35 Burst results for "debbie"

Healing From COVID-19

In The Thick

04:25 min | 3 d ago

Healing From COVID-19

"Debbie Masar is an actress that you might recognize from the movie goodfellas. Less take it. Easy. Or entourage for younger sometimes lines the people you love best is the most loving. You can do you sound like a twisted fortune cookie. except. So, I reached out to Debbie when I thought I was sick and she immediately called the. She was one of the first people that I had seen posting publicly about being sick with covid nineteen. I don't know if she realized how important it was for me to hear from somebody who actually had it. So I wanted to reconnect with Debbie now that we've both recovered and I called her identity I'm Maria joining from Brooklyn. Yes. So officially welcomed in the thick and. We're talking about surviving in battling cove it and I remember when I first got sick. I. Was having a lot of anger and denial and anxiety and rage. You told me that this thing was gonna come in waves that I needed to be prepared. You told me at that point you were already in recovery and you're like I'm cleaning all the time and I was like, Oh my God, how can she even lift her arm? And so I'm wondering what was it that made? You understand how important it would be for you to. Talk to someone like me when I started to feel really sick it didn't feel like anything that I ever had before it was kind of weird and it was a collective thing that was happening in my house all at once with all of my family members, I always feel like it takes a village. I actually had people that were having similar symptoms as me and getting sick at the same time as me and we sort of formed this. Co vid nineteen like reach out center to each other going Oh my God I haven't have you got an oxy meter. Have you taken this herb? A lot of people are just suggesting things and things that they thought might help them but I really was so grateful for actually people reaching out to me that I'm also kind mommy like that like when people get it and they're confused. Because I had gone through it is well, I just wanted to be there for you and I had talked it on my instagram because there were no people talking about it and I remember you saying that you were getting backlash and so what was that like Debbie to not only get this but then you're very open hearted person people were coming at you during this may first of all, I was being told by my doctors that I know that I'm friendly with I'm sorry. Jeb. But I only have a couple of tests that were given to me and you just don't fit the criteria and I thought to myself. I'm taking the subway two to three times a day. I was in Italy, all of December and part of January I've been on airplanes. How do I not meet criteria? I have every symptom so we will when people started coming on. Instagram I mean first of all, this disease has been politicized at this point, which is wrong. So I, just felt there was an incredible. Amount of ignorance of arrogance of denial of people going like you know Oh. Gosh. You know it's only for like the people in. You know nursing homes. So you know like you when I see what's happening in the rest of the country where my heart. Goes you and I? We did. We survived there's definitely an awareness of kind of survivor's guilt for sure. I don't have any guilt. I'm thrilled. A great way to. End. It. There's no guilt here because I thought I would die my lungs are not the strongest they never have been since child I have chronic bronchitis. I've been a smoker most of my life and I had pneumonia a few years ago. So I thought I was going to die and I, have a family I have a lust for life and I hate needles because I survive I went and gave a huge bag of my convalescent plasma. I try to spread the word because this is far from over. People need to buckle up because it's going to be a rough road and we need the tools to know to be getting tested. Not think that because you have the antibodies necessarily that you're safe when you do get sick what are the things that can help you

Debbie Masar Instagram Maria Pneumonia Bronchitis Anxiety JEB Brooklyn Italy
2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extremely active,' NOAA says in updated forecast

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 3 d ago

2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extremely active,' NOAA says in updated forecast

"Is already a record breaking Atlantic hurricane season. Here's NPR's Debbie Elliot heading into peak hurricane season, Noah's lead hurricane forecaster Gerry Bell. Says 2020 could be one for the history books current and predicted oceanic and atmospheric conditions now indicate a higher likelihood and 85% chance Oven above normal season. No was updated forecast says there's potential for up to 25 named storms the first time the federal agency has predicted so many and and 3 3 to to 6 6 of of them them could could become become major major hurricanes. hurricanes. Already Already there there have have been been nine nine named named storms storms so so far far this this year, year, the the earliest earliest on on record. Debbie Elliot. NPR

Debbie Elliot NPR Gerry Bell Forecaster Noah
Miami - Florida Braces For Potential Impacts From Tropical Storm Isaias

Retirement Road Map

01:03 min | Last week

Miami - Florida Braces For Potential Impacts From Tropical Storm Isaias

"Air up for parts of South Florida As Tropical Storm PCs moves north from the Bahamas, we get the latest on the storm from CBS News. Florida is bracing for heavy rain, strong gusty winds and storm surge as tropical storm Besigye's bears down on an already area suffering from the pandemic. CBS's Manuel Bohorquez reports from Riviera Beach, We've noticed the winds become increasingly stronger as Visayas approaches Florida There are potential impacts for most of the states East Coast, But the areas of highest concern are from here in Palm Beach County and up north along the I 95 corridor. Debbie Debbie Flippy Flippy was was shopping shopping in in Fort Fort Lauderdale. Lauderdale. Seven Seven cases cases of of water. water. I I have have lots lots of of batteries batteries in in case case the the power power goes goes out out of of lanterns. lanterns. I I have have plenty plenty of of food food and and keep keep a a lot lot of ice in the freezer. Although the storm has weakened from a hurricane to a tropical storm is expected to regain strength overnight. Forecasters say the center will move within miles of Florida's East coast on Sunday, possibly as a Category one hurricane CBS News

South Florida Debbie Debbie Flippy Flippy Fort Fort Lauderdale CBS Cbs News East Coast Bahamas Riviera Beach Palm Beach County Manuel Bohorquez Visayas Besigye
Memorial Service Held For Congressman And Civil Rights Icon John Lewis in Atlanta

1A

00:58 sec | Last week

Memorial Service Held For Congressman And Civil Rights Icon John Lewis in Atlanta

"Georgia congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis has been honored at a memorial service in Atlanta. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports that the funeral ended six days of mourning contributes to Luis's Life and service. Thie final celebration of Life for Democratic Congressman John Lewis was held in his longtime church. Atlanta's historic Ebenezer Baptist senior pastor, Raphael Warnock, called Louis the hope and promise of democracy. He became a living walking sermon about truth telling. And justice making in the Earth. He loved America until America learn how to love him back. We celebrate Thie service was a mix of personal and political tributes, including from three former presidents who honored his pivotal role in in the the the civil civil civil rights rights rights movement movement movement and and and as as as an an an advocate advocate advocate for for for human human human rights rights rights in in in Congress. Congress. Congress. Debbie Debbie Debbie Elliot. Elliot. Elliot. NPR NPR NPR News News News parts parts parts of of of

Debbie Debbie Debbie Elliot Congressman John Lewis Congress NPR Louis Congressman Atlanta Raphael Warnock Ebenezer Baptist Georgia Luis America
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | Last week

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

The Sunday Show

01:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

"Is underway across Selma, Alabama's Edmund Pettus Bridge in Remembrance of civil Rights icon and Georgia Congressman John Lewis. It's one in a Siri's of events leading up to his funeral Thursday in Atlanta. NPR's Debbie Elliot is in Selma. Saturday Services honoring Louis were in his hometown of Troy, Alabama, and its Selma's historic Brown Chapel Church once used for mass meetings during the civil rights movement. Alabama's first black Congress woman, Terri Sewell of Selma spoke at the service. I want to thank the family for allowing Selma To say goodbye to John. Thank you, Selma. Final goodbye comes today as an honor Guard escorts Lewis's casket draped in an American flag over the iconic Edmund Pettus Bridge. That's where Luis and others were beaten by law officers as they marched for equal voting rights. Later, Louis will lie in state at the Alabama capital in Montgomery, Debbie Elliot

Selma Edmund Pettus Bridge Alabama Congressman John Lewis Debbie Elliot Louis Terri Sewell Siri Brown Chapel Church Luis Atlanta NPR Troy Montgomery Georgia Congress
Desk Shields Are Part Of Salem, NH Schools’ Reopening Plan, Boston

WBZ Afternoon News

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Desk Shields Are Part Of Salem, NH Schools’ Reopening Plan, Boston

"Says it's got a plan when it comes to schools and Salem. Deaths of Children and teachers are being surrounded by a clear shield. The kind you see in a supermarket checkout now, says Assistant Superintendent for Business operations Debbie Pain. She says. The same deal is happening in the lunch room with Touchless payment systems. Every kid in Stanford, we'll get five cloth masks, and if a family is still uncomfortable, remote learning is an option with a three sided shield on their death or table. If there at a table some rooms student Senate tables instead of the individual student desks, and the teacher will also have a shield to be behind when students or staff are behind those shields. They are able to remove their masks. Otherwise, students and staff would be expected to wear their masks in the hallways when they get up from their seats when they're moving around the class Karen Regal W B Z Boston's News radio over Main Bates College

Debbie Pain Assistant Superintendent For B Karen Regal Touchless Main Bates College Salem Stanford Senate Boston
The danger of herd immunity in solving the COVID-19 problem

Morning Edition

03:41 min | 2 weeks ago

The danger of herd immunity in solving the COVID-19 problem

"Herd immunity, and it's a concept some leaders and scientists have considered when it comes to responding to this pandemic. NPR's Jeff Broomfield reports on what exactly this idea is and why it presents troubles. The thinking goes like this. Sooner or later, the pandemic cast stand and Debbie shredder gets it like everyone wants a way out psychologically right, because no one's ever coped with something of this scale, and it's not like a crisis like a hurricane or 9 11 where it's like, time bound or geographically bound. This is like everyone everywhere for indefinitely right now appeals to people, right? Treaters of researcher at the University of Edinburgh Medical School in the UK, and it turns out there is a theoretical way it could end. If enough people get sick and recover and they become immune to the corona virus. Then the pandemic fizzles. Those who haven't gotten it yet are safe. The technical name for this is herd immunity in its purest form. It's like Darwinian self selection, right? We let the virus go. Whoever is going to die, I will die. That's life and then whoever makes it we'll have hopefully some form of immunity. Several governments tried with the idea of the beginning of the pandemic, including the U. K, But in the end, most decided it would cost too many lives. There was one exception Sweden. They kept businesses open and let people make their own choices. At one point, Swedish officials said Stockholm would returned immunity by the end of May, but they have not reached it by the end of May. They just lost a lot of lives and also took an economic it shredder says. Herd immunity works as a math problem, but at an individual level Swedes stayed home. People don't want to catch Cove it nobody wants to be part of the herd to stay that way. But could nations eventually reach herd immunity more slowly? Probably not, says Jeffrey Shaymen of Columbia University. So example, I like to think about it. South Korea. They're getting 50 cases a day right now. They will hold on for another 1000 days, which is almost three years that have 50,000 cases, which is 30.1% of their population. Most experts think herd immunity take somewhere between 50 to 80% of the population, even in the U. S. Even it's 60,000 cases a day. It'll take at least into 2021 possibly years more to reach those levels. And there's another looming problem. People may be able to get the Corona virus more than once, shame and has studied other Corona viruses that cause common colds, and he found people could be re infected. Some of them were 48 weeks separated from the previous infection, which is rapid and that might have been a relapse. But others we clearly know are different. They were 8 to 11 months apart. Greta Bauer is an epidemiologist at Western University in Ontario, she says this fall and winter maybe the time we find out about re infections, and if Covitz survivors get even mildly sick, the second time around Corona virus will keep circulating. If that were the situation, then there's no potential to develop a level of herd immunity sufficient to stop the infection. I corresponded with 16 different scientists, and almost all believed that achieving herd immunity as a practical matter was virtually impossible. Without a vaccine with the vaccine. It will be a lot easier to control the virus, but it will likely still exist in pockets around the world. So what's going to happen again? Researcher devilish reader I think it's going to be with us play forever. At this point, I think I mean at a global scale, it's going to be with us, and it's how we decide to live with it. There are ways to live with it. Test the sick, isolate them until they're better and everybody where a mask and keep their distance.

Researcher Jeffrey Shaymen Debbie Shredder Greta Bauer NPR Jeff Broomfield University Of Edinburgh Medica Catch Cove Stockholm Sweden South Korea Columbia University Relapse UK Western University Ontario Covitz
Delle Donne hurt that request denied by panel of doctors

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Delle Donne hurt that request denied by panel of doctors

"What's happening with George Wallace. Alright, Debbie. We know that the WN BA denying Elena delle Donne's request to opt out of the season due to Lyme disease panel of doctors decided that she was not high risk, and she should be permitted to play in the bubble While she spoke out today for the first time on the player's Tribune, said that the panel never once spoke to her or her doctors, and now she's left with two choices. Risk her life or forfeit her paycheck, says she takes 64 pills a day for Lyme disease, also says she has not made her decision yet. It is carefully weighing her options as the Mystics getting stuff for the WN BA season.

Elena Delle Donne Debbie George Wallace Mystics
Tuberville wins Alabama GOP Senate runoff

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Tuberville wins Alabama GOP Senate runoff

"US Attorney General Jeff Sessions, has lost his bid for the Republican nomination to the Senate from Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. He was defeated in a runoff election by a political newcomer who was endorsed by President Trump. Unofficial results show Tommy Taber Veldt, the one time football coach at Auburn University, handily defeated Jeff Sessions in a GOP runoff that had been postponed from March because of the Corona virus. Sessions held the Alabama Senate seat for 20 years before joining the Trump administration as attorney general. His campaign was unable to overcome a barrage of attacks from the president, still angry that sessions recused himself from the special counsel's Russia investigation. Suburb. L advances to face incumbent Democrat Doug Jones and the fall in a contest widely seen as the Republican Party's best chance to turn a Senate seat.

Jeff Sessions Senate Alabama Senate President Trump Tommy Taber Veldt Republican Party Debbie Elliot Us Attorney Alabama NPR Doug Jones Auburn University GOP Attorney Special Counsel Russia Football
Philadelphia School District To Rely On ‘Safety & Science’ To Guide Decisions On Returning To Classroom In Fall

KYW 24 Hour News

01:04 min | Last month

Philadelphia School District To Rely On ‘Safety & Science’ To Guide Decisions On Returning To Classroom In Fall

"Philadelphia's schools Cheap isn't giving much consideration to President Trump's promised to withhold funds from schools that don't bring all students back the classrooms this fall. Okay, what? Debbie's mic Thenardier reports Superintendent William Height says the district gets less than 10% of its revenue from the federal government. And he says the back to school plan he expects to release next week will be based on science and safety. I told reporters. He's not going to be influenced by the president's threat to cut funding that he doesn't even control while you haven't given any guy. Shannon's up today, and now you come in and say, just bring everybody back is just to me. It's just It just validates the fact that there's a credibility issue. Their height, said the president's comments reveal a lack of understanding of the complex issues. Districts are confronting as they plan and if that was credibility that would have been Godin's early on so that states on trying to each do their own thing or district on tryingto each do their own thing to get Children. Height says the district is basing its plan on advice from the city and state health

Superintendent William Height President Trump Philadelphia Godin Debbie Shannon
Florida schools must reopen with in-person instruction, education commissioner says

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | Last month

Florida schools must reopen with in-person instruction, education commissioner says

"In Florida, the state's education commissioner has told school districts they must reopen their campuses next month and offer classes five days a week. NPR's Greg Allen reports. The order's getting pushback from teachers, school districts and members of Congress, though Many school districts have been contemplating hybrid schedules some days in person, other days online, But under the state order issued this week that wouldn't be allowed. The order says there's a need to keep schools open all week for the quote wellbeing of students and families and a return of Florida hitting its economic stride. Democratic congresswoman, Debbie Watchman, Schultz says the order is unconstitutional and unsafe. That is outrageous. That means that in schools all over our urban areas where there is already overcrowded, social distancing becomes impossible. In Broward County, the state second largest school district superintendent says he doesn't see a realistic path opening all schools has

Florida Greg Allen Debbie Watchman Schultz Broward County NPR Commissioner Congress Superintendent
7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

04:35 min | Last month

7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

"What's going on welcome back or welcome to the show for the first time? I'm musty as your host, you'd help you. Launch and grow a successful podcast helps you grow your business. Build your personal brand and become more successful and better known whether your goal is more impact or income or all of the above. This is the show for you. When you want to use a podcast to do just that now today. We're GONNA. Be talking about something that trips up a lot of entrepreneurs and business owners when they start their podcasts, and is why it becomes such a chore, and then they eventually fail and give up and to be. Debbie. Downer or someone who's really negative, but I'm going to share with you today. Seven myths slash pitfalls about launching your podcasts at I've coached a lot of people through have helped a lot of clients through and I've seen this happen over and over again even if you're a year into the podcasting game or your year to growing your podcast, and you're like my shows is. Is kind of idle like it's. It's not growing anymore. I'm not getting any leads from it. I'm not getting any new customers from it I'm not getting anything from his just another thing for me to do on my to do this. Well are some flaws are some things you're doing? That are causing you to think like that could help you reshift. Reposition your exact your mindset. Mindset around this in this training Oh this episode so before get into this one. Definitely just circle back had a share something. That's for me kind of illustrated. This point in in real life got a client who's done amazing job for their their podcast. They're up to about twenty thousand downloads month. They're doing great. They get all of media the interviews they are able to reach big. Big Equal, but they often compare themselves to people who have been doing undoing podcasting eight nine ten years, and they're only about a year or two in the game, and that's a big issue that really is that truly is one of the biggest things you can was taken over one I would say is, is this and this? Is this whole conversation that we had with? This client recently was all about this. It's about comparing your niche. PODCASTS was show. That's much much much broader. Here's the deal. If you have a niche podcast meaning, you're talking to a very specific market, and you compare yourself to Joe Rogan or a very much a bunch of punch broader podcast that has reached because they bring on guys like ee. Lan Muss. It's hard to compare really look at your podcast success. Getting to twenty thousand dollars for most people is is isn't hard or sorry is easy and the fact that they've done in less than a lesson. Two years is pretty remarkable so especially in this world now. Now, maybe in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fifteen much easier, nowadays, not so much a lot more competition out there, so I'm happy for them, but they're comparing themselves to a lot of people have been doing this for eight nine years I mean. If you've been doing this for eight nine years, you should expect to have a way bigger show especially consistently the way they're who they're comparing themselves to. If you go back and look at those shows a near year twos I. Bet you. They weren't doing the numbers they're doing now and they're still doing the same numbers. They probably wouldn't be doing for this long. I can guarantee. GUARANTEE THAT SO NUMBER ONE! Don't compare your niche podcast. Show to someone who's doing something much broader Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss you name it like those those guys are in a broader market. They have experienced They were mainstream before they got into podcasting so yesterday some anomalies. There's Louis Houses who've been doing this for years again. That's START OUT PODCASTING, but no, it's time it takes time trees on grover night. Why would you podcast overnight? So that's number. One number two is comparing your launch to somebody who's way bigger than you so listen. If you have a small audience, you can expect to demand hundred thousands of downloads. Downloads out the gate. I've only seen. That's probably a handful of times where someone is able to do that and every single time it's it's from somebody who already has a large of a name in their in their space. They may not be like Oprah, Winfrey big, but they have the in their space carved out a name for themselves. So if you're coming in doesn't have a name for themselves. You can expect your podcast. Be This game changer? It's a reflection of you, your podcasts and your content of reflection of you, so a big mistake. People make is comparing their launch to someone WHO's ten times bigger than them. You're trying to go into battle with someone who has way more firepower than you compare your launch or or that you're more of your podcasts. That is a mistake. Big Big mistake that I see people

Downer Joe Rogan Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss Lan Muss Debbie Grover Night Louis Houses Oprah Winfrey
State flags moved to Museum of Mississippi History

The Sunday Show

00:49 sec | Last month

State flags moved to Museum of Mississippi History

"Is moving its old flag with its Confederate imagery to a museum. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. The flag has been taken down from state buildings. Under a law approved last week, the state flag, first adopted by white supremacists in 18 94 incorporated the Confederate battle emblem. The banner will now be housed in the state's history museum. That's the the proper proper context context for for it, it, says says Pamela, Pamela, Junior Junior director director of of the the Mississippi Mississippi Civil Civil Rights Rights and and History History Museums. Museums. After After 126 126 years, years, we're retiring this flag and putting it in a place in a museum, where people can be educated and and long and be able to interpret looking. Interpret that flag. Commission will design a new Mississippi state flag that will be put to popular vote in November. Debbie Elliot

History History Museums Debbie Elliot Junior Junior Director Directo Mississippi Mississippi Mississippi Pamela NPR
4.8 Million Jobs Added in June, but Clouds Grow Over Economy

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:41 min | Last month

4.8 Million Jobs Added in June, but Clouds Grow Over Economy

"Are much better than expected Report out today shows US economy, adding 4.8 million jobs in June Labor Department now reporting that unemployment also fell to 11% last month, but bankrate dot com economist Mark Hemorrhage says that number may actually be slightly higher. He joined debris. Debbie Feinstein live on Skype to explain 1/3 of the jobs that were lost among the 20 Two million of since been restored, which obviously means 2/3 yet to be. So we sell the high rate of unemployment in our country, and I had an asterisk to the 11.1% unemployment rate you mentioned. Their Labor department cautions us that because of problems with measurement that are ultimately fairly complicated, the actual unemployment rate is about another percentage point above that. So let's talk about 12%. That's 2% above the highest level we saw during the great recession over a decade ago and within certain sectors, for example, in leisure and hospitality, which is the category including bars and restaurants, the unemployment rate they're 29%. That's above the level of the great Depression, So we still have a lot of heartache to work through here. Also, we've gotta recognize that new shutdowns air now underway again because of the pandemic. This data and today's report is from the 1st 2 weeks in June before this latest round of shutdowns. What does this mean? Looking ahead to the next report? That means there's more risk associated with a weakness, or at least a stall in the data will get for the month of July. As you indicate this dad has always collected around the 12th of the month, so it is somewhat stale. At this point. That's why, in some cases It's been more optimal to look at new claims for unemployment benefits of there. We're down for a 13 straight week, but elevated above a 1,000,000 for 15 straight weeks. Do businesses feel okay about rehiring again now? Or is there still too much uncertainty? For example? What happens now? If people stopped traveling again? The answer? That is really about the answer having to do with where you're located. What sector you're operating in on what the business outlook is operating a restaurant which would be doing business under challenging, Sir. Come stances on the best of times because of the high failure rate thinking about being restricted at 30 or 50% of your traditional level of business. You're thinking you're walking on egg shells. But if you're in a service industry, perhaps technology I t working with the cloud collaborative tools of security, the many tools that have kept many of us in operation during the lock down, But do you think the outlook is pretty good, by the way? Mortgage interest rates or a record low levels that's helping the housing mark. And that's one reason why the financial services Trade really still has a remarkably low unemployment rate right now, and that is bankrate dot com economist Mark Hamrick.

June Labor Department Bankrate Mark Hemorrhage Debbie Feinstein United States Skype Mark Hamrick
Rob Garnet One More Wave

The Coastal Athlete Program

06:12 min | Last month

Rob Garnet One More Wave

"Welcome back to the coastal. Athlete. Program I'm your host. Shep today. We are joined by very special guests. We are joined by the record surf operations a US Navy veteran. Therapy advocate, a waterman, a good friend of Joe and be good friend of mine, because we're all part of the one more way, family, Ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome to the show Rob Garnett Rob. How're you doing? Then fantastic thanks for having me am. Champ and Danny Danny met you before but SHEP. We've talked a couple of times on the phone, so it's cool to be some of the zoom. At least on Zoom. Danny is our producer, and so he's going to be helping out doing the editing and mixing the episode down and things like that Joe is going to be joining the podcast just a minute. He was transitioning from from pork. Chop actually up to his apartment. He's coming back doing some surf therapy sessions. My guess would be out of Pendleton or something like that. As usual on Wednesdays, Joe is on the road living the mission so rob. Before. We get too deep into asking you. Questions I just have to ask when it came time to transition out of your career in the military, did you? When did you know that you wanted to get into surf therapies specifically? And when did you know that like this was going to be a special moment? I. Think when I was so I retired from the navy and two thousand fifteen and so that was kind of win Wave, actually becoming nonprofit, and so I had a couple of buddies Alex and Kyle. We can talk about later. That were trying to get going. They've been doing it kind of. guerrilla-style for before getting official, and so I kind of knew about it before retiring. And then it kind of kicked off. For ME I. I was volunteering here and there with more ways. I had some other gigs so right when I retired I started doing government contracting jobs I did that for a couple years before spending a lot more time volunteering than later coming on. As employees. So, Joe I just ask some general questions. Trying to do is cut those questions and stuff at the back, so feel free to take the lead, and you have the floor sounds it sounds like you talked a bit about something about diving for the navy and then sports. Now we're talking about why I came the navy. Sorry to repeat it, but. I came in hoping to be Navy diver. I've been a commercial diver for about six months in Galveston. Texas after drop Nettie. Collagen thought that'd be a good transition and When I tried to join the navy, they said the Dow closed and that they dove at butts that I should go try that. Sounds like a good idea and so. They had me take a job. That would allow me to go to buds. became a parachute rigger, so I went to school i. By Mos got my. Parachute rigger on. And then off to buds I, not really no one else doing. My parents were hippies so military people. No one wants to be joined. The Navy so really did not get into. So I imagine was a little bit of a surprise to show to buds. Learn what that school was or. Just just the suffer faster not quite ready for nicely. I imagine imagine that's quite interesting. SUFFER FEST! I also can imagine that doing the work that you did. Know you and I kind of a little bit of your background. I've imagine that really helps. Set you up for the mission at one more wave and getting on top of things and getting things moving. You maybe talk a little bit about that. Of maybe some things you learn from the Navy that you apply now at one more. Share just. Learned a lot towards the last couple of years at Miami my time in the service. How can help people in much really from? I've been injured several times while on active duty at spent time at the. At Naiko which I know, you're not talking about for jokes. The National Intrepid Center of Excellence Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic says Maryland runs, and so I started my treatment probably. This is probably two thousand ten zero five years before I retired, and so I have a lot of time to spend time with other folks that had had you know whether it was PGA s or All the kind of things that were happening to people are not super physical, but burying paxil sleep issues, and so I got exposed to lots of different therapies, and I just knew man. This is can't wait to spend more time doing this. And, so I was really excited because I learned all these things in the navy, but how can help other people at learned a lot about the va have across his work for compensation took care people how some days are better than others. Some states are Oracle, and and what? I didn't realize. Your percentage rate affects how you get treated to I was treated well, but I'm on a different ratings on people's. It's tough so I definitely learned a lot, you know. Early on about how to help other people do this and it really as you've seen Joe out. Watch people's faces. When you get to give him some equipment whether it's a board or a boogie board or people that have had nothing. He's got a wet suit like our friends in. Santa Cruz just the amazing transformation that happens. Not only from equipment, but from the community that step we all share the Melcher that we love. Not Picking up cigarette, butts or cleaning off the flight deck, but you know going out von and be talking a little trash, each other encouraging each other and just share. That shared experiences is powerful so. Yeah I definitely can attest that shared experience than to be fair. No ship Naidoo usually pick up cigarette butts, but easily on the beach and they drive us nuts, so that's why. It's quite funny. Were you a surfer before you've got out of the military and got with one more way? Has. Started at middle, school on off and then did it alter the teens long morning. And then took several years off and then kind of into it later on, so yes. We're always at the beaches, kids. We're always bodysurfing. Trying to collect fins like my friend Joe Against. Debbie me and my fin collecting hoarding abilities. That I have for quite

Navy JOE Shep Danny Danny Joe I United States Rob Garnett Joe Against Pendleton Naidoo National Intrepid Center Of Ex Santa Cruz Galveston MOS Official Debbie Maryland Nettie Texas
"debbie" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

02:07 min | Last month

"debbie" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

"Happy Remind Jews. Out what. We call two. Friends. A Into three? And I? Needed are. A law. For Three You'll read. Guess that's what friends spouse to do. People sent beautiful flowers. Michelle Carson said from drag race and do his Co. this orchid which you can see behind me here on his. Own. People I work with. Who? I know loudly some many things. To all the people thank you for thinking meeting. Every comment as much as every flowers every donation. Can My mom find at the Lincoln? Thank you so much. On Decline. Often anyway. Thank you everyone each and everyone of you but mostly. A. Three! Needed, can. That's what friends. Do. Own. Debbie. Welcome back to the program. It's time for. A hold on! What her name stepping then. Head and I knew it. Balls.

"debbie" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

03:55 min | Last month

"debbie" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

"Coming up a bunch of. No More Burger Talk Debbie airtime has no. My Colon can't take it..

Congressional Caucus for Black and Jewish Relations Kicks Off

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Congressional Caucus for Black and Jewish Relations Kicks Off

"Three in the congressional caucus on black Jewish relations hosting a virtual roundtable on tackling systemic racism in the U. S. it's chaired by former representatives including congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz and members will be able to hear policy recommendations from national leaders and does including the anti defamation league and the N. double ACP the caucus recently issued a statement condemning the murders of George Floyd Brianna Taylor and optimize our very president trump meanwhile also holding a round table discussion in Dallas presenting ideas for police reform and race relations the president laid out in Dallas with faith leaders law enforcement and business owners first it would aggressively pursue economic development in minority communities it would include confronting health care disparities putting courage police departments to meet standards for use of force training would renew calls in Congress for school

Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman George Floyd Brianna Taylor Dallas President Trump Congress
Philadelphia - 4 People Charged In Shooting Death Of 13-Year-Old Boy In Chester

KYW 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Philadelphia - 4 People Charged In Shooting Death Of 13-Year-Old Boy In Chester

"Justice has been served according to officials in Delaware County four people have been charged in last month's shooting death of a thirteen year old Chester boy but K. Y. W. Sandra Kramer reports authorities aren't celebrating just yet Debbie the Delaware County district attorney Matt Krause says thirteen year old nineties farther Davis was targeted by the four suspects he says they chase the boy in a car just outside his home he attempted to escape he attempted to get away from these murders by hopping fences in the backyard unfortunately he was not successful three of the suspects are in their early twenties the other early thirties they're all charged with first degree murder but officials aren't high fiving each other right now is Chester's mayor puts it after all a little boy is dead Delaware County district attorney Jack Stoll Steiner had a lump in his throat as he talked about the most recent conversation he had with the keys to his dad told him I can't imagine I literally cannot imagine what he's going through one of the rest of his life is going to be like without

K. Y. W. Sandra Kramer Matt Krause Davis First Degree Murder Chester Jack Stoll Steiner Delaware County Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

Strong Black Legends

04:42 min | 3 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

"Okay this is the part of the show where I give metaphorical flowers to something or someone that I really enjoy. We call it Tracy's flowers and this week. My flowers go to drum roll please. Now somebody just said who is dame owens until you did in look. I'm tired today. How can you not know the Dana Owens is Queen Latifah Gogi encyclopedia and gives you a clue and then sweet Queen Latifah Apologize? For not knowing that she is also data owens. She's just sell bomb. She's so amazing. She does literally everything. So okay first of all do me a favor and go to your Internet machine and try to find a picture of Queen Latifah where she looks. Amiss. Oh you can find any. Oh that's because there aren't any I have never seen her with her hair not laid makeup. Just fresh and just amazing. I've never seen a bad pick up her musically. She does it all. We already know that she wraps in from the jump. She used her music to let you know that she is not having it because she has had it up to here. See what I did. Let's he was headed up to. Here is the name of a song that she did. And so I had said because it was funny to me. Y'All get it. Her first album was called is still the Queen. Everyone immediately did and she continued to give us box. That got us all in line such as you an. I T Y who you call him a bitch knock Queen Latifah. 'cause he's having it she was like we're up in his colon all but Mama I wanna sang and so she did. She released an album of jazz standards. She has had roles in movie. Adaptations of some of my favorite Broadway shows. Chicago and hairspray. She was in leading Shell Staw. She was And the Little Mermaid Live and she sang the theme song to not one but both of her talk shows which speaking of she had to daytime talk. Shows y'all and you know what both of them were good. My favorite one though is one from the nineties and there are so many clips on Youtube. I encourage you all to go. Watch them just as soon as we're done hanging out there so good. Yeah Arina. This is an amazing actress. Everybody knows about Senate off. Everybody should know about living. Single Witch Queen Latifah herself said was basically ripped off by the people who made friends. She said it not me so and is true and she is also about her money. I love me a black businesswoman. There's the makeup line that she had our pizza. The Girl Queen Collection. We miss you every day. She does voice over work. She's got a star on the Hollywood walk of fame. She's now producing. She is really doing everything. And I think it's high time that she gets her do she. Also in my humble opinion looks just like Zorno Hartson so she's basically blessed anointed by the ancestors directly so the Aka Kalija Aka Dana Owens. These flowers are for you. Well podcast family that it we did it. We made it to the end of the road. Congratulations on making it to the finale of season two. We did it again. I keep saying. And what finale it was I? I didn't take any souvenirs from Ebi Alan's House because I think that's cop theft but I do have this recorded conversation in. Nobody can deny that it happened. It's an opera history books. Yeah I got to talk to so many amazing people this season people. We've all welcomed into our homes through our TV screens across the years and giving him there will deserve flowers. But don't worry don't worry I'm not GonNa go act in Pasadena and brand new now just because I'm celebrity adjacent. You know what I'm saying like. Just don't me next season when I'm speaking into a dominant Chris? Microphone and wearing something from the next season. Abbey Park election. I'm have me A. Pr Box is happening. I'm claiming that to happen. I'll just add. Thank you so much for listening. It's been in the season with me. This show is a production of Pine Street studios in partnership with Netflix and strong black lead executive producers. Are Max Linski. Genoa's Berman Jasmine Lawson. And a guarantee a great. Our lead producer is Josh. Gwynne production bigest Jupiter India Neil Anderson with additional support by Cindy That gay and Alexis more our music has been by the incredibly talented.

Dana Owens Girl Queen Collection Ebi Alan Tracy Chris Shell Staw Netflix Chicago Berman Jasmine Lawson Senate Max Linski Genoa Jupiter India producer Zorno Hartson Neil Anderson Pasadena
"debbie" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

Strong Black Legends

11:50 min | 3 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

"Changing the way people were looking at black people. The reason we took US television show for them to realize that we are middle class just like everybody else government class but this was something that People were ready. They just weren't ready for it. I don't know why you wanted it. But we did many other things they weren't ready for. I was always being called into what I call the principal's office doing shows that. Were you know really about something we did? We didn't episode once. Call mammy dearest were we reclaim the image of Ngoma We took her out of that Gingham fabrics and we took the Gingham that Gingham Ma'am address and wrapped it like an African clean and this was one of the most difficult episodes we do because we had people that were wearing black face and it was very controversial but we would just dealing with a straight up and then this cute the cutest little white boy did you have wanted senior life as who wrote it vary mom. Yes he wrote it. It was amazing and then I introduced egotrip moving. Giovanni University speaking again as always we met Nikki. We were all doing that. They didn't know anything about that. We need to introduce it again I think that's how became aware of Nikki. Giovanni distance from vent Tom that episode because when I turned myself into myself and I said this lady Hackett heavy like will. This is the thing television so powerful. This is something that I'm sure is part of what your conversation is. In while you're talking to any of US television film so powerful it penetrates the arts. It's for the arts to address those things that are most difficult challenging things that people need to know about Ryan. If we're not doing that would never really doing a good job. Yeah we can't just be booty shaking in you know it has to be about something you know. Speaking of art and music great transition right. It was not a great transition I I really really want to talk to you about you and your sister. Felicia own saliva album. Oh I don't know how did not know until today that the poetry the Human Felicia are reading is from your mom. How I don that's on me. That's my fault but can you tell me a little bit about the lands at your residing in the song the it's from a poem call on status one of my mom's poems from her book spice of Don's and this was the book of poetry. That was the a contender for the nominees. Yeah in so it's about a woman who comes from very simple place aspires to be in a big city in all these other places but realizes that where she really belongs is with the folk that she comes from. What really matters. We did this. Mother's Day special. That twenty five years ago where we can surprised our mom me. Felicia my brother Tex. We recited one of her poems on status. Beautiful point is something I used to win poetry contest with when I was a kid. Yeah and Salon Jr had seen that special and really liked it. I'M PRINCE WITH HER MOM. Tina in so tina call. Mrs Debbie Launches Obsess Happen Assistance. I said really as of course she can have. She can have anything she wants so volition. I said Yes to that. Poem is How ago he says Oh aborted train kissed all goodbye and in my heart was a sympathetic side for I would go in live in a city where people in hearts and buildings were bigger while they remain to work in toil in town who's thriving was of soil for long at work. I knew no distress. I even decided to write them less. What needed after all full degenerate? Who's living in thinking was way out of date then? One day I found all of me confusion bound with problems. High as Jack's beanstalk and no one with whom to talk. My dilemma was all my own. No Counseling Dad. No kindness shown and for once I knew my real status cockroach in the park theatre now. My heart knows no delight like a trip back to the old home site and that the money would ask off at a screen door hanging off so they got no tall skyscrapers clowns in nightclubs. Cutting capers. It's home. The folk are warm and most important law Thank you I just need that first line. That was you to fall and this like as you're sitting here now reciting this poem that as I'm listening to. It seems to reflect so much you in your life like what does if feel like how. How do you connect with? That was interesting because I was winning poetry contests with it when I was like twelve and thirteen years old. And it's so true because my life is increased taking me around the world. I've seen everything but at the end of the day is really my family that makes me whole is really my family's love for me. It makes me feel like I can keep going and doing what I do is that I feel like the recitation of that beautiful poem while looking back on your career is the perfect moment to talk about what you're doing. Now what can we look forward to? What is was coming out of the Debbie Allen Dance Academy? Oh Wow my kids I call them. Data Diana's Fra our all over the world There in film and Television on Broadway in Europe on the road in China in Brazil a literally they are everywhere in the world and So proud of what we're doing and that we're keeping going where in the capital campaign right now trying to build a new building. They deserve to have a state of the art in no academy. And we're going to give them that We just did our tim anniversary of the high chopping nutcracker which was off the vogler away. Yeah it was great. It was an all star. Felicia was in it. So tell me about what is what is hot chocolate. Nutcracker is a new telling of the classic nutcracker it. It's something I was involved with many years ago. You Know Ellington wrote a nutcracker suite that is all the music from Chekhov's is jazz version then using that music but Gil cates. Who was my personal. Rabbi he produced the Oscars Ten fifteen times. I know I did. All of them with him. he said. W need a Christmas show. You need to Christmas show so I said Okay so finally I wrote it in. I was inspired by my son dump. Who when he was a little boy. He's thirty now but he when he was like five. I took him down to the sea the nutcracker he was bored to dip he started dancing. He's like mom winners. The rat coming off read in that stuck with me is okay. The boys want to see a rat created something called the rat pack and I took. Who was the mouse king and made him hobby a New York to sidekicks enough already? With this battle with the nutcracker we gonNA change this around a musical fund delight in we go to the land of the Candy Canes Still Go to Fairyland we go to Egypt. We go to To to New Orleans. Vote Bird Land. So we go to. China we go all original music composed by a thorough sandovol James Ingram. Some mariah Carey loved noise era. Right rickey minor all of us And it is just a new classic. And I'm telling you every time we do. We sell out so really. The tenth anniversary was off the hook the hood and so I'm hoping one day will make it a move. It's GonNa there's GonNa be a behind the scenes special on Netflix. I can't wait it's going to is coming. Shonda rhimes actually produced it had to Shonda. Yeah I'm so excited with his documentary. Because I have so many questions about taking something as classic timeless the Nutcracker and you know people get defensive over like well this is a classic and it shouldn't be touched. It shouldn't be like retold. Did you meet any of that resistance? And if Saudis you care demand so happy yes go and see a new telling of the story there's gotTa be seven hundred nutcrackers in this country around Christmas time. They're all different and varied and classic means that something that needs to be revisited year. An age eight is still relevant. Like the work of August Wilson. Like the work of Tennessee Williams like the work of Shakespeare it is. Those stories are worth telling with a new with new clothes on. This is all about imagination and creativity all right. You got my vote. Debbie Alpha Presidents when twenty. I would not wish such as being on you know I am so happy to had a chance to talk about this with you. Thank you for all of the lessons. I learned so much about the and Mike Care. Mentor ship in directing. Can you think you wanna flow like what's what's what's next up in the pipeline for you? Movie coming out on Netflix Christmas on the Square Dolly. Parton all her music and it was the brainchild of Sam Haskell. Who produced all of her movies for Netflix? Call heartstrings and so we didn't credible Movie that's inspired by One of life in school and endowed plays an angel. It's really wonderful. It's lovely lot of dancing and some great talent. Ahmed Screen Christine Brennan Ski. So doing that and I have my my freeze frame. Stop the madness. Which is a dance driven narrative about gun violence and racial prejudice in America? Veer bounced portrayal. Is All music dance in them? Determined determined to get out to the people. It's something for the people And I feel like we need music and singing and dancing right now so badly. Thank you for supplying that for us today and yesterday in. Thank you from you today. Absolute.

Netflix Felicia US Nikki Giovanni University China principal mammy Debbie Allen Dance Academy Shonda rhimes Christine Brennan Mrs Debbie New Orleans New York mariah Carey Tina Don Ryan
"debbie" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

Strong Black Legends

02:17 min | 3 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

"Just like all episodes of strong black legends. A have to begin by practicing to be the kind of parent that I aspire to be in. That is the kind of parent yells at you and ask you what you know about their favorite things as such no about alum. But what about Debbie Allen? This has been so much fun sometimes most times. I cannot believe that my job is to go around the country. Talking to our favorite black folks the folks who made us laugh and made us cry minutes believe impossibility gave us the reason to keep going even when we wanted to sit down to stop child. Sorry sometimes the testimony. Just sneaks up on you. We can't even begin to have that conversation without talking about Debbie frigging Allen. She can sing. She Can Act. She can dance. You know the difference between when people say that somebody can sing versus somebody who can sang. What is the dance version of that? Because whatever that is. That's Debbie Allen. Deb Can do it. She's also produced indirect everything from girlfriends. Everybody hates Chris Insecure. Get Away with murder. I'm aside. Give us US free. That was Debbie. I was so excited and so nervous when I found out I was going to get to talk to but I had no idea that. She invited me to her house. Debbie Allen's actual house when I walked into the dance studio which is in her own home which is not a bad flicks. She had portrait and pictures from all the different stages of her career. Just dutton own. Everybody I'm talking about Bam. There's her dancing with win. Verden who was Bob? Fosse's wife Bam there. She and her sister Felicia Rishaad. I'm sure you've heard of par Paris now. This her and her husband was hired like Norm Nixon and Shabaab. There's her and her mother. Pulitzer Prize nominated poet. Vivian Eire's Allen Legacy pedigree legends. I am so excited to share with you the conversation I got to have with the Debbie Allen once again in her own home I hope you enjoy. It.

Debbie Allen Chris Insecure Pulitzer Prize Vivian Eire Deb Norm Nixon murder Felicia Rishaad Fosse dutton Verden Paris Shabaab Bob
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

14:32 min | 5 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Debbie was scheduled to interview two guests. The first ever Tamblyn was featured in last week's podcast but the second guess had to cancel because of a health problem so writer. Roxane gay suggested turning the tables and she would interview Debbie. Wrx had no each other very well. They're engaged to be married later this year. Here they are at the green space at WNYC on February tenth. Twenty twenty. Okay here you always wanted to interview you. So why are the fast and furious movies? The best movies ever made a great question. I've never seen any of them. And Roxanne almost consider that a deal breaker when we first started dating her favorite movies or among her favorite movies and I was trying to sit across from her and not have like jaw. Drop but yeah so. You're not perfect but close me up for that. I'm sure okay. Deborah you've been doing design matters for fifteen years which in podcast about one hundred. Why did you decide to do a podcast? And however you sustained the interest in doing one. S- for so many years well. I didn't really decide to do one. I was asked. I was offered an opportunity by voice. America business network which was a fledgling Internet radio network at the time and I was offered the opportunity to pay them for airtime on their network. And at the time I was doing very well professionally in a commercial realm and I had surpassed any possible. Hct Dream that I'd had professionally in my brandon career but because it was a commercial I actually felt that I was dying and that I had lost all of my creative heart and I you know I wasn't writing anymore. I wasn't drying anymore. Wasn't doing anything creative and I understood why I mean. My professional success was the first time I'd ever been successful at anything in my life. So of course at the time. I was like okay. I'm not going to do anything but this. Because it feels so good to be successful at something finally in my forties but then that were off that metabolized and I needed to do something creative and this felt like a sneaky way to be creative but still be able to justify it from a business perspective because I interview clients or I can interview people in the Design Business. And so that's really how it started. It was really a Hail Mary to my creativity and because I have such generous friends. They were willing to come on the show. I mean they had no reason to come on the show. Me Steve. Hallows Steve Heller sitting in the front row. Steve is my mentor. My Fairy Godfather. He's been on the show thirteen times every time he says okay. He'll still be doing now. I want to do with him every year. So we can create this oral history of designed together. I'm shocked that he says yes. But why why it grew I think is just because of the guests that I have and the generosity in their hearts for me. I'll never ever get tired of talking to people about who they are and how they how they become who they are and how they make their lives and how they create and make things out of nothing. One of the things I've noticed about design matters is that there's a narrative arc to each episode. You really tell a story or you ask the kinds of questions that will get your guests to tell a story so what does a good narrative arc look like for you in a given episode like a game of pool billiards I understand? That's just not what I thought you were going to say so. I think a great conversation. Great interview really is a game of pool. Because when you're playing a game of pool you're not only shooting one of the billiard board balls into the whole you also want to leave the rest of the balls on the table so you can continue to shoot more holes and so forth Get THE DIRTY. Look off your face. It's distracting so so what I try to do is ask a question that will allow me to be able to continue the conversation no matter where they take their answer and so for me. It's about being prepared to go wherever they go and know enough about where they may go to be able to anticipate what any number of answers they they could give. Mostly try to listen really hard. That's why I stare at people when I interview. Oh and I try not to talk which is why I not all the time. So you know like a little bobblehead sitting here but it's mostly because a lot of people when they're conversations talk talk talk talk talk and then stop talking while the other person's talking only to then wait till they finish talking to start talking again and my second ever guest Cheryl Swanson said to me after the interview and I asked her how it went and was really expecting great. She said well. Maybe I should listen to my answers before you ask the next question. And that really and thank God that was to as opposed to episode three hundred and two But that really gave me that sense of you. Really have to pay attention to everything. Somebody is saying. I also don't like to do my interviews remotely because I like to be able to read a person. No if they're feeling uncomfortable or when I might be able to push or say really because I know that maybe they're not giving me everything And also just listening quietly enough to let people say what they have to say. How far are you willing to push someone to get a good answer or to get at least an authentic answer? Maybe pushes into the right. Word Nudge Nudge Nudge. Encourage Inspire. I mean part of the reason that I like to start the show with a question that surprises people is so that they understand that I respect them enough to do the deep research and if I give them that sense of taking this interview really seriously that they'll intern take it as seriously as I do because all I'm really interested in talking about them and not judging at all and I just WANNA be able to offer their story to the world in a way that celebrates who they are but also allows other people to be inspired by their struggles or how they overcame something to become who. They are because really. There's only two interviews I've ever done in the nearly five hundred I've done now where the people that I interviewed were like. I'm just cool with WHO I am. I don't give any fox anymore about anything and those men were in their eighties so I think but but they were in their eighties and so I think at that point they were. They'd earned that. There's not anyone I've ever interviewed that I've ever gotten the sense. That they were absolutely comfortable being who they are and owning the world in the way that they should or could there opening their hearts and showing who they are in a way that I think gives people a sense that anything is possible for anyone. You mentioned your deep research and one of the things. I don't think people understand about design matters is that Debbie does hours and hours of research for every single episode hours and when you talk to her while she researching. It's not a good idea but it's really impressive like when she interviewed me. I I was really surprised. By the level of depth that she was able to achieve and sort of get into deep cuts. So what does your research process? Look Lake for an episode. Well it depends on who? I'm interviewing if it's like. I just interviewed Lucy wainwright roads the musician I interviewed. Aaron McKie own Khaki King Amanda Palmer. If I'm interviewing musician I have to try to listen to their entire body of work which is wonderful but also very time consuming. Fortunately I could listen while I'm doing other things and sort of get a sense of of their music. If it's a writer I have to try to read as much as I can in preparation for my interview with you. I was so terrified that I'd be caught out not having the answer to something or knowing something I had to read everything twice and so I did. But that was joyful. Somebody like eligible Thanh who has twenty books. That was really hard to do. So what I decided to do was read the other books that were sort of in the category of the book because that was a novel and he doesn't write a lot of novels and I had also read somewhere that it was a sequel to a book that he had written twenty years ago which was one of his first novels and it was only one line in the in the second book that made it clear that it was a sequel. But I found the line so that made me really happy of course so but generally speaking. I tried to read as much as I can. Of whatever body of work or listen everybody of work? They have generally speaking. I feel comfortable if I have about fifty pages of research and that's generally Things that I found online or transcripts of audio I'm also very good with kindle and so in as much as I also get hardcovers of copies of everything because I want people to sign them. I also get everything on kindle so then I can highlight and then transcribe really easily so generally speaking about fifty pages. Then I call that down to about ten to twelve pages of questions and then for an hour long episode. I have to call it down again to about five to seven. The really hard part of doing an interview is knowing when not to ask a question it happened tonight had such a good juicy question for amber but she brought in something that allowed me to take it somewhere else with other questions that made me eliminate that but you know you wanna flow with the conversation. So that's part of the research is having enough to be able to pivot anyway. Somebody goes so. She's going to talk about dark sparklers and that means we have to eliminate an entire conversation about bang. Ditto that means we have to eliminate it but then I can continue on And so I think curtis gets really nervous my producer when I come in with ten pages and I'll say curtis I couldn't call it down to anything less than ten pages and he's like okay and then I try to as I'm interviewing make the decisions about where to go next. So that's how it works. It's incredible and it shows. Have you gleaned any insights about creative people in general over five hundred episodes question? No probably yes I mean. I think that everybody's insecure. Everybody is searching. Everybody's hoping everybody's head trauma I think that no matter who I've interviewed whether they're super super famous or just starting out the people that seem to resonate the most are people that put their whole hearts into and show everything and that never gets boring ever which is why I can. I hope that I can do this for the rest of my life. Do you put your heart into everything. Sometimes tragically but yes. What is the next fifteen years design matters? Look like Oh I have so many good plans. I can't talk about a bunch of them yet. But there's some really exciting things that have popped up just unexpectedly very serendipitous Louis One of the things. That's interesting about the show. Especially if you listened to the early horrendous episodes of the first four years four years of horrendous episodes. I mean that's resilience and keep them up on I tunes just so I can say to people. It takes a while to get good at something trust me. It took me one hundred episodes to really begin to understand but I have some exciting exciting possibilities but mostly just because of I think some credibility that I've earned in being able to do this being able to talk to more and more and more people and so I just WanNa be able to talk to the talk about this show now as one in an effort. The sort of brand consultant is still alive in there and I think design matters is not really great name because it's not really about just designers anymore. It's about this is how I've I've re-engineered it. It's about how the world's most creative people design the Ark of their lives and you know desire matters writers that works Iro but I just see being able to do that with with more and more and more people and more kinds of people I love talking to scientists and then I get all of my my questions about how we got here unanswered but at least ask and I love to talk to artists and I liked at Mit just loved chuck to anybody that is able to create something or make something or think something out of nothing. If you could rename the show what would you call it? What matters Oh distrigas no I think on that. No Never Mellon everyone..

Debbie Steve Heller writer WNYC Twenty twenty kindle Roxane gay Tamblyn Roxanne billiards Deborah curtis Lucy wainwright Louis One America Design Business Look Lake Cheryl Swanson Hallows
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"For fourteen years now debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative types about what they do how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about on this podcast every moment talks with portrait painter amy cheryl about her emotionally evocative work i didn't know i was doing it until i had a show and i had like three people start crying while they were looking at the work i'll say y'all here's debbie millman the subjects of amy cheryl's portrait's are african americans they were clothing with vibrant colors and patterns and they stand out from richly colored textured backgrounds they look right at us and they seem to be taking our measure their portrait's are beautiful luminous and intense when cheryl was asked to paint michelle obama's official portrait she produced a painting that was a departure from the traditionally stodgy first lady portrait wearing a luminous stress obama is seated against a sky blue background and she's looking right at us taking our measure a michel joins me today to talk about the making of that portrait and her life and career as an artist amy welcome to design matters i think you you grow up in columbus georgia the daughter of a dentist and a homemaker surrounded by what you've referred to as generic eric ethan allen landscapes hanging above the fireplace your family was not an artistic one in though actually my mom funny she'd spent a year at the cleveland institute i mean she was born in nineteen thirty five i say that because she's eighty five years old now so even at her age and i guess that was in her late twenties it was not something that had a foreseeable future so when i said i wanted to be an artist she still did not understand what that meant you know there was no like i can see what this means she didn't want to hear it yeah your parents raised you christian and i understand you had bible studies in your house every friday we did how did that influence your impact you as a child i didn't really think about it i mean we the church was a rather strange on actually because we kept this abbot so it was no tv after the sun went down on friday until the summer down on saturday lecture bought in yeah so it was like a lot of old testament and new testament stuff but i mean it's just what i knew what i.

amy cheryl debbie millman michelle obama obama michel cleveland institute official columbus eric ethan allen eighty five years fourteen years
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Fourteen years now debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative types about what they do how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about this podcast it'd be woman talks with writer carmen maria machado about her career and the importance of ego essential element to being an artist because otherwise like what are you doing did you have to have that investment in it here's debbie moment if you like fairy tales and myths this book is for you if you like horror and science fiction did the same book has got you covered if you'd like experimental fiction queer theory and luminous storytelling well you're in luck my guest today is the author carmen maria machado and her book her body and other parties has been nominated for the national book award for fiction she's here today to talk about her writing her life and her career carmen welcome to design matters thank you for having me carmen i understand that from the moment you were able to pick up a pen you were writing and i read that as a kid you found the address for the scholastic book publishing company in a baby sitters club book and sent them a chapter of a novel you were writing adding please let me know if he would like to see more of it how old were you when you did this oh my god i must've been i'd say probably about third grade so how old you in thurgood like eight maybe yeah my godmother bought me a personalized stationery set it had jungle animals on it and it had my name my address and after that i just went to town i was sending letters to everyone and i felt really empowered by the stationary you write the story on the stationary no the story was printed my my parents had bought you know it was like a windows three point one like it was a really old computer well it's old now it was at the time amazing and i loved the word processor and i typed a lot of stories up on the word processor so i tied it up i must have gotten my father to print it out at work and then i wrote the sort of i guess what you call the cover letter on my stationary and then i mailed in did you ever hear back i did not my my wife who works in publishing assures me that some intern probably hung it up you know in their in their cubicle with like a lot of joy and happiness which makes me it makes me happy your grandfather came to the united states from santa clara when he was eighteen and went to tennessee to go to college it took him ten years to finish his degree between working learning english and being deported back to cuba during the mccarthy era and serving in the korean war which is how he earned his citizenship growing up in allentown pennsylvania you've said that there was a lot of storytelling going on in your home particularly from your cuban granddad what kind of stories were being told in how did they influence you you know he would tell stories about cuba and about his life after he left cuba that were really strange and that they were they were very dark and i don't think i fully appreciated or understood their darkness so for example there was a story he would tell about you know how he had this rooster and then you know one day they were having dinner and they hadn't seen the rooster and a while and he asked where's the rooster and they were like what you're eating you're eating him you know because it's cuba everyone's you know there was hungry they had to eat their their pet rooster as you do and so you know and that's a that's a very dark story and or he would talk about how you know a.

debbie millman Fourteen years ten years one day
"debbie" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Debbie straight headed st nick sports king take you know in just a few laps back pink feather what ram tv like yourself you're kidding skin everybody true piece can really to that true breeze stop moaning those metal maman have left and care without singing.

Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"A nuclear accountant independently healthy okay fair enough well thank you for answering a question evangelists break thank you for the many many contributions you've made to art and design and culture and thank you for joining me today on design matters plump can have the anniversary forty years that's veterans you can find out more about edwin schlossberg and yes i on their website the as i design dot com this is the 14th here had been doing designed matters and i'd like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference we could make a difference who can do both i'm debbie norman penalty for which a talking with you again soon for more information about design matters or to subscribe to our newsletter go to debbie mellman dot com if you love this podcast please consider contributing to our new drip kickstarter community members get early access to the podcast transcripts of every interview competitions to live interviews qna sessions with guests and a brand new annual magazine you can learn more about this at indeed dot rip slashed debbie dash hillman that's d dot rip slashed debbie dashed millemont if you want others to know about this podcast please read review in the it tuned store and linked to the podcast on social media designed matters is produced by curtis fox productions the show is published exclusively by design observer dot com and recorded live at the school of visual arts masters in branding program in new york city the editor in chief of design matters media is accurate pettit and the art director is emily weiland generous support for designed matters media is provided by whic stock.

accountant debbie dash hillman debbie pettit director edwin schlossberg debbie norman curtis fox new york editor in chief emily weiland forty years
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And at the end of the day the only thing that matters is who turns out of up david kate johnston thank you for these wise words thank you for joining the today on design thank you dave its latest book is it's even worse than anything what the trump administration is doing to america you can read more written by david as dc reported dot org this is the fourteen th here i've been doing design matters and i'd like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference we can make a difference for we can do both debbie mellman and i look forward to talking within a dancing for more information about design matters or to subscribe to our newsletter go to debbie mellman dot com if you love this podcast please consider contributing to our new drip kickstarter community members get early access to the podcast transcripts of every interview invitations to live interviews qna sessions with guests and a brand new annual magazines you can learn more about this at d dot rip slashed debbie dash mellman that's d dot rip slash debbie dash meant if you want others to know about this podcast please wait a review in the it in store and linked to the podcast on social media design matters is produced by curtis fox productions the show is published exclusively by design observer dot com and recorded live at the school a visual arts masters in branding program in new york city the editor in chief of design matters media is accurate pettit and the art director is emily weiland generous support for design matters media is provided by wicks scott carr.

debbie mellman debbie dash pettit director david kate johnston america curtis fox new york editor in chief emily weiland scott carr
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And at the end of the day the only thing that matters is who turns out of up david kate johnston thank you for these wise words thank you for joining the today on design thank you dave its latest book is it's even worse than anything what the trump administration is doing to america you can read more written by david as dc reported dot org this is the fourteen th here i've been doing design matters and i'd like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference we can make a difference for we can do both debbie mellman and i look forward to talking within a dancing for more information about design matters or to subscribe to our newsletter go to debbie mellman dot com if you love this podcast please consider contributing to our new drip kickstarter community members get early access to the podcast transcripts of every interview invitations to live interviews qna sessions with guests and a brand new annual magazines you can learn more about this at d dot rip slashed debbie dash mellman that's d dot rip slash debbie dash meant if you want others to know about this podcast please wait a review in the it in store and linked to the podcast on social media design matters is produced by curtis fox productions the show is published exclusively by design observer dot com and recorded live at the school a visual arts masters in branding program in new york city the editor in chief of design matters media is accurate pettit and the art director is emily weiland generous support for design matters media is provided by wicks scott carr.

debbie mellman debbie dash pettit director david kate johnston america curtis fox new york editor in chief emily weiland scott carr
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And at the end of the day the only thing that matters is who turns out of up david kate johnston thank you for these wise words thank you for joining the today on design thank you dave its latest book is it's even worse than anything what the trump administration is doing to america you can read more written by david as dc reported dot org this is the fourteen th here i've been doing design matters and i'd like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference we can make a difference for we can do both debbie mellman and i look forward to talking within a dancing for more information about design matters or to subscribe to our newsletter go to debbie mellman dot com if you love this podcast please consider contributing to our new drip kickstarter community members get early access to the podcast transcripts of every interview invitations to live interviews qna sessions with guests and a brand new annual magazines you can learn more about this at d dot rip slashed debbie dash mellman that's d dot rip slash debbie dash meant if you want others to know about this podcast please wait a review in the it in store and linked to the podcast on social media design matters is produced by curtis fox productions the show is published exclusively by design observer dot com and recorded live at the school a visual arts masters in branding program in new york city the editor in chief of design matters media is accurate pettit and the art director is emily weiland generous support for design matters media is provided by wicks scott carr.

debbie mellman debbie dash pettit director david kate johnston america curtis fox new york editor in chief emily weiland scott carr
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And at the end of the day the only thing that matters is who turns out of up david kate johnston thank you for these wise words thank you for joining the today on design thank you dave its latest book is it's even worse than anything what the trump administration is doing to america you can read more written by david as dc reported dot org this is the fourteen th here i've been doing design matters and i'd like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference we can make a difference for we can do both debbie mellman and i look forward to talking within a dancing for more information about design matters or to subscribe to our newsletter go to debbie mellman dot com if you love this podcast please consider contributing to our new drip kickstarter community members get early access to the podcast transcripts of every interview invitations to live interviews qna sessions with guests and a brand new annual magazines you can learn more about this at d dot rip slashed debbie dash mellman that's d dot rip slash debbie dash meant if you want others to know about this podcast please wait a review in the it in store and linked to the podcast on social media design matters is produced by curtis fox productions the show is published exclusively by design observer dot com and recorded live at the school a visual arts masters in branding program in new york city the editor in chief of design matters media is accurate pettit and the art director is emily weiland generous support for design matters media is provided by wicks scott carr.

debbie mellman debbie dash pettit director david kate johnston america curtis fox new york editor in chief emily weiland scott carr
"debbie" Discussed on Tribe of Mentors

Tribe of Mentors

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Tribe of Mentors

"Debbie if you could a giant billboard anywhere with anything on it what would it say and why this is easy my billboard would save this busy is a decision i say this all the time at nauseam and here's why of the many many excuses people used to rationalize why they can't do something the excuse i am too busy is not only the most in authentic is also the lazy assist i don't believe in too busy busy is a decision we do the things we want to do period if we say we're too busy i believe it is shorthand for not important enough it means you would rather be doing something else that you consider more important that thing could be sleep it could be sex could be watching game of thrones if we use busy as an excuse for not doing something what we are really really saying is that it's not a priority it's not as important to us so simply put you don't find the time to do something you make the tie find to do things i think we're now living in a society that seized busy as a badge it has become cultural cash shea to use the excuse i am too busy as a reason for not doing anything we don't feel like doing the problem is this if you let yourself off the hook for not doing something for any reason you won't ever do it if you wanna do something you can't let being busy stand in the way even if you are busy make the time to do the things you want to do and then follow through and do them what is one of the best or most worthwhile investments you've ever made this answer might surprise you more maybe not but the best investment i've ever made was in psychotherapy when i first started i was in my early thirties and the bills practically killed me but i knew i needed to deeply understand all the destructive things that had happened to me in order to try to live a remark.

Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Mm mm this is designed matters with debbie moment from from design his observered icon for thirteen years now debbie moment has been talking with designers and other creative types about what they do you got to be who they are and what they're thinking about on this podcast divvy norman talks with the director of hamilton thomas care about his career and about the joys of collaboration i learned not only how much bigger the world was the my little were friends but but if there were people that were going to make make thing things the pi would never be able to make i welcome that here's debbie moment you could say that directing musical is a form of design and materials i'm using lyrics and human performance thomas kale has directed some of the most memorable musical theater experiences of our time including in paints and hamilton his collaborations would lin manuel miranda and now the stuff of legend as at the show's he's created on his he joins me to talk about his extraordinary life and career yeah thomas cal welcomed to design matters please stop talking about with skit is this could get from me very very happy to be here oh thank you tummy is it true that when you were growing up in northern virginia here we go the first son you ever memorized with slick rex rap mona lisa absolutely approve prove it to me sock it to me that kind of pod let's just say it's it's in a very special place in my brain that does not go away which is what i was always fascinated.

director hamilton thomas virginia debbie norman thomas kale lin manuel miranda thomas cal thirteen years
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"This archive will episode of designed matters was recorded in june of 2016 this is designed matters with debbie mellman from design observer dot com for eleven years now debbie mellon has been talking with designers of other creative types who about what they do at the guts fi who they are and what they're thinking about on this podcast if he melded talks with chris anderson about how the ted conference has helped change the way we learn for the first time we can see examples all the best educated speakers pie dea share is out there and see what they do me inspired by them here's debbie nominee death taxes and public speaking the first two are inevitable but for most of us the prospect of giving a speech in front of total strangers his the staff of nightmares who better to help us than the man behind the ted conference chris anderson became the curator of the ted conference in two thousand into and ted videos are now viewed about a million times a year the presentations by speakers from all walks of life are usually short smart and always compelling for sanderson's new book is called ted talks the official ted guide to public speaking he joins me now to talk about it and about his career pretax chris anderson welcome to design matters thanks debbie chris plante stand that you're quite a good cook and one of your specialties is chicken gel frizzy what it what is chicken gel frizzy and had learnt make it but was unexpected and i may give you completely the wrong answer but my belief about chicken joe version it is a passionately help belief is that it's been it's form of courage again but made with a lot of onions and green peppers as the kind of the base of it it's very spicy curry.

debbie mellman chris anderson sanderson debbie mellon ted official chris plante eleven years