17 Burst results for "cripe"

"cripe" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

07:09 min | Last week

"cripe" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Of course. he's already been there. D'artagnan travel you know just saying if he if he feels a be emotional and you can always go back. It's it's interesting this with louisiana and you mentioned his time at home. I i heard a great story about how he just derived i. I think it was sort of late. August in rome city. I was about to start. Or whatever and part of the ownership change the the the director football scouts. His staff. dale. Go out for dinner in a fancy restaurant and enroll and after the game all of them. Because i just moved off the real staying in the same hotel in central rome and they're walking through rome at night. It's like eleven o'clock at night midnight but because it's summer there's people on the street if you've ever done it obviously is a magical place to be and there's people kicking a football around in one of the squares. I got to the ball or near the gravy fountain. whatever someplace. It's very lucia rica. sees the ball and he says come on. We've had this great meal with this great conversation about football. let's play. let's see if they'll let us play and he basically just runs over to. The guys picks up the ball and he got his coaching staff. I'm they're playing football in the middle of the night in a square in eternal city of rome. This is syria. I cannot imagine much as i love. Tomoko i kind imagine thomas to know you don't know that i maybe club with with abdul. I don't know. I love that kind of childlike. Zing me to somebody who goes and does something like that. And he doesn't have a great relationship with the media marlin. I don't think he ever did even as a player wants to anyway. I don't think he wants to. He's not somebody who has a whole group of friends in the media. Which i think a lot of wanna give away trade secrets here but a lot of managers have talked to privacy and get their point across and not troop and just doesn't fit he just doesn't fit the and then he's got the other weird stuff with with with the ultramarathons and in seven days or something like that and how ski. Very extreme extreme everything. Obviously the family drama. Donald got hit with but i think he's an incredible really personality wise. It is my management because there's a different reason riquet in front of the media. And i think he said before the game i don't read. I don't listen to what you say. I don't care. Because i know football much better than all of you here says that i can see. I always think whenever. I hear a guy talking like that right. Oh i know football better than all of you here. you know. i'd love it. If like in the back of the room like you know hand goes up and show alex ferguson's ask yes yawn cripe that becomes difficult but the fact that story about. I know more than all of you write. This reminds you to another great story which has nothing to do with okay. Oh has to do with somebody. I worked with years ago at the bbc. Who's a real gentleman. One of the nicest. Most knowledgeable ex players i've met is a guy named jimmy armfield and many years ago england had i don't know if he was managing under leads at the time that there's a gentleman named howard wilkinson who i'm sure robbo very well. Yeah i and he could be gruff sometimes. And he's in a press conference giving him a hard time after result and and he goes out and basically barks at everybody. He's like enough of this. You don't understand football. How many cops do any of you have anyway. Right for the back of the room. Jimmy armfield who's very mild mannered. Very gentleman but clearly was annoyed at this. Yeah what's his hand up. And he says forty three forty three howard. How about you howard wilkinson. I think at one camera. No caps or whatever and i love that with all of a sudden you show a better deal anyway sorry there's very little tribute to the delete. Great jimmy armfield. I wanna move it onto italy And i want to move on before we get to italy to something else. Gijon rule matt was booed. I think from the moment he got into this. Is what a nine the banner as well. I'll obviously the reason don't got booed is because you've been sleeping under a rock. He made his debut for meantime when he was sixteen he ended up not extending his contract. He was offered a very good contract. It was a whole back and forth. I've been on the record before saying that. This is actually one mistake that he made have taken. He should have taken the money. That was there. I don't know what he was thinking. And now he's in paris where you know he's competing with catering novice starting job which is decidedly suboptimal and also not making that much more money than what he was. Earning would want me now. We're offering him. I don't know. I'm in two minds about this. Because some people are scandalised. Oh how can you boom like whatever your club. Thoughts are after everything. He did fatally euros. And i liked juju donor room as a person. But i also kind of feel now your fans. Your club is something you chose you. Country is it. You're booing him for that. You know doubt rejoice. Both things can be true. You can love him for what he did at the euro's it which by the way he did because not out of a gesture of generosity to the world but because he also wanted to win the euros or himself and for his country for his teammates. There's nothing wrong with that. So i don't have a problem with him being food am i. No no no you you. Can't you tell fans what to feel in what to express this is. This is wrong and you can understand why million fans are unhappy. Within it was playing in milan he played anywhere else in in the country. Probably they might have been a few boos had. They been fans in this in the crowd but much less than what we saw yesterday because it was going back to two zero. Just just unfortunate. That game was there in stage. At that time. I think we time they might forget bill. Mellor elizabeth for now very row for them i. It was two month ago and is not anymore in kwaku traditional fashion so understand it. I don't think it affected him very much. He did make state but then he also later in the game. So where do you stand on this like. I know i'm going to guess that you're pretty caustic when it comes to this but are you going to tell me that when you're on the pitch you never heard anybody boo cheer night it it can be difficult you know and I left is not going to west ham up in the air. It's a shop move sir for everybody. I'm gonna wake back to oslo on you. I'd get some booze and get some people jarad me but but he does plan your mind. Because you think in you're going to be sent a retention i do think affecting donald..

football jimmy armfield howard wilkinson rome lucia rica rome city cripe Tomoko eternal city dale louisiana abdul syria alex ferguson robbo italy Donald thomas bbc england
"cripe" Discussed on Budget Arcade: Free to play gaming

Budget Arcade: Free to play gaming

01:37 min | Last week

"cripe" Discussed on Budget Arcade: Free to play gaming

"Having you'll buy packs battle passes down your throat and playing via the there were no thirty minute cool downs or adverts popping up which was refreshing overall for the initial eight hours of game play. I really enjoyed the game but my only real cripe at this stage was always win the coin toss to go first when playing the game which i found it not as going second could give you a better advantage but i won more games than i lost. So it wasn't much of an issue lesson for a free to play gabe and nostalgic and begging soundtrack. I would give this good seven point five out of ten and we'll probably get a few more hours in but would recommend this game to anyone looking get into easy to play battle card genre. Bravo jeff bravo. That was hilarious. We're still recording. Oh you stopped all right back from the top. He's from west she okay. Oh gosh of battle gave what was happening. I thought since it release and also wwe super. Well i if you wanna get us on twitter.

cripe Bravo jeff bravo gabe twitter
"cripe" Discussed on What's Good Games

What's Good Games

05:09 min | Last month

"cripe" Discussed on What's Good Games

"We've decided that we could keep talking about some of the lesser news stories of the week but instead we have a plethora of hands on time with video games that we would like to devote the rest of the episode twos. We're just going to go ahead and jump into what we've been playing. I see here. That steimer. And i have played a couple of things brittany. I have played a couple of things. And then i played a couple of indie game. So where shall we start ladies. I would say we should start with far crisis because that embargo lifted this week. I feel like that's kind of what everyone's talking about right now. That sounds lovely. So the folks that ubisoft invited us to come to see a behind-closed-door presentation and to get some extensive hands on time with a build of far cry six so thank you to ubisoft for extending that. Invite and having us brittany. What did you think about your time with this upcoming game. So when it comes to far cry the first far that ever from start to finish was far cry five and then far cry new don. I believe is what it was called. I played a little bit of primal but it just kind of loses me in all ubisoft games kind of lose me because the are just huge and yeah but the thing before cripe six that i'm really excited about and i mean this happened a little bit far cry. Five is the opening always gets me. I think the narrative beginning usually hits really hard. and then i'm really really invested in the story. And then along the way what happens just kind of get sidetracked in these over the top missions and like this huge world and you just kinda lose the steam when it comes to that so i was worried when i was going to be playing for our crisis and the democrat emma. Gosh was so so many hours i remember. It was like five hours. Allie probably got about two and a half hours. Because i warned ahead of time and said yo. I have a three month old baby but they were super gracious and understanding so my poor list. I had to leave him by himself so many times anyway. But what i'll say is like. I stuck to the narrative for the most of my play through and i had a really great time with it. It's much more interesting than me. The setting of danny an island rather than the religious nut jobs and far cry five. And i find that i'm more drawn to games that have culture to them and i feel like far cry. Six has far more culture than any of the other far. Cry game ever played. So i just like experiencing that and you know stepping into the shoes of someone who is like me and granted like i don't know how that's going to continue throughout the entire game. I don't if i'm gonna get distracted by you. Know what are we setting marijuana plants on fire or was it tobacco plants and like. Yeah yeah you know using his over the top weapons. Like i don't know if the narratives really going to like you know stick that landing and it's hard to say what the few hours spent with it but i'm definitely excited to play more of it and and if nothing else i know it's going to be a really fun co op gameplay jason. Because they far cry. Five new dine definitely were. And you don't have a lot of open world games like like far cry that do offer the co op gameplay so like overall like i'm feeling like i know i'm going to have a good time with this no matter what but i'm just really curious to know how the narrative is gonna stick throughout the rest of the game so feel like your traditional farcry. Yeah i mean it did to me doing anything different or is this fairly much like we're really leaning on the story to make an impact and have this feel. I think andrew. It'd be better suited to answer that. 'cause you've played more far cry but for me. It felt very similar outside of narrative. Yeah i i definitely here. I'm trying to pull some bureau. That's what i've been doing it in the background here exactly. So thank you for sending this i. Actually i captured some of my game plan. They sent over. And i was having trouble getting a downloaded but i have played quite a few of the far cries. I definitely think that this feels like like it. Feels like a far cry game. But i think they also are doing some things a little bit differently. I'm just gonna kinda show you guys some b. Roll in the background here. While we're chatting if you're watching at youtube dot com slash. What's good games. You can see some of the stock bureau. That ubisoft provided for me. While steve i can pull up my specific game play. They're going through some customization options. Now but the thing. I think that's really different about this game. Not from a gameplay perspective for narrative perspective is that we actually feel like you have like a named protagonist right. So you have danny row haas which i cannot stop thinking about ted lasso when i hear danny rojo's and it was interesting because we interviewed the narrative director on the weekly for the opening night life for twitch gaming and he was like we may daddy rose years before last came out. We hadn't danny rose. I and i think it's hilarious that somehow this other giant media property this tv show on apple. Plus if you guys haven't watched ted last so it's it's a joy it's a lovely comfort food brittany says your chicken soup so if you haven't washed it it's wonderful but there's a character in named danny row..

ubisoft cripe Allie danny jason andrew danny row haas ted lasso danny rojo youtube danny rose steve ted apple
"cripe" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

07:04 min | Last month

"cripe" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Our wednesday program cliff is up next in mississippi. Hey cliff hey buddy can you hear me i can thank you and i'm telling you it's been a monday or wins the i don't know if you've ever had those i hear you but You know after ninety nine speed dials finally got in and i got to Listen to legend and my ears are still ringing And there was just no way to cut that by that is legend definitely goes at a high desa decimal level and he's he got to be servewell to move a couple of feet away. The phone is still here in fisher pay. Look i just wanted to comment on a few few programs. He had joe tessa tour. And laura what they right you all three of. Y'all were talking about the the oklahoma texas deal and man. I wanna tell you. I you know the only thing wrong with that interview didn't last long enough. I mean was that was really i. I was amazed at how much light than contributed to that To that segment. Well you're you're talking In in joe lauren to extremely talented people there and we did that. Today of the official announcement of the oklahoma texas entry and it was fabulous. Joe was on his back deck at At his mother's house in upstate new york laura. I think was in the car pool line. It was pretty fun. Let me tell you. I you here when i was watching this nation concern this year because laura seems like every time you turn around. She's on some pro deal. You know and i'm thinking oh god bless. Don't don't let espn a luther over to the life. She's too good on the college side that you know what impressed me the mushed by and this is Pity me if somebody is really bring in that that is you know when tibo and roger's got into sparring match over there some of the quarterback issues and it was just amazing to me. How would be bulls could be turned into steers. Just by her saying okay. You know more. Let him go so far. And then i'm going to bring them back you know and he's mean. Most of the audience knows a lot about laura but She she is really brilliant. She is fearless but most important. She's really funny. And sometimes that's hard to to for to come come through because you have to be careful. But she said i was really She's scream. But i you know i just i just think she has that capability and you're right. She is funny and she likes it. She might just so entertaining. And i mean if you just look at the holistic see pergram we we have some of the most colorful characters in the whole world on on that program but anyway i am very happy with the lineup. That y'all got the sec nation. And i'm glad europe you're included on that because you need to be and I think it's going to be a great program to follow up before the games go. But i literally looking forward does that i wanted. I wanted to talk to you about one other thing. And that was a few quite a few Sessions ago you talked about the playing off trial in in jamaica. Oh yeah i we. We had a three year. Stint where the jamaica tourist board put on of the jamaica classic which was lpga of them and write my then. Wife blogger was An pga tour official. And i was working for a company called executive sports out of delray beach. Florida and i did the tournament operations for for the like classic one of the one of the curry. You think it's a lot of times on when operations if if somebody in the pro-am group is missing. They'll ask on the bus to fill in. I gotta ask to fill in on laura davies team and launched. Taylor was playing it. He he drew cripe quite a crowd in jamaica. Because at that time he was he was playing football. And all the so funny was we all teed off and and and lord one of those you know driving like a toothpick in his hand and and until he could kill it but every time he y'all pick ball up blowing it up to where laura dave's ball that is funny. It was pretty embarrassing too and it was embarrassing to tap to do that. You know but especially the large because he was. I mean he was. He was the incredible hulk at that time. If you wanna make you look if you if you don't mind let me do any might want more. I got girl cousins. Texas and two of them went to oklahoma and to on the mom and the youngest daughter went to texas. And i i mean that that those full girls is just stopped down. And i know you know that the sec is going to get hold beautiful. It's already beautiful. It is going to get more beautiful when that trans when that transpires. I just want you to do me a favor to will. And that is if you have any kill with the commissioner or any of those might sure that oklahoma gets sent to the ease as texas dip sent to the west because i i'm a mississippi state bulldog and i'm telling you right now. We don't need any in the west. I mean you know. I and i think you'll be great. I think it'd be great You know look at an alabama sources in oklahoma and the files are done. Know georgia's good no florida's but i mean oklahoma's apartment throw them enough and on the baseball side of life the we'd we'd love to have texas in In in the west the guys just just finish them off well cliff. Thank you so much for sharing the brought some great memories back about trial and hope to get back there before too long. Appreciate it very much. Tom is up next good afternoon. Doing tom april how you doing. Hey tom hey paul how you doing. I'm doing great tom..

laura joe tessa oklahoma joe lauren jamaica tibo texas mississippi buddy fisher upstate laura davies cripe espn laura dave sec roger Joe delray beach new york
"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

08:19 min | 2 months ago

"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

"This discount is only valid on their bundles. So give them a try. I have always been person since since childhood. I don't know. But since i was born this way. Where like something. I love to do if i'm like uninspired or if i'm just like inefficient anything bad like in my life had a bad day had about month. Whatever is go to either. Like michael's or joanne or like staples and just like browse through the aisles of supplies. Like i love to play shopping. Like there's just something about it. And i always you know. That's why jeremy me. Because i always like started. You're all started. Journal started journal. One time he was cleaning out my stuff okay and he found like ten journals that had lake two pages in them which is like that's the seven but anyway i guess i didn't really have a point there except for that not most hobbies are not expensive at all so that's true and also like most hobbies aren't gonna stick and that's part of it and i think that's another thing you kind of accept along with will be bad image. Might not work out. You know and i always say like if you try it and it doesn't work out then you know and you don't have to like wonder oh. Should i do that. Am i in that. You're you're just not it's okay. Yeah definitely i think that. That's that's a very good point And you know if you get into something. Like i have like a ton of painting stuff and i have a painting room always have like a painting like space in my house and like my kids use it and i use it infrequently like i get really into it and then i don't touch it for like a year and they get really into it and then i don't touch it for like a year and i've been like that for more than ten years now so i know so if that's you i would just say that's normal too and that's okay. Do to have a hobby where you just get super into it like do you do that with sewing or anything else for sure and i going to ask you when you were talking about the cookies. Do you notice that when you come back to it every year. You're better at it. A honestly i'm not i'm not saying you're you're like great but i do you feel like you come back and it's easier. Yeah i think like now. I don't even really have to look at the recipe. Because i've been doing it about three or four years now and it's pretty easy And i do think that maybe like over time. You're sort of like collecting little creative ideas and filing them in the back of your brain even when you don't realize it like i was saying earlier. One of my like reoccurring topics in therapy. Is that really wanna be a lifelong learner. It's the most important thing that i want to have until the day i die is like i hope that like on the day i die. I have some kind of little like paint set. That's not opened that. I just boggling. That would make me happy So can you share with our listeners. Like your intentions for hobbies and your goals as you're growing older. Yeah i love that. I feel the same that i always wanna to trying. I have a story told us before. By the neighbor my my in laws live up in sacramento and their neighbor is this older lady and she passed away last year but we went over to our house and it was filled with all of these paintings and she was like inner inner eighties and i was like. Oh have you always painted. And she's like. Oh no i picked it up a couple of years ago usually. Oh my gosh you know and like every wall of her house had these paintings and i was so inspired by that and then like my dad at sixty joined his church choir. Sing and like ray. And i'm so motivated by that and so i feel the same. I sure. I think if i had a dream like right now if i pictured it i would have this massive garden. Overflowing in my head. That's always my dream. You guys talked about vision boards. That's like my vision dream. And i'm not near it yet like i have like my little garden bed that so far is alive. But that's a place that i want to get to. And i i feel like thinking like it's gonna take a long time is exciting. You know instead of being sad about that. I'm excited by that. So that's something. I think about as a big future hobby. I would like to have yeah. I'm always inspired. When you guys talk about how you hope that you're so blogging in sixty years. I hope i'm still sharing and like taking pictures and setting little goals and trying to meet them because it makes it fun is fun for me like i feel like that's fun and i don't i hope i change but i hope you know some of those things that are still exciting. Are absolutely yeah. I think that's beautiful. I was going to do one of our segments that we always do. And then i was like wait a minute. I think what we need to do is have a segment where we justice gus. Our favorite pen. Our goto pin. Because i know. I just know. I just know that our listeners are going to like this. And they're like what's your favorite pen. Tell tell us just those what they're thinking right now so okay. We both have an all time favorite pen. It's like kind of like the only one do you feel that way. Oh yeah for sure. Okay so you go first okay. Mine is the pilot g. two and there's a ton of pilot g. tubes but i need the extremely fine point which is the point three eight and i think everything else is terrible. I have discussed this at length with people. This is the one i just feel like. It's chris it's clean i. It gives me my best handwriting. Some pens you have garbage handwriting. Sometimes you have good and this is the best. Absolute favorite pilot g. Two point three eight. What's yours. We'll put these in the show notes. So you guys can just click them Okay so mine is. The paper made flare. I looked at the package. And it says it's medium. But i think it just kinda comes one way so when you see it you'll dislike. You'll recognize it. Recognizable pin that you've seen and it comes in either a pack of all black or a rainbow pack and then some hamsters like giant rainbow packs. Which is fun. But i pretty much only like the black one and the other the colorful wednesday. Keep them around like for my kids and stuff but i would rather use like a purple under a blue one than any other pin. That's for sure interesting Yeah if it's all. I have i can live with that so the thing i like about it. It's like a tiny fine not not like super tiny but it's a pretty fine felt tipping so it's kind of like writing with really tiny little marker and of so. Yeah one of my first jobs. When i was like really like i don't know twenty one or twenty two was making thoughts and I way to make like whole alphabets of fonts. And i seriously think i that. The amount of money i made for them was like either eighty dollars one hundred dollars. I can't remember for each for each hole fund. And i thought it was great and i was like i can the a model This is my job now so anyway. I've always loved this pen. And yeah i also agree with at least like it makes me feel like my handwriting. Looks like my handwriting and drawing to i love journal so I like to draw in my journal. like to drought my room ideas. My diy ideas kind of like any idea has to be drawn out like charts Things like that so anyway before we go. Tell me the best book you've read this year. So twenty twenty twenty twenty. One doesn't even more so the best book you've read so far this year and the best podcast you've heard lately love it. Okay my favorite book. I just read it. It's called it's fiction like a super easy beach read fund..

Journal started journal joanne jeremy michael sacramento chris
"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

05:29 min | 2 months ago

"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

"It's kind of like the cheapest version of a spin bike like what you would use the gym like you can adjust the tension and do all that and it tells you like how long you've been going and like the but it's very minimal. It's not like a peleton. it doesn't have a screen. It doesn't play videos for you. It doesn't talk to you. It doesn't do anything like that so anyway. I have been writing it four days a week. Since the flaw. And i was like okay have a baseline. This is the most athletic. I've been a long time. I'm really proud of. And then i was like i wanna start doing ten mile rides but also i don't wanna do it so what i did is i made this chart. I made this goal them going to do a hundred ten mile rides. And what i do the entire time i do. The rides is watch cheesy movies. And it's awesome. It's like the best goal i've ever made. The first movie i watched was knives out. I watch movies like that like any basically any movie. Acl netflix or hulu. That jeremy wouldn't watch. I watched that kind of stuff like the other day. I watched the version of bewitched with nicole kidman and will ferrell and it was amazing. Which by the way. Some house porn She has a really good cottage in that movie. So everyone should look it up but anyway Yeah i think those simple of a goal where it's like. I'm getting something out of it but it's like very much just for me and i'm not gonna like have really like anything to show for at the end of it except for like happier life. Yeah for sure do you. Have i know your big on like a prize at the end or price. When you finish your yeah your super. Have you picked a prize or no prize at the end. I know i didn't pick the price goes. I feel like watching. The movies is the prize is right now. I just love it so much and for so many years of my life exercise has been like kind of like a not a punishment but like not a delight in the middle or maybe like not fun and this is like a delight so i'm just enjoying it for what it is and all probably definitely by myself for prize at the end. Don't worry but i haven't seen it yet. Own me started almost my tenth one so it hasn't even been that many so i'm one tenth of the way to michael that's great. I think i think to like just figuring out how you're motivated and the types of things like obviously what you like to do. I think a lot of times we just we think. Oh that looks cool without any sort of thought about if we even want to or if we like to do it. And i think that's important and then giving yourself permission to quit like just okay. The hobbit is another going up. So what happens when you start a hobby. Or let's say like it's a hobby. That cost them money like your leg. Start making jewelry and you buy stuff and you get all your stuff together and start doing it and you just hate it. You know that happens. Sometimes what do you say to that situation. Yeah i think it definitely happens a lot. I think the first thing is if you can try something before you invest in it. The better so pottery is a good example. Where because it's so expensive him ever gotten into. I'm like right and you haven't even done your electrical rewiring yet or maybe you have. I don't know but it's so if you can take a class at someone else's place link us the material see if you like. It is Before you buy a sewing machine try to borrow one borrowing for a friend. Ask if you can have it for a month anytime. You can do that when i bought this pottery wheel that i have. I knew that if it didn't work or if it just ended up gathering dust. I could resell it. I wasn't going to make all the money back. But i was gonna make enough back so thinking thinking like that like a lot of times. There is more life in your tools so that can help. But also i'm like a huge sunk cost person like i'm just like that's over. I made a mistake. I'm not gonna also like beat myself up and feel terrible and keep doing this garbage hobby even just because i spent money. Then i'm then. I'm out the money and i'm sad and so a lot of times we like. You mentioned like the guilt quilt. I totally get that. Like i think so. Many people have that project where they bought the supplies and they haven't used them. And i advise you to pass it on. Give it to a friend who might be interested. Donate it to goodwill like. Get rid of that guilt. Supply that you makes you sad because it's keeping you from doing so many other hobbies like you have to just of cut it loose. And it's a bummer. But you'll feel better. You'll feel like you ran ten miles because he got rid of it. yeah. I totally agree with that. All right let's take a quick pause for a sponsor break. Summer is flying by. And i'm trying to soak up as time outdoors in the evenings as possible. One tree. i've been enjoying june shine. Hard kabukicho not only as june shine delicious but it is better for.

will ferrell nicole kidman hulu netflix jeremy michael
"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

06:57 min | 2 months ago

"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

"Quantities of twenty nine. Or two hundred ninety. And i did it because my business like that. It's so i know. I you know what it was is i i was like what. What are we going to do. Like i truly couldn't figure out what i wanted to sell like where i wanted to take my business and i often find that if i have like obviously goal is hugely important to me but then if i have strict rules around the goal i do better so making that like limited edition felt good and then once a month felt like semi good realistic at the time and so i for a year i did all sorts of different things like i sold. Twenty nine knit blankets and sold two hundred and ninety like letter press prints and posters and like all sorts of stuff and then at the end of the project. I realized that. I just really liked working on big projects and like setting goals and so from. That is where it gets workbook. Which is my planner. Business came from. And i've been doing it to workbook now for six years and last summer right in the middle of kobe. My husband was deployed. My kids were home. All the time. And i was just like man i losing it. I need some sort of like focus like some sort of creative focus. And so i kind of thought back and i was like well i could just basically do make twenty nine again. Only do it. When i turned thirty six so i'm doing the exact same thing but now the editions are thirty. Six and three sixty and my focus. This time around has been more on like helping people also like be crafty and creative. And so there's been some normal things. Like i did letter. Press prints to start it off but then i sold a cross stitch like pattern and cross stitch kit for the march edition and then for april. I mentioned like my husband. He rose coffee as a hobby. And so we were like. I asked him to help me. Roast coffee we sold like a coffee subscription for april and then i sold a quilt kit for may so it's like all of my hobbies coming together. It's sort of a hobby showcase and it's fun because i get to try a lot of things i get to see what sells i make money and i get to kind of think through like what do i wanna do next like. I'm still in the middle. And so i don't quite know where it's going but it's been it's been really fun. I love the idea so different I've never heard of anyone doing anything like this before. So i subscribe to the coffee right on the coffee. Subscription and it is delightful. It's like we get coffee four times right. It's yet report. And we got the first one already and it was so delicious. So yeah that was really really inspiring. And i missed the rainbow quilt kit. But i don't know if i would have made. I probably would have taken like six years to make the quell united. Lean would have been like my guilt but It was that one was so cool too because it was like you got all the the colors to make a rainbow quilt. And yet you have to look at. Lisa's quilts if you haven't yet. I will link to our instagram. There's so many good ones thank you. Yeah it's it's fun because it's like because everything's so different it's like hopefully there's something for everyone like like. Oh i like coffee. But i'm not interested in the rest of my great. It's fine here's the ones. I know when you have the pottery one that one's for me. I'm going to be like waiting there. My computer Okay that that'd be so exciting. So yeah i wanted to ask you. What are your thoughts are on like attaching your hobbies two goals because it seems like. You're really like goal oriented with your hobbies and does that help you to just like keep engaged with it and keep busy with it. Do you think you're doing it. yes. I think so. I was thinking about this before the call because so many of my hobbies are based on something that like. They're based on like something you can get at the end right. I think that's why like diy home projects. Because i get to hang them on the wall or i get to see them i like making garments to wear them so i am fairly like results focused so i enjoy setting the goal. I enjoy working towards it. And then i enjoy having the thing but there's other hobbies that i have that i think would be more casual. You know like gardening or reading books or even like sometimes. I get really into puzzles like those are still hobbies. Even though there isn't a thing there isn't like a result at the end. And so i. I definitely have more casual hobbies and i think if you're listening to this and you're feeling overwhelmed. Something to remember. Is that you know just reading like just going out for walks like that's a hobby. It's something that you're choosing to do in your spare time for fun like four enjoyment and so it doesn't have to be something that results in a big like review productive. Yes exactly there's gonna be a after. You know to your hobby and i think potentially it can be more satisfying. If it's just part of your life. Right i think. Ideally we're turning our hobbies into habits a little bit so they're just a thing that we do. Yeah so. I do try to think about that. But i'm like any graham three and so for me the planning and the working and making progress and sharing. that's just part time wired and so that's part of high motivated but that definitely is not going to be the case for everyone and i think that's okay. Yeah you want to hear my hobby. That i just started. That's not productive. It maybe i. It's enjoyable it's not. It's not like like what you're saying like a dr. When you're like i'm gonna paint like a recently decided that i might be thinking i'm still. I still have committed. But i might paint trim in my house myself because it say like a crazy amount of money and i was like i. I don't wanna do it at all. But i know that i can and i know that if i did it would take a long time but that at the end i would feel this like very big satisfaction in my work. That's a productive. I wouldn't say it's a hobby but as a productive goal okay so this is my unproductive one so you've been writing my little stationary bike. I thought last summer when we first got here. And i love it. It's like a little inexpensive stationary bike. Like nothing special about it..

Lisa united graham
"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

07:33 min | 2 months ago

"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

"Yeah i think it's malcolm glide well yeah yeah oh it's an outlier that's what it's called. Okay i'll put this stuff in the show notes. I'll put the ira glass quote too. Because i know exactly what you're talking about. It's a great. It's a wonderful quote. If you haven't read it i wanna talk about time because so many people right to me and they you know with the cookies like icing cookies that i do people like. How do you have time for that. And i'm like i don't have time for that. It's it's just like you know it's kind of a matter of squeezing it in a little bit on this day and then the next day there's like a couple of hours on my lunch break or whatever you know. Nobody has time like that. So what would you say to people who may be have fulltime job. Maybe have a kid too. And they're like. I would love a hobby but i don't have time. I love this question. I get it also all the time i was thinking about this like different ways that i make sure i schedule it in but i have like a non traditional job. You know so my work and my play can really blend so. I wanted to talk about it more from my husband's perspective because he works full time out of the house and we have two kids and so it's much more of a normal schedule and something that has really helped us make time for hobbies. So he has a couple different hobbies but this specific hobby he plays video games and we have just made it part of our routine that thursday nights and sunday nights after our kids are in bed. He plays and he like logs onto xbox with his friends. And that's like a set thing that's part of our schedule. And so the first thing i would remind people is that you can block it off like you can decide that you know. Aerobics is hugely important to you. And that's the thing that you have to do on wednesday night instead of your normal routine of like whatever it is scrolling and watching tv or whatever so can committing it. like that. i think is hugely important. I think that telling people like telling your kids if you have them or your roommate or whoever. Hey this saturday. I'm going to ace my sugar cookies. Or i'm going to throw pots or whatever making it clear to the people around you that this is a time that you need you think is really important and then the last one that this is something that i have made a point to do. Is i really let my kids see me working on my creative hobbies all the time. Yeah and i think it's like i think it's really important that i'm not trying to squeeze it in where you know. Keep it out of their way and only when they're not being but only do it when they're busy. I think it's important that they just see that. Oh this is important to mom and you know she does it and a lot of times like they're involved it's messy. It takes forever drives me nuts but like they've gotten older and they're less like in it and they're able to be near me as i'm working you know and i think i think that's because their entire lives they've just watched me do my various projects and now it's just it's as normal as anything else and they think that has really helped. Yeah i that makes perfect sense to sort of like train your kids over time that you get to have hobbies too. So it's not a surprise to them. I think that that's That's brilliant something that like you said specifically about the cookies a couple of episodes back with how you know. You don't do the icing icing cookies. I don't even on it's called but you don't do it all year like you in a in a season and i think a lot of times we think of hobbies as something that we have to do every day or if we don't do it every week it doesn't count and i don't think that's true at all like i think you can pick it up and get into it again and kind of put it away and that can still be like a very satisfying hobby. People get we we slush me you people everyone. We get the idea that if we don't do it perfectly if we don't do it a twelve ten then it's not worth doing and that's completely and totally not true with hobbies You know especially things like for me. Okay my hobbies right now. Throw my kids better birthday parties. And then i see other bloggers you know on instagram or whatever and they have like caterers. Snow cone truck in. Like you know what i mean. It's okay that my party isn't a twelve out of ten though. Because i still feel like i had. I don't know this like amazing experience setting it up and doing everything. I think that that's really hard for people. is just think if i don't do this better than everyone then i shouldn't do it You know but that's not true at all and like my cookies. It's definitely one of my most fulfilling joyful hobbies. Do it maybe. I would say like six times a year and my cookies are not as good as some other cookies on the internet. They're just not. But it's so much fun so i would just encourage people To be pretty good at something you know. I think that is like it's still so much fun. You know and a big thing that i'm obsessed with is to just stay curious and interested and keep like active on having more and more hobbies. That's something that is probably like by. I'm so like my number. One goal in aging is that i wanna be interested in things and active in learning new things. Like that's my number. One thing that i'm obsessed with and i think that if you won't let yourself do things that you're not perfect at you're going to miss out on hundreds or maybe thousands of fun things in your life exactly. Yeah and and if you the comparison is always so rough because you can always find someone who's better than you at every single thing always right and like it's it's just part of it and i think this is actually. This is like so in the weeds. But you mentioned like we were both bloggers a thousand years ago. And i remember like watching you. You and a beautiful skyrocket and and thinking like you know on the one hand like i wish that was me but on the other hand thinking like oh like that's possible and i that i've always tried to like lean further into the like that's possible side as opposed to like feeling sad that it didn't happen to me. It's kind of like well now. You know like how big it can get it. That makes sense now. You know like how good you can be. And i just found it like so motivating and it's made me way more able to be excited obviously for other people's success and also just like want to keep going you know like it just it feels like it's expanding as opposed to it feels expanding to me instead of limiting so maybe like a mindset shift. Yeah i think that. That's that's really really inspiring. I won't let your like my ultimate girl. Crash love you so mile away all right. Let's just take a quick sponsor break..

malcolm glide
"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

07:55 min | 2 months ago

"cripe" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

"So happy superfan leases. Podcast was probably the first podcast i was ever on. Did you start at like seven years ago. Like at least yeah and twenty early two thousand fourteen. We refer to elisa's our third sister because she is also an gee blogger so we started logging together at the same time in our own little alternative universe in Like fifteen years ago so yeah times have changed but One thing that. I love about elise. She's an extreme goal setter and she's an extreme hobby enthusiast. So i thought we could start off by could explain to our listeners. Just some of the hobbies that you've done or started as an adult. I love this topic. And i'm so excited that this war chatting about because i think about hobbies all the time. I'm definitely one of those people. You and i have talked about this. How you started something as a hobby and then it turns into part of your job and then there's there's plenty of things that haven't become part of my job. But i i relate to. You is a lot with that so different hobbies over the years that i have tried some that. I still do gardening making pizza making bread like so many different types of bread and then now sourdot sewing like all sorts of different sewing projects. Quilts were big for a while. I so a lot of my own clothes knitting so like knitting blankets but then also knitting garments sweaters. Pottery is the big one that i started a couple years ago and took a break from. I'm sure we'll talk about that more. And then like cross stitch embroidery for a while. I was like into running pilates. That's like a sampling of some of them. Incredible yet that's such a long list And it really really inspires me. I always love falling you because it's so motivating to see someone trying something new learning it from scratch and then becoming like would you say like a softcore expert. You know on a lot of things. Yeah i always say this has become like such a cliche line i have. I'm not really an expert at anything. But i feel like i'm an expert at trying things. Let's say double in painting and you you sort of learn what it looks like to start painting the gathering this supplies part and feeling excited and then you you hit a plateau and like you're not good kind of come out of it because you get re motivated like that cycle. I think is the same basically for every craft and so. I've gotten used to sort of what that looks like. Which i think helps. I'm less intimidated to try something new. Just because i've tried so many new things definitely. That is a really good point at something. I definitely want to talk about is the feeling of being bad at something feel so bad and i think it keeps a lot of people i know it has me at times from really getting into something because you either want like mike. I'm always searching for a way can be good at something the first time which usually doesn't exist right so yeah. I think that that's really really challenging. What do you do to like. Get through that or do you just feel like you got used to it. Yeah i remember hearing podcast episode. I wish i knew exactly what it was but it was. Ira glass was about you. You get into a hobby or even like a job like you want to try something because you see other people doing it. Well right like you want to try ceramics because you're so inspired by the amazing jonathan adler vase. You saw right. So you see the best. And then that motivates you to start and then you start an your skill is nowhere near where you want to be an and i think that's incredibly demoralizing sucks. It feels like a waste of time and it feels like a waste of money. And i think part of it is acknowledging that part of it is is knowing that and even as someone who knows it. I also still know that. I don't share my fails the men's all talk about them like after but i don't share really ugly photos and i don't. I don't wanna put really ugly photos of fails out there and i often when you're in it like when you're actually trying to learn and it's going badly you don't want to like discuss it right so a lot of a lot of time. Yeah like when you tell the story of your mistakes or you. Tell the story of your accidents like your trials. You always do it after and it's usually when you have something successful to show until like because of that we just don't get to see a lot of people's like messy garbage work. They they they get to kind of gloss over it. So i think that's a problem because i think it makes it feel like it's rare to not do well but of course it isn't. Everyone does it. Everyone starts at the beginning. And i think kind of knowing that like knowing that as a blogger for so long i know a lot of the behind the scenes helps and then the second part is like often think like. Maybe it's gonna take me like a year to get good at this. But if i don't do it then in a year i'm still not going to be good at it right so i kinda try to think about the future me instead of the current me. Yeah i think that's a great point. People always write to us and ask why we don't share more fails or why we don't share more of like the middle of the process and i think that it's important to understand that it's too hard to. It's too hard to get feedback on stuff. That's why i don't because it's too it's frustrating when people are just like constantly sending you you do this better. You could try this. And you're like i know that i'm just practicing. You know i'm sharing this thing. So i and i do think that it's like kept me from sharing a lot of things that are like almost good but not quite and that is like a shame. You know and i do that. That's sad and probably for people. They never see a really really bad stuff. So i guess i could try sharing that more. I think that that's a great point. Maybe we can all just like know that. It's there even. Yeah yeah yeah. I think that's right though. Like the feedback on the stuff. I know isn't good is almost unbearable. Because there's no there's not a lot of room it's different if you could have a discussion and like talk through it but to share share it with the internet is really hard and so then. Yeah there's just. There's not a lot of examples i don't. I don't know that you have to start sharing all your messy middle. But i think that if if you in the back of your mind you can if everyone listening can keep in mind that we all have a messy middle That might help. Yeah yeah. I think that's a that's a great point. We definitely all have it. And i like what you said about a year from now It's like we start practicing something that we get over and over and over again a year from now we might be feeling kind of good at it or you know picking it up for the first time still which both of those things happen to me all the time. But i do think that. Yeah that's like a a reason to start now Just start getting through it. Like i really like you know that. Like ten thousand hours book called like malcolm gloves or something. Yes the most famous whenever. I can't think of what it's called. Yeah but how basically anything takes ten thousand hours to get good to get to the point that you are an expert..

elisa elise jonathan adler mike malcolm
"cripe" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"cripe" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"To ear veered here in declare your independence. Amir's tacky says from the VA People Studios of Phoenix. Who Today. We're going to have some fun in the Third Hour Charles? Go yet comes in. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA. We're GONNA see what SIP with the world. It's always good to talk with Charles. Charles go yet been longtime friend awesome. Awesome talk show host here in the valley for years and years and years and years antiwar. Yeah we're going to be doing glen. Cripe IS GONNA come on language liberty whenever we have these guys coming on that are from Nigeria Senegal. Sri Lanka Sri something. I mean you know it's All Nepal. We add Mexico City Ukraine Poland. Russia is amazing. They had these young people going and learning about liberty with English authors. You know 'cause language liberty. They mean freedom of John Locke and I'm Smith Jefferson that kind of thing and you have these kids. They compete to come. Here and kids are in their twenties early Thirties. But they apply and they bring about four or five months. They'll have sixty eight people and a half to go shooting. As as one thing that has happened they go dernie. Mugogo shooting plus we interview each. And it's just interesting as heck in the first hour. We Have Jeff Kerr decades now Jeff. Before I butcher your name too much. Say It for a SORBET KNOWS. What how it's supposed to be said you one of the closest say it's courageous for daycare. She gets a lot more than that. Thank you jeff now. This is a recommendation from from the Liberty Adviser and whatever Tim says we do and he said Jeff. Fantastic bio really interesting has the largest facebook. facebook one of the largest facebook groups of Bitcoin and thought it was really interesting. Background was going to give you a little little bio here. Jeff courteous I saying it right. Nailed their pro gifter. Ankus is the founder of an online crypto network over one six million people dam and the new and the new era social media platform. Uptrend would two ends up. Trend T. R. E. N. N. D. UP TREND DOT COM. Jeff is an advocate of personal liberty and self expression he is devoted to create an online ecosystem where people can financially thrive through doing what they love. All right what you want to start off at your your first memory at three year. Beginnings in the CRYPTO. You know going into uptrend. I say if you take everybody should know about. I think maybe I'll start from somewhere. That's relevant to the audience. Which is you know my introduction into more of a liberty based mindset and realizing things are not necessarily the way that they ought to be and so you know it. All started with bitcoin and essentially the undermining or nothing undermining but a new creation of other financial system. I feel the financial system is what is the underpinning socio economic thing that's ruling our world as Bitcoin was phenomenal first-mover it's able to shift this movement in the right direction but I even got into bitcoin really for quite some time. Up In two thousand sixteen was when I kind of stumbled upon a Theorem by chance and when I saw a theory Bennett. All sorts of click below of curium made it. Click Cranky. Made it click. I mean I I couldn't get we've interviewed vitality. I've met mitalent quite a bit and we knew each other for a long time and I remember. He's one of the original crowd around a picnic table at port fast in New Hampshire and Roger Veer and him and Voorhees and all these guys are like ooh earnings change world man. It's going to be big row song about like here here. You go and they sit there and explained it to me. I I see so we've been following this since God beginning Night Tan no later in eleven but was put this way. I got my first bitcoin. Casillas coin for three dollars and eighty five. Cents is put that way okay so back in the day but the thing is is that by TALLEC. I had him come. Maybe you can answer this one question. How am I going okay? What is the theory of is it? A CRYPTO is an operating system. Is it what are you trying to make and what you witnessed and you came across it? Bitcoin is complicated enough but a theory him. Why that why that. As opposed to other CRYPTO. What was your attention? Would you think it to be? Yeah say the easiest metaphor to simplify theory is is that you mentioned it at theorems in operating software and so on an operating software. You know you could say like iphones. Ios You have lots of different APPS and it's what those apps built on a theory can do compared to traditional apps that really set it off for me and you use in Utah Application. You wanted to use it for what well so for example on a theory of the big thing on any kind of decentralized APP is that it's taking power away from a central authority so you could look at a platform like youtube or spotify Those are those are two really good examples to start with what happens is the user pays these platforms and the platforms decide. How much money they're going to pay out to the artist who contributes and actually add value to the platform so therion was doing was essentially removing that kind of power. Hungry middlemen this just therefore the profit increase a decentralized web where you instead of doing ten dollars a month. You're just making micro payments to lit to watch a video or listen to a song. I know. Youtube is recess. Maybe not the best example. I'm spotify is relevant and so the user who's listening as less any artist earns more. Everybody's happy there's no advertisements and you just rock on forward and so. I saw this being applied to essentially every industry in our world that has middleman. And so this is how you're funding or the infrastructure for payments and so on for uptrend is in the theory and platform so the platform itself is actually just a Web. Two Point Oh platform and I've self-funded the entire thing so I haven't done any fundraising outside funding And then when you earn tokens on uptrend you can then convert that into an Er see twenty token which is essentially a cryptocurrency and application. That lives on a theory. Okay ear see twenty. I hear this all the time you know. All I got me a token it's it's a theory of token number five forty seven or something. Okay right yeah I ain't so you take the same thing you got whatever and it's its own chain. Its own token its own but mainly what by talent I guess was trying to do is to make sure that anyone could have the features of crypto customize it to their application and it be interchangeable on all a theory of network exchange. Are Some Arazi Tokens. Not Exchangeable on the exchange or through a theory that far removed or they all tied. Yeah so they're all applications that live on a theory. I'm just like mobile APPS. They've on a theory him. What's the theory that lives on a theory? Are you saying it's like? Irs exactly the US. You go so it's an operating system. Yeah you got it exactly. It's like it's pseudo. It's the best closest metaphor that I've come across. Well see I was telling you you know. How often do you get by TALLEC? Talk to anybody but you know I tell you I'm going okay. Man I mean you're nice to me and you being a good friend and everything he'll.

Jeff Kerr Charles TALLEC facebook VA People Studios of Phoenix Liberty Adviser youtube Amir Russia Mexico City Ukraine Poland spotify Sri Lanka John Locke Irs Cripe Nepal New Hampshire
"cripe" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"cripe" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"So we changed NBC's liberty international even more direct. So it was fine. That's how they you know, does it. It's like the Gotcha game anyway as previous segment. So this is why it's liberty international and it's just it's all this PC stuff and I just, I'm I it's getting out of hand. Well I kin has had a big impact internationally on these doing a lot of conferences and stuff. And you're saying you're going to Mongolia later, aren't you? That's right. Our our conference. This year is next month in Mongolia. But tar that it's a great great event that I would are all your listeners to come to. What's goalie? How'd that happen? Well for one thing, liberty international prides itself in being different than a lot of other libertarian organizations in that we hold, our conferences, in a different international location, every year last year was in crock of Poland prior to that prior to that it was in Puerto Rico, we've hold them all over the world and this year, we have a lot of good friends in Mongolia for five years, my wife and I have been teaching at the free market, academy. For about thirty forty students learning about free markets, and we became very good friends with a lot of people there, actually, they're, they're super fans of von nieces Hayek. They've translated the works of, of very Rothbart I i-in rand into into the local Mongolian they've published by book years ago in the adventures of Jonathan gullible into golden. And so they've got quite a following of people at Silkroad foundation and the money in the Meese is Mongolia institute. So it seemed like a natural they were really hot for putting on the conference. And they have a good cadre of people to help with. Well, this is I'm wondering the impact, we'd had a lot of examples everything called project Zona, where it's. Glenn cripe did a thing called language of liberty and it's all done in English because hell everybody in Europe speaks English anyway. But I'm what's the impact? Is there a worldwide undercurrent of these guys are going to be the leaders someday? And it's twenty years from now, all of a sudden we're free or how you seeing this play out. Well, you know. Battle. But yes, we have a huge impact, we think going for now for thirty five years annually with conferences in all the world, but it's more than just our conferences, are the reason I joined them many years ago when it was called the Pretoria. International it with the reason I, I joined because they were publishing free market literature libertarian work in other languages. And I'm pleased to say that mine my book now in over fifty languages, eighty Titians of the book and, and that philosophy. Liberty animation that you were talking about now. It's on forty six languages on my website.

Mongolia Mongolia institute NBC Glenn cripe Pretoria Silkroad foundation Europe Meese Puerto Rico Jonathan Hayek Poland thirty five years twenty years five years
"cripe" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

13:01 min | 2 years ago

"cripe" Discussed on WTVN

"The sun is setting on the dirty energy of the past today marks the dawn of a new era of climate action. It always sounds like a parody doesn't it? That is Senator from Oregon, Ed Markey. And he dead serious. He was there with the dancing Queen get old on the green new deal. But I mean, my gosh, she's people even when they are dead serious. Don't they selling caricatures of themselves anyway, but they are definitely a big believers in science, right? And and so we should not deny science and pointed out that the reason remembered the premise, I we'll talk about the two sides to stories once facts, and the premise the premise of anything is false anything built upon it is going to be false as well. Now, the premise of the situation in Virginia with all three with the gov- Lieutenant governor and with the attorney general they'll have their own problems. But the only reason we know about their problems why? Well, ultimately because they the doctors that they were in school with the northern wasn't. I founded so offensive what he had been supporting what he said in defense of birth. Within the baby and still having that birthday baby up for potentially well abortion that that they felt like they had to do something. It was so morally reprehensible they had to do something. And so one of the point simply based on science, if we are to be believers in science some aspects of it or theory, a lot of scientists as fact, right? A lot of it is proven that we should adhere to and the inconvenient truth. When it comes to life is that there is a scientific definition for life. And this is true of everything's not just human life. The the four different characteristics and must be present for life the capacity for growth, the potential to reproduce the potential for functional activity, and there has to be continual change preceding death. And that is the uncomfortable truth when it comes to well abortion generally in my goal here is not to travel too far down that path. We all have our own ideas on things, we all have our own sense of morality you. I I don't want to get into the weeds talk to the bell. We're you know, we all should should come down from a point of morality. I'll I'll leave that up to you. My point is still straight for those that preached science. This is the science, and they should at some level have to account for it in the question does become okay. If you believe that a baby could be berthed, and then it is still up for being aborted at what point are you? Then able lever that life should not be aborted. What is your sense of morality? And again, the most offensive thing even above and beyond that is that north them. And some of these other Democrats in Virginia actually thought that was the politically correct thing to do the politically expedient thing for them to be doing in their state. That is remarkable. Let's go to sandy and North Carolina. Sandy, go. Hey, how are you doing? Well, I'm sorry to go back on that. But I will make a point about the issue of of cripe. You know, we breathe out. To on average when human being. You might as well just make it a annihilation plan. Go. Yeah. Because we are polluting just. So you bring up a good point. CO two into the atmosphere. Every single. You just made a better case than north. I'm dead. Yeah. Absolutely the sciences their part per million. We put out human beings that is more. Not to mention the, you know, Cal flatulence, right? We got to account for that too. You gotta account for Cal flatulence to be in. This is the real dilemma, this is the real dilemma appreciate the call center because the real dilemma here, if you are let's imagine for a moment that you you are a science believer on the left in you believe in the green new deal, and you are maybe not a believer that we should be eating meat. What are you doing here? Oh, you know, b because on one hand if we end up not eating mean, we have all the cows the cows have flatulence and the Cal flatulence. Average Cal will actually produce more pollution than your car during the course of a year. So now, we got the quandary about. Okay, we're we're not eating the cows. And so we've got all these cows. And they might be populating, and then we've gone all that extra a carbon emission. So it's a real quandary. Once you do travel down that path. Oh boy. Let's go to wrecks in Ohio Rex go. Hey, how you doing Brian? I wanna say it's kind of funny that AMC has made national headlines. That's kinda pathetic. Can I go to show you what kind of bird brain, she? But I wanted to get into really I watch these six hours the full thing. Matthew Whitaker oversight year? Now, do you wanna call oversight hearing? That's a joke on the democrat side because the only ones asking real oversight questions where the Republicans regarding the crimes in their district. State Representative district they reside on the border Democrats now. Call them. I wanted to discuss what many people think is not happening. You know, it might have to hear me out here. And I'm going to hang on one. Second wrecks. And I want to reset now in full disclosure. I have done to shows previous to this one in. I did not have a chance of catching tire hearing. I got bits and pizzas of it. And then I went through most of what I thought were effectual moments in it. So I got a pretty good taste my my thought based upon what I heard experience is that if you read between the lines what Matthew Whitaker was really saying. Is that? Yeah, you're gonna find some self on Rosenstein in on or an on call me and on other individuals. So I'm curious to hear what you felt having taken in the full hearing experience. Yes. And actually, you're correct on that now much of a fellow sovereign citizens here in the US listening. They might not believe anything that's happening for you have to look at the evidence talk back to the hearing because this is kind of contextual. Now, what we've seen President Trump constantly tweeting about illegal Hoke right now, Matthew Whitaker, the trained general President Trump is kind of educating the public at that point. Have you ever known Trump? You say something that hasn't come true. Truth. Now acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker Jeff Sessions. I believe it's not a bad guy. A lot of people think he's sleepy session. You know, I used to kind of think that, but I looked at it a little deeper now nephew would occur was the chief of staff to Jeff Sessions. He was kind of running back and forth between Rayburn sessions Huber has a team of four hundred seventy US attorney, you think that the seventeen angry Democrats that little is a threat look at what the Democrats have to deal with. And you could see the panic the panic today all six hours of the democrat side was them screaming and moaning cypher information out of Matthew Whitaker. They tried and tried and tried jackson-lee treated him like credit. It wasn't Darasing for her. And we know to have been captured with a little phillix ring on her left and kinda like a photo op anyway. And these people even Escobar with just what occurred Trier? To crack. Yeah. Y-? You're absolutely right. So Rex let's let's let's take a couple of things. And and what he's saying is like having taken the whole thing listening to the absurdity of it. The first thing is when you have any of these house hearings. If you take it in some of the hearings that will happen between Senate committees in house committees. There is a difference in the professionalism in the decorum between house hearings in Senate hearings almost always and it gets down to alternately the representatives of certain districts that end up on committees relative to those who have to win their state, and I'll leave it at that. But when you take a look at what ended up going down there. No doubt. They did try to push his buttons to get him to crack a Matthew Whitaker. It was kind of hilarious. Not just when he was being hilarious a somewhat deliberately in calling them out. But he's a shorttimer. He's the ultimate. Shorttimer? And so he went there to do what he was going to do. And what he was going to do what I'll give you the truth where I can tell it. And otherwise, I'm not going to take your crap. And if you think you're smarter than me, you're probably wrong. But when you really get through some of the finer points of what went on in that hearing today there was a lots of room for the ongoing investigations. And what Rex is talking about here is and even with sessions where he's providing cover there's been stuff going on right along. Right. It's not like the only person who would be involved in investigations of the the Komi team of Rosenstein of or of all the conspirators. It sounds like it would be Jeff Sessions. The overwhelming majority of the work would have been his staff including Whittaker. Right. His his right hand. So Whitaker has knowledge and all this stuff. Not just from his time as attorney general but ever since Jeff Sessions became the attorney. Army general himself now that being said, I still think is bullcrap that. He recused himself. I do not give sessions to pass. But yes, I do agree. And from what I've been able to to read into the situation there happened ongoing investigations with regularity. Now a lot of folks were concerned when Democrats took control the house that the house investigations ended. But it's not like all the evidence from the Justice department necessarily went away or what Whitaker himself has the biggest issue. You have had up to this point is that you still had to co conspirators in rod Rosenstein, and Bruce or they're what's interesting is now that you're going to have an attorney general who's not going to recuse himself from this situation. Now, it gets real because the issue you had the moment that sessions recused himself, and you had rod Rosenstein, become the acting attorney general over the more investigation was what he needed to stay there for about as long. Because he possibly could. Because that was one of the few ways he might be able to protect himself given that he himself is a conspirator in all of this signing off on a warrant request. With bogus information having known. It was bogus information. Having set the president up with the more investigation in the first place because he ended up issuing the recommendation to the president to fire Komi only. So that would trigger these special prosecutor is all obvious and out there for anyone to be able to put the pieces together. So yes, I agree. That's part of the reason why at the onset the show. I said I am cautiously optimistic. I'm a realist that airs undecided of optimism, and I do believe that ultimately we are going to have accountability. And I also think as we take a look at Bill bar, and his vote mentioned that the original committee vote in the early nineties when he became attorney general under George Herbert Walker Bush. Bush. His committee vote was a unanimous vote every democrat voting for him. He was appointed attorney general in the Senate by a voice vote not a contentious situation in the least. Well, it was a party line vote to get him out of committee. We'll see what happens before the full Senate. Why is it so much different? I actually think that a big part of it comes down to what we're talking about. Here. He represents the real threat to that next leg and the coming accountability. And I don't necessarily think at this point in his life. I don't know anything about the guy. I don't know the guy, but Bill bar already been attorney general sure he was perfectly happy in his day to day life, doing whatever it is. He was that didn't include all the stress and drama. I can't imagine that he is accepting this situation without his eyes wide open going in and feeling as though there is a very important job. The needs to be done. And I ain't a lot of those immigrants are keenly aware. And that's why they are. So scared, I'm Brian Mudd. And for the great one. Mark.

Matthew Whitaker attorney Jeff Sessions rod Rosenstein Senate Virginia acting attorney general Brian Mudd president Rex President Trump Ed Markey AMC Senator North Carolina US cripe Ohio
"cripe" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"cripe" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

"Of a lifetime. Now got a wife and three daughters and three granddaughters. Counting on you to you like, you know, can't be true. I never believed that foreign second toy sit in front of Dr Larry cripe. You know, said, you know, once I got down there said I'm ninety nine percent. Sure, you've got AP L, which is a form of leukemia. We're gonna do bone marrow biopsy just to make sure but. There you go. And so member Robert Mathis after the Jacksonville game. He said, you know. You know, there's no pity parties in life. There's no pity Persian football will man up come in tomorrow watch the tape and we'll move on. And we'll get better. So those words kinda resonated me with me, right? Then you know, when he told me that. And so I just said, hey, I just looked at the doctor said, what am I chance? What are the odds? What's the game plan? What do I gotta do to beat? This whole was it on that day where he said it's going to be a fight you're going to have to battle. But I think we can get you back in a couple of months, and that was when you decided right? I'm going to be backed by the end of this year is that when you made that decision. Yeah. They, you know, he's told me exactly what the, you know, induction was what I was going to go through as probably going to be in the hospital for a month. And then do some outpatient chemo for two more months. And if everything goes, according to Hoyle, you know, you you could possibly get back. You know? But then you just take you know, one day at a time. But again by you know, I was at the right place at the right time. Great doctors, great support, great care and all that stuff and the way you guys played as a team and performed. And you know, I stay connected. You know, 'cause I 'cause I had the setup head the film head the whole thing down there. So I had a distraction. You know, I had something, you know, besides my family and my daughters, my granddaughter's, but the team just watching you guys play in watching Andrew in the fourth quarter comebacks one after another after another that was my that was the best medicine that I could ever receive. Saved did knowing that that's sitting there in in watching. They inspired me. And I said, you know, one, you know, he told me what the survival rate was. And and it was high, you know, because the research that's why we do we do today. So we can help, you know, try to stamp out all blood cancers. But. But anyway, I've always had great protective, you know, and things, but you know, that really taught me, you know, we know what the expectations are with our jobs. You know, we know it's bottom line business. You win you stay. If you don't you're out, if you're a player, you produce your you stay if you if you don't you're they move on. It's pretty simple. You know? We know life's tough soon as you figure out that life stuff. It starts getting to help a lot easier. So I got great protective. We keep the perspective or coaching and playing a kid's game. And and let's don't make much out of it. Chuck strong foundation has raised millions and millions and millions of dollars for research to help. But you had to go through help others that are going through what you're going through. What was the process of the actual chemo day to day? Were you watching practice film inbetween getting chemo bouts and shit? Like that was that was that the day to day for you. And how long were you in that hospital for? Shows there twenty six days, and so right when they they did the bone marrow biopsy. I 'cause I Tina picking up where I didn't have anything with me. So I said, well, I'm gonna run home and get some clothes or whatever. Right and get my dog kit, my toiletries, and he's like, no, you can't leave. I said why don't have anything? He's that's all right. We're gonna take your wife. She'll go down to paperwork gets you admitted. You gotta go downstairs to the to the oh are and get, you know, pick line put in and then they start pumping. And then thirty minutes later, I was in a room and they were pumping antibiotics enemy steroids enemy and the chemo..

Robert Mathis chemo Andrew Dr Larry cripe leukemia Hoyle Jacksonville Tina ninety nine percent twenty six days thirty minutes one day
"cripe" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"cripe" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"I do those things, but what I started this research in two thousand twelve but what actually happened was that the book in a way and the research really took my life over. So when I think of my research, you can even see it if you look at my publications, I'm you know, pre two thousand twelve post two thousand twelve and. My life is completely different now. So when I studied Catholic culture, and I studied you know, belief that Catholics from state h hundreds had I never ran into scientists. I never ran into people affiliated with the government. You know, I never had the kinds of experiences. Some scary that I had while study that stuff. So as soon as I got into the territory, I the landscape change completely. And I found myself in a really really weird. Research site, basically research area, I went to Mexico. I ended up in the book going to the Vatican and met a lot of people early on in that Jack valet who mentored me and helped me think three these kinds of things Jeff cripe will an an inspiration and mentor as well. And there were times when I decided this is I'm not going to do see more just too weird and something with back in. So and this is so I'm glad you you understood that and and saw that this was something that and you know, the the book is described it's Oxford book. It's a published by Oxford, which is an academic press. And I wrote the content of the foot, but the descriptions of the book are edited by my editors in their their they don't necessarily describe the contents of the books a lot of people read it, and they go, oh, this is just, you know, somebody who's reducing you associate Justice mythology or. Beliefs, and I want to say, no, no, it's not actually I I want you to read the book, it's different than that. Because my regional descriptions were actually edited quite well, let's just put it this way. They were edited lot to the point that they didn't look like my descriptions anymore. So there was that one other thing before we go on to some other questions is that the dividing folly, you mentioned this between, you know? What's called the nuts and bolts people who are interested in kind of, you know, let's let's apply the scientific method to this thing and find the physics does the craft and how they you know, the propulsion and how they work and everything is often put into. You know, it's versus the more religious oriented some would say Woohoo aspects of the phenomenon. And what I found was that as I got into the issue, and I talked to scientists you actually worked with the phenomena that issue was actually a false dichotomy. They're not mutually exclusive. No, they're not at all. I mean, you can't really separate these out. So I tried my best to explain this in the book as well. And actually the characters a lot of the characters in the book. Some of who are anonymous forbid reason it has to be. These are scientists here at the top. They're well known scientists at the top of the game. I wanted to know if you would call this a transformation for you. And I say that for for this reason, it's a, you know, it's a steep learning curve. I remember when I started, and I've I've talked about this before on the program. So I I apologize to those of heard it. But you know, I I was thinking to myself. Well, this this field is a mess, and what it needs is a good reporter and give me six months and hall had this all figured out. And of course, you know, it's thirty years later, and I I I made no less now than when I when I started because it it really leads you, and so many different directions and unexpected directions. And I I know it changed the direction of my life in in very distinct ways. And I wondered if that is accurate in describing what's happened to you. Yes. I think you know, John max the person who made this well known in the nineteen eighties and nineties at Harvard professor called it the the pistons logical shift or the metaphysical shock, right? And and no doubt. I had that I had that into it..

Oxford Jeff cripe Mexico Jack Justice John max Harvard reporter professor thirty years six months
"cripe" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

11:11 min | 2 years ago

"cripe" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Weather. News Radio twelve hundred W O AI. Welcome back. Diana walsh. Pacifica is a professor of religious studies at the university of North Carolina Wilmington and chair of the department of philosophy and religion research. Focuses on religion and technology, including supernatural belief in its connections to digital technologies and environment. Her new book American cosmic includes a lot of names of of conic figures in the fields that we talk about on this program often add this book has been praised as being nothing short of spectacular and intriguing and I would have to agree with that assessment. Diana, welcome to the program. Thank you, George. I'm happy to be here. I was curious what you set out to do. You know, what the thesis was when you started down this road. And how that changed over the course of the next couple of years. I mean, I would have to think it was changed a lot considering what you learned and recent events. I mean, well, the timing is great. Yes. It is great. And George thanks for being such a great reader of my book. What you said was, you know, I look at the connections between religion and UFO's and the book is considerably much bigger than that. And that's exactly what happened. So I have to say a bit about what I do in religious studies a lot of people even colleagues in history. And and, you know, people at the university are unaware of people who study religion from an academic perspective. And there are, you know, a few thousand of us in the United States, and we're not theologians or we're not ministers. And some of us are really and some of us are not. And basically what we do is. We have academic tools we teach dis and we look into the ways in which people practice their religions as you know, delete. We don't come down on the side of whether or not God. This or not really that to philosophers of religion. So we look at religious practices, and that type of thing. And so I had written a book on purgatory Catholic. I'm Catholic historian basically, and I set out to do a couple of days in the book. The first thing I wanted to do with to show how and our new environment, which is digital a digital environment screen technology has allowed for a new type of what I would call a religio city to merge and just like the printing press created and helps the Protestant reformation or the invention writing thousands of years ago changed society what I'm looking at is how you technologies change. How we just and I was particularly particularly looking at religious belief systems. Also wanted to address the idea that you're today inspired the same sort of experiences that members of other cultures experience with respect to non human intelligence beings like angels, and even demons and Jacques fillet had pointed this out in passport, humid going. Yeah. In nineteen sixty eight which is an excellent book. And so I, you know, either the two things I set out to do what actually happened. I do those things. But what? And I started this research in two thousand twelve but what actually happened was that the book in a way and the research really took my life over. So when I think of my research, you can even see it if you look at my publications, I'm you know, pre two thousand twelve post two thousand twelve and. My life is completely different now. So when I studied Catholic culture, and I studied beliefs that Catholics from Seda h hundreds had I never ran into scientists. I never ran into people affiliated with the government. You know, I never had the kinds of experiences. Some scary that I had whilst that he that stuff. So as soon as I got into the territory of that does the landscape change completely, and I found myself in a really weird research site, basically research area, New Mexico, ended up in the book going to divide akin, and I met a lot of people early on in that Jacques valet who mentored me and helped me think three these kinds of things Jeff cripe will an an inspiration and mentor as well. And there were times when I decided this is I'm not going to do say more. It's just too weird. And. And something with back in. So and this is so I'm glad you you understood that and and saw that this was something that and you know, the the book is described it's an Oxford buckets a published by Oxford, which is an academic press. And I wrote the content of the book, but the descriptions of the book are edited by my editors in their their they don't necessarily describe the contents of the books a lot of people read it, and they go this is just, you know, somebody who's reducing you associate Justice mythology or belief, and I wanna to say, no, no, actually, I want you to read the book, it's different than that. Because my regional descriptions were actually edited quite well, let's just put it this way. They were edited lot to the point that they didn't look like my descriptions anymore. So there was that one other thing before we go on to some other questions is that the dividing folly you had mentioned this between. You know, what's called the nuts and bolts people who are interested in kind of you know, let's play the scientific method to this thing. And find the physics does the craft and how they you know, the propulsion and how they work and everything is often put into. You know, it's versus the more religious oriented, some would say Woohoo aspects of the phenomenon and what I found was that as I got into the issue, and I talked to scientists you actually worked with the phenomena that this issue was actually a false dichotomy and they're not mutually exclusive. No, they're not at all. I mean, you can't really separate these out. So I tried my best to explain this in the book as well. And actually the characters a lot of the characters in the book some of who are anonymous for good reason and has to be. Scientists here at the top. Well, known scientists at the top of their game. I wanted to go if you would call this a transformation for you. And I say that for this reason, it's you know, it's a steep learning curve. I remembered when I started, and I've I've talked about this before on the program. So I I apologize to those of heard it. But you know, I I was thinking to myself. Well, this this field is a mess, and what it needs is a good reporter and give me six months and all had this all figured out. And of course, it's thirty years later, and I I may no less now than when I when I started because it it really leads you, and so many different directions and unexpected directions. And I I know it changed the direction of my life in in very distinct ways. And I wanted to if that is accurate in describing what's happened to you. Yes. I think you know, John Mack the person who made this well known in the nineteen eighties and nineties at the Harvard professor called it the the pitch to Milwaukee, call Shifter the metaphysical shock, right? And and no doubt. I had that I had that into it. When when I started I Chris Bledsoe, actually, an experience or lives near me. And so he, and I became friends and my family befriended kids family, we we would have dinners together. And so I got kind of like an inside view. The life of an experience her as well as I mean, I've been studying religion, basically, my whole life. And I have the tools to study weird stuff. You can say, right. So, you know, what would you happy religion? But a lot of weird stuff. You have you know, people walking on water. You have angels you have delays. You know, we're talking about all traditional religions in some ways have these weird things. And and we studied them. So I I already had the tools to study them. But the tools that I had were ones that I used for historical things for things that are in the past for things that I didn't necessarily believe in. And when I began to you know, Krista son went to my university. So we had occasion, Chris, and I had occasion to talk all the time. And I met many people that he knew and I guess what happened was that? I I met also scientists would show up and they would. Want to basically talk to Chris and innocence and not just Chris experienced in general. So I by this time, you know, this is about. You know, I'm I'm pretty gung ho about my research. So we've been two months, I knew many many experiences, and and I met a another group of people around the experiencers in I called this group the meta experiencers because we're were experiences some of them, but not all of them. But what they were doing what they were scientists some affiliated with government, not, you know, some affiliated with institutions, and they were using this information that the experience had for technologies, and some of these technologies or tech were well-known technology that were effective. And so this is I think what started to really cause me to shift. My my perspective, my life view, my life perspective, and it was quite radical. It was quite uncomfortable by, you know, exciting. I mean, it was a lot of different things at the time as well. I was working with scream. Writers and producers of the conjuring, and so the screenwriters to tell because I was helping them with their their script about Catholic culture. They could tell something was going on with the and he would say what? Now, what you see now, Diana. I'm gonna ask you to hold their per second. We have to take a break we come back. I wanna get into that talking about your work on the conjuring. And and how it affected your views and set you on the road to American cosmic cat Stevens has the first of a trio of moon songs. We'll be right back. Find out more about.

Diana walsh Chris Bledsoe George Jacques fillet professor United States Oxford university of North Carolina W Pacifica UFO Seda h New Mexico Stevens Justice reporter Jeff cripe John Mack Harvard Milwaukee twelve hundred W
"cripe" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"cripe" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Are the two things I said I'll tell you what actually happened. I do those things, but and I started this research in two thousand twelve but what actually happened was that the book in a way and the research really took my life over. So when I think of my research, you can even see it if you look at my publications, I'm you know, pre two thousand twelve post to two thousand twelve and. My life is completely different now. So when I studied Catholic culture, and I studied, you know, beliefs that Catholics from Seda h had and I never ran into scientists. I never ran into people affiliated with the government. You know, I never had the kinds of experiences. Some scary that I had while studying that stuff so as soon as I got into the territory of UFO's the landscape change completely NFL myself in a really really weird. Research site, basically research area, and when she New Mexico. I ended up in the book going to the Vatican. And I met a lot of people early on in that Jacques valet who mentored me and helped me think three's kinds of things Jeff cripe will and an inspiration and mentor as well. And there were times when I decided this is I'm not going to do say more just too weird and something with back in. So and this is so I'm glad you you understood that and and saw that this was something that and you know, the the book is described it's Oxford book. It's a published by Oxford, which is an academic press. And I wrote the content of the book, but the descriptions is a book edited by my editors in their their they don't necessarily describe the contents of the books a lot of people read it, and they go, oh, this is just, you know, somebody who's reducing you're supposed to Justice mythology or beliefs, and I want to say, no, no, it's not actually I want you to read the book, it's different than.

NFL Oxford Jeff cripe Seda h New Mexico Jacques
"cripe" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"cripe" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"And I love the parallel that you're able to draw Tim to other sports and other memorable icon. Ick calls that we've heard in other sporting events, you pointed out, do you believe in miracles? Yes. L Michaels the US hockey team down goes Frazier down goes Frazier down goes Frazier with Howard Cosell. These are these are memorable calls in sporting history and chick Anderson's call of secretary winning the Belmont is right there with them. I think so you know that one line, and you know, he's moving like tremendous machine. But then you know, I I re wrote the long tear is call of the of the finish. You know that progressively starts out with secretary does all alone. And you know, it's just he never really guys this this remarkable way that he was able to link his own wonder at what he was seeing but never stopped delivering information and never completely lose it. You know, he didn't start screaming and shouting. And you know, have been some great calls in the past decade, you know, Trevor Denman with with then yet, and this is unbelievable. And and there can had a whole bunch of them. But I think in a way you listen to chicken some people criticize while there's you know, there's been a hundred calls better than this. And you know, my point was not that that he rose to that level of emotion that the guys I just talked about. But but that he didn't. He kept it under control. And then just laid out what was happening, and I thought it was beautifully done. And and then the more I learned about chick about what kind of guy he was, and, you know, a tremendously memorable friend and character to a lot of people. But also a guy who lived a really lonely peripatetic kinda light racetrack the racetrack. And, you know, five kids at home in Indiana who he really didn't get to see all that much. There's really an interesting life that there was a tinge of sadness to to you know, he was a guy that was repeatedly told to take care of himself a little better. But but chose not to and maybe or maybe not costing life at a really young age to me, those those factors also weighed in on why it was interesting for me to write about him. Moving like tremendous machine. It's it's something when you when you hear it. You know, exactly what it is. And I don't know if you came across it in your research or whatever but Luke cripe botch late lately, cripe was calling the twice around at Ellis Park. One year a couple years maybe before he died in. There was a horse that was in front by quite a ways. And I believe John court was on it. I can't remember the horse's name, but but they turned for home. And he said do whatever the horse's name was moving like a tremendous machine. And it it just, you know, put the biggest grin on my face because it it was apropos, but it was such a blatant theft. I I loved. I'll say this. If you're going to do that. As a race caller, you better pick a point where it's kind of funny and almost inappropriate, you know, you should do it in the Preakness. No. L park on the last day. You probably are entitled to do. Whatever you want. Yeah. But I'll say the twice around at Ellis Park is just about the perfect time to do that. Tim late in Sports Illustrated. Ladies and gentlemen, he is another second clips award, right, Tim. Yeah. Thirty one years apart. I'm I got a sweet going now. Congratulations. He'll receive that eclipse award January twenty fourth at Gulfstream.

Tim Trevor Denman Ellis Park Luke cripe Frazier chick Anderson secretary US John court Howard Cosell Indiana Sports Illustrated theft Thirty one years One year