twenty eighteen, whatever, if kneeling was controversial, Tony Sixteen but is. Generally accepted across the League twenty twenty. Then you're not really protesting. You know anymore and that's. That's important here because we still have people. Who Need to be allies and when I say people, I really do mean the owners. The owners are some of the powerful people perspective states you know like how many people can you name in Texas more powerful? Jerry Jones for a if he's on board. That gets a lot of people on board or it enough people. That are that are Jerry's fans like okay. Cool them battle-gear, but if you know how many people over there, Massachusetts, or more power more powerful than than Bob, kraft right like this. Won't we get those guys on board? Right as allies. That's when we really will get some like after like a true like seismic shift here because that's the people they know prosecutors in their local, you know. States, cities know DA's in they. They know politicians like they. They got power over their. Their voice matters what Robert Kraft says. When a Mike is far more important than some like vague statement on the Patriots Twitter Account, you know I think that's that's the next step here. Owners are owners are good at this. They don't make themselves available might just head coach swing. Put the pressure on head coaches. No, it's not just the coaches. We need to put the pressure on the owners. You guys of the white billionaires. Who Some of you even supported the president. was empowering a lot of the people that still countering backlash. Matter like it's the next step is them. It's getting them to be all in in on this. Because essentially they become recruiters at that point. Can Jerry onboard and you didn't in your in your far right and even riding with Jerry Johnson. Baby if you can, if you can't see why Jerry, Jones gets on board, then you're.

Jerry Jerry Jones League Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty NFL Jerry Johnson Dell Robert Kraft Kraft Tony Sixteen Texas Massachusetts Patriots Mike President. BOB
NFL commissioner encourages team to sign Kaepernick

Charlie Parker

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

NFL commissioner encourages team to sign Kaepernick

"And NFL commissioner Roger Goodell cities encouraging teams to try and sign calling Capper Nick speaking with ESPN Monday NFL commissioner Roger Goodell was asked about the possibility of Colin Kaepernick returning to the league after Goodell's assuring the NFL will do more to support player activism and combat systemic racism if he wants to resume his career in the NFL that obviously is going to take a team to make that decision but I welcome that support the club making that decision and encourage them to do that some feeling a dell still owes cap make an apology for the widely treated him when he knelt during the national anthem in twenty sixteen to protest racial injustice happening because I play in the NFL since that season but has reportedly been working out like crazy in hopes of getting an opportunity this

Capper Nick Espn Roger Goodell Colin Kaepernick NFL Dell Commissioner
Nursing on a Wheeled Thone with Andrea Dalzell

The WoMed

05:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Nursing on a Wheeled Thone with Andrea Dalzell

"No I can just talk a real life mermaid today. Her name is Andrea. Del I know I. Keep saying I'm excited for every episode, but I truly am. This has been such a cool journey, and I hope you guys get as excited for each episode. Is I get to share them with you? I love getting to connect with people Andrea is an incredible voice in the nursing community, and for people living with disabilities. It's hard to know what to say or how to ask the questions, but it's important to start the conversations I really hope you enjoyed this episode as much as I do. This week's nursery energy moment was sent to me from at Valentine Al-Jabi. She writes Hi de I have a great end e moment for you that I did last week I was a covert unit taking care of my patient. Since the hospital has a no visitors, allowed rule, and my patient has been scared and unsure of what's going on also related to her dementia. Her daughter is an ICU nurse at the same hospital and they told her she is not allowed to go see her mom swallows caring for her. I texted the daughter and asked if I could facetime her so that she could. Could see her mom and the look on both their faces was absolutely priceless. I love stories like this and we need to keep sharing be stories, so thank you Valentine for sending that into me. It's so important to not lose our sense of humanity, and to try to connect now more than ever be at working through this pandemic or connecting through to unlearn centuries of racial prejudice I have a new challenge for nursery energy. How are you going to show up for the black community? How are you going to educate yourself? How are you going to advocate for black people in healthcare community? Let's sit with that. Anti Hyphen so excited to talk to. You don't know if it was on like an e. news like did like a instagram blast to, but I found you through nurse Tammy Edge. You decide like all the most amazing things to say about you. And I found your page and I'm like this girl is freaking awesome. Old Thank you I love nurse Tammy on my Sassi's amazing. We need to get this girl well, though because. Thousands sitting there. I forget what the count is now. It's like sixty to sixty five days now. Yes? I. Don't understand I'm like I would be screaming from the rooftops. Yeah, like fix me. Figure something out. But. We're not here. Talk all about nursing. About Andrea Dell's. How am I saying your last name Correctly Delta? Yeah, ooh goodness! People. Ask me all the time to try and be very conscious of of how I say names because I feel like I just WanNa. Make sure everyone's name is correct. Yes, but like my last name is literally two syllables. Dowell in Zell I get. died and even seeing the in the middle there correct. So I absolutely love your instagram page I love your for yourself as a mermaid. A wheel thrown like where where did that come from I? Love that. So a lot of women in wheelchairs, general or wheelchair users Themselves as Mermaids, because we're still very active on land yet. We're free water like there's no restrictions in water. Rates! We're MERMAIDS, right? mermaids can't walk on read. No, but we're on chairs and we're still getting around on landrace. Oh, yeah, I was miss. Wheelchair New York two thousand fifteen all I should know this. That's awesome. Thanks so I just said my chair was thrown on the Mermaid. WHO. Of that. Love that okay, so I want to talk about this now. You're Miss Wheelchair, New York. That's so cool. How was that competition like so? It's a small competition and we're not like a pageant per se where all about advocacy community like we promote community within disability atmosphere as as a whole, so my competition was really just proving what I'm able to do for my community and how undoing? As a whole for New York City But New York state. Yet competition was kind of it was it was nerve racking I think anything you go into? That's new is nearby and I've never done pageant world. Didn't I was very new to advocating and being an advocate having this voice, yeah. You know. Winning title. Everyone's like I. I was shoe in, but at the same time I didn't feel like that. The girls are amazing. I were who I was up against. They all have a waste. They're all making an impact in the world in a way shape or form and I just stood out, and I'm just grateful to have my name among that cohort of two thousand fifteen missile New York contestants. That's amazing. Is that where you developed your instagram following from a good percentage of a yes? percentage. That's amazing. What is that been like for you just to kind of have that voice now like? Media. I feel like not only. Am I being seen for WHO I am? but I'm being seen in a disability light like I'm opening that that vision that a lot of people tend to shy away from. Saying. Here's my life with a person that has a disability add still extremely active are still doing things that. Every person can do just in a different way.

Andrea Dell New York Tammy Edge Andrea New York City Valentine Wanna Dowell Sassi
Karyopharm Moves to Expand Selinexor's Label

Breaking Biotech

03:22 min | Last month

Karyopharm Moves to Expand Selinexor's Label

"This week we're gonNA talk about some updates from Lasko. Twenty twenty and then I'm going to focus on either as well as another company called, carry farm, so we're doing a little bit of a cancer focus on the show with this episode last episode. And yet should be should be a pretty good show, so I hope you're keeping safe and everything's going well for everyone. I know that the US in particular has been dealing with a lot right now. Not GonNa get too much into that, but I'm GONNA touch on it for the sake of the market, but. With Dell, let's get right into it. So the first thing I want to talk about is some news from Moscow. And one company in particular that I hadn't mentioned, but they seem to be. One of the bigger winners is adapt therapeutics ticker symbol ad, and they showed phase one trial data of ADP A to m four where fifty percents of patients with Sino you'll. Sarcoma exhibited partial responses. Now they also showed some data in believe lung, cancer, neck, and head cancer, and then also with melanoma, and a lot of these patients had responses so I think it's not only due to the soil sarcoma data, but for a lot of solid tumors they show that they're molecules able to lead to some kind of response, and the shares traded wildly high on this news up one hundred twenty eight percent, and then they didn't offering and as I brought this kind of stuff up before in the past. Seeing positive solid tumor data is huge because the market is gigantic I'm GonNa talk about this later, but in lung cancer non small cell lung cancer, the patient population is like two hundred and eighty thousand patients per year. So when you're thinking about companies that are likely to see big increases in stock you know. Are they looking at solid tumors? That's a big thing that you can ask yourself and if they're going to see some positive data in that than maybe you should think about how you WanNa. Play it. So good to see that from them might might do deeper dive in the future, but another company touch on is allergy therapeutics, and specifically they are a company that is doing an off the shelf cell therapy. And the data they showed isn't in it off the shelf car. T. Therapy so aloe five zero one and they were looking in relapsed, refractory, non Hodgkin Lymphoma, and the to specific subsets of that was deal. As well, as F. L.. And for all of you who've been watching my show, you'll know that as of last week. You understand clearly that deal is aggressive form of non Hodgkin Lymphoma whereas NFL or Informa- is more of a slow growing. Or an indolent non Hodgkin Lymphoma, so in both of these forms, which is better than just seeing it in say the version they saw an overall response rate of sixty three percent and thirty seven percent were complete responders and I believe this is in line with traditional car. T. Therapy in all explain in a second with off the shelf part means, and just before going to that. They also saw that around thirty two percent of patients saw site time release. Syndrome, which is also I. Think in line with some previous. Cardi therapies so. The benefit here really, and he's been approved for a few years now, and it's seen a lot of success, but those therapies aren't autologous cell therapy, so they need to get the patient. Take the blood from the patient isolate the cells, edit the cells, and then infuse them back into the patient,

Solid Tumors Lymphoma Twenty Twenty Lasko Sarcoma United States ADP Dell Moscow Sino Informa NFL
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell says "we were wrong" amid protests

KYW 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | Last month

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell says "we were wrong" amid protests

"Remember when Colin Kaepernick took a knee to protest police brutality and wound up losing his job over it well given the George Floyd deaths in the protests from coast to coast NFL commissioner Roger Goodell is now issuing an official apology first my condolences to families of Georgia Florida three out of ten of our modern are pre in all the families who have entered pleas to challenge me we National Football League condemn racism in the systematic oppression of black people you can see the league should have listened to black players of the time and said that in the league's opinion black lives matter the dell was coming under increasing criticism for not

Colin Kaepernick Roger Goodell Georgia Florida Dell George Floyd NFL Commissioner Official
Cooking Up a Storm with Chef Del

Plant Strong

05:17 min | Last month

Cooking Up a Storm with Chef Del

"I want to welcome chef del Shrove. To the plans drawn PODCAST DEL YOU and I. You know I I met you back in two thousand in nine believe it or not? Thousand Nine I got invited to the wellness forum. By Pam. To come talk about the the release of my first book. Engine two diet and that's when I first met you wonderful? Wonderful Gentle appreciative Dell and you're in the kitchen. If I'm not mistaken and I think you are sitting there with your crock saw. You're out. You're kind of your chef. Outfit on and you had. A some sort of a greater I think you are grading lemons, oranges, making dusting dusting and. I just remember the the minute I met. You I was like this very special man, and you got a special special attitude towards life as well and your profession. Remember. I have a picture of unit Pan mnay in that kitchen and the one I remember. Is I remember I made one of your recipes. I think your Mac and cheese. Yes yes yes, you accused me of changing your recipe because you said it tasted better than yours. Well it now knowing what I know about you now it doesn't surprise me not. Not In the least, but so before we get into some so what I want to do with you today, del is want to talk about some of the cookbooks that you've written some of the successes that you've had those then I'd love for our audience here about some of your kind of your your tips and tricks. When it comes to cooking techniques and I'll, I'll serve those up for you and not on the tail. End I'd love to talk them out. Personally You're the path that you've been on some of the struggles that you've had with with eating maybe with your health, and how other people that I'm sure that are out? There are going through the same struggles, and and what advice you might have for them by sharing your story. So. Let me. Launch Him I. Ask you this question, Dal, so you've written if I'm not mistaken for different cookbooks. Is that correct maybe more? I'M GONNA. Say Four. I'm GonNa let me listen off for you. You wrote the for forks over knives cookbook, the China Study Family Cookbook the China Study, quick and easy cookbook and better than Vegan cookbook does. Does. Just me saying those make you exhausted. It does and I am I. If you know the story about even the forks over knives, cookbook I had ninety days to write that manuscript. Maybe time contract to the time I turn it in three hundred recipes in ninety days. I find that hard to believe. But it explains a lot of we'll talk about later. but and I was writing. I was writing another I was writing better than Vegan when they approached me about forks over knives, so I set that aside and dove into that cookbook. So, it's. It's a lot. That's four cookbooks in four years. Well that's yeah. That's insane and. Of all those cookbooks I would imagine. The one that has done has probably sold. The best may not be your favorite, but the one that's sold the best. has been the forks over knives cookbook over three hundred recipes. I mean D- home I want to set this up. You've got over four thousand two hundred seventy six ratings. Right for that book. You wrote that thing August two, thousand twelve. It is consistently in the top hundred, two hundred of books on Amazon. How did that book and the success of that Book Change Your Life? Oak a completely. Imagine. I I never really thought about. The possibility that a book like that would be successful I can see selling cookbooks than using it as a platform for teaching, which I love doing, and all that, but never did I foresee that it would be this spring board for a career in public speaking. For the amount of teaching I get to do and for actually taking the time off eventually. To explore other possibilities. I mean it it still is my my my base in common allows me to do a lot of different things including checking this time now to work on my own house so I never who knew right? Brian I taught went down. Who? Is Co owner of forks over knives. We talk once a year like who knew we were both there sort of laugh about it.

DAL China Study Family Cookbook Dell PAM Brian I MAC Amazon China Study
Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

The $100 MBA Show

06:10 min | Last month

Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

"I could begin today's episode by naming all the famous entrepreneurs. We all know that don't have a college degree. Whether. It's Mark Zuckerberg or Walt Disney or Michael. Dell or Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak or Bill Gates or Ray KROC or I can keep going right. But. That doesn't prove that have a college. Degree is a waste of money, or the conjugate doesn't help you become an entrepreneur. I let's recognize the fact that everybody on that list I just named and more ones I didn't list are exceptional entrepreneurs, exceptional people whether they're very bright and talented, whether they have a lot of tenacity like Ray Kroc, or just are willing to work harder than everybody else I'm not interested in edge, cases or extraordinary people that are extraordinarily things. I am interested in addressing this question with the fact that what about everybody else everybody who may not be a genius or The special gifts of some of the people we've talked about. Can they make it as an entrepreneur without a college degree? Well, let's talk about what caused. Agree gives you so that we can boil it down to. Do you need those things to be successful there more college degree? We'll give you an education. They will teach you somethings who go to class and you'll learn now whether that. is of date or not is a different matter, but you will learn. You will gain those skills number two. It's going to put you in an environment where you're going to meet. Other people go to college whether it's online or offline, you are going to be networking with other people other likeminded people other people. WanNa be successful just like you, and often you know in the same field whether it's computer, science, or business, or whatever it is so one you're gonNA give formation number two. You're going to get exposed to people, and you'll be able to build a network and the third thing that call will give you is a piece of paper. They'll give you a certificate. They'll give you a diploma. Something that tells other people employers particularly that hate. This person knows stuff or knows this area of expertise whatever your degrees in, so it's almost like a permission, slip or sort of like a coupon like hey, this paper proves of this person. Know something in this area with a stern on a different matter, but that's how society views a degree, so those are the three things college will give you now. Can you achieve these three things outside of college with Al GonNa College Information Skills. Skills Yup, you can learn the outside college whether that is indifferent programs online learning courses online books, universities will have a monopoly on the information, right? You can get this information elsewhere network while there's a little bit different because you know you're not in a space like an actual campus, but hey, you still can go to conferences. You still can meet people online. You could be a a person that really values relationships in kind of. Of Fall some advice. We talked about in this in this podcast. How To make sure you build your network constantly? So this is doable. Assad College, and the third thing is the piece of paper now a totally different think society has agreed that this piece of paper will allow you to get you know opportunities whether it's jobs or an interview or whatever it is. This is the difference the piece of paper. So do you need a? A piece of paper. That's the question here, so college is beneficial. If you do need a piece of paper that permission slip, but if you plan to be an entrepreneur, if your soul is GonNa, be a business bill I want to be an entrepreneur. All my life I don't want to really pursue a career that requires me to have a degree. If that's you tried and true, then really GonNa College may not make the most financial. Financial Sense not going to say it's going to hurt you, but it's a lot of time often in your prime years and a lot of money being spent on something, you may not really need because you can achieve the things you want to achieve as an entrepreneur without it now if you are not sure if you like fifty fifty. Hey, I think I to be an entrepreneur, but maybe I want to work for a little while. While maybe I want to start a business and then after that I wanna go ahead and you know work somewhere at a corporation, a degree will help you get that job. This justice, the reality of the situation there are exceptions to the rules of course in different careers one of them is programming development engineering technology. Many engineers don't have college degrees, but they're so highly skilled, and so saw after that they can get a job. Job Easily and our certification programs outside of the university structure that you can take in that field that can qualify you to get jobs. A lot of people say hey, getting your degree is sort of like a backup plan. You can always get a job if things don't work out, but that really doesn't help you answer that question of. Do you need a college degree to Be Successful Entrepreneur? I don't think you need it I. I do believe you'll. The half caused. Degrees can be successful I. do believe that people that don't can be successful as well as a matter of how you WanNa spend your resources. Your time and your money I can't tell you for certain that thing that I learned in university. I don't use at all in my day to day life as an entrepreneur. I'm sure there are some things that I've picked up that I've used. But if I'm going to be completely honest. I don't think there's enough of that. I would say would require me to have gone to college to be. Successful, so you also have to define what success means. What does success mean to you as an entrepreneur? Is Success being able to pursue a hobby that you love and make a profit is success being able to replace current income in your current job with your business success, a a million dollar business is that a ten million dollar business? Is it a billion dollar business which a lot of? Of People think that's the only meaning of success. No, you need to define what success is for you as an entrepreneur and for most people I think it should be able to make a healthy living that allows you to be financially free doing something that you really feel passionate about that. You

Ray Kroc Assad College Steve Jobs Mark Zuckerberg Dell Bill Gates Steve Wozniak Walt Disney AL Michael
Coronavirus pandemic to surge smart home demand

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last month

Coronavirus pandemic to surge smart home demand

"That a lot of the tech we rely on is inadequate for the job the need for better stuff to avoid system crashes in the frustrating video conference moments like this yes lost all in the event a boom time and a supply crunch for makers of home tech devices we immediately sold out of webcams bracken Darrell CEO of Logitech tells Bloomberg his company and others are trying to ramp up production in several major firms including Twitter Facebook dell an American Express unveiled plans for workers to keep working from home at least through the end of the year Daryl says the work at home economy will likely last a lot longer I think these these trends are permanent so it's just a way of coming through and I think it's going to be really hard to suck that way back and there's a simple reason for that he says or things were saying because the people really like working

CEO Logitech Bloomberg American Express Daryl Twitter
A groundbreaking terrorism charge against an alleged incel

The Big Story

09:50 min | Last month

A groundbreaking terrorism charge against an alleged incel

"You probably don't remember the name Ashley. Noel are Daca even if you heard about her killing when it happened police tapes around the crime scene here at the crown. Spa near Wilson and Dufferin. An active investigation is underway. One woman in her early. Twenty S is dead falling a stabbing earlier this afternoon and to others. Who are also involved in. The incident aren't hospital. The Grand Scheme of the new cycle at the time it was a small tragedy with victims and violence and a first degree murder charge and a court date to come at some point. The crime happened at the end of February. Just as newscasts were starting to be dominated by the emergence of covid nineteen so the story got lost until Tuesday when the charges against the accused were updated and two words were added right after murder terrorist activity and this is important because I the image that those two words might conjure in some minds is not even close to what police say happened here and second because certainly in Canada and quite likely around the whole world. This is the first time that charge has been used in this way. Every murder in Toronto is a tragedy. Every murder should be covered and every victim should be mourned. And we probably know that. That's not always the case. So what is it about this one? That might leave a legacy that is significant to victims and activists across the world. What might those two words at the end of the charge change in our fight against misogyny Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story? Stuart Bell is a reporter with Global News and he was part of a team of journalists. Who broke this story? Hello Stuart. Why don't you start by telling me what we know about what happened on February twenty? Four th in as much detail as you can well as about noon on a Monday and The owner of a A massage parlor in Toronto Heard some loud noises coming from a back room and she went to see what's going on and a man came out with a believable machete started attacking her. She was actually able to wrestle with a bad and eventually stabbed him as well and so the to them came outside covered in blood. Witnesses saw them. Come outside the storefront Bleeding heavily and police arrived. They found the body of a woman inside at twenty four four year old woman and they arrested the young person who was injured at the scene at the time they charged him with first degree murder and attempted murder but it was always a big question. Mark over this particular killing as to why. What was the motive for it in there were? There was some especially given Toronto's history with the in cells in the two thousand eighteen van attack. There was some speculation. No could this be but it was only yesterday when the charges were laid in court when we finally got the confirmation that in fact Police are alleging that this was an insult attack. Let's start with The victim of the attack. What do we know about her? And I guess about the place where this happened like set the scene for us a little bit so we have some context for for the charges while it's an erotic massage parlor if you read their website they certainly don't conceal the fact that You know there perhaps a little bit more than massage other certainly encouraging a certain type of Clientele. The woman was killed was twenty four years old. She was a mother. The woman who was injured was thirty years old believe she's described herself as the owner of the of the business She had some cuts honor arms. You know sort of defensive kind of wounds. We know why this particular place was targeted. We don't know for sure but certainly from other in related attacks over the years we've seen places targeted for example a Yoga Studio in Florida just because the attacker believed that was a place where he could find women which were really his target right so that may have been the case here as well. What do we know about the alleged killer? Well we don't know much in can't say of what we know. Because he's a youth he seventeen and therefore his identity is protected by the Young Offenders Act. It's just not even possible to discuss anything that would reveal his identity but we do know from our police. Sources that Following his arrest he made statements that put him in line with cell ideology. One police source told OUR CATHERINE MACDONALD A Global Toronto that he wanted to kill as many women as possible. We also heard that. He said he was familiar with the Toronto Van Attacker and the author of what is considered to be the in cell manifesto for police to come out and say outright that they believe this was inspired by ideology You can bet they must have some either from his own statements or his maybe as online usage or maybe both they probably have evidence that certainly leads them in that direction. Can you explain the significance of the way? The police have changed the charge. What does it mean? Well it significant on a bunch of levels. You know if you look back at the history of terrorist attacks just in the last couple of years There was the the van attack in Edmonson. There was The Quebec mosque shooting was the the Toronto Van Attack. In twenty eighteen in all those cases. Either certainly things that looked like textbook terrorism but in none of those cases where terrorism charges brought with the prosecutors did in those cases was basically say We're charging you with first degree murder or attempted murder and I think the the reasoning behind not pursuing terrorism aspect of that is it really doesn't add anything in the end result and it may be even makes the prosecution more difficult. Because you've got to prove the motive. The motive was somehow terrorism related. But I think you'll probably have noticed. There was a lot of push back to that. Why was the Quebec Mosque? Shooting not officially considered terrorism. Why was the the Toronto Vanak not treated as an act of terrorism? I think that caused a lot of confusion in a lot of people were upset so I think it's entirely possible that we've seen a bit of a change here Don't forget three days before this massage parlor attack. There was another attack. There was a woman in scarborough on sidewalk when she was attacked. By a man with a hammer in killed he was also arrested and charged with the same murder terrorist activity charge and he was alleged to have been a supporter of is this ideology so in that case they they did lay that terrorism charge. So I think when you look at those two cases together for probably seeing Abbot of a sea change in terms of prosecutors in police saying look I think it is it is important that when terrorism happens we treat it as terrorism that we recognize it for what it is and you know even though it not change the length of time that the person will spend in prison. It's important for the community to have it recognized for what it really is and I think there's another significance as well and I've heard this from sources over this particular case which is one of the best ways to interrupt. Terrorism is for people to recognize when individuals are going down that path of violent radicalization so for parents for example. We're talking about a seventeen year old in this case for parents or friends or people that are around our teachers people that are around someone to have a better idea of what terrorism looks like how people behave when the radicalizing in into to intervene when they see that happened to get that person help before they end up picking up a a knife for were renting a van and mowing people down and so I think by the hope is that by prosecuting. These types of things as terrorism Dell help raise awareness among people. Terrorism is not just nine eleven. It comes in different forms it can be just a young person online radicalizing attaching themselves to a cause and deciding to go in and pick up everyday objects as weapons and to do something in their mind for their cause. So I think that's the other significance is hopefully benefit in terms

Toronto First Degree Murder Murder Stuart Bell Quebec Mosque Toronto Van Attacker Toronto Van Attack Noel Ashley Wilson Jordan Heath Rawlings Global Toronto Dell Canada Florida Global News Mark Catherine Macdonald Edmonson
Katy Perry reveals that Adele is her next door neighbour

Armstrong and Getty

00:25 sec | Last month

Katy Perry reveals that Adele is her next door neighbour

"Guys know the Katy Perry Adele our neighbors I didn't I just found out apparently their next door neighbors and before quarantine kicked in a dell just showed up in PKD like a surprise visit I don't even know that either until recently I wish we had talked about that during the interview with her too so that means that Katie was in the same neighborhood as prince Harry Meghan Markle because the next door to a dell as well they are they're an adult neighborhood

Dell PKD Katie Harry Meghan Markle Katy Perry
'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

All Things Considered

02:11 min | Last month

'We Can't Take Your Call': Uber Drivers, Other Gig Workers Struggle For Unemployment

"The uber drivers to Airbnb hosts that dog walkers they are the millions of people who make a living from gig work thanks to a massive federal relief package they are temporarily eligible for unemployment benefits but the unemployment system was not built for gig work and so many states are struggling to help this new class of workers NPR tech correspondent Shannon bond reports many of them are still waiting for their money Michael o'dell as a jazz musician in Columbus Ohio but music doesn't pay the bills so he drives for lift in Newburgh in since the pandemic hit he only goes out when he needs cash right away I definitely don't put the time into it like I normally do because I'm not going to get good rights unemployment benefits should be a lifeline for gig workers like him but dell hasn't seen a check yet I've been applying every week and every single week I get the night like regular unemployment denied because lift and uber don't consider themselves his employer they say there are millions of drivers are independent contractors who choose when and how much to work that's how many apps operate and that means they don't do what a normal employer does Jay Shambaugh a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution explains normally if you're eligible for unemployment insurance it's because your employer has been paying into the insurance system and it's part of paying in their reporting earnings gig workers have to show proof of their earnings so the state knows how much to give them an unemployment benefits and Gemma says most states have to set up systems to process those claims that's been the big hold up figuring out how they track who is supposed to get this money it's been more than seven weeks since Congress made gig workers eligible for unemployment and according to Brookings thirty nine states are now processing those claims but even those who got their claims in really early are still waiting like lift driver Jerome gauge in Los Angeles he applied for unemployment in early March make sure that all on your reported earnings looking over your reward is zero dollars because you don't think that your employee earning their knowledge days appealed he's still

Shannon Bond Columbus Ohio Newburgh Dell Jay Shambaugh Senior Fellow Brookings Institution Gemma Congress Los Angeles Airbnb NPR Michael O'dell
NBC says 2.35 million viewers for live golf's return to TV

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:23 sec | Last month

NBC says 2.35 million viewers for live golf's return to TV

"John NBC sports says the return of live golf brought more than two point three million viewers across all its platforms of sixteen percent higher than the final of the dell match play last year an exhibition was up against the official return of NASCAR last year's match play was part of a TV line up filled with sports including NC double a basketball the March madness Major League Baseball in the NASCAR

Nascar NC Major League Baseball John Nbc Dell Official
Author 'Rodham' imagines a different `Hillary'

Weekend Edition Sunday

07:03 min | Last month

Author 'Rodham' imagines a different `Hillary'

"A young Hillary Rodham madly in love with the man she met at Yale Law School abandons her own path and heads to Arkansas slowly she starts to uncover bill Clinton's many infidelities and makes a choice what would have happened if Hillary Rodham had never married Bill Clinton a new novel by Curtis Sittenfeld imagines it just that and she joins me now to talk about it hello hello your book starts out in a familiar way but then your book takes a very different attacks from the historical timeline what what happens so in real life Bill Clinton proposed to Hillary Rodham twice and she said no both times and then he proposed a third time and she said yes and in my version she says no the third time two and she goes her own way then she initially becomes a law professor and Chicago at northwestern and then she kind of goes on from there and the book follows her over the next forty years I want to ask you before we go much further in this you know so much has been said about Hillary Clinton why did you want to write speculative fiction about her doesn't everyone is in a totally natural impulse and possibly so actually it's funny because I agree with you that so much has been written about Hillary and it was sort of in reaction to that that I think I wrote this book so in the lead up to the two thousand sixteen election I was invited to write essays about Hillary and I would decline because I felt like every possible thing there was to say about Hillary had been said she had been analyzed from every angle and then an editor at esquire magazine invited me to write a short story from Hillary's perspective and I accepted and writing that story was this kind of strange exercise where I realize that the question was not what to the American people think of Hillary Clinton but what does Hillary Clinton think of the American people and it turned out that that I had four hundred pages worth of thought to say on that so it was actually trying to sort of slipped the narrative and and instead of making her the one who's scrutinize lake giving her voice which of course is totally fictionalized voice likes she did not write this book I wrote this book and so she says no to Bill Clinton she becomes as you mention a law professor she then becomes a politician was it inevitable that she'd become a politician how did you come up with this path for her I think that in real life if she had not married Bill Clinton I'm not sure she would have led the life that I created for her in the novel and I think with a novel like this you know that the reader is bringing some opinions or expectations and I as the writer I'm kind of toying with those expectations and sometimes for filling them and sometimes defying them and I felt like it was the most interesting version and to have her enter politics but you know have no pulp click association with Bill Clinton yes except to quite a few meetings along the way I want to ask you about writing Bill Clinton the character because like the real life Bill Clinton your fictionalized bill also has a swirl of sexual misconduct allegations around him and he's also accused of sexual assault so one of the reasons that I love fiction is that I feel like getting knowledge is that people are very complex and that the same person can have very appealing qualities and very troubling qualities and I think that the plan is like the embodiment of that where I would never pretend that I can't understand his his appeal I would never you know sort of say that I can look at him with admiration and you know without feeling any sense of sort of discomfort and so and I think that a novel allows for knowledge in that like this is in an essay that's trying to either celebrate him or take him down they're both the very intertwined in our consciousness are you trying to suggest that we might consider them differently if we had to think of them as individuals yes so actually I think that one of the reasons I wrote this book is that around the time even after the two thousand and sixteen election I had this realization that school children who knew Hillary was running for president often literally didn't know that Bill Clinton existed and that kind of blew my mind where I thought you know what is what if adults saw Hillary as completely separate from dell the way that kids do and you think that that would change fundamentally the way that she's you yes I do I think I mean I'm not I'm not saying that it would sort of solve all the problems of sexism but I think it would make her have an identity much more like that of Elizabeth Warren or any clothes are I wonder if it isn't insulting to suggest that a man held Hillary Clinton back maybe this story and their story is one of a hugely successful partnership that is arguably one of the most successful in American political history it's totally possible that you're right like I'm not even sure it's either or I think it may be though Clinton held her back in some ways and probably helped her and others and the same for I think maybe she held him back in some ways or maybe didn't always do things that were in is personal or professional best interest and then in other ways she was hugely helpful like I don't I don't think it's an either or it's sort of situation for for either of them did your opinion of either bill or Hillary Clinton change after giving them the fictional treatment you know being intimately involved in sort of creating this alternate narrative for them so I was already an admirer of Hilary before I began working on the book if anything I definitely have more admiration for her in terms of toughness her perseverance her hard work there's also there's all these stories I think they are sort of in the public but they don't get that much attention about what a loyal thoughtful friend she is like often over many decades or you know like she's she's very funny which is not really part of her public image so I am fully pro

Hillary Rodham Yale Law School Arkansas Bill Clinton
FDA Authorizes First Antigen Test to Help in the Rapid Detection of the Virus that Causes COVID-19 in Patients

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | Last month

FDA Authorizes First Antigen Test to Help in the Rapid Detection of the Virus that Causes COVID-19 in Patients

"A new type of coronavirus test is reaching the market in summer expressing caution about its accuracy the first antigen test for the new coronavirus has been approved by the food and drug administration this Sophia to test from quite dell corporation looks for protein traces of the virus known as antigens from a nasal swab similar to screenings done for flu or strep throat the trade off is it's less accurate than genetic testing a former FDA official Scott Gottlieb says this test will miss about twenty percent of patients who actually have colluded nineteen but he and others agree the test will greatly expand screening capability needed to reopen businesses and schools they suggest though anyone with symptoms he tested negative undergo the more thorough genetic screening which takes hours to

Sophia FLU Scott Gottlieb Dell FDA Official
Dellen Millard and the Murder of Laura Babcock

Sword and Scale

09:25 min | 2 months ago

Dellen Millard and the Murder of Laura Babcock

"Was a kid that was shunned and pooh-poohed over at the country club at a lot of people in that world new Delon as the rich kid who throws parties for burn outs and high schoolers. Rumor has it that Delon takes things to another level when he brings out a black and yellow toolbox filled with party drugs whole basement set up for youngsters for parties. Tried to make it look club in what takes place. They solders xbox Diet. Tv's and stuff like that so joan. There ain't drugs or some folks down there to grow it from. The police ever attended there for these couple years. We had one get out of control. We had to call the police to GET PEOPLE. People usually usually. It's twenty anyways that night. It was more or something was something posted on. Facebook just one. That's the new airplane hangar in Waterloo. Well sometimes a source of tension between father and son slash president and vice president of Malardier was generally a pretty sweet deal for Delon until any contracts were finalized. It was essentially a place for Dell in the store. His hot rods jeeps and jet skis. It also gave access to mechanics and engineers who would gladly tinker away at whatever projects Dylan through their way. All you had to do was keep the place clean and organized. But he couldn't care less about that. More toys were stored at the sprawling. Millar to state. Police I arrived the night of Wayne. Millar it's death. They noticed none of the fifteen vehicles parked on the property were missing. Most of the mansion gave the impression of a messy. Frat House adorned with airplane memorabilia. Save for Wayne's master bedroom sadly smelling of multiple cats and unchanged litter boxes but in the interrogation room when the conversation turns toward Wayne's physical and mental well-being being in the months leading up to his death delon casually hints at what life had been like since he moved back in with his father over a year ago. Yet depression him. He carried some pretty sadness within throughout life. I never really never really wanted to share it with me. The death of Wayne Millar is eventually ruled a suicide albeit a strange one as the coroner suggests he's never seen someone kill themselves with a shot through the eye as the interview with Dell includes. It's clear they've taken. Everything is told them as absolute truth but for grieving son gives the impression of a tired traveller being mildly inconvenienced by the TSA. Of course looking back on it now knowing the full story at all makes sense because Dell and Millar is a master manipulator the new CEO of Millar who will quickly closed the book on his family's legacy and throw it into the fireplace one year later it's February twenty eleven and twenty six year. Old Sean Learner is throwing a surprise party for his then girlfriend. Laura Babcock also in attendance Dylan Millard. An ex boyfriend of Laura's that Sean does not personally know as the party ends several people including Sean and his girlfriend. Laura go back to Delon's apartment. After limited conversation. Sean describes his impression of Delon as sketchy at a certain point. Sean Witnesses Delon giving Laura a pill unprovoked as a birthday present ecstasy he assumes which makes him a bit uncomfortable. Laura Babcock who has felt lost in life since graduating with degrees in English and drama at the University of Toronto has begun seeking treatment for mental health issues that have taken over her life undiagnosed and with increasingly more erotic behavior. Laura is asked to leave her family home after an incident where she threatens her mother with the wooden spoon sometime during the next year. Sean and Laura break up although Sean still loves and cares for he watches from the sidelines as Laura moves in with a new boyfriend eventually ending that relationship and having him arrested for assault as well as the sexual assault of a friend still concerned for his ex-girlfriend's wellbeing and realizing that she's headed towards a downward spiral. John makes arrangements for Lara to stay at a local days. Inn Motel they convene at a nearby food court. Where Sean Learns? She's recently began working at an escort. Service he loans her an Ipad to help her find a safer more permanent living situation. It is the last time they will ever meet in this same period of spring. Twenty Twelve Dylan Mallard is secretly juggling relationships with at least three women including his ex fiancee and the eighteen year old. He was cheating on her with Christina. New Christina Nude Ga is friends with Laura Babcock. Well I guess the more accurate term is frenemies as much as it pains me to use that word. Both of them have slept with Dylan at one time or another and Lars Birthday Christina decides to text her something along the lines of happy birthday. It was a year ago that I I slept with Delon to which Laura replies. That's fine I slept with him a couple of weeks ago to which an upset Cristina remind. You is the one who started. This mean girls exchange in the first place texts back. Did you miss your medication? Today you're a crazy psycho bitch trying to get my boyfriend. You had him and he lost him give it up Christina. New is a delight a role in all this is far from over but it begins in April of twenty twelve following the birthday text. Meltdown now. A flustered Christina texts her permit skuas Boyfriend Delon whose bruised ego once again for every turn of kindness you showed her. She took it and threw it in my face making me discouraged. Fuck she's like a virus like herpes always there but only shows up once in a while with a whole lot of annoying lesions. There's a difference herpes. You can't really get rid of. It just feeds off you until you die. I. I'm going to hurt her then I'll make her leave fancy myself something of an undercover doctor. I think with the right treatment. These herpes can be gotten rid of well. Dr Millard. How do you propose to remove the infectious disease? I think we're being harmed in irritated by toxins released by a parasite removal of the parasite should alleviate the irritation. I will remove her from our lives. Delon reaches out to a friend of a friend and purchase a wooden handled Smith and Wesson Handgun and on July third twenty thirteen. The day of removal has arrived. Want to just do. This is the last footage of Laura Babcock taken by a friend. Who Finds Laura's private joke of meowing and public amusing and wants her to see? Just how silly she looks. She's been telling him about an upcoming trip to Las Vegas. And when he drops her off at a bus station. July second he feels like she is excited for life while. Nobody's there to see it. The signal that Laura Cell Phone Sends Ping's off nearby towers explains what happens next the following evening July third. The map suggests that Laura is very. Near to Dylan's location. The information won't be revealed for many years data records then trace Laura and Delon's phones as they travel to Delon's home. The two phones move together the next day as well until suddenly LAURA'S PHONE STOPS RECEIVING MESSAGES.

Sean Witnesses Delon Laura Laura Babcock Wayne Millar Sean Dylan Christina Laura Cell Dell Sean Learner Facebook Joan Depression Dylan Mallard Waterloo Christina Nude Ga Frat House Dylan Millard TSA
"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:13 min | 6 months ago

"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"And please do stick around because in just a moment. We're going to hear from you about the things your building but first a quick message from one of our two thousand nineteen lead sponsors of how I built this Hiscox. WHO understands every small business is unique and Taylor's policies to your businesses very specific needs? Get a quote or purchase. A policy at H. I. S. C. O. X. DOT COM HIS COX business insurance experts experts planet. Money is the man who popularized recycling by making a deal with the Mafia. It's the bedroom. Beats maker making hits for Drake Nicki Menaj and the woman trying to get her money back from Ben Nimmo planet money from NPR. Hey thanks for sticking around because it's time now for how you built that and today we're updating the story. The first ran about a year and a half ago about two sisters in Lynn Massachusetts who had perfected the family recipe. I make this stuffing's that's Casey White. And I make the Dow and that's her sister Vanessa and the dough and the stuffing therefore Perogie. The Polish dumplings filled with cheese and potatoes. Sometimes sausage their grandfather used to sell them at the Family Deli in western Massachusetts in middle school goal. I would go there on Saturdays and help pinch Rogis and we always had them in our freezer. kind of like our kraft macaroni and cheese were. We just had him for his. And Knesset Casey went off to college. Their mom would bring them coolers full of Pirogies from the Deli and by the time they graduated they were still eating them and their friends were to ensure they could get parolees trader Joe's or wherever but who wanted those there wasn't really anyone making pirogies like families to make make and we finally said it was one of those ideas where you're like. Someone's definitely going to do this. And then we we realized after a while that no one was real. We don't maybe we should delay day. Maybe they should make Perot Giesen seldom okay. So at this point he was two thousand. Fifteen and Vanessa. Casey's grandfather was no longer alive but had written all of his recipes out by hand so they went to the Deli and the Gaza. We brought them back to my house and caked my table role in flower and so began the Perogie making for ten hours. Every Sunday Vanessa would do the dough and should be not too thick not to who shoo weeds and Casey would do. The fillings started with three flavors potato and cheese the pineapple and cheese and sweet potato caramelized. Onion wait ah I do not believe. They grow pineapples and Poland. It is very strange. Yes definitely not something. You would find back in the old country. But it actually was one of their grandfather's. There's recipes anyway. Every weekend Casey Vanessa would make the pirogies freeze them and then sell them at the farmers market in Melrose Massachusetts though I fire virus market with about fifty boxes and sold out in an hour in realized that there was a market and one reason they were selling so fast I think dumplings are the ultimate comfort food. Or It's bananas or it's Asian Dumplings Ed Food Twenty. All that year Vanessa Casey would make and sell pirogies Roque's on the weekend and then office jobs during the week but there is a point where we had to go to the next step because we were just making only you can only make so much in that that that long ten hour day we couldn't grow it unless we kind of took the leap of faith so we quit our jobs and after taking that leap the sisters move there Perogie operation from Vanessa's house to a commercial kitchen in Gloucester Massachusetts. They hired a few people to help them. Make more pirogies. But Vanessa Sir. She is still doing the dough stretching it out running it through the Joe Cheater and then cutting those circles thousands of circles day for the rest of our staff to fill Elon. Hinch Vanessa and Casey call their company. Judge you PIROGIES. Judge is the Polish word for grandfather and since we last talked to them. They've shifted their business from retail failed to wholesale which means they're focusing on large distributors like stadiums grocery stores in fact they're about to launch in their first grocery stores next month with fingers crossed on a possible contract with a stadium coming up and by the way that pineapple and cheese stuffing they no longer make it Apparently people don't like pineapple with cheese like we went to Poland a few years back and neither of us are pineapple on any menu. If you WANNA learn more about judge you parolees had to our podcast page how this NPR dot org and of course if you WanNa tell us your story go to build that NPR dot org and thanks so much for listen to the show. This week you can subscribe it apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast and while you're there please do give us review. You can also write to us at H. I. B. T.. NPR Dr Dot Org. And if you want to tweet it's at how I built this or at Cairo's our show is produced this week by run up Fata with music composed by RAM team Arab. Louis thanks also to candidate. Lim Julia Carney Neva. Grant Jeff Rodgers. Our intern is Sequoia Carrillo. I'm Guy Roz and you can listening.

Casey Vanessa Vanessa Casey Pirogies NPR Casey White Vanessa Sir Poland Dr Dot Org Hiscox Family Deli Lim Julia Carney Neva Lynn Massachusetts Taylor Massachusetts Drake Nicki Menaj H. I. S. C. O. Ben Nimmo Gaza pirogies Roque
"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

10:03 min | 6 months ago

"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"So you guys decide to go public. I guess in Nineteen Eighty Eight Do An IPO and raise tons of money. And why did you why. Why did you decide to do that by the way because at that point you I guess owned the entire company? Well we need the capital. We were growing at like eighty percent it per year and the company was only four years old and we were expanding into all sorts of new countries. We were expanding into new product article lines you know and we also wanted to be more of a pure with our customers and being a public company somewhat enable bliss to do that because customers could look and see that we were you know a real legitimate company. Yeah you know that that was helpful to time. Well here's what I think is harder harder for people to wrap their head around. which is you were expanding by an order of magnitude every year you? There was huge amount of revenue coming in but but yet that wasn't enough cash and capital for you guys to expand sure all the revenues not profit we. We weren't a software company and so we did need need some capital to finance the growth of the business and hire more people open new offices open new factories build. It systems you know. We absolutely needed some capital and by getting that money. Were you able to say okay now. We're going to beat. IBM WE'RE GOING TO BE BIGGER THAN IBM. Well We definitely want to to be the biggest and I would say it changed a little bit in that timeframe to you know competing with Compaq and one of the things I think I learned along the way was that if you obsess on the competitors editors you could be making a really bad mistake And I think you know that was definitely true in the case of those two in the sense that we had a better business model and if we were trying to just look at them we would miss opportunities by not listening to our customers. And how did we get from a company that started in a dorm room to having a half a billion dollars in sales well. We did it because we listened and we learn so I I guess by the year two thousand and two thousand two thousand one dell computers. PC's becomes a number one brand by by sales by market share more than compact more than IBM. Yes what did you do. You remember finding that out. Yeah you know we sort of have this Celebrate for a second Sometimes a little longer but you know we were focused Kristan. How do we keep growing? How do we expand into servers and storage services and software and how do we solve the next unsolved problems and two thousand one? We've been thinking a lot about China and India and the emerging markets markets and So there wasn't a lot of dwelling on any particular success so I mean the company you You know the story of Dell is pretty remarkable because it seems like from the moment you started selling. PC's of your dorm room until two thousand one. It's a success. After success after success there was no moment of failure. There was no there was no real struggle. Is that true is that is that right. No that's now right at all there were plenty of struggles and certainly if you go back and look at the history there you'll find all kinds of missteps along the way and did ends and mistakes you know. What was the dumbest mistake you you may? Because it doesn't I mean Michael I'm beyond it doesn't sound like you made any mistakes shakes it. Sounds like you were pre naturally gifted as a high school kid to understand business and then you understood computers and then you just started the successful company so what what was a mistake. You made okay. So nineteen eighty nine we created something called Dell UNIX which was which was a software? Yeah Yeah you know this. This was sort of prior. To the whole Lennox way yeah and UNIX was a well used operating system in mid range computer systems you know turns out we were really early at that and that was that was a really bad idea. It was a kind of a horrible misadventure bid cost the company money did it affect stock price. Sure yeah all that around the same time. We also had a a wildly ambitious engineering program that had our team had cooked up and it was too big of technical leap and the project failed. It was a project called Olympic. We had problems with our inventory control early on you know. We had all kinds kinds of mistakes. Fortunately no then we're fatal and one of the things I learned a long long time ago. You know when you find a problem fix it as fast as you find it uh-huh and look when you're pioneering in a new area where the new business model there's no playbook there's no You you have to just learn by doing and you have to into it an experiment your way through the problem. I'm curious about two thousand four because you you you stepped down as CEO of Dell. The company is just. It's a obviously a fortune. Five hundred company had been already for more than a decade huge revenues. Did you think okay. I've made it. I'm thirty nine time to move on and start a different phase in my life. Not Really. I didn't really think about stepping down. I had this partner in the company. Kevin Rollins who was the president of the company. He and I were running the company together and and I decided okay you be. CEO for awhile. I'll be chairman. I'll still be very involved and after about two ears you know. The industry started changing pre rapidly and the board came to me and said you know. Hey we think you should go back to being young. Yeah yeah and I mean what what happened. During that time because by all accounts that I've read there was a decline in two thousand four. Del Starts to lose market share and then a couple years later. HP becomes a number one PC seller. And then you come back in two thousand seven so what was going on in those three years. I think the market was changing. I think there were new. Things starting to emerge the cloud. What people we'll call it cloud today starting to show up? I think we weren't being aggressive enough in changing the business given the he's shifts. That were happening. Yeah you know it's a change or die business it's quicker dead business and the board asked me to come back into the CEO role and I was happy to do it but I've read that that around that time. The the quality in the service of Dell was was in decline with the company was is getting a lot of heat. And I'm sure you saw that criticism. So how did you. How did you deal with that? Look I think I think you can in any inigo dote you know extrapolate but there were definitely some areas where we could have been investing more in innovation. And we you you know. Change the focus of the company starting around two thousand seven to understand what we needed to do to be you. You know an important and relevant company in the future and so look I felt then and feel now deep sense of responsibility and commitment into the company. And I'll I'll care about the company after I'm dead. What what does that mean? All Care for the company after I'm dead the means that you know this is a lifelong pursuit for me. In terms of you know helping the company reach its full potential and certainly my dream is at the company persists well beyond my lifetime which You know still pretty young guy so I think that's a many years away. I wonder Michael. How much of your success has to do with you? Know your hard work and your brains and you know intuition and how much of it is luck good question I don't really know I'm sure there's some element of of luck there I I I've probably been lucky. A Lot. you know I feel like I. I was really lucky to be born in the United States. That's probably the biggest stroke of luck right there because I think in the United States when you're twenty years old and you show up and you want to sell something to somebody you know they look at you too funny so i. I think that that was my biggest stroke of luck was just being born here in this country and having the opportunity in the freedoms that that's at forty minutes that's Michael Dell and if you still think of a Dell computer as the nerdy John Hodgman character in those pc versus Mac commercials dough. Computers have actually been used by the good guys in the Jason Bourne movies movies and Spiderman Captain America even mission impossible in fact a few years ago in two thousand Sixteen Dell was the number one brand featured in movies more than Sony more than Mercedes Benz or Adidas and yes more than Apple.

Dell Michael Dell CEO IBM United States Compaq Kevin Rollins Kristan HP John Hodgman Adidas Lennox Mac chairman Sony partner Jason Bourne
"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:40 min | 6 months ago

"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"Factory operation and so this was a little bit scary because it's sort of looked like a massive dorm room. You know it was. It wasn't the most put together. Place this is. This is not an actual tool dorm room right like you you had by this rented out office space. Yeah Yeah We. We're growing quickly. And so we you know we tried to clean this space up and and put on some semi respectable business attire. Yeah so the guy's going through and we're showing him. Here's how format the hard drives. And here's how we you know. Insure the quality controls. And we're sure we can meet your demand for this order for one hundred fifty units and he says what are those and I said. Well those are the computers that we have to format hard drives and by this time we'd actually been assembling our our own. Computers Format hard drives became too expensive to buy am from other people and he said well. Why don't you sell those us and I was like? Oh that's a great idea. I should've thought we were so busy. Making these hard disk drive kits that we. Dan Really thought to make our own computers when we come back in just a moment how that idea launched Michael Down a path that would make del one of the biggest computer companies in the world. Stay with us on Guy Rosner listening to how I built this from. NPR Hey everyone just just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who help make this podcast possible I to squarespace the website builder dedicated to providing customers with easy to use professionally designed designed templates. Join the millions of graphic designers architects lawyers and other professionals using squarespace to promote their business visit squarespace dot com slash. NPR for Free Fourteen Day trial. And when you're ready to launch us the offer code. NPR to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain. Thanks also to First Republic Bank whose first and only business is client service. They work with you to create customized financial solutions. That support your the unique needs and goals reach out today and you'll be connected with a dedicated banker who will always be your first point of contact with the bank because they understand your total financial picture. They can recommend the services and products. That are right for you or your business to learn more visit first republic dot COM Maddie Safai. Here host of shortwave daily science podcasts from NPR. Listen for new discoveries everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines All in about ten minutes every weekday. It's a great addition to your daily listening whether you're a science nerd or you know just a little science curious. Subscribed grabbed two shortwave from NPR. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR. I'm Guy Roz so normally at this point in the show we start to talk about the slow and steady growth of business and the early struggles goals and all the hard work that went into getting enough ground but in the mid nineteen hundred s pretty soon after Michael hired his first engineers to start making taking the first dell computers from scratch. They were selling so many computers so fast that they started to compete with the biggest name in computing thing. IBM IBM at the time. Had A six megahertz to eighty six computer that they sold for three thousand nine hundred ninety five dollars. Yeah so we introduced a twelve megahertz to eighty six base computer and we sold it for one thousand nine hundred ninety five dollars so our computer was twice as fast and was half price. How how are you able to do that? What we still made a decent margin Selling them and I think one is. We had some clever engineers and we had this great supply chain that we created traded. And so when we would sell let's say two hundred computers in a day You know we would give that signal back to our suppliers who would every day or every few hours deliver parts to our factory. Yeah and then we would you. You know ship those computers out to the customer so we add a unbelievably efficient supply chain. We created out of necessity because we had no capital that also meant that we had the freshest parts at the best cost and as the cost of materials were coming down. We benefited from that. And we could get get the latest technology to the customer faster than anybody else and you didn't. You were direct to consumer company. You didn't retail shops. We're not selling Dell computers. Peter's right you have to call Dell or fact style and order computer at the time that's right except Most of our business wasn't to consumer to business. It was two businesses. But that's what you said is actually a common misperception. A lot of people thought only consumers by from Dell. That's actually not what was happening. We were. You're selling to all sorts of companies and governments and small and medium-sized businesses. And that was most of our business even from the beginning and at that point like the late eighties. What did you have in mind for the future like? What was your ambitions for the company? Well we we had some pretty big aspirations. The first one was we said we want to expand globally. It was pretty clear to us that. If you were only successful the United States that would be good enough. The second was that we had to go after selling to you big companies. Because if you didn't sell to the really big companies and the biggest governments in the world well you weren't going to be irrelevant company out. And then the third one was we said. We had to differentiate on the basis of service and we created this thing called On site service and today would be a very common thing but back then you know if your computer broke you had to put it in the trunk of your car. Hard to get back to the computer store and then they would take it and then they ship it off somewhere you'd wait weeks and weeks and supposedly get it back so we came up with this program where he calls on the phone says before the Internet. And if you had a problem we'd help you resolve on the phone and if we weren't able to resolve phone we'd send a technician with parts to your location to fix your computer on site and we did that all across the United States and we thought the minute we announced his our sales will double because it was like so much better than what we were doing before for and they didn't double instantly but after about three months a double so well I wanna I wanna put this into perspective because you know we we think about about like really young entrepreneurs.

NPR Dell Michael United States First Republic Bank Guy Rosner Guy Roz Maddie Safai technician IBM Dan Peter
"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:30 min | 6 months ago

"dell" Discussed on How I Built This

"You know as soon as I got out of school I would rush over there and and they had all of the computer companies of note in the world in the Astrodome and they were showing off their computer crimen. And that's amazing coincidence because as you went to that convention which happened to take place in Houston that year happened to be in Houston that year and it just happened to occur like a couple of months after. I got my driver's license. Yeah so yeah I mean. There's there's definitely some luck involved here right and that convention not only were you there. But Rod Kenyon anion went there to who went on to start Compaq Compaq and Dell came out of that convention. Yeah well and I remember in my chemistry class In highschool the guy sitting next to me was telling me that his dad had just left Texas instruments. Sir Go start this new computer company and you know he was one of the early guys at that Compaq some amazing so you see you you. Obviously you graduate high school And then you go to university till to UT Austin right yes. Does a pre MED major. And you know some some of this was the programming from my parents because my father is a doctor of my older brothers doctor and I always. I thought I'd be a doctor and and when I started going to school my parents weren't around all the time. Hi Right because I'm I'm in Austin near Houston. You're pretty far away so you got a lot of free time on your hands so I start exploring this whole computer thing further and one of things that I noticed about the computer business was that it was very inefficient. It took a really long a long time for the technology. Get from the people that made it to the people that were buying it and it was actually rather expensive and slow slow to occur and to me that was sort of frustrating. So you are a your student at. Ut You're supposed to be doing pre med training right and you start to think the PC market like there's an opportunity here is that what what you start to think. So I was in this mode of of buying computers and soup ing them up with more capability and then reselling them and and it was just sort of a fun thing to do at way to make some money. I loved the computers actually working out. Great what would you do. You would go. And and find like second hand computers and take them apart and rebuild them and then sell them to people. No I was buying new computers. I would upgrade them with more memory and actually the main business became putting hard drives in those machines so back then the original IBM personal computers had no hard disk drives. So what I would do is I would buy. A couple of these. Describes and by a controller card writes some software and make some cables and make a hard disk drive system that you would put inside an IBM computer and then instead of two one hundred sixty K.. Or three hundred and twenty K.. Floppy disk drives. It would have a ten megabyte hard drive right which which at the time was something. Amazing sounds ridiculous. Today ten megabytes then was that was like unbelievable. How long would it take? Take you to upgrade one computer for example. Oh it didn't take that long pending on what you were doing. Maybe thirty minutes forty five minutes. That's something like that so you can see. You can do a bunch of computers every day. Oh sure yeah no problem in between classes. But you really weren't studying you weren't. There's no way you were doing your schoolwork I was. I was definitely slacken off on the schoolwork during that time. Yes but who would you. I mean how did you find customer so it was no craigslist. There was no the eighteen or nineteen years old. I guess I mean. How did you even know who to sell these two? I advertised in the local newspaper newspaper. I bid on state contracts and I. It's kind of funny the The State Office that was responsible for buying computer requirement and everything else was about three or four blocks from my dorm room so I could just like walk over there and they they would give you all the dockets for all the things. The state wanted to buy. How did you even know how to do that? You know I don't really remember how I figured that out but I somehow figured it out and you know but let my. My biggest customers were universities in the area. Doctors lawyers architects things. He's like that students weren't really buying computers at the time and most of the students that I knew they weren't really interested in computers at the time. That sounds. It's crazy right now but this back in nine hundred ninety three and nineteen eighty four. There weren't very many people that had personal computers time. Okay I am hoping that I don't like a broken record but I'm just I'm just thinking Mike Golic here you are. You're an eighteen year old kid. I mean you probably probably looked like a a baby in you. Were going around hockey computer. So like why would these architects or businessmen are lawyers have taken can you seriously well. I guess they figured I'd do. I was talking about I. Nobody ever said. Well I'm not going to buy from you because as you don't look the part or something so I think the early adopters of computers were sufficiently technical and Geeky that I was able able to relate to them in a way that resonated and so I didn't have any problem. And how much money were you making the time I was doing about about fifty to eighty thousand dollars a month Lau in business when I was in my dorm room that I mean that's just an insane amount of money. Honey I mean. Did you tell your parents that you were that you were making this much money No no I didn't Now so you know they they eventually going back to late. Eighty three they became very upset with me. And said you have to stop this and and focus on your studies. You gotta get your priorities straight. You know what are you doing with your life and all that stuff and you know I agreed to do that. You know it was like going cold Turkey or something it just. It lasted about ten days and I actually realize is that this was more than a hobby or a nice way to make some extra cash on the side while I was going to school but actually something very passionate about so during sorry no ten days I I sort of mapped out. You know the the beginnings of how it was going to finish up my freshman year but then the launch this as a real official business and I eventually made a deal with my parents that if it worked out I would continue can you and if it didn't I'd go back to school. I mean it's I can just imagine how exciting it was you're eighteen and you're selling your starting a company basically basically without even realizing it I guess what was it that was more exciting. Was All this money that was coming in or was it just that you were just selling a bunch of computers. Well it was probably a little bit of everything I mean. The opportunity for what became Dell Computer Corporation was more and more apparent. And while you couldn't see out three or four years you know you could see far enough out that you keep going. I guess the first couple of years or the at least for the first two years you were just buying off the shelf computers and making them better. That's right you know what Whoa we started. Upgrading other people's computers. And then we started making these hard disk drive upgrade kits that became the main gene business of the company selling hard disk drive subsystems and memory kits to upgrade the computer. You say Michael When you say we who who are the we the and you started this by yourself in your dorm room and then who did you bring on to help you. Well always say we that makes it sound like there's more of us But we started just me but I I hired about one person a week every week you know for the first year or so and then it became became more and more and I remember one time we had this customer. Who wanted to come visit us? It was Martin Marietta which is now part of some much beer company and the guy wanted to buy like one hundred and fifty of these kits which was for us at pretty enormous order and he wanted to come to Austin and see.

Dell Computer Corporation Houston Austin Compaq IBM Rod Kenyon Ut craigslist Mike Golic Martin Marietta Turkey hockey Michael Lau official The State Office
"dell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:18 min | 11 months ago

"dell" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"A dell to speak to an advisor today convinced there is untapped potential with conservative grassroots donors Republicans have long been moaned their lack of a fund raising tool for small dollar donations that's as pervasive as the Democrats platform called act blue so the GOP rolled out its own earlier this year called when read but not everyone is happy it's a story by Simone pathway politics reporter at roll call Simone explain what's happening over a decade now Democrats have been raising money for their campaign and outside groups and causes through a builder platform called act blue we've heard a lot about it during the twenty eighteen campaign especially as a lot of these first time candidates raise millions of dollars each quarter which is pretty unprecedented technician for house candidates and Republicans have never really had an equivalent platform they've had computing platforms but they didn't all do the same thing as act blue after twenty eighteen when Democrats picked up about forty the house Republican leadership in the house in the Senate and the White House that okay we have to do something about that in their hope is that they will be able to tap into grassroots donors on the right conservative trump supporters who might have turned out to vote before he was in office and might not have donated before he was office either and try to get their money to rival some of the small dollar donation for fueling the last how do you find those bodies that is a great question a lot of it is built on email list so that a lot of candidates on both side of the aisle have in terms of about small dollar donation begin with having a reply email list and you can get that way you can purchase names rather campaigns you can swap them with other campaign you can participate in petitions online you know if you see a petition for the lawmakers saying that they want you to sign up to tell Congress to do something when you find out they can actually sell that information to the other candidates so that that can it can then get another email on their left though emails are very lucrative especially because when you get an email in your inbox in Canada it can how that link compact blue or in our public indicate twin read and which is really one stop shopping you click on the link it can save your information and you can donate money to that candidate any other candidate you want to all right there in one place president trump's rallies were he draws these tens of thousands I would imagine of people are throwing their emails in as they sign up or buy tickets or when they're on the doors acting right yeah yeah that is definitely a good way for a candidate to rack up even more names to all right so the you sort of reference there are are competing interests but they don't necessarily what say that they're competing with each other right so look at their handful of these fundraising platform on the right the R. and B. the public a National Committee is trying to think of like one specific company called when read that a built upon a couple different companies with which it has previously contacted Klay there and dividing all house members and candidates to use this one platform the idea being that everyone is on the same platform the compass on sort of all well both will be lifted right by it by having the power in numbers the problem is that because there have been other platforms out there for so long the folks who didn't went out and didn't get that contract with the R. and B. are feeling a little alienated as you can imagine people who build their own businesses that are website are are losing business because the irony is threatening to cut off resources that evidence in the campaign he did not use their chosen platform which is called with rat we're speaking with Simone path a politics reporter at roll call she's written interesting story Rick with regards to fund raising its entitled small dollars a big deal as G. O. P. E. C.'s untapped potential in trump supporters is there a break down by the way in terms of who's doing better or who's making progress when it comes to small donors I mean at this point I think you know the number everyone is still sort of starting over is that one point six billion that donors gave her act believed to democratic campaigns and causes in the two thousand eighteen midterm cycle that with huge and that really is the town I think I get a lot of Republicans going forward in terms of what kind of donor base they might be losing out on you know Democrats will be conducted that they are the party small janitor Republicans have not prioritize that as much as they have relied on bigger donors but they're starting to see again with some of the temperatures you might not have been politically engaged before there might be some untapped potential there you you had like a a break out your story that's sort of a sub headline called frustrating the competition who feel sort of slighted by this the movement to win read yeah these are some of the other Republican fundraising platforms that have built around for a long time for a longer time that went bad and so these are folks who are feeling alienated by the R. and B. threatening to pull support for campaigns that are using them instead of good read these are people who have to build you know different technology and that I am not able to judge chooses better but obviously the R. and B. did make an assessment that this one particular company was better and that is left the other folks who were radical feeling a little sour Simone Simone path a politics reporter at roll call it's nineteen minutes in front of the.

dell advisor nineteen minutes
"dell" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"dell" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And treat that very dangerous condition and saved my life. Again. That's why I say with the conviction that my attitude literally saved my life is because if I hadn't had that attitude and that Dr wouldn't have done those exercises. I long wouldn't have you and I would have died from that complication. Well, I appreciate you share an story. Steve is definitely a place that I don't think anybody wishes to be in and folks, you're listening right now, when you're probably thinking, wow. This problem that I thought I had. Isn't really a problem and not until the house caves in or your health, gives way you really start to, to gain appreciation for your day to day. And, and Steve is a great example of attitude changing year life, Steve, I love to hear from you. So this happened now. What is the philosophy hasn't people apply? What you learn and learn from what you wonder. Thank you for asking that is that was really after it took me about a year to recover completely man. It was as you might expect a lot of a lot of work at a lot of misery and pain in hard work. But after that year, I had another profound kind of thing that happened to me where I started just kind of got a new purpose in life to share my story and working at Dell in still work at Dell today I came into Dell. The day after it was on the day. Celebrate my alive. Day is down March night. I celebrate celebrated like a birthday and that night, I had experience, where I committed to sharing my story with the world and come in to work that next day out. Like what does this mean what is sharing my story mean, and I saw a Email from the talent development organization inside of the organization, I work in, and they were having a speaker series and reached out to them and said, set up some time with them and shared my story with him and said, do you think anybody would want to hear this and they said? Yes. And so that was when I started thinking about, okay, how do I make this story of surviving and recovering from a skiing accident of anything to do with working at Dell and that was where and everything kind of came to life. It's really not a story about the accident or just my recovery, but it's a story about how important our attitude is in achieving our goals in our outcomes, and our objective. Lives. And then also like, what are some practical things that you can do to improve your optimism or your positively, so that you're more likely to achieve those outcomes? So what happened was when I was recovering from my accident, everything was recovering really. Well the only thing that there was any uncertainty about was my brain injury. And so I started studying about the brain and I learned two things. One is, I learned how important are attitudes are in both healing as well as there's a lot of science around how important attitude is in accomplishing objectives, and their science behind that the more confidence you bring into a situation, the more likely you are to get the outcome, you want in that situation. And in a second thing that I learned about was neuro plasticity in that our brains are changing how they're structured based on what you do. And think every day, so if you're not very optimistic today or not very positive today. All you have to do to become more optimistic or more positive, and get these more and get these better outcomes is practiced the things that make you that way and every time you practice them your through that neuro plus dissident, you're slowly changing the structure of your brain so that your posit with the psychologist call the positivity offset will help you compensate for the negativity bias that we're all born with. And so in the book and what I talk about is ver- very practical things that you can do to improve your positively change the structure of your brain overtime, and just be more naturally when you do find yourself in a situation where something has gone wrong that you're more naturally going to move to this mindset of okay? Now, what am I going to go do to move from that, why may to the what now mindset? I love that. And so, folks, the book is called head. I a crash course in positively you could check out Steve's website. It's Steve age law. Ten..

Steve Dell
"dell" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"dell" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Dell. The tech guy. Tell I like to talk about. Maybe a.

Dell.
"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

"End it service for customers and dell got a late start in the smartphone market but they did get into it and two thousand nine they introduced a smartphone called the mini three i smartphone iran on operating system called ozone o s the letter oh follow by the word phone from two thousand nine to two thousand twelve dell would try to secure a spot in these smartphone landscape but ultimately the company would withdraw from that market by december two thousand twelve dell was done with smartphones at least as a manufacturer although they would sometimes seldom in their store but what about that s e c investigation i mentioned earlier will in two thousand ten the sec revealed the dell had been under investigation because of some accounting practices in which the company had failed to declare certain payments it had received from another little company called intel so here's what happened according to the sec the this is according to the allegations del received large payments from intel in return for a promise that dell would not build computers using microprocessor that were made by intel's rival amd the practice apparently stretched back as far as two thousand and three and the sec said that those payments back in two thousand three accounted for ten percent of dell's operating income that amount would eventually peak in the second quarter of the two thousand seven fiscal year for dell that's when intel's payment was seventy six percent of dell's operating income that is incredible dell had been using that money according to the sec to help pat outnumbers for sales when reporting earnings to wall street so in other words dell the company was taking money from intel they were doing it for the reason to suppress one of intel's competitors so sort of an anticompetitive practice here and then use that money to beef up their own earnings to investors now without admitting it or denying any of the allegations dell entered into an agreement with the sec c which included paying a one hundred million dollar fine both kevin rollins and michael dell individually agreed to pay four million dollars in fines they also did not admit to or deny any of the charges dell was really having trouble with its business model at this time to was also finding it challenging to enter the services market partly because while del made hardware the products that made still relied on other companies software meanwhile dell's competitors some of the were making integrated systems they're building the hardware and the software and so it made that a more attractive system for a lot of companies so is having trouble entering into this field and the company recognized that that was really a a potential good source of revenue if they could just crack it and twenty thirteen michael dell decided that extreme measures were necessary he felt the company had strayed off of its paths significantly in need again to the services industry but at the same time it was beholden to shareholders and shareholders might end up holding the company back from making some big risky decisions so he led the charge to buy back the company effectively turning it back into a.

dell one hundred million dollar four million dollars seventy six percent ten percent
"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

"Spend on expensive computers so some of the big names like apple and ibm we're having their own crises brought about by various questionable decisions but dell computers was actually coming out ahead because the company had been focused on comparably powerful computers at a much lower price than competitors offer so people still needed computers they just couldn't shell out the big bucks for the brands for like compaq or apple or ibm so dell continued to do pretty well during that recession at least at first in nineteen ninetytwo fortune magazine would name dell computers among the fortune five hundred list that list ranks the five hundred largest us corporations according to total revenue for the most recent fiscal year for those companies dell appeared on it for the first time in nineteen ninety two and that made michael dell the youngest ceo of a fortune five hundred company he was twenty seven years old at that time but things were not necessarily going to go smoothly for dell and his company in the near future that my friends is what we call a cliffhanger you'll have to join me for the next episode to find out what happened to dell or you know read an article or something but no tune into my episode and you guys have suggestions for topics i should tackle in future episodes tech stuff whether it's a company technology personality in tech maybe there's someone i should interview or have on as guest host send me a message the email for the show is tech stuff at how stuff works dot com or drop me a line on facebook or twitter handle for both of those tech stuff h s w don't forget to follow us on instagram and i'll talk to you again really soon for more on this and bathrooms of other topics visit how stuff works out com our world is full of the unexplainable mysterious events unusual objects and people who defy the tiny little categories that make us feel safe i'm erin minke most days i'm writing and producing the hit podcast lor now i'm opening the doors of my own virtual room of wonder with aaron mckie's cabinet of curiosities every tuesday and thursday you'll get a guided tour through some of the most bizarre corners of history from unexplainable moments and coincidences to people and objects that have come with unusual backstories consider this your invitation visit apple podcasts dot com slash curiosities today to subscribe and listen for free step inside gather around i'd like to take you on a tour welcome to the cabinet of curiosities

apple compaq ninetytwo fortune magazine ceo dell facebook erin minke aaron mckie ibm michael dell twitter twenty seven years
"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

"Sold for twelve thousand one hundred ninety nine dollars which is a lot of money but it was still less than half of what compaq was charging for its similarly powerful for eighty six thirty three server which had tag of thirty thousand dollars so while it wasn't incredibly expensive machine that would be dwarfed by even a budget pc today it was still very affordable compared to the competition dell also opened up a manufacturing center in limerick ireland in nineteen ninety to increase its production capacity specifically in order to serve markets in europe and africa more readily and despite the increase in sales and despite growing so rapidly the company's actual prophets were not quite as impressive dell had lower profit margins than some other manufacturing companies and in nineteen ninety del produced too many memory chips and was unable to sell as many as the company had projected plus it had to cancel a big project that would have seen del produce workstations for companies though setbacks whittled the actual profit for dell in nineteen ninety down to five million dollars still pretty impressive but when you view it against the more than five hundred forty million dollars in sales questions have to be asked if you sell five hundred and forty million dollars worth of stuff but at the end of the day your take home is only five million people start asking questions like where did all the rest of that money have to go to how much are your operations costing but in this this particular year had a lot of hard things hit the company nine ninety was also in lee walker stepped down as president and ceo of dell computers michael dell reached out to another executive named morton meyerson to take over the the company myerson had previously led the company electronic data systems which was founded by former presidential hopeful ross perot back in nineteen sixty two myerson had led electronic data systems from nineteen seventy nine to nineteen eighty seven and retired three years after general motors had require acquired rather dds for two point five billion dollars meyerson came in rigidly to help del transition to the next phase it had successfully held together during the explosive period of growth now the company needed to transition into a large corporation dell computers was transforming in many ways around this time while the company had begun as a direct sales computer company aiming at individual customers and corporations now the emphasis was really shifting to those larger clients like big companies and government agencies and starting in nineteen ninety dell began to explore options by dealing with resellers those retail establishments specifically ones like software house superstores which later changed his name to compusa walmart was another one sam's club staples and i'm sure you all know this but the way that reselling works is you have a merchant or company they end up buying computers from a manufacturer at a certain price they agree upon the price so the reseller ends up buying those machines the reseller than sells machines to customers typically at a markup you could sell them for at cost but then you're not making any profit and unless you're doing it in a way to try and convince the customer to buy other stuff that is marked up for profit it doesn't make good business sense so the problem was however it would eventually prompt the con the company to reconsider its relationship with these retailers in nineteen ninetythree because profit margins were getting really thin for dell and part of that was because of this this strategy to use resellers but we'll get to that bit in our next episode around this time in the early nineteen nineties the pc market was in trouble for the most part there was an economic recession going on in the world and consumers had less money to.

twelve thousand one hundred ni five hundred forty million dol thirty thousand dollars forty million dollars five billion dollars five million dollars three years
"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

"Customer service and experience which they were able to do for a few more years but that would start to slip not too long from this point sales people were supposed to take six weeks of training before they could even start taking calls and they were trained also to help up sell options to customers like i mentioned before that's dell made a lot of its money so if you called into dell to order a baseline computer chances are the salesperson you talked to would bring up other options more memory or filling up those expansion cards are slots with cards dell was known for very quick turnaround as well so that was a big selling point once a salesperson turned in customer order to the manufacturing facility that order would have to be filled within five days so keep in mind these computers are built to specification it's you could order a base model and you would get it just as fast as you would if you decide to add some bells and whistles to it so it was a very different approach than what you would find if you just walked into a store and bought a computer off the shelf dell was also taking another stab at the corporate world the company began to make servers for anderson consulting and other big clients by the end of nineteen ninety about forty percent of dell's sales came from corporate clients and in total sales equaled five hundred forty six million dollars and the company was shooting up the ranks among p c manufacturers one thousand nine hundred nine it had ranked number twenty two out of all company computer companies in nineteen ninety one year later in a shot up to number six one of the first systems dell produced for corporations was the dell system t series such as the four twenty five t e and the four thirtythree t e these boasted the four eighty six processor which was the newest model from intel and the higher end four thirtythree t e model.

dell intel anderson consulting five hundred forty six million nineteen ninety one year forty percent five days six weeks
"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

"Computer building it completely from the ground up but assembled from purchased components so they weren't manufacturing the various parts of the computer they were sourcing them from other manufacturers so was not an upgrade kit it wasn't actual computer and dell was able to benefit from a few choices that ibm had made when it introduced its personal computer strategy back in nineteen eightyone i covered this in recent episodes but i'll just give a quick overview ibm chose to go with a nonproprietary approach with the personal computer and that said it strategy apart from apple computers which was very much in the proprietary realm right so ibm used essentially standard off the shelf components to build its computer systems and that meant that if you had the knowledge and the time and access to those components you get build a machine that worked exactly the same way as an ibm machine essentially you're you're using the same components or components of equivalent abilities to make a computer that processes information in exactly the same way as an ibm machine moreover ibm had licensed a version of basic the programming language from microsoft but ibm did not get an exclusive license which meant anyone could license that operatings or that programming language i should say not an operating system so not only could you copy the hardware ibm was making by buying these components and then building your own machine you could also run the same programming language same version of the programming language basic on your machine which meant that any software that was built to run on ibm computers would also run on the machine you built because it's essentially the same thing moreover dell was able to get in touch with various ibm ibm inventory managers and buy components directly from them because i b m had this quota system for all of its components and frequently inventory managers found that their warehouses were getting filled with these different components that didn't have any place to go they were just taking up space so they could sell those to other entities including michael dell so he's buying the components.

dell ibm michael dell apple microsoft
"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

"The date to which del traces its history that pc's limited was the company that would become dell computers or dell technologies these days dell ended up upgrading those computers they knew for the people at the university of texas and then he differentiated himself from the various computer stores by infra sizing oh prices and personal customer service so someone had a problem with something they could call him and he would walk them through and fix the issue soon word got around about this del guy in the computers that he could help build they started getting more orders and making more money he began to hire a few employees to help with the work he was actually getting more orders than he could fill personally and soon he was making about twenty five thousand dollars per month at that rate it seems silly to stay in college and get a medical degree he was already on his way to a very successful career so michael dell dropped out of college to focus on his business at the age of nineteen at the end of nineteen eightyfour after just one year in business and focusing pretty much exclusively unsettling and installing upgrade kits not full computers pc's limited had made about six million dollars in sales six million dollars in its first year as a college dropout not bad according to the company's own time line the following year one thousand nine hundred five pc's limited would produce its first.

michael dell dell university of texas six million dollars twenty five thousand dollars one year
"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey there welcome to text up i'm your host jonathan strickland i'm an executive producer at how stuff works i love all things tech and recently tech news sites reported that dell computers was preparing to go public again because once upon a time it was a publicly traded company and then it changed back into a privately held corporation and in july two thousand eighteen it announced it was getting ready to go public again by the end of the year and this bit of news prompted me to record these episodes about dell computers where the company came from how its path has led up to going public for a second time and all the trials and tribulations along the way so today we're going to start to explore the dell story and i could not resist using the dude you gotta del tagline more on that in the second episode but let's start at the very beginning so on february twenty third nineteen sixty five michael dell was born in houston texas has dad was an orthodontist and his mother was a stockbroker and his parents wanted him to consider a job in medicine but michael would end up pursuing a very different career and for one thing michael grew up just as personal computers were really becoming a big deal apple computer was founded in nineteen seventy six when michael was eleven years old so that was something going on in the background while he was a kid and meanwhile he was learning a lot about business and finance primarily from his mother and he got to work early on he thought it was interesting this idea of making money and he turned out to be really really good at it even as a little kid he became a dishwasher for a chinese restaurant when he was just twelve years old and he is the money he earned to support a hobby he had he had a hobby had nothing to do with computers it was being a philatelists what the heck is a philatelists it's stamp collector technically someone who studies stamps but a lot of people use the terms interchangeably let's just call him a stamp collector so he was collecting stamps and he started having an exchange he would do exchanges and sell stamps and by other stamps and eventually he was able to make two thousand dollars which is a huge amount of money for a little kid and as a teenager he spent summers selling subscriptions for the houston post he did the standard procedure which was making cold calls you know just essentially going down the phone book and trying to call people at random he decided that wasn't very effective so he created a new marketing strategy and it was really effective he ended up making eighteen thousand dollars in a year so his first car that he bought was a bmw he lives a different life than i i do he also bought an apple two computer when he was fifteen and he took it apart to see how it worked we put it back together again he would later by an ibm pc and do the same to that and he saw that ibm already had a big leg up when it came to computers in the business world it was a very much entrenched company in one thousand nine hundred eighty three upon the urging of his parents michael dell enrolled in the university of texas with the goal of being a pre med student so his whole thing was as following what is parents told him to do go into premed hand really determined what he was exactly going to specialize in this was this freshman year in college and in the meantime he kept turning his mind to entrepreneurial pursuits he still had this love of business and ways of making money and at first he.

eighteen thousand dollars two thousand dollars eleven years twelve years
"dell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dell com cast so take just like that in school maybe you'll be all right.

Dell
"dell" Discussed on Mike Dell's World

Mike Dell's World

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on Mike Dell's World

"The rules for youtube they own youtube and they could do what they want on youtube it's not a it's not a censorship issue you know it's not the government saying you can't do that it's youtube who owns the platform saying you can't do that so you know i'm not building my brand on somebody else's brand you know and and those who make their living on youtube you know better have some sort of a backup plan some other of you know former income or form of expression or however that's kind of like i said that's what this mike dell's world is all about i own the domain mike dell dot com on few others obviously and i blog and podcast from mike dell dot com and i could say whatever i want to say really nobody can take that away from me i mean yeah sure there's ways but it's a lot harder since i own still main and i own you know by website and it's it's all on me it's not on anybody else it's on me so anyway think about that when you're building your podcast your blog or whatever you know if you do all your blogging on wordpress dot com not using your own doman name then guess what wordpresscom owns your blog you know essentially they could say we're not going to allow you to have your blog anymore it's off stunts yata here not a thing you can do about it you know with mike dell dot com okay say go dead he gets tired of me and says we can't have mike dell dot com on our servers well i could always go to fifty other servers out there you know somebody will take me you know so not not that it's impossible to shut me up but it's not likely you'll same thing with blueberry where this podcast is hosted you know site worked for them chances of them kicking me off of it are hopefully.

youtube mike dell wordpresscom
"dell" Discussed on Mike Dell's World

Mike Dell's World

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"dell" Discussed on Mike Dell's World

"There's no snow on the ground down here in it's quite nice got up into the forties today i actually had to break out the sunglasses which was kind of odd for me lately anyway coming down on monday drove all the way down and coming down on monday was pretty much sleet snow rain clouds you name it most of the way down and it looks like tomorrow the last couple of hours of my trip will probably be in snow a little bit of a hell berta clipper coming in so they say i i'm planning on possibly doing another episode from the road tomorrow so i figured i'd get one from the hotel room here said it's to ninety five i need to get to to ninety nine before the end of the month and new year's eve or new year's day i haven't made up my mind yet we'll yuna do episode three hundred which will be a full blown mike dell's world episode with music and all kinds of other facility why not ring in twenty eighteen with a nice round number three hundred is around as they get so yeah it's first time i've taken single podcast pass three hundred at least one that i actually have done all along we did a couple of dailies that that actually went three sixty five but i don't count those because i would sit down on record ten or twelve of the stupid things at a sitting so you know it was really like one long recording session.

mike dell