6 Burst results for "darlene jackson"

"darlene jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:08 min | 2 d ago

"darlene jackson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ran for City Council back in 2017, and she actually came in second to move in the a senior, and what was really inspiring about that is she could have backed down and she didn't She doubled down and since then she's become our state committeewoman. And I think that went to her resilience. You know, she is a fighter and to someone like me, a Latina born and raised in the Bronx. That's really inspiring to see because representation and I see you have being inspiring for those Uh, the youth with new ideas to want to better our community as well. And I feel that she is a candidate that puts in the work. She's put in the time something like 10 years. I believe in local politics and In a release. This is why local elections are really, really impressed. We did the errors, weapons teaching. We deserve leadership that's present in our community, and her presence is definitely felt. Lisa. Thank you So much for your call, and this is W N Y C f M H D N A M New York W N J T FM 88.1 Trenton W N J P 88.5 Sussex W, N J Y 89.3 Netcom NW NGO 90.3 Toms River We are New York and New Jersey Public radio. Few more minutes to finish up with David Cruz on some of the New York primaries in the Bronx on that district 18 race, So the listeners supporting candidate Amanda Farias This is one of those races and we talked about so many of them in Queens earlier in the week with so many candidates, and so many candidates who are running as Progressives and people with the same kind of interest that Alicia was was articulating. So besides Korea's, there's Darlene Jackson. L You Laura Michael Belzer, Missouri. She'd Mohammed Maju MDA. William Rivera and William Russell more, Um, I don't know enough about all of them to say which ones are running is more progressive or more moderate or whatever. But how are candidates deciding Among you know, big slates like these. Well, I would say that. How are voters deciding? Right? Um Well, essentially, a lot of the support has been thrown to Amanda Feria. She did get the support from the Bronx Democratic Party and she is I would think the most progressive Out of all of the candidates. She is running on a municipal jobs guarantee program, and she is calling for the defunding the police and she's essentially distinguishing ourselves from the rest of the candidates and also the sense that she does have also the most money as well. And the other two like I would say William Rivera, he's closely aligned. With the incumbent, and he's getting some support from him, and I think they're also just trying to just tap into these, uh, meaning. He's conservative. Just so we're clear to listeners in that district if he's running With the support of the incumbent, Ruben Diaz Sr. Than he's running to the right of the pack. He's he has a conservative bent, I would say, And he does have the support from Diaz as as well, Although it's not an official endorsement, I would say that the you know the other candidates as well running essentially on the same kind of line. You want to improve the education system. They want to fight for affordable housing. And they all do want to see some level of, uh you know, they want to see public safety improved. I would say with respect to Manda Ferry asses well that she, along with three other Female candidates in respective races have been endorsed by the Bronx Democratic Party, and I thought that was pretty significant. I wrote about it early on in the election cycle, because I think the Bronx Democratic Party has long been viewed as this boy's club in there. Trying to deliberately undo that image right now, and I think that attempting to be a little more inclusive under state Senator Jamal Bailey, who is the Bronx Democratic Party chair. I think that was sort of to me it it sort of signified a bit of a turn for the party itself. It's so he's been viewed as sort of like being too much of a club, but I think they're trying to make Trying to change that up a little bit. All right. We're going to leave it here. As with the other boroughs, we couldn't get to all the city Council races in the dish in in the borough, but listeners, this is to give you a flavor. And just kind of help encourage you to vote to study up on the candidates to look at the voter's guide that if you're a registered voter in New York, you probably got in the mail that does describe something about just about every candidate in just about every race. Or go to the Gothamist. Voters Guide or The New York Times Citizens Union one or some of the other voters guides. Also, if you have an interest group That you think aligns with your interests. Go see who they're endorsing at. That definitely is a way that you can figure out how you match up with the candidate. Um, you know when there are these races that have let's see in that 112345678. We talked about a race in Queens the other day that has 15. So, uh, So there you go some ways to study up if you haven't already and cast that vote, while early voting is still going on through Sunday or on primary day itself on Tuesday or by mail if you have your absentee ballot And read David Cruz coverage on Gothamist. David. Thank you so much. Thank you. Brian. Brian Lara on W N. Y C. Going to talk about Supreme Court decisions that came down today, including. If you have your health insurance via obamacare. You can breathe a sigh of relief yet again. Maybe we'll hear a little bit about that. In the news headlines to with Michael Hill. Hi, Michael..

Michael Hill Amanda Feria Amanda Farias David Cruz William Rivera William Russell Michael Darlene Jackson 2017 Ruben Diaz Brian Brian Lara Bronx Democratic Party Diaz Alicia Manda Ferry Lisa David Tuesday 10 years
"darlene jackson" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:35 min | 7 months ago

"darlene jackson" Discussed on The Current

"They're going to have to rearrange the whole department. So they're going out and triage union vehicles if the patient stable enough they stay in their vehicle at their unstable than they have to come back into the emergency department. Rearrange make a bad put a structure in a hallway to get that patient in and they are working with the same staff. They've always worked with and it just is It's actually a nightmare. In this problem right now. Sarah newfield is an er nurse at that hospital and cbc spoke with her listen to what she described. It has been mentally and emotionally and physically. Absolutely exhausting is pushed us past what we thought we were able to handle and reciting to question. How is this sustainable. Where short-staffed every day. I think everyone is feeling the weight and the pressure darlene jackson. Tell me more but what you're hearing from nurses of what it's like to work in that environment whereas you say there's not enough space in the hospital. You have to treat people in in a parking lot. Well i i will tell you that are exhausted. They're frustrated. We knew that wave two was going to be much bigger than wave one. We absolutely knew that but our government basically sat on their hands for the for the entire summer when we could have been encouraging retired nurses to come back to work stopping up doing everything we can to get ready for wave two and basically nothing was done so we've moved into way to a numbers are growing. We had almost five hundred new cases yesterday. We're up twelve percent Infection rate and nurses are exhausted. You and this province went out and bought equipment. I mean we bought hundred ventilators with the space to put an in. But we don't have anyone to man that equipment and that's the biggest issue. How concerned are nurses about contracting the virus themselves and they're right in this environment in a hospital that is full to bursting presumably vulnerable as well. Well we've had about one hundred nurses infected since it started the second wave. And you're right. They're very vulnerable. I talked to a nursing steinbach. Who tells me that When she goes to work in the er she gets one n ninety five mask and not mask is gonna last year for her twelve hour shifts. So what happens. Is that every time. You don don. On that nasa that you've been exposed to covid patients with the risk of exposure get tired. So if.

darlene jackson Sarah newfield don don nasa cbc
"darlene jackson" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:52 min | 7 months ago

"darlene jackson" Discussed on The Current

"As that process exceeds our capacity then you have to make more difficult decisions about things like who actually will benefit the most from care and that's called called triage and that's somewhere we don't want to get to if we don't have to do you feel that that's inevitable. I think there are things that we can do that. We have to do them quick. We have to do them rapidly and we have to initiate the process. Now we still have two weeks of surge even if we initiate things right now And so yeah. There can be some very tough decisions in the next week to two weeks in the intensive care unit serve pressure. Is there on on frontline stuff like yourself. I mean you said that we're all tired and we are certainly but you're right there and you're working long hours right you know at at at the the the the tip of the spirits they say so what kind of pressures they're on people like yourself it's interesting. There's different types of pressure. I remember during the first wave. We just kept waiting for things to hit us and when it didn't post the guilt that you know canadians were so supportive and we never hit that first wave because everyone did the right thing Now with that in our back pockets Everyone's a little more realistic. We're seeing it where we've been doing this for eight and a half months The hospital moves much slower than it used to because of isolation everything is an additional challenge putting on the appropriate. Ppe taking it off ensuring that you don't make a mistake because one mistake will lead to an outbreak which can paralyze your hospital. That is an incredible weight and then add it to our nursing and Medical staff and physicians who are also trying to keep the rest of their life in order with their kid going to school and dealing with intermittent Quarantines and sick family members at this point. We're really seeing morale in the hospital. Start to take a dip for yourself. I mean are you frightened about what you know is going to await you when you when you arrive at work today or tomorrow or later this week you know. Fear doesn't factor into it anymore. I think we just done it long enough. We've had enough experience with we know what's going on It's more a dread about seeing what's coming And not seeing a definitive clear plan to deal with it as of yet. It's kind of like the cassandra complex. We know this was coming forever. We predicted it or epidemiologist. Knew it was going to be an issue. And now it's here and following the predicted curves and yet the measures are half hearted and not effective. You mentioned nurses. I wanna bring darlene jackson into this conversation. She's president of the manitoba. Nurses union that province currently has the highest per capita rates of covert infections in the country darlene. Good morning to you morning. Tell us what's happening in the small city of steinbach. What are you hearing about the situation at the hospital her. This steinbeck is a small town. That's just a small city just about fifty kilometers to winnipeg and It has almost become an epicenter of Cova nineteen in manitoba We're hearing that nurses are Are working crazy overtime hours. Just to keep up. They are going out and triaging patients in their vehicles. in the circular driveway of the hospital just because The emergency department is so jam packed with patients. There's no bad there's nowhere to move them Patients out of emergency and in order to bring another patient in there..

darlene jackson cassandra complex manitoba steinbeck steinbach winnipeg Cova
"darlene jackson" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

07:31 min | 8 months ago

"darlene jackson" Discussed on Curious City

"Curious city Listener Anthony Avery. Is a fan of grave culture and House music. Even his PhD, dissertation on Electric Dance Coulter. As a teenager in Buffalo New York who went to raves which are dance parties in huge spaces like old warehouses he didn't realize house music originated in Chicago he knows that now but he wants to know what it was like to be a part of the housing and early eighties in Chicago. House music is soul disco, funk pop and Post punk tracks remixed into long continuous dance tracks. The two most prominent house clubs in those early years were the power plant and the warehouse. That's where LAS people say house gets its name like where house. To Answer Anthony's question I talked to a lot of house heads or super fans who went to the warehouse and powerplant in Chicago. In the early eighties, you'll hear them talk about Dj Frankie knuckles one of the founders of House and they'll share memories of dancing all night long. People would bring backpack sometimes so they would have fresh change a clothes because it wasn't like you get a little bit of sweat. You know Freddie your shirt in the back of your shirt I mean drenched take the t shirt off of somebody you ring a cup of perspiration out of it people remember how inclusive the scene was it originated in the gay black community they say the clubs felt like a safe space physically and culturally. I'm GonNa take you through a typical night from the memories of the people who went to those early clubs. People like Charles, Matlock, who runs a dance music archive and trained as a DJ under Frankie knuckles. When he first started going to warehouse, he was under eighteen. So he got a fake ID to get in. He says I you had to get there I would have to wait until my mom we go to sleep. So midnight or so she's nodding off I would sneak out usually the back door would leave the door kind of like sort of not totally locked. And as long as I got back by eight thirty before she woke up in the morning eight, thirty nine I was good and people say how you dressed was really important. We took great care and effort into ensuring that whatever we war have. We cut our hair all that all of that. Had to be completely unique. That's Mehari a prominent Chicago musician spent a lot of nights at both clubs and he says how you dressed also had consequences. The warehouse in the powerplant weren't located where typical clubs located at the time and lots of people took public transportation and had to walk to get to them. Kahari says you might have been targeted along the way because of the way you're dressed guzzled wear blouses and kilts a kind of dress that was associated with gay culture and Homophobia game-breaker would be threaten. House fags like that was like a thing because it was assumed that you were gay if you were doing house. So he says, sometimes, it felt unsafe we were risking our lives. To get to the point, literally to get to the Party and a lot of cats ran or guides don't don't get beat on you know like it was serious but it was worth it. was like we need to be weird this music as where people are like. Once. You got the club people say you were safe even if gang members came in violence was not allowed. Laurie branch. House Dj who was in highschool. At the time. Remembers excited walking up to the club. You hear it. You know for blocks away this kind of they heavy the. Medic. Energy. That's coming at you. Branch says the warehouse and the power plant had almost no furniture or decor. They are mostly empty spaces with black walls and just a couple of jobs and wallace speakers, and that was the point the bear space allow for open atmosphere without pretension. She said, music inside was loud everybody was dancing on the floor below. And then you descend into this energy on the dance floor was just would overtake you and you didn't want to leave. For Ranch, the warehouses also placed to explore her sexuality. She was just realizing she likes girls I had at the time. So I was really trying to figure it all out but it it was a safe place to do that that certainly add it to its its appeal as a young person. In High School in the eighties, most people were not out but inside the warehouse things were different. I really hadn't seen people before other than the few that I, I kind of knew here and there. So you know to go into a place and surrounded by folks who are Kinda like family you'd never had with with a pretty neat experience for me. You know and I could meet girls there I didn't have not something you can do in high school. France has that dancing was more important than socializing, gossiping or trying to get dates and Charles matlock agrees he says you could dance alone. You could dance with friends you could dance with strangers. The first dance partner that I had at the power plant was this woman who I never knew her name but I never said, Hey, what's your name and you know you WanNa hang out because I had a girlfriend no, I mean we dance extremely well together. But that the limit of of of US having fun matlock says the room would vibrate with the speakers that were designed to immerse packed crowd putting everyone into a feverish trans moving almost as a whole the wooden floors would bounce under dancing tree. Everybody says another great thing about the warehouse was new mixes people would follow particular Dj's like Frankie Knuckles Robert, Williams Marshall Jefferson Steve Silk Hurley and Chicago's e knuckles in particular would remix pop and disco songs that they were almost unrecognizable Charles Matlock on dancing to a song had him entrance and then realized it was remixed version of Michael Jackson Song. He previously thought he didn't care for. House heads tell me as the years went on. CHICAGO deejays became recording artists in the eighties and nineties. Many of their records got bootlegged and shipped to Europe where the sound spread quickly. But the DJ's didn't always get profit the sales back in Chicago commercial closer to playing house celebrities like Madonna and Boy George would attend house parties. These clubs were like the warehouse or the power and the black kids from there couldn't always get in and there was. Discrimination. That's how DJ Darlene Jackson even want to go to some club on the north side or like that, and they just wouldn't let you N. so they had a specific door policy about who will come in who couldn't but they're lean says that some people continued to find create their own underground spaces or dance away at clubs where they could some people even open up their homes to let. People Dance. And you can still hear the old school soul funk sound and some modern sounds at places like chosen few picnic a House Party of fifty thousand located in Jackson Park warehouse heads like Charles Matlock are still sweating and bringing their grandbabies, nieces and nephews.

Chicago Charles Matlock Frankie knuckles Dj House People Dance Anthony Avery Laurie branch High School Buffalo New York Europe Darlene Jackson Freddie Frankie Knuckles Robert Kahari Jackson Park France Mehari wallace Michael Jackson
"darlene jackson" Discussed on Only A Game

Only A Game

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"darlene jackson" Discussed on Only A Game

"That's Darlene Jackson again. She's also known as D._J.. Lady Di a well-known House Music D._J.. In Chicago she was ten years old on disco demolition night her favorite music than was disco and when she saw the news reports featuring images of Steve Doll in a military outfit Disco Sucks Banners White Rioters and smoldering piles of vinyl she heard a message. I think part of what Steve Tapped into was a little bit of this unspoken transcript that this is the music of black people of gay people of of Latino people and we should not accept it. We should not try to be a part of it and so that's why people perceive it as a homophobic and racist event unspoken transcript a lot of US heard it. I understand now that there was an underground gay disco scene and all of that we were unaware of all of that that Steve Doll again you know we were unaware of the origins of it. We basically joined the timeline at Saturday night fever and studio fifty four and that was forty years ago. Things were just different. I don't believe I'm a racist and I'm not a homophobe nope and fairly Kafka asking that. I don't exactly know how to explain my way out of something that I didn't think in the first place you know Jackson says one simple gesture would go along way an apology. I think that that would be a step in the right direction. I think people will respect that but instead of apologizing the white sox last month celebrated disco demolition nights fortieth anniversary they were commemorative t shirts and and Steve Doll throughout the first pitch but he says he's now aware of why some feel disco demolition night was an affront. I understand it and I'm sorry if that's caused you harm or has hurt you. In some way that's about all I can do. Doll has trademarked the phrase disco demolition so what if someone asked him to do another disco demolition night today it oh I'd say I don't know that doesn't seem like a good idea because I mean based on all the knowledge that I have now of <hes> how it affects people and upsets people and whatnot. It doesn't seem cool. I guess disco is an awesome music. It espouses love and it has a lot of energy and why would anybody hate it. Take that story came from only a Games Gary Wallich. Dave hoechst book is Disco Demolition. The night disco died and most basketball fans regard Michael Jordan as the greatest of all time but one very young fan has a different goat in mind..

Steve Doll Darlene Jackson US Steve Tapped white sox Lady Di Gary Wallich Dave hoechst Chicago Michael Jordan Kafka forty years ten years
"darlene jackson" Discussed on Only A Game

Only A Game

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"darlene jackson" Discussed on Only A Game

"<music> this is only a game. I'm callum borders on July twelfth. Nineteen seventy-nine Forty eight thousand fans packed Chicago's Comiskey Park for disco. Go Demolition night records flu like Frisbees more fireworks exploded bottles were thrown at an estimated seven thousand spectators as their very own demolition spectators took the field and went out of control. They got really. I would say they get violent. It was so primal and tribal that's Darlene Jackson. She was ten years old. When the white sox held disco demolition night she was jolted as she watched the postgame news reports? I remember sitting in our living room. We had green green carpeting <hes> seeing on the floor and my dad and the background saying these people have lost their minds in recent years some of said disco demolition night had a dark side aside. Many didn't see eighty or didn't want to see forty years ago. Here's only games Gary Wallich in the late Seventies. The Chicago White Sox were owned by Bill Vivek Vivek was famous for his creative promotions including a pyrotechnic scoreboard and the shower near Comiskey Centerfield bleachers but in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine neither fireworks nor personal hygiene drew hordes of fans. We were not doing well. That's Bill Son Mike Vick in nineteen seventy nine. Mike was the white sox assistant business manager and promotion director at the season midpoint. The White Sox were thirty five and forty five the team was drawing fewer than ten thousand fans per game. The poor attendance called for more creatively the extreme measures while the SOx struggled disco was at the peak of its popularity it was everywhere in and movies nightclubs clothing shops and on the radio the genre had grown far beyond its more obscure beginnings in the Mid Seventies as a dance club phenomenon especially popular with African Americans Latinos and the Gay Hey community but in nineteen seventy nine there was a growing backlash against disco particularly at one Chicago radio station. I caught wind of a guy named Steve Doll blown up disco records Steve Doll had lost his job Bob Spinning rock records when the radio station he worked for change to an all disco format he quickly found another job at another rock station but he was still angry and every morning I would play disco record at run the needle across the record and then I would have an explosion like blowing up the record just to be clear dolls talking about explosion sound effects. The real explosions lotions would come later doll started holding death to disco rallies at nightclubs. He even hit the airwaves with his own forty five single a parody of Rod Stewart's disco mega hit. Do you think I'm sexy. They spent so rod Stewart the stones. A lot of mainstream rock roll acts put disco records. I think that there was a feeling of disenfranchisement franchise meant by the kids wear the blue jeans and t-shirts dolls appeal to his growing fan base was too much for vector resist. Steve was doing a six to ten shift and at ten Oh five. I'm standing at the door or a studio going. Let me in. I got an idea that presented his idea for a disco demolition night at Comiskey Park it would take place between games of a twi night doubleheader against the Tigers Tiger on July twelfth admission would be just ninety eight cents for customers who brought in a disco record doll agreed to give it a spin that had no idea what the promotion would turn into early in the morning of July twelfth. Mike Fach met with a group of off duty Chicago police who would be working security and I told them in the morning meeting what we thought the estimated attendance would be. I told him we were going to have thirty five thousand people. They thought that was hilarious. Yes but by four o'clock that afternoon about that many headlined up outside Comiskey Andrew Brown was one of them he was there on an outing with his cub scout den. I was ten and a massive baseball fan. This is my first doubleheader..

Chicago White Sox Steve Doll Comiskey Park Chicago Comiskey Centerfield bleachers Bill Vivek Vivek Darlene Jackson Rod Stewart Mike Vick Mike Fach Andrew Brown Gary Wallich baseball Mike Tigers Bob Spinning business manager director forty years