35 Burst results for "crack cocaine"

New York's Legendary Mole People

Unexplained Mysteries

01:33 min | Last week

New York's Legendary Mole People

"On a cold evening in nineteen ninety two journalists jennifer toth accompanied six new york police officers on their patrol through the new york city subway. She'd been inside the tunnels before. But this was the first time with a police escort. The cops hopped onto the tracks. Flashlights in hand. Toth was careful as she climbed down after them. Stepping over the electrified third rail the tracks were live which means that one accidental touch of the rail could kill her instantly as they walk deeper into the tunnel. Toth noticed a few discarded. Needles and glass vials. That used to hold crack cocaine a disgusting odor filled the space. She spotted human feces everywhere. The tunnel was silent except for the faint echoes of dripping water and scratching rats. Then a figure moved in the darkness. A behead heavy footsteps move toward them. One of the cops swung his flashlight around his hand drawn to his sidearm. Ready to draw and fire bay saw the figure race up a rusty ladder leading to a small room hidden in the tunnel. Ceiling toke was sure. It was one of the infamous mole people. She and the cops gave chase but the figure seemingly vanished. The cops weren't willing to go any deeper into the tunnel so to meet the real mole. People toth had to go into the darkness alone.

Jennifer Toth Toth New York City New York Toke
America's War on Drugs: 50 Years Later

The Experiment

02:00 min | Last month

America's War on Drugs: 50 Years Later

"Carl grew up in miami in the seventies and eighties grew up in a predominantly black neighborhood. Would some would deem resource poor and he got a very clear message about drugs. People talked about drugs in a very same way as they talk about drugs. Now drugs are bad on do drugs. Drugs are the source of are suffering drugs. 'cause addiction drugs are the reason that people die prematurely plenty of people in his neighborhood drinker smoke cigarettes or we'd but there were drugs that seemed out of bounce wants people warned them about drugs like crack and heroin. It was nothing to see a public service announcement with someone like peewee. Herman this is crack. Rocco peewee. Herman would be talking to kids saying something about. Everybody wants to be cool. Hey you wanna be cool like me I don't do crack because doing crack is like putting a loaded gun in your mouth and pulling the trigger and that state in my mind for a long time. Some of my assumptions were that a drug like crack. Cocaine was so addictive one hit is all that was required for the user to become addicted. Everyone who smoked crack cocaine eventually became addicted and then about the people who use drugs. I thought they were horrible people. I thought that they were irresponsible. People i thought that they could only focus on getting another hit if their drug. It would take me a good fifteen years to start questioning the story that i was telling myself. Is it fair to say you were scared of drugs. Yeah it's fair to say that. I was absolutely scared of drugs. I believe those messages so much so i decided to study drugs And try and figure out how. I could help people who were addicted

Rocco Peewee Herman Carl Miami
Rapper-actor DMX dies at 50

WBUR Programming

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Rapper-actor DMX dies at 50

"Has died. He had a heart attack last Friday and passed away today in White Plains, New York He was 50 years old NPR's Andrew Lyne Bongo reports, Cmx left a lasting impact on his fans and on music. There was a gruff intensity to DMX is voice Oh, No, because I love DMX blew up with his debut in 1998 album. It's dark and Hell is hot. It's a grim record about violence and sin and salvation. It went multiplatinum ex would continue that streak through the early two thousands while also acting in movies like Belly and Cradle to the Grave. He also openly struggled with an addiction to crack cocaine and did multiple stints in prison. But he kept working kept performing always with his signature rasp. Angelyne Bond NPR news This is NPR. This is not

Andrew Lyne Bongo White Plains Heart Attack NPR New York
Demi Dances With the Devil

Jason and Alexis

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Demi Dances With the Devil

"Dirt dammit. Lovato's new documentary has been released. It gives a lot of details on what led to her 2018 over ghosts. It's called Demi Lovato dancing with the devil, and she admitted to using heroin and crack cocaine. But she also said she didn't think she could overdose. In one episode, she said, I'm not saying that I have not used needles, but that night I wasn't injecting it. I was smoking it. Which is another reason why I was so shocked when I woke up in the hospital hospital because I thought No, I'm not injecting it. I can't overdose on it. Oh, that's not true. Obviously. She then said at the end of the day for you do too much of anything. It's going to

Lovato Demi Lovato
Times Square, NYC Then And Now

Talk, Tales and Trivia

04:32 min | 5 months ago

Times Square, NYC Then And Now

"If you haven't been. I will make sure that you feel like you have. I hope that you enjoy this episode. You know new york city is fantastic. And i love it a matter of fact i have been there many times and i used to live there as i will tell you in this episode but i also want to tell you that it was in the late seventies and eighties entered the nineties. That new york city star to lose its attraction. It started to lose the people that came to visit and it star to be a real dumpster. People didn't want to visit new york anymore and so it was the governor's the mayor's and police commissioners started to take back new york city rebuild new york city one step at a time starting with times square in nineteen eighty eight is to murray hill in new york city. I lived in a three story. Walk up but first and second avenue on thirty first street not exactly prime real estate but safe enough. It was near the united nations and right above the entrance to the queens midtown tunnel Now you know if you are a new yorker or visited new york you know exactly where i lived then a couple of years later i found myself living in the salvation army apartment building for women. It was ideal. It served two meals a day and it was right across the street from the much coveted. Grammercy park the oh so glamorous and it was a close walk to eighteenth street between fifth and sixth avenues where i worked. I thought it was a dream. Come true and it was. I never really ventured to the west side past sixth avenue or anywhere near times square. Well that's what we're talking about. Today is times square and new york city. Everything i needed was right around where i lived but times square was unmistakably a major part of the city no doubt a black guy on the city a disappointment to the twelve hours of manhattan and somewhere that was to be avoided if wanted to dodge trouble darkness dealings and drugs. If you have seen the two thousand and nineteen movie joker with walking phoenix. Ps and by the way. I suggest that you might have an idea of the area and new york city. That was the cd and trashy times square. The closest thing. I can compare it to is a scenes in the movie joker to find a seedier place was difficult when they were filming. The movie and times square didn't look like does today so in the two thousand nineteen movie joker with no cd place to replicate times square. Really the producers of the movie had to go to newark new jersey a real old fashioned pit hole. If ever there was one to newark that was of the same timeframe as the movie never fixed up and never given a real chance to survive and today's society. It's a real shame but it depicts it perfectly times square where beauty came to die. No kidding in nineteen eighty six. When i was there there were multiple pornographic theaters and times square. The motion picture association of america introduced its rating system that included an x rating dip became associated with pornography. And so all the movies that were in times square were x. rated or the dreaded triple x. and everything was pornography back then pornography and. I should say drugs. The times square as a porn capital error was part of new york city's in the seventies and eighties amid its fiscal crisis. And later the crack cocaine epidemic which was rampant and it wasn't until the mid nineteen eighties that there was a push to clean up times square and new york city

New York City Times Square Grammercy Park Murray Hill New York Salvation Army United Nations Newark Manhattan Phoenix Motion Picture Association Of New Jersey
Bowser names Contee new Washington DC police chief

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 7 months ago

Bowser names Contee new Washington DC police chief

"Against a national search for a new police chief for the city and W T. O P has learned that she will name Robert Conti to replace Peter Newsom. The 48 year Old County is now an assistant chief in charge of the homicide unit. He's been on the force for 31 years, joining as a cadet while he was still in high school. He sees Attorney General Karl Racine telling W. T O P. He's pleased with the mayor's pick the native Washingtonian who understands the District of Columbia. And I think really has a firm grasp of, you know of the community on D trust the community, and I think the community trust him as well. Conti grew up in the Carver Langston neighborhood of Northeast Washington during the crack coat crack cocaine error of the late 19 eighties. He's has said he witnessed police using brute force during that time. Karima

Robert Conti Peter Newsom Old County Attorney General Karl Racine W. T O P. Carver Langston District Of Columbia Northeast Washington Conti Karima
"crack cocaine" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Life. But the bottom foundation, which separates us from so many other different organizations that were Christian in nature. Now we're not gonna beat the Bible in the people and if you want you want a life change in your own personal life, especially during these horrendous times is just unprecedented times is that people need to develop a relationship with God. And, you know, I believe that individual. I'm not going to go into all the different details, but to draw that there is a creator. In fact, our country was founded on that very notion that there is a creator God and gives us an angle inhalable rights. And that we have a maker that cares about us. And so we have believe since 1922 I've been here 30 years you've been here 18 years is yes. We want to do all the things that will help a person becomes successful. But beyond that, we want to know we want them to know what happens to him when they die. Are they confident of that? So going back to Dr Jacob and them coming on board is calling for them. It was a call, and the mission wasn't doing well, but they came in. And you could see the hand of God moving in their life and their leadership and the changes that they made and they really are one of the top life changers unsung heroes of being able to influence thousands of people's lives, including my own, which I share a little later in the program, and we call them the re founders of the mission. That's correct. So they started in mid seventies and There was really nothing at that time for women and Children that was become started become a problem. You know, women were starting end up on the street. With their kids and little pocket. You would see women sleeping in their cars or vehicles. Homeless women were starting to come surface more and more than just alcohol, alcohol and then in the 19 eighties. Crack cocaine became prevalent in our society and cocaine itself and seventies and then crack cocaine in the mid eighties, and then even HIV. The talk about a virus that was horrendous in the mid eighties, starting so things started changing and started changing politically. So people that were coming in for services that needed help. They weren't just the old alcoholics. Even there was plenty of them still around. But now you're the population wasn't in their forties or fifties. It was now starting in your thirties and their late twenties. So what do you do? You have the same situation where you want to help people, but now they have a different set of problems. Still had the same kind of answers. We want to get people to work. We want to get people so over, you know, and doing doing things in their own right mind. But yet now the whole lands landscape of homelessness will start to change. So in 1989 8 1987 1989 to 1989. The mission had a very wonderful opportunity. They were in some dilapidated buildings. And those buildings were bought and with the windfall of money at the time, they wanted to open up one center that we've been a comprehensive center for homeless men. And that became the center for Manis,.

Crack cocaine cocaine Dr Jacob
Murder case unsolved for 25 years — then cops got a phone call

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:35 sec | 8 months ago

Murder case unsolved for 25 years — then cops got a phone call

"And Alabama Cold case murder is Solved with one telephone call 25 years after the fact, Johnny White, it has had a string of arrests for traffic and drug offenses. Through the years. He was facing one for possession of crack cocaine pipe. Less than three weeks after two hunters found Christopher Daley's body with a gunshot wound to the head in April, 1995 Murder went unsolved until this week when Decatur, Alabama police picked up the phone. They say Johnny White had told him he wanted to confess to the decades old killing. Police say the 53 year old offered details that matched evidence and he is now charged with murder. Authorities say it's not clear what prompted the call from why did

Johnny White Christopher Daley Alabama Decatur
Redefining Radical

In The Thick

04:40 min | 10 months ago

Redefining Radical

"Hey welcome to the podcast about politics race and culture from the OC perspective I'M A. And I'm Hutagalung arena. Today, we have a very special guest joining us from yonkers new. York is Jamal Bowman he's the. Democratic nominee for Congress in new. York's Sixteenth District Jamal. To the show. Hello thank you so much for having me. It's great to be here. We don't often speak to you know members, of Congress or potential members of Congress few like somebody maybe unexcited Cossio go. because. You're win like hers was a a really big deal. You defeated Longtime Democratic incumbent Eliot Engel in a huge landslide lead your the likely winner in the twenty twenty general election because you represent a very blue district. So it's really been a super big year for you. Your Primary Win came at the height of the conversation around justice for Black and Brown lives inequity the pandemic. With. It. So really your wind came kind of on the backs of all of that. So. Give us just a quick back story shore. So the back story I guess begins you know being raised by a single mom in the projects along with my three sisters. During the crack cocaine epidemic, which projects I gotTa know which projects Oh Easter projects one hundred, fifteen first avenue in Manhattan. WanNa raise on the. Upper East side East Harlem Section Manhattan went to public schools by entire life lived in the projects in rent stabilized apartments started teaching in nineteen ninety nine in the South Bronx in one of the poorest zip codes in the country, and you clearly can see the inequality the inequity in how wherever you go in a city state or country black and Brown people seem to be suffering more than everyone else. So growing up as a black man in America who has been a victim of police brutality. The first time I was beaten by police was eleven years old and notice I said the first time happen again, the a later on. IOS Eleven hanging out on the street with my friends and being rambunctious in boisterous in doing what kids do and I guess someone may have called the police because we were maybe too noisy a too rambunctious. and. The police came over and tried to live saw curtail us and tell us a comma down. You know we kind of push back in had a few words for them. Next thing I know like I'm being done up against the wall thrones Grou- face dragged all over the floor. In the back you know except Tra, and then we'll take into the precinct and US well to my mom about this later were taken to the precinct in a coma mom to come pick me up with a birth certificate because they didn't believe I was eleven am. makes. Me Think Tamir Rice as I say that out loud rain. She comes with a birth certificate picks me up and takes me home. Didn't explain to her what the charges were if any why they approached us to begin with, they just allow her to take me home in my mom and I didn't even think to you know press charges. Report anything like that. We just kept moving and it just tells you how internalize sort of our oppression is. Right like we just accept we have accepted in I have accepted that okay. There's nothing we can do where powerless. So becoming a teacher. Being a social justice advocate within education and having the opportunity to be a founding principle of my own district, public school charter school, and being education organizers around equity and restorative justice in culture, Responsi-, schools all of that led to me. You know think about a potential run for office and why Eliot Engel while I looked at twenty eighteen election and I saw that me thirty thousand registered Democrats in the district actually voted and he won with twenty two thousand votes. Yeah. Some like, wow. This person has making trillion dollar decisions that impact millions of people and he only got twenty two thousand. Volts Yep you look at who supports him right? Who Funds his campaign we're talking big real estate. Yep Big pharmaceutical companies, weapons, manufacturers, hedge fund managers, and every institution that is hurting our community hurting the working class. Those are the people that are institutions that funded his campaign. So that's why we decide the challenge chairman ultimately were able to win in the end

Eliot Engel Congress York Tamir Rice Manhattan Sixteenth District Jamal Jamal Bowman Yonkers Hutagalung Arena Crack Cocaine Chairman Grou Black America United States TRA
The First Step Act, Chuck Colson, and the Churchs Work of Restoration

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:08 min | 11 months ago

The First Step Act, Chuck Colson, and the Churchs Work of Restoration

"I'm old enough to remember that time way back in two thousand, eighteen when Democrats and Republicans worked together. Really it happened and resulted in a major bipartisan criminal justice reform bill called the first step act which sought to reduce the number of people in overcrowded federal prisons and improve conditions for those behind bars. When he endorsed the bill President Trump said this we're all better off when former inmates can receive and re enter society as law abiding productive citizens at last month's Republican National. Convention Ivanka trump called the first step act the most significant criminal justice reform of our generation? I don't think that's an overstatement. A major feature of this bill is that it reduces mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders, especially low level nonviolent offenders, and for those already serving time for crack cocaine related offenses the reductions were retro active in just its first year. First Step Act has literally changed thousands of lives according to a recent report from the United States sentencing commission the sense is. More than seven thousand Federal Prisoners Dean able to safely return to their communities were reduced as the libertarian publication reason rightly noted the first step to act as a modest but very real first step towards comprehensive criminal justice reform and I'd add that as part of the legacy of Chuck Colson and the very good work of prison fellowship, this bills and example of the Church's work of restoration. God us. Chuck Colson to transform the way that many political leaders especially conservative political leaders thought. About criminal justice while imprisoned chuck learn just how empty and even counterproductive the lock them up and throw away the key rhetoric that he wants espoused really was the call that God then placed on Chuck's life was to bring the Gospel to prisoners and their families through prison fellowship but that quickly expanded to include prison in criminal justice reform. He quickly realized that being tough on crime was pointless unless we were first smart about crime being smart about crime lead Chuck to campaign against. The three strikes and you're outlaws that swept the US during the nineteen nineties he knew that such laws would only lead to overcrowded prisons, unaffordable system building and maintenance, and eventually the court ordered releases of thousands of prisoners because of political pressures instead of Prudential Wisdom, we've seen some of that even recently God use Chuck Solid, conservative Christian and law and order credentials to advance this new message people who may not have given other activists. The time of day respectfully listened to him many. Hearts and minds were changed not just because of Chuck Colson Passion or is incredible ability to articulate. But because he took people with him back into prison to see for themselves, what he saw to borrow modern fraiche chuck move the Overton Window in other words that acceptable range of policies politically acceptable to the mainstream population and so decades later years after Chuck Olson's death at a time of deep and painful political division. The first apt act garnered bipartisan support, Chuck's legacy of giving people. The moral permission and the intellectual justification to do the right thing in this area is something that Christians should seek to emulate in every aspect of life and culture. Of course if we're going to do this, we have to I know what the right thing is, and then we have to learn to talk about issues in ways that might be heard about a year ago that vision drove us to launch. What would you say a video resource designed to help Christians Converse on our? Culture's most challenging questions. Now, our personal stories might not be as dramatic as Chuck Colson was, but we can still strive for the same humility

Chuck Colson Chuck Chuck Solid Chuck Olson President Trump United States Crack Cocaine Prudential Wisdom
What John Thompson Meant To DC

The Lead

08:48 min | 11 months ago

What John Thompson Meant To DC

"What was it like for you to cover John Thompson and the Hoyas as a young reporter? What were your interactions with him like? It was. You know it was an education was twenty, three, twenty, four years old and that was my first beat but John was a handful. As you can imagine, and he controlled everything we control the player access you controlled access to himself and draw the program, and so John was someone that you You had to kind of meet on his terms. Can you describe he was six foot ten? He was just this literally and figuratively massive figure. Can you describe what it? was like to be in his presence well, I mean look any six, ten, three, hundred, pound guy is going to have a certain amount of power to him. You know he wasn't nimble I won't say he was Nimble but he certainly had the meeting of former athlete and you know he had a big loud booming voice nothing had happened by accident I had no intentions of being a basketball court. I. Wanted To be a teacher basically social worker kind of person freelance. Knew. How to use his size and his voice to great effect and I, was not the recipient of John's paint peeling yelling as as the players often were but they will tell you that there was just there was just nothing like it when he really was angry and was coming after you about a mistake, you made a decision you made. He certainly tilted the room when he came in when their buzzer went off and they said it's over. We didn't stay up and down the hallway and talk with people kissing is just so we can get a good article written about us he coach during the glory days of the Big East what do you remember most about his team's and just the style and the way that they played? Well, the frenetic full court pressure was their thing. To set up an impressed. Retract. Very physical teams anybody that came into the pink dot hit, and that's just the way that they had always played. Here. And that leads to a lot of confrontations. A couple of pretty bad fights. But a lot of grabbing and holding things like that. And that's just the way that they had always played in obviously worked for them. David you're born and raised DC. Can you talk about what John? Thomson and the Georgetown Program? Men's to people in DC and in particular to black basketball fans in the city DC was like a lot of cities in the eighties dealing with a lot of different stuff that was that was very difficult. The year is only sixty days old during that time. There have now been ninety-two homicides here in the District of Columbia last year sixty to eighty percent of the murders in the nation's capital, we're listed as drug related. You had the explosion of crack cocaine in DC in in the mid eighties just devastated whole swath of the community and you had Marion Berry who was this incredibly polarizing figure, and this is before his drug problems came to bear. He was polarizing well before then because he insisted that these rich white guys that tended to run the city hire black people all the people who only know Marion Barry through the nasty headlines in the videotape of crack cocaine. Don't know extraordinary work. He did in this in Washington to open up the doors of government to the black people of Washington you're shutout for years decades, and then you have this presidential era of Reagan, where there was a lot of hostility towards cities, there was a lot of cutting a city services. There was a lot of emnity towards people that were on welfare and they've perception that raking perpetuated was that all these people are welfare cheats and they're not in their bums and you're not working for a living perhaps the most insidious effect of welfare is it's usurpation of the role of provider. Public assistance for a single mother can amount to much more than the usual income of a minimum wage job. In other words, it can pay for her to quit work. These competing forces, all kind of colliding with one another in the city in the early eighties in the mid eighties and into that Maelstrom, you have this basketball team. That is good enough to win a national championship in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four. Jobs. The I ask championship. And then notice that the team is mostly black eleven of the twelve guys or thirteen or fourteen guys that get your attention in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three, or eighty four you know rap videos late eighties is a Lotta Georgetown starter jackets in those videos. was torn concept had long hair and short baby came in national programs to the point where a lot of black people thought. Georgetown was an HP. Come to the. Question to see hundred. So there was this kind of interesting blend. Wall Street types and judges, and fortune five hundred CEO's with the people that cleaned the offices and drove the buses rooting for the same team and it was gonNA. Kinda, cold because it kind of it helped bring the city together in ways that really only the football team had done previously and it brought a lot of pride to the city as as a six. They were proving that black kids from inner city high schools could go to Georgetown and do work. They could do the work and that was a source of immense pride to people in DC Thomson was, of course, the first black basketball coach to win a national championship. But David you've written about how Thompson would bristle when asked about that accomplishment. Why did he? Take exception to that question will John would always say is that the question implied that he was the first black coach who who had the qualifications to win a national championship I'm not interested in being the first and only black do anything because it implies that in Nineteen eighty-four, a black man finally became intelligent enough to win NCAA, title and that's very misleading. And that was John's way of saying you know you need to understand the history of coaching. There was a lot more deferential treatment provided to white coaches for for decades and coaches like Adolph rupp that didn't recruit black players. was hostile toward black players. So that was John's way of saying you know do your homework. In nineteen, eighty nine. He famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCWA rules that he felt disproportionately affected black students. undercurrent NCWA rules students can qualify for athletic scholarships by scoring seven hundred out of a possible sixteen hundred on the College Board Sat test fifteen out of thirty six on the act or with a two point average and certain. Subjects proposition forty two would require athletes to have both. What did he? What did he say about that? John's position was that both the sat scores and your grade point average could be impacted adversely due to the educational disparities present throughout public schools at the time black has weren't being taught the things that were on the sat. He made his point that you know these tests should not be the end all and be all in terms of determining whether or not a kid was smart enough to go into college. Moment existence and I. started into school that I would not been dotted with an opportunity to get a college education myself. He was recruiting kids that play but also kids that can do the work. So it was not as much an issue for him in terms of recruiting it was more the bigger picture of. Are we going to allow these tests to determine whether black kids can get into colleges and then they finally wound up modifying prop forty two as a result of it.

John Thompson Basketball DC Crack Cocaine Georgetown David Hoyas Dc Thomson Marion Barry Washington Reporter Adolph Rupp District Of Columbia Georgetown Program Thomson College Board HP Marion Berry Ncaa
A Conversation with "Blackout Girl"

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

08:00 min | 11 months ago

A Conversation with "Blackout Girl"

"Jennifer store is the author of blackout girl. It is a memoir published by Hazel in twenty eleven and it's about to have its second printing. Read the book and You won't doubt the power of addiction in the day to day life of a young woman, the subtle persuasion of alcohol, the pervasive violent consequences, one drink too many and the sheer luck some my call at grace to survive at all Jennifer Storm. Welcome to let's talk. Thank you so much for having me. You know one of the dynamics of our mission at Hazelton Betty Ford is that we published books and we publish your book in twenty eleven it's done. Very very well in fact, it's about to have its second printing. What does that mean to have a second printing of a book? It's such an honor truly to not have the story come out once and reach an audience but for it to have a whole new audience to touch I, it's it's a wonderful experience. It feels more relevant today than actually when I did publish it unfortunately just because of what we're seeing with sexual violence and addiction, it's still dominating headlines. The headlines more than it ever has. So it feels really timely and on the heels of the metoo movement I know there are a lot of people that are suffering in silence and so my goal is to get to those people and we'll come back to that in a couple of minutes. Cisco back into your own. Life. For people who haven't read your book or no the story Tell us a little bit about your introduction to alcohol and what happened as a result. So. I came from a mother and a father who both came from very abusive alcoholic homes and they of found themselves in high school and really vowed to to get away from that and so they married young my father went off to Vietnam my mother he returned my mother started having US Children's I'm one of three I'm the youngest and they did their best to keep us away from all of those family members that were heavily. Addicted at the time, they had their own demons, and of course, their own traumas that they never dealt with and for the most part though they did a really great job trying to raise us I really was only exposed to alcohol when my parents would have it at family gatherings, and then a friend introduced me to alcohol when I was twelve years old and I had my first beer which literally led to ten beers and I drank. The first time I picked up a drink and I write in the book that I it never felt that thirsty before my life and I blacked out that night and subsequently a came to well being raped, and so I had this horrific introduction to alcohol this very addictive introduction alcohol and yet it was the first thing I turned to to deal with the trauma of that incident. When you were sexually assaulted a home. was that your bottom as it related to alcohol it was the start actually. So it's what really propelled me into continuing to drink because. I had all this shame and this guilt in this anger and rage that I didn't know what to do with it and I was young and my parents coming from their own alcoholic abusive homes didn't have the coping mechanisms to deal with their own stuff. Let alone now watching their daughter go through this horrific trauma. So I started drinking you know and this was in the eighties. So alcohol was in everyone's homes. We all had the you know the liquor cabinet, and so it was really easy for me to access What happened to me led to the breakdown really up my. Parents marriage, and so the supervision and our home started to deteriorate my parents divorced by the time I was fifteen and so I was kind of left to my own devices as where my older brothers and drank alcoholic and that gave way to starting to use pills I would do anything to numb the pain I was having and so if it meant alcohol, it meant pills it meant marijuana that led me to LSD, which then quickly led me to cocaine but everything every single time I drank the result was always the same I drank I drank to excess I blacked out. and. So the introduction of cocaine when I was around fifteen sixteen helped kind of. Sober me up. If you will I always say that parentheses it would keep me from blacking out. It would allow me to retain control because when I was putting myself in situations where I was blocking out of course, then I was vulnerable to more violence and more abuse and I didn't want that. So the cocaine and the alcohol then became this really damaging codependent relationship and. And how long did that codependent relationship work before? You had your bottom. So eventually I turned to crack cocaine at age seventeen and I had my bottom at age twenty two and I it was brutal and I attempted to take my life. I didn't have any hope I was completely destitute. I didn't see a way out of my addiction I couldn't go a day without being high and being. Completely out of my mind and that got to a point where it felt so. That I wanted out and I didn't like I said, I didn't have any hope. So tried to kill myself and By. Some measure of grace I am here today and I woke up in hospital bed the next day and I. I had sliced my wrists pretty severely to the extent that of one was bandaged to to hold it together done so much damage and it was a miracle and the doctor looked at me and said, it's a miracle that you're live and I was in a psych ward because that's that's where they. Put you was nine, hundred, Ninety, seven and an intake officer came in and kind of started going through the questions and she looked at me and said you, you're not. You're a drug addict do you want treatment for that? Because you you shouldn't be here? Do you want to go to Rehab and I said, yes, it was the first time I had made the admission that my solution was actually my problem. And then you got treatment, did I went to a traditional twenty eight day treatment facility in Allenwood Pennsylvania by all accounts a great facility I they didn't they weren't trauma informed which that's the term that I would come later to understand and really appreciate but they didn't take into consideration the underlining trauma that I had dealt with. It was solely twelve steps addiction recovery. We're not going to deal with these outside issues right now you're here to get clean and sober and that worked for me my first night and Rehab came to share her experience strength. And hope much like I do now and she had said something that profoundly impacted me and she said that her secrets kept her sick and that has been my mantra since that day in that Rehab and it told me that all this stuff that I was running from all these bad things that had happened to me and these pains and these traumas these were the causation. These were the reasons and I needed to deal with these if I really wanted to be clean and sober for the rest of my life, and so I did that work on my own. The trauma work did yes. which point you decide that you're story. was worth telling. In a memoir. I started writing that night in Rehab writing has always been a source of of empowerment and healing for me. Even after the rape I have a book of poems that that I wrote I would stay up all night i. now know that that's post traumatic stress disorder I couldn't sleep. I had insomnia had irrational fears so I would right and that would calm me and so because I couldn't talk about my trauma in traditional treatment facility I wrote about it. And I kept writing and then I did my fourth step and I kept writing and kept writing and you know I was an avid reader at the time and that's really when memoir was starting to come into play and I wasn't finding my story anywhere and so I thought well, I have a good story. Maybe I'll maybe I'll submit it and I was a big fan of melody babies and so I just happened to twelve of her books. So I happened to look in the book and see well their published by this amazing place called women, and so I reached out to Hazelden and sure enough they were interested and it was it was an incredible

Cocaine Hazelton Betty Ford Jennifer Storm Jennifer Store Crack Cocaine Hazel Cisco Vietnam Insomnia Rape Allenwood Pennsylvania Officer Marijuana LSD
Getting Out Of Prison Sooner

Planet Money

04:52 min | 1 year ago

Getting Out Of Prison Sooner

"Alexis Nicholson, has this picture from when she was eight years old, so yeah, this picture means to me I've always had onto even though she's a piece of paper from chucky cheese. It's a picture from her eighth birthday party. There were a lot of people there, but this picture especial to Alexis because it's just her and her Dad Reggie there in a photo booth in their heads are up against each other smiling. Shaky cheese and I. don't really it's hard to talk about. Alexis is Reggie's only daughter. She's twenty five years old now, and she got this picture printed on a pink sweatshirt that she's wearing. I've always been a daddy's girl. You know what I mean so I've I've always been close to him? Even though he's always been far away, I guess you could say her. Dad was arrested not too long after that birthday party when he was just twenty five years old, according to transcripts, the police had shown up at Reggie's house in Oklahoma City because it's home. Burglary alarm had gone off Reggie wasn't home for it, but when he got there, his door was left, wide open and police were waiting outside. They had responded to the alarm. And Reggie told the cops they could go in look around, and while they were looking around, they found a shoebox with some drugs, money and a gun inside. And they arrested Reggie. I do remember when I got told. My grandma beats me up from school. And She was just like they got you. In I knew I knew she was talking to Bellboy at. Believe is so I asked her I said who I said WHO has she? The police do. The police found six hundred and thirty five grams of crack cocaine in the shoebox, which is a decent amount it would be like to soda worth of crack a little over a pound enough to be considered trafficking. This was in two thousand and three now. If you were caught with this exact amount of drugs today in Oklahoma. The most prison time you could get is twenty years so a long time. But the laws were much harsher back then, especially, because Reggie had been caught with drugs twice before, and that combination to drug convictions plus a trafficking conviction it carried one sentence and one sentence only the rest of your life at the trial. The prosecutor told the jury that life meant. They could give reggie a million years if they wanted. Mercy is for people who don't commit one crime. After another, the prosecutor said mercy he said is for the innocent. The jury gave Reggie Life in prison without the possibility of ever getting out, that was mandatory, but then the jury added another one, thousand, six hundred and fifty years after life, even though that's impossible, and even though he didn't do anything violent. For Lexus it was like she had to mourn. A living person is different from see somebody in a casket versus going to a prison in. You can't leave with the person that you WANNA. Leave with this breathing that the person has life. You know what I mean. This impossibly long sentence came out at a time when Democrats and Republicans were trying to top each other how tough they could be on crime especially on drugs, and even more especially on crack. They said someone like Reggie's should never come out but this. After seventeen years behind bars, reggie got the chance to do something. He never imagined he'd be able to. Your original Nicholson Nicholson Junior. Mr Nicholson. Could you give me your? Number please Sir Reggie got the chance to ask to be considered to be released from prison one day. Even though he was told, this would never be a possibility, but here he is before April board about to make his case. You recognize these folks. Asserts mom this. Magadan okay great they've this was in February. We were able to be there for this. For Reggie's parole hearing his whole family showed up off my dad. Also I didn't see this big back. That's my day her. For All in small conference room at a prison in Oklahoma City. Reggie's the only one appearing by video screen. Nicholson. Would you raise your right hand, please? Swear the testimony you will be before the board will be the true. This hearing was almost impossible to imagine twenty years ago and Reggie didn't get this opportunity because his case stood out. It didn't standout. Reggie dot before this board, because lawmaker said maybe we went too far, not just with Reggie with a lot of people.

Sir Reggie Reggie Life Alexis Nicholson Reggie Dot Nicholson Nicholson Junior DAD Oklahoma City Crack Cocaine Chucky Cheese Oklahoma Prosecutor Alexis Bellboy Burglary
Noose found in Bubba Wallace's garage stall, NASCAR says

Get Up!

11:41 min | 1 year ago

Noose found in Bubba Wallace's garage stall, NASCAR says

"Now? Mike Greenberg Bristol with you this morning. And as I said right off the top of the show, I would have loved to have started with any of those today, and we certainly will get to the mall, but we begin with an absolutely despicable story coming from the world of NASCAR. In this developing story, a noose was found in bubba Wallace's. Stall at the NASCAR race in Talladega Alabama yesterday less than two weeks after Wallace led efforts to push NASCAR to ban the confederate flag NASCAR announced the news last night well after the race had been postponed due to inclement weather, and said it was launching an immediate investigation here. was there statement late this afternoon? Nascar was made aware that a noose was found in the garage stall of the forty three eighteen. We are angry and outraged, and cannot state strongly enough. How seriously we take this heinous act! We have launched an immediate investigation and we'll do everything we can to identify the persons responsible and eliminate them from the sport. As we have stated unequivocally, there is no place for racism and NASCAR, and this act only strengthens our resolve to make the sport open and welcoming to all while himself tweeted a statement last night, which read in. In part today's despicable act of racism and hatred leaves me incredibly saddened, and serves as a painful reminder of how much further we have to go as a society and how persistent we must be in the fight against racism. As my mother told me today, they are just trying to scare you. This will not break me. I will not give enor- rely back down. I will continue to proudly stand for what I believe. In Allah Marty Smith is covering this for us in the scene in Talladega. He joined us an hour ago. The News in Bubbas garage stall was actually seen by a member of his team. Darrell Bubba never saw it. He never saw it personally and win. That team members saw it. He alerted NASCAR. And Nascar immediately had a meeting of its senior executive staff, and they made the decision that they were going to remove this person from the sport as quickly and rapidly as possible. This was not a situation where a fan might have meandered in on this because there were no fans in the garage. So what you're looking at is you're looking at team members. You're looking at officials. You're looking at potential security. You're looking at maybe cleaning personnel that have access to these garage areas. Again! That was Marty Smith with US earlier. Lebron James among many who posted messages about this. He tweeted sickening Wallace, my brother! No, you don't stand alone I'm right here with you as well as every other athlete, I just want to continue to say how proud I am of you for continuing to take a stand for change here in America and sports at Nascar. I salute you as well. Well Sprint Cup driver Michael McDowell added. God help us the level of evil. It takes to do something like this is disgusting. This is enraging and heartbreaking all at the same time Dale. EARNHARDT Jr. tweeted simply a hope of a wins it tomorrow again. The race will be run today. It was delayed by weather yesterday, and as I bring Steven A. and Marcus into the conversation here I'll. Repeat that the area in which this was discovered, there were cameras all over it should be. Relatively easy investigation for the NASCAR officials to conduct, and we are standing by for any information live from Talladega Marty Smith will bring us anything as soon as there is any further news with that thought in mind, Stephen. We've not yet had a chance to say good morning to you I. I just want to give you the floor here. What are your feelings and thoughts as we see this story developed from last night? Well I. Mean I think that for me? Personally I'm a little bit different than the kind of sentiments that have been expressed by a lot of people, because obviously you find this reprehensible and disgusting, and it's incredibly sad, and we get all of that but there's a forgive the the figurative smirk that might end up covering my face or draping my face because to me. Me It's just folks displaying the ignorance, and the more they put it on display, the more it enlightens a lot of people in White. America about what Black America has been telling them about for so many years decades spanning centuries for crying out loud. This is not new. This is something that we've known existed for all time. This is something we know we'll continue to exist. And there is no way around it and so this there comes a point in time where you have to accept that reality one of the things that I would encourage everybody to go watch. If you get an opportunity, you can go on Netflix. You can watch that documentary thirteen by EVA do vernay along with others, sensational job of address mass incarceration in the United States, of America one of the things they highlighted. Is that under the Nixon? Administration where you're literally talking about you know White folks that are hippies and you associate them with marijuana and you associate black. Black folks with crack cocaine, and as a result of that will ultimately galvanize folks in your favor, because they'd be scared to death, and you'd be hearing words like law and order ad, nauseam that was in the sixties for crying out loud in two thousand and twenty, and we're hearing the same thing now. You just have to open your eyes. You have to pay attention to the parallels you have to. You have to pay attention to the correspondence. That's taking place right before your very eyes throughout history, we have had people that have been adroit at light laying low. Controlling the narrative, manipulating the narrative switching things to their favor, all in an effort to maintain or to retain power. It's something to kind of thing that has been taking place in. Usually they've been incredibly skilled at remaining in the dark and saying it's then it's not us, it's them. It's not us well guess what are coming to light more and more in this day and age I find that a cause for celebration, not a 'cause. You know to be saddened by anything. The I find these to be. Beautiful tops as difficult as it may be the fact that I nation appears to be becoming more enlightened than ever before and ultimately as a result. We're coming together. I find that to be a huge plus not a minus. If the ignorance has to show itself, and if the ignore, it has to showcase themselves in order for this to happen coming out of the dock to me. That's of course was celebration Marcus. Stephen. That's what I alluded to earlier man just come on out. Show us who you are, so we know how to deal with you and everybody. That's four. Right knows how to deal with you. Look listen, this is. There has been. We've been having this conversation for a long time. I mean we had this conversation we had. This conversation went capped kneeled about police brutality. We talked about racing all of them and man you. You look if you look around and social. There were people literally Oh twitter last night. Say A BUBBLE! Did this for attention? What what are you talking about like? It's not. It's not unfathomable that someone could do that. We sold Jesse's me. Make reference to that because people can conjure up things to create narratives to make people overreact. That's why saying earlier. Estimate I'm not doing this emotional. Rollercoaster I'm getting off of it right like I'm nuts and bolts to was going on. There is progress that needs to be made in this country I'm focusing on that progress that needs to be made. That's what bubble wireless is focused in on a by making his statements in Nascar. That's a lot of athletes are focused on a lot of people in society in general of focused on making sure that we draw a line between racist people and people that one good for everybody. That's the bottom line. Look for as much as this is egregious and the things that have transpired for low type. I grew up in the south light. It's not. An uncommon for me to see racist people are know what it looks like or even even be surprised or shocked about certain things that tend to happen. The bottom line is this. I'm often emotional roller coaster like if you racist just be that come out publicly and be that enlist separate that and you be a part of the minority port society that we want to get to, and we think we already are at so all of that being said I'm with Steve Day like in this bringing a lot of people to the light, and the hateful ones are fighting their battle because they see slipping away. Score you're not GonNa hear me say this very very often, but I wanNA give major major kudos to a Lotta. White folks out there in America because if it wasn't for them, protesting and marching with black individuals if it wasn't for them, you know engaging in the kind of of of you know resistance to whatever level of oppression we as black people have been feeling this nation I. Don't think some of these folks will. will be coming out I. mean listen the back. In the day. They used to wear the sheets and used to cover the identity and their faces that we didn't know who the hell they were by virtue of that now. Some black people, a lot of black people will tell you they exist in corporate America. They could be the very people that you're working for the very people that you're talking to I happen to be. Be Blessed we happen to be blessed to not certainly not have that at this company is because we've seen the actions on the part of our executives. And what have you over continuous basis? Elevated level of sensitivity that this place has shown throughout the years deserves to be commended. There's always work to do. There is no perfect place. Make no about it, but I'm incredibly proud to be a part of the Walt Disney and And specifically the ESPN family in that regard having set all of that I'm in the minority, because the reality is vast people, there's a vast number of people of African. American descent in the United States of America that feel subjugated I wouldn't go so far as to say enslaved, but feel subjugated by bosses in corporate America people that say all the right things when the cameras are rolling, but behind the scenes they engage. Eight your and the conduct. Subjugation that they devote their voiceless. They don't have a voice in that regard, green. Marcus knows exactly what I'm talking about. And so because of that because of these times that we're living, what we're seeing is a populous within the United States of America that sees the dramatic shift, and there's so appalled, and and put and taken aback by what they see transpiring that they can't hide their vitriol. They're coming out of the dock because they're being forced out of the dog. We as black people. People have to appreciate the fact that couldn't happen without a vast number of white individuals in our society standing with us and saying you know what we see where the hell you coming from. If we didn't see it before we see it now, and we're with you, so you have that other segment of the population saying wait a minute we lose some of our own here. Some of our own alternative guests and the poor in this noxious. We gotTA speak up and as a result. Of the dock again I find that a cause for celebration doesn't bother me at all. If we wore, we wore. Let's get it on. I liked that. I want to leave it there for the moment again. Marty Smith is standing by Talladega. If there is any further information on the investigation, we will have it for you immediately, meanwhile, Steven as going to stay with us here for a few more minutes, and we'll get some football conversation as we go his feelings about the Dallas, cowboys have been well documented. This should be a very big day in Dallas. We will talk about it and why and then Lebron and other NBA players have until Wednesday to decide whether or not they're going to play. What should we expect? Woge will answer that question as we continue this out. GET THEM ON ESPN. GEICO. GETS YOU ACCESS TO LICENSED AGENTS? Twenty four

Nascar America Marty Smith Talladega Bubba Wallace Marcus United States Lebron James Stephen White Steven A. Mike Greenberg Bristol Alabama Michael Mcdowell Dallas Darrell Bubba Black America Netflix
Michael Dippolito

Casefile True Crime

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Michael Dippolito

"Michael Dip Aleida was born in Philadelphia Pennsylvania on December eighteen, nineteen seventy. But the parents struggled with drug addiction, which led to mock obeying raised by his grandparents. MARKLE developed his own substance abuse problems during early adolescence, and at the age of fifteen, he was admitted to a Rehab facility. Following his release, he maintained sobriety for five and a half years, and worked as not cancel at the same treatment sent out where he drew saved hell. He relapsed in his early twenties and spent the next few years in and dad of Rahab and began dealing crack cocaine. Michael eventually relocated to Florida and began working as a telemarketer for several different companies. His job involved cold, calling potential investors to sell gold coins and foreign currency. And Natural Sows Ben Michael thrived in this line of work at one point earning around two hundred thousand dollars in an eighteen month period. However the siles worse game in which the telemarketing companies would keeping clients investment money. When this games inevitably fell apart, Michael set up a cold cooling scheme of his own. Into thousand two, he was arrested and delighted, convicted of unlicensed tele-marketing communications, fraud and grand theft, and was sentenced to two years prison. He was released in two thousand five with an extended probationary period of twenty years, and ordered to pay a total of two hundred and nineteen thousand dollars in restitution to his victims. A payment schedule was set up in which Michael would contribute monthly installments over the course of his twenty eight year probation. He was also required to report to his parole officer once a month to provide details regarding where he was living who he was living with what car he was driving and how much income he made. His home and vehicle could be searched without prior warning at any time, and he was forbidden from leaving. Palm Beach County in southeast, Florida with the AD obtaining prior approval from the parole office. Upon, his release from prison, markle moved in with these. Go Friend Maria. He immediately started using drugs again, which prompted Maria to end their relationship? Determined to get so about once, and for all markle stopped using and begin attending support meetings and canceling. He secured a job at an online marketing company and reconciled with Maria, and the two were married in July of two thousand seven. Afraid of ever returning to prison Michael cooperated with these parole conditions and maintained his sobriety. He developed a stable retain starting h morning with the Noli Session at the gym before heading off to work. In late, two, thousand seven, he started his own online marketing company. Mad Media, which solved I'd bananas and search engine optimization services to help clients direct more traffic to their websites. The company's initial success was hindered by the global financial crisis of Thursday night, not mad media to end a decent profit regardless and avoided markle comfortable lifestyle that catered to his expensive tastes. By October of two thousand eight, he's marriage had started crumbling. Maria was out of town when Kobe introduced him to Eros Dot Com a website that advertised sex work services. As detailed in the book poison candy by Elizabeth. Parker! Michael contact a sex work I need Dali, Muhammad and to the to organized to meet that evening. Markle was immediately attracted to up. Who was the daughter of Peruvian and digestion parents? She was born in New York, but raised in Boynton beach along with her younger brother and sister. The parents had divorced when she was seventeen. The which she lost contact with her father, but maintained a close relationship with her mother, two siblings and her mother's extended family. At the age of nineteen, Dali started sex work and spent several years running message policy in south Florida and California. She was also a law since Thrilla Stygian and worked part time as a real taw. Markle and Dahlia had a common and instantly hit it off.

Markle Ben Michael Maria Michael Dip Aleida Florida Philadelphia Pennsylvania Crack Cocaine Dali Palm Beach County Mad Media South Florida Boynton Beach New York Officer Parker Elizabeth Eros Dot Com
Lamar Reveiws - Dead To Me

Bob and Sheri

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Lamar Reveiws - Dead To Me

"Time now are for the drinking People's movie a lot critic more and alcohol I demand. sales up He is fifty three percent dead to me too on much? Netflix. Make you do strange How you doing things? Like listen to excellent? this but Tennessee This is woman another was arrested winner from for Netflix. repeatedly calling That I nine probably one one would not asking have seen police the bring if a helicopter my wife hadn't because kept talking Blake about Shelton people was trying telling to kill her her about it I. and I do like Christina He seems applegate like a nice and I've been man watching her since married with children we were just talking and she's about turned him out to on be the voice a fantastic and I mean Gwen actor Stefani and she when I just picture keeps hers getting better living somewhere. and also like I picture Linda. her living somewhere Chiarinelli like London that Senate. or She's New York so or La. She's loose living on. and crazy. Blake Shelton's farm She's perfect for in the part. Now this is Oklahoma. one of those reviews I just where don't think her an sadly Oklahoma so he I can't must really tell he must you anything really be something. you This all lady I also can give. claimed You is the that there big was picture a man in the woods with no with a details knife and and I urge you to That be she's careful dating if Eric. you start Church reading about and this show Dolly. or Parton talking was to people flying about in that night always to see remember. her. Her name Just is Mary. let Myers my education. police they pair The less of visit you to know make sure she the was okay better off. You and are they found of course an open bottle of vodka because on the table because in if smelled if if of alcohol I tell and had slurred speech. anything that goes She was on charged with in misusing. the first episode Nine one one then so it's I just know not it's the stuff same. It's just not Staying the same. in You just all have the to time sit down but and watch it. you gotta But back off I will from the say bottle there folks. Christina applegate. I'm She plays with Jin you Blake. Shelton a really wouldn't be my first uptight. pick as my Real celebrity estate agent assassin. living in California. No not She's at got all. two Although and she has he was just probably lost a crack her husband shot he's to a real a hit outdoorsy and guy. run He driver. just doesn't seem to have that She's kind of Mollison. really sad she's Let's go very to today's very more of mad the day. and It's Scott she's completely wearing who frustrated says that because he has discovered not only has she lost her husband. what he believes It seems is the like entrance the police to an underground are alien just not base. working hard enough to find Google the person Earth helped who ran him him find down. it. I mean It's there's on a lot a small other cases uninhabited island but you know for in her. Indonesia. This only thing And he believes an it desperation. is a doorway to She's an underground joined alien grief base counseling because it group. doesn't fit in with its I environment. really believe It's you in could a secluded probably location. made a pretty good Where show. quote Just aliens based on love the to Grief have Counseling a hidden base? Group. It's it's really But I've good looked at these pictures. but It's there. also She meets an his secluded hippie location. woman. Where Nicholas And it's Cage around would her. love She's to have around a summer her age house and her something? name is That's Judy not necessarily and she's aliens. played by Linda Carter. Using Nellie Google and Earth tools. they He could measured not the opening be defined. more. It was twenty meters across Judy is which free he says spirit. is She's big enough so to calm. fit Not a a lot care of in the alien world. ships Jan is wrapped so up text tied as the word a two dollar Moron watch two and gene eight eight gene winds two up six spilling two her guts seven to judy four three seven. and We'll they send wind it up to you moving and judy you can into decide the for guest yourself house. of Scott has And found if the that doorway were to all an underground the show was ufo about station. it would be well When you worth text the word watching Moron to eight eight eight but two six wait. two seven three seven There's you're automatically more registered to win a bottle of our secret. very own hand sanitizer. Judy It's has called secret. people Gm me say. has secrets. I think Jen's he actually dead found husband a has secrets door and so to does a liquor just store about every character in this show so while warning we're found captivated that by the raw emotion I tell you what that it. shows You're a pervert between and Jin. you are Judy really focused on one we're area. also The entertained. I don't understand By how funny but the the the back pull and forth must be between really them something is. a serial We are still underwear intensely thief in Singapore trying to solve admitted the multiple in court that mysteries he snuck that out are being during uncovered lockdown and those to mysteries. steal a bunch of bras We are dying and underwear to know the answer to Number is what one makes us you don't click mess around the next with episode police. sterner In Singapore instead of it is off they the TV. will cain you literally The show is designed and when for they say been it's watching. a lockdown. You know They like probably crack cocaine. mean it. A The mayor government third designed over there for repeat so sales. sneaking It's out to steal people's it's exactly Bras the and same underwear. thing. I Each episode you know if is I thirty were if minutes I had that rated Rook R Liberty. for language. I don't know where There's I would ten go episodes per because season. none of my neighbors Two hanged seasons their underwear are on out. Netflix. Online's Right now where this where is would I an go extinct. to steal bras Just and underwear awesome to awesome. break into Awesome their house show and going to the is drawers? dramatic I guess is so extremely literally funny. and you know But the thing it's is a thriller like with at the same time the Internet. at all You of this could especially in theory have all the if women's underwear your past you want forty delivered to your and you've lived role through some for stuff these guys is not because I just was talking owning to the underwear. my daughter about It it needs and to she's the full married long. just Someone got married needs to and have she been goes. stolen I'm just I just. like It's not the this same particular. for me. I don't Category get to show of and pervert I said that's because as you have law going lived some on life. here You have to live a little bit of the life. transcends I think to really underwear. share you. Watch I some of this know right. but you're right. He Yeah would have I to don't break want into to say somebody's house like you. or to store I right want to give anything away. because It this is the you show know for some stealing grown people. women's Yeah underwear you've off got to of have had the clotheslines. life slap you in the face a few times That's and see in some stuff the same I mean and era that's what as makes it above so so stealing so good a pie my score from on this the farmer's is five wife's solid. kitchen Budweiser's window this house. right I just and this I is just another finished example up watching of why Hollywood. any woman So could trust I'm done you with that because and given I liked the choice very much y'all probably and all I between see skill you underwear is and stealing What a you're pie talking about the show you're talking about dead's meet Netflix love pie but I would take Netflix's the pie. I pushing this so coke hard. exterior When when did they first release it? trust full Nineteen of a suspicious released in nineteen also in nineteen. for your painting. I don't So I don't why want do to you be think known bobbling as up under a serial the radar for a underwear while? Now thing it's just you it's know. exploded I because mean people okay. are looking I for stuff got to a little watch. drunk one night and You I stole can't stop. somebody's I mean underwear once you start but cereal an episode says at the that end is. That's what you I just want to be known for. the only Let's thirty awful minutes is okay. that There when are only you thirty die minutes so it won't be in your newspaper. you just you Obituary gotta you gotTa but know people what's going will go on. They leave you back. right Serial at the perfect Pani. time that you want That's to exactly know. What's that right. little mix? I don't have many times. I said Let's let's close just watch out the first we. five We minutes have not just mentioned the first this five yet. minutes But we have to shout stop. out porn You can't star stop Ron Jeremy you sold who me. has I'm to become an environmental watching activist. so He's five. fighting Frosty to buds save a tree. for That is deadly. dad

Judy It Blake Shelton Netflix Christina Applegate Scott Christina He JIN Singapore Indonesia Slurred Speech. Tennessee Ron Jeremy Senate. Google Crack Cocaine. Nellie Google Myers Linda Carter Oklahoma California
Lost in Ghost Town with Carder Stout

The Addicted Mind Podcast

06:37 min | 1 year ago

Lost in Ghost Town with Carder Stout

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted mind. Podcast might guess today is Carter. Stout and he is the author of an awesome book called lost in Ghost town harder. You introduce yourself. Are you doing so good to be here? My name is Carter Style and I'm on the addicted mind best. That's right. Welcome is so. Tell me a little bit. I as we're talking a little bit earlier. I just finished your book lost in Ghost town and it is a great read and I got it on audible and actually listen to it and it's so well read as well I. I feel really afford to the person who read it was just fantastic so It really gets the tone right and the beach right and I'm very grateful. Yeah it is it was. It was great to listen to so. Let's just jump in and talk a little bit about your book in your story shore so I grew up down in Washington. Dc Georgetown and She had a privileged background currents were business folks and lived in a big house and pretty much everything that a child would ever need besides the love and attention. Of course we all hope for as children and so I felt really felt guy was someone who was had a lot of value on my father was working all the time and my mother was alcoholic and pretty much on my own and that led to a lot of feelings of is delusion mints Blue self-esteem and from a very early age I had an older brother introduced me to alcohol and cigarettes and then to other substances when my parents got divorced. I think I was about eleven and there was. It was so chaotic in my house was so unhappy in my house and it was such a sense of disintegration of his family. That was a part of that. I began to experiment with eating disorders and I can't anorexic. I also game blame. It would for a young boy. Ornate less at that time was very rare and of course nobody knew what to do about it and that was really the way that I dealt with the pain of what was happening in my life and to learn to read that was my first real springs with addiction because it was a food addiction. Those addictions led me to in my teen years experimenting with Drugs and Alcohol and but my twenties when I was living in New York is when I started cocaine starting doing cocaine. And that was something that was prevalent. It was around a lot of friends that were in entertainment downtown and it just seems to be everywhere and of course my appetites or it grew and I began to really isolate myself from the group and started doing it by myself and I realized that I had a problem and I thought I moved to Los Angeles. I am really gonNA be able to take this on and and get myself back on track because La has each's and people go on hikes. Edgy do yoga. The macrobiotic food at least that was a mess and I told myself and so I ended up coming out here and of course the addiction got worse and eventually when I was really at my lowest point and I almost lost everything I ended up in Venice California and this is really the what the book focuses on is my time in the present tense of the book. Boston goes down and that time I had lost all of my friends. My family wasn't speaking to me being evicted from the small efficiency. I had it couldn't afford. I didn't have a bank. I didn't have a computer. I didn't Abbas phone but the one thing that I did have was a car and it was an old Ford Taurus sedan and because of that car I got introduced to a drug dealer in a part of Venice called the Oakwood neighborhood which was largely African American. And I didn't realize when I moods Venezuela this Oh good neighbor. Heart neighborhood was the epicenter of crack cocaine on the Westside of Los Angeles recept center of drug activity and wandered in and I met as Stra dealer need flynn who needed a drier and we quickly became friends and began driving around as he did his deliveries and he introduced me to this. World Service Underbelly of drugs and gangs and I was a white guy in a very precarious neighborhood and Flynn became a close friend. He was really not like it's a drug dealer. He was smart. He was self educated. He was ritual. It was kind and generous. Moral and So the two of us from very different backgrounds. Different races different socioeconomic status is forged his unlikely friendship and that's really what the book talks about a lot and focuses on. Is this friend that we had. And as we're delivering drugs to all sorts of different. He will on the west side and ultimately what happens is that he and his grandmother Beatrice who becomes a mother figure to me. Invite me to stay in their home and really for the first time in my life showed me the love and acceptance and care that. I've been missing for my own family and it was really bisque. Care that they gave to me for help me to WANNA take care of myself getting guests

Carter Style Los Angeles Ghost Town Stout Flynn Cocaine Crack Cocaine Venice California Boston Venice Beatrice Washington Venezuela Abbas Taurus New York Stra
Alleged El Paso Walmart gunman charged with federal hate crimes

America's First News

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Alleged El Paso Walmart gunman charged with federal hate crimes

"And the man accused of killing twenty two people and wounding two dozen others in a shooting that targeted Mexicans in the border city of el Paso Texas is charged with a federal hate crimes that indictment unsealed Thursday eight charges the gunmen whose name we will not use who espouse white supremacy with ninety pounds under federal hate crime and firearms laws U. S. attorney John bass said the charges send a message on August third of last year at a Walmart in the central Paso a man used a semi automatic rifle to murder twenty two people he also shot twenty two other people the victims included citizens of both the United States and Mexico as well as one citizen of Germany who is a resident of Mexico shortly before the attack the gunmen posted a manifesto online in that manifesto he called the attack a response to quote Hispanic invasion of Texas claim to be defending the United States from quote cultural and ethnic replacement brought on by the invasion a federal grand jury sitting here in el Paso returned a ninety count indictment against the Walmart shooter that's two counts for each of the forty four innocent victims who were shot by the attacker both those who survived and those who did not as well as to an additional counts for one of the other people he attempted to kill as I mentioned twenty two of the ninety counts carry a maximum penalty of death but we're gonna follow DOJ's established protocol for deciding whether to recommend the death penalty to a jury our top goal of course is always to stop threats before they materialize but it's very difficult working it's made harder by the amount of racist propaganda online which can inspire loan actors who don't have criminal records I don't have contacts with hate groups to commit atrocities today we in the grand jury allege that the defendant committed these federal hate crimes committed these violent crimes to frighten and intimidate the Hispanic community if the grantor religious the defendant tried to terrorize an entire community this will not stand the department of justice will continue to fight these acts of hatred both here in el Paso and across our entire country no the gunman already facing a potential death sentence at a state capital murder case all the Texas man's been executed for a shooting in which he killed his wife and two children and two other relatives during a drug fueled rage nearly eighteen years ago forty seven year old a bellow chill receiving lethal injection Thursday at the state penitentiary in Huntsville prosecutors say was high on crack cocaine when he started shooting inside of his Dallas home in August of two thousand to condemn for the slayings of his thirty two year old wife Cecilia and his seven year old daughter little crystal also killed work which was nine month old daughter's father in law and sister in law he's the second inmate to be put to death this year in Texas the third in the

Enter the Wu-Tang Clan

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

09:31 min | 1 year ago

Enter the Wu-Tang Clan

"Today. We're going to enter the WU. Tang clan I love that so much I was. You May as well have reached across the table and slap me. When you told me I was like? Oh I'm going to do this next and you're like I'm going to do the Wu Tang clan and I was like what and you really did your due diligence. You might have done a lot of research focused all right first of all. I watch the show. Time for part documentary series. Tang clan of Mike's in men came out in May two thousand nineteen It was filmed to commemorate the twenty fifth anniversary of the group. And actually there's also a dramatize who series called Wu Tang in American saga which came out. on Hulu in September twenty nineteen It portrays a fictionalized account of the the formation of the Tang clan over ten episodes but I decided I was going to the source. Yeah I was GonNa Watch the documentary. Good good for you documentary. I read some chapters in some books. Wow I read some websites. I listened to a lot of music primary sources I am I am here for Al.. I am your as of this moment. Just for just for one tiny moment in the blip of the timeline of the universe. Im Your expert on the Tang clan. That's very exciting to me as a CO host most of this podcast that I am sitting in the presence of the current expert of the Wu. Tang clan this is. I can't wait to learn it. You're so right off the bat the term. MC It can mean master of ceremonies which is usually the only person at a gathering that was allowed to use a microphone. It could also stand for microphone controller or Mike Cheka It is also the general inverse skilled rapper and to be a true. Mc means being able to perform under any circumstance to the ultimate performer and an emcee masters. The moment and makes every move appeared deliberate and I realize as I read the definition that you can tell I am the whitest. We are rivaled only by your good friend here Lauren. Also one of the whitest white girl I am very. Are you aware and I apologize in advance. If I mess anything up please let me know and happy to take feedback on this especially because this is a topic that I I that I start from. Scratch basically exactly all right so if you are an expert too and you already own the complete route Tang discography and you have a relevant tattoo. A to somewhere on your person and you just wanted to make sure that I got the names of the members right here. They are so right off the bat. You've Rizza JR izza older. You bastard goes face. Killa La Method Man Ray Kwan Inspector Deck Masekela and you God and then later on you had capitana so now you can go ahead and forward to the sparkly quiz music if you want but if you wanna hear the whole story buckling so picture it. Staten Island late. One thousand nine hundred eighty S. Oh ooh I know your favorite of the boroughs so the Park Hill housing complex which is located in the Clifton neighborhood on Staten Island had become the site of steadily increasing crime crime and drug abuse beginning in the early nineteen seventies by the late nineteen eighties to gain the nickname of crack hill due to the many arrests for possession in or sale of crack cocaine that were taking place place in and around the development. The bulk of the Park Hill neighborhood had been built in the nineteen sixties During New York City's plan for urban renewal projects in the majority of US residents were African. American can the complex consisted of fifteen acres of six story. Brick apartment buildings hearing from former residence doesn't exactly paint the most glowing portrait but kids of all ages in this complex played outside listening to music. DJ -Ing break-dancing Designing Graffiti and doing all kinds of other activities. That would later come to define hip hop so in their early early twenties. Cousins Robert Diggs Gary Greis and Russell. Tyrone Jones formed a group named force of the imperial master later known as the all in together. Now how crew. So Gary and Russell lived in Brooklyn but will come to Staten Island to visit their cousin Robert. Each of the three members recorded under an alias. Gary grace was the genius genius. Robert Diggs was Prince Raquin or the scientists in Russell. Jones was the specialist the group never signed to a major label but they caught the attention of the New York City rap scene through their homemade tapes by nine hundred ninety. One genius and prints were. Kim resigned to separate record labels but the label seemed to have strong armed them into doing some songs that they didn't didn't really feel so for example prince teams for a single was called. ooh I love you rookie. Ladies Man in the showtime documentary shows parts of this music video from nineteen ninety one and it is very nice it is so ninety S. It's so he you know. He's all dressed in early nineties. Ladies have that bright makeup on the big hair and like the shoulder pads and it's like Ooh we love rocky and it's like China he's like yeah all the ladies love me and this is when you listen to his later stuff like that was that was not really his vibe boy. So that didn't go so well for Prince or team didn't go for further genius genius so the cousins refocused their efforts and they give themselves some new nicknames. So the genius became Jessica cheesy pronounce. Gizeh and prints are keen became name Rizza. Oh showers the Russell Jones became older dirty bastard or ODBC R- is said that he knew the best rappers on Staten Island and he wanted to put a home-cooked meal of hip hop of real people. Together there early nineties rise of West Coast. Music shifted mainstream hip hop visibility. Away from New York City and Rizza decided to change all in the early nineties so recipe and collaborating with Dennis Coles who was later known as ghost face killer. They decided to create a hip hop group whose ethics would be a blend of of eastern philosophy picked up from Kung Fu movies. Five percent nation teachings from the streets and comic books so five percent nation is an American revisionist movement which split from the Nation of Islam in nineteen sixty three so this movement rejected being called a religion preferring instead to be known as a culture and a way of life in its teachings are referred to as supreme mathematics which you'll hear over and over you know when they give interviews and talk about you know Wu Tang. They're always talking about the supreme mathematics. Okay cool so Liu. Tang clan assembled in late nineteen ninety-two with Rizza as the defacto leader and the group's producer Rizza an old dirty bastard adopted the name for the group after the film Shaolin and Wu Tang so in contemporary China Chinese martial arts sales are generally classified into two major groups. You have Wudong which is named named after the Wudang Mountains in Shaolin named after the Shaolin Monastery Risen said that Wu Tang was the best sword style of martial arts and the tongue is like a sword soared and so I say that we have the best lyrics so therefore we are Tang clan. Love it the group also developed backrooms for their name including witty unpredictable. Edible talent and natural game okay and wisdom of the universe and the truth of Allah for the nation of the gods. I feel like I've heard that. Yeah Yeah so this is a background. It wasn't like the actual thing but it's fun when they can do that to make it so the group pulled together three hundred dollars to record their first track at firehouse studios the song protect. Your neck was released independently on Tang records in Nineteen ninety-two. The song made them the most talked about new act in New York City's underground and announced a new brand of hardcore hip pop in in the documentary talked to some of their former management. who were like? Okay here's what we did like we would send someone at a record store like ask for the new. ooh Tang Song and they'd be like we don't have that and then they would have somebody else come back in and be like two of us have the new routines and they'd be like no and then somebody would come in like playing the Wutang boombox and people would gather around be like yeah. This is great and they'd be like yeah. Wish you buy some of this so it was like guerrilla me. Yeah it worked. uh-huh course they would also like early on. They would kind of show up at Radio Studios like a colleague Ecology station or something like that with album. You should play this. Maybe we should do that with our podcast. Why haven't we done that? Well maybe not with radio station. 'cause that's the University of Rochester banging on the glass door. Be Like you should thumb drives us. Yeah exactly thumb drive you should play. Yeah podcast I'm your radio station. What I'm sure you're three? AM timeslot is open. Yeah of course. It is so risen the management including his brother divine bovine wanted to make sure that the group's members wouldn't be saddled with exclusive contracts with a particular record label. He wanted them to be able to launch future solo projects so there was a little bit of difficulty difficulty in finding a record label that would sign the Tang clan while still allowing each member to record solo albums with other labels. Okay seve Rifkin. Allowed records agreed need to all of us in Nineteen ninety-three so loud would get the first option to sign a solo artist. But then they would be allowed to talk to other studios so if you were like I'm GonNa go out on my own loud could say okay. I would give you this much money and then you were free to shop around and then still pick is the best thing. That's a nice deal. Yeah it was in. This was pretty pretty rare for those times especially when labels like owned Like decades so signing with records everybody agreed that led to the November remember nineteen ninety-three release of their debut album and Tang parentheses thirty six chambers.

Tang Clan Wu Tang New York City Staten Island WU Rizza Russell Jones Mike Cheka Tyrone Jones Prince Raquin Robert Diggs MC AL United States Seve Rifkin Park Hill Housing Complex Lauren Gary Grace
"crack cocaine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:08 min | 1 year ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Wonder what other entrepreneurs what other people made their money from that era when crack cocaine was so big and you write in the book if if cocaine was god's way of telling you that you had you have too much money Iraq's rise in popularity can be attributed in part to its low price nothing more than cocaine mix with baking powder thank down to hard rock it could be sold for as little as two dollars and fifty cents so you can see the a lower yeah that was the genius it was up I was a marketing yeah you know I grew up in the error of joining us to discuss his new book which is called crack rock cocaine street capitalism in the decade of greed is historian professor David Farber any are you there professor J. we lose your because of the storm I think we lost him the book is apps are you that you're back okay good I'm sorry the weather here is terrible all my gosh you poor thing I know I we've seen the pictures when you lived in New York City you know I can remember this decade where are I was visiting some friends in a high rise here in Boston and it was in the middle of the day the middle of the day and it was everybody was young successful nouveau riche if you will and out came the cocaine and it just went around the table in the living room it was like you want a sticker you want to drink you want some coke it was a scene I mean it was absolutely great I care of horrified and couldn't wait to leave I I grabbed my date and I whispered to him I'm leaving you can do whatever you want to do but I'm getting the hell out of here this is not comfortable for me and I did I got up and made my excuses and left but boy it was so it was crazy the abundance yeah I told him to get help how popular drug use was in the nineteen eighties I mean it was endemic and cocaine was seen as a drug with no downside that's not true people became addicted to it that became infatuated to it they lost a lot of money on it it's stupid things on it but coke was all over the place you can see why poor people wanted in on that same high sure and for two fifty I mean who wouldn't want that yeah yeah and that and that the peril that was you don't get high for about ten minutes from smoking a racket cocaine and some people than just wanted to do it again and again and again and our whole lives soon by the use of this drug I'm where was this story about heroin in the middle of all this was it after or before we're weird is heroin lie everyone was really powerful presence in the nineteen sixties and seventies and I think because of the fact that here when was so often used with a needle a lot of people became afraid of it because remember the nineteen eighties is also the eight eight eight eight right HIV aids of people were looking for an alternative way to get high everyone was seen too dangerous and then I think it's part of the explanation for why crack cocaine takes a similar kind of explosive high but it seems less dangerous to people so when you were living in New York when it when it was the beginnings of this book did you always say I'm going to I'm going to write about this I'm going to really and truly give give everybody the real truth about the chronicle of what happened I think like a lot of people when I was right in the middle of it all I was was angry I mean it was really affecting my family my neighborhood and it was really ugly and tough so it took me a little while to sort of wrap my head around the idea that it was more about more than me just be an angry like why did this happen how come to America why did so many people get invested in this well again I think it took me about five years to get enough distance to start thinking yeah there's a story that needs to be told and it took me a long while to figure out how to tell that story it's hard to tell a story about an illegal market yeah it really is it really is so so I'm so I I'm so excited about this new book because no one is really John much about this history I is your book for like the one that really gets into it well I hope so you know there's some other good journalists who've told some great stories about some of the crack cruise the my book try to kind of put this whole story into the bigger picture how YA crack cocaine in the nineteen eighties and nineties and to me it's it's sort of the flip side to Ivan Boesky in Michael Milliken and Wall Street greed it it's really the same impulse just coming from the poorest sector of America so these guys are so different than the people who became rich through legal way and I think that was part of the story for me that all the ups and downs the capital of them I mean we all know that capitalism is the system that brought us so much but it's a complicated story night I wanted to tell from the bottom up what do you think can you tell me what you think that at this point in time I'm how many people are still in jail because of the that time in that error yeah it's hard to get precise numbers but boy we get over two million people in jail in the federal penitentiaries about forty percent of people put away for cocaine or crack cocaine at the height of this era and a lot of people got jail sentences remember of fifteen or thirty years sometimes you're just selling small amounts of crack cocaine so we're still living with the legacy one of the biggest dealers out of Washington DC a guy named ray fell admin he's just up for parole now thirty three years later I haven't been a major cracking pen in Washington DC so some of these guys are still saying in jail that don't the biggest crackers in Chicago those guys are still in penitentiary that unbelievable that's crazy yeah I'm do you think that where are you where are we in your opinion as a historian with the legalization of cannabis are we ever going to get reform in the in the penal system today I mean this is so sad to see so many people that did stupid things in their time in in their use and here we are you know yeah I think that's the take away from my book there were certainly some file human beings evolved a crack okay people order murder who did dastardly thing some of those guys some of those guys lock him up you know keep in prison long yeah but a lot of people you're right they made a stupid mistake and we need to rethink sometimes why mass incarceration is taken off the United States we kill more people than anybody in the world right now something went wrong and we need to fix it yeah well this is been a fascinating segment with you David and I am so glad that you came on the book is available right now wherever books are sold historian David farmers Nubar crack rock cocaine street capitalism in the decade of greed thank you so much David and we will be back in a moment this is Frankie Boyer have you been thinking about taking an Alaskan vacation well now you can book an Alaskan cruise tour with Y. M. T. vacations and immediately save two hundred fifty dollars per person called why am TV cations today we've been helping people take the vacation of a lifetime for over fifty years and right now if you've been thinking about what it would be like to go.

crack cocaine cocaine
"crack cocaine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Crack cocaine make that possible. the cuts on crack. justice system would drop hammer. the war on drugs was never really to war on drugs it was the war on. that part of the story next on revealed from the center for investigative reporting P. R. X.. when the new deal was proposed it was fiercely contested as a totalitarian plot much like the green deal today it's a watermelon. green on the. the communists on the. selling deals then and now on this week on the media from W. NYC. this morning at seven ninety three point nine FM W. NYC. next week on all this is Allison Stewart after Anthony Ramos joins us to discuss his career along with this new album the good and the bad and his role in the forthcoming film in the high jump and then messed up by talk about his new memoir over the top and best selling author fantastic discusses her novel. don't miss all of that. from the center for investigative reporting and P. R. X. this is revealed outlets. date we'll bring you stories from the war on crack from the podcast the uncertain our marketplace the teenager who sold the crack in front of the White House Keith Jackson went on trial in December of nineteen eighty nine I've never forgotten and G. C. Thompson was.

Crack cocaine W. NYC. Allison Stewart Anthony Ramos Keith Jackson G. C. Thompson P. R. White House
"crack cocaine" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on The Working Experience

"She was not smoking crack cocaine if she was was we would all know it. Her life would be a train wreck if she was smoking crack cocaine and I was around her. I I don't even know it smack. Mac what crack cocaine smells like but it definitely wasn't crack cocaine in the pipe or ten. You know that's that's the thing like a kid could was the the parent of one of the people there one of the kids yes. It wasn't his parent. It was another kids parents. Just goes to show like the the impression that you have on children like you. Don't think they're watching you but they're literally watching every step very closely. Yes and kids very closely. Adults always tend to not always always but many adults are just that are now. They know they know a lot more well. What my my son told me that I was the worst out out of everyone and he attributed that to the fact I drove to the Party so I wasn't drinking. He attributed to the fact that I wasn't drunk and everybody else was. That's a good compliment than I would. I'll take that except that dead dead last. You're also total stiff. When you're sober. I remember this guy. He was the boyfriend fiance of someone when I kind of a friend of a friend and this Guy <hes> I forget where we were but I I guess we're out to dinner or something like. Like that and there was a group of us and he was like really a Steph like he just you try to engage him in any like sort of conversation or whatever he just you know like I wouldn't say anything he'd Kinda like one word. Answer is sort of obnoxious and then we went out to a bar and he had like two drinks. He was like the life of the party all of a sudden gregarious. It was like a total like one eighty. I was like well. I guess alcohol will be holding. This relationship shouldn't shift. I mean I think for a good many couples at slight like that that couple I saw on the cruise and the Potomac they weren't really talking to each other. They were just sitting there plowing down Kanza Heineken. You know that's that's eight to each their own each up. You know I saw yeah so anyway. As we're gliding into the <hes> the weekend just remember hang around with positive people <hes> they won't judge you. There's no drama I mean if there's no drama whereas the fung where's the fun in that. That's that's right if if someone's not making an idiot themselves. How do you classify that as fun. I'll leave everybody with this theory that I heard from. Someone called the lightning rod theory so if you're at a social gathering tickly wedding you know where it's inevitable. Someone's going to have way too much to drink rank. Usually it's an open bar and after dinner you know people just start going to town. I I've been out one or two weddings where particularly a couple when we had just graduated from college and nobody was really married except the person getting married and like so we were all nobody had any money so we're all getting getting that open bar pretty hard yeah like we're getting. We're getting our money's worth yes and so the lightning rod theory is it's okay to be the second drunk as one at the event right. You is as long as someone else disgraces themselves more than you they'll be. It's okay right the guy who takes a dump in the pool at the after party. You know let let's say you make a pass at one of the bribes bridesmaid. Nobody's GonNa really remember that. They'll remember the punch. Ryo something right right so everybody this weekend. Don't be the lightning rod okay. I don't be the lightning rod stand near Bag Rog. Enjoy the lightning rod because it's oftentimes very entertaining very funny. Yeah it's great to be around that person <music> out. I have a buddy who after he turned forty he has resigned. He will not go to any social functions nice so no weddings another as a picnic barbecue. He's out. He said he's miserable. Adam Zimmer Mary. He's married is kids so his wife and his kids will go but will not go that is that's a maneuver..

crack cocaine Steph Adam Zimmer Mary Kanza Heineken Bag Rog
"crack cocaine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Of the crack cocaine all this was present there's a saying in my view your defended the Kool aid in that don't even know the flavor it was the line of the night last night that seem to get the most response even the even bigger than Tulsi going after come all over putting pot smokers in jail that was the best debate best zinger the best line was that I mean the daily show went wild with that CNN MSNBC that little zinger there by Cory Booker going at grandpa bite and that was the line of the night last night Biden look alike add you know what that means I'll be honest with the I had to I had to look it up myself was an interesting night yeah for Joe Biden last night I thought he started strong it was a fun night last night I mean I it was a lot more entertaining than the night before there was definitely more fireworks last night yeah by the end again by the end of those debates these debates I've just I'm tired of it I'm flipping around chicken scores ESPN I'm just I'm I'm I'm over but the beginning in the middle definitely held my attention Joe Biden started off pretty solid but by the end of the night he just wanted to take a nap he wanted to eat some were others originals turn on Andy Griffith put on his pajamas that include a cap and go to bed man he was done he looked he just looked old and tired and I just can't picture is not very many people on that stage if any that I can picture sit across the table from Newton especially ones that used the term Mullarkey Republican talking for the Republicans are trying to kill obamacare obamacare took care twenty million people right off the bat a hundred million people three existing conditions and in fact what we got is a public option that in fact would allow anybody to buy and known as to keep the private insurance they can buy into this plan and they can buy into it with a thousand dollar deductible and love never have to pay more than eight point five percent of their income when they do it and if they don't have any money to get in free so this idea is a bunch of malarkey we don't last night we got a lower keys time the word malarkey is been uttered in a presidential debate by the way he sounded good right there I like his policies and he's he's flip flopping an awful lot but he sent a decent right there well he didn't sound so good by the end of the debate when he's trying to get people to follow him online if you agree with me go to Joe three oh three three oh and help ME one this fight thank you very much the hell's going on out here is that the text message it was supposed to be the next number but he thought the website do thought I caught a niner in there somewhere but you mentioned it earlier knowledge the story of the night not necessarily the line or the zinger but the story was told C. Gabbard taking on comelec Heris and told C. showed no mercy a senator Harris says she's proud of her record as a prosecutor in that she'll be a prosecutor present but I'm deeply concerned about this record too many examples to site but she put over fifteen hundred people in jail for marijuana violations then laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana.

crack cocaine thousand dollar five percent
"crack cocaine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:11 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Must tune into because we're revolting every. Okay. Never bring you bagels in the morning. That's all I'm saying don't bring me free by the spicy one jalapeno that like that. That's that's like crack cocaine, but almost did it almost is about once every couple months is fine. Some people like to indulge in drugs. We'll take take. Calapan yo in it. Okay. So what's interesting here folks is believe it or not? You have just lived through one of the best ten year period for the stock market in US history. And also one of the absolute worst twenty year periods. And I think there we're going to talk a lot about patients today and patients paying behavioral finance to this hour. But J P Morgan asset management sent me their little book that incentive to me. But I got it somehow. All right. I think you actually have to be a client that maybe not a thing. It's online. But anyway, I I every corner they come out with these numbers. And this is very very interesting. So I start with twenty year annualized returns by asset class. Yeah. And looking through this. My eyes went right to the standard and Poor's five hundred what are you suppose? The s&p five hundred is done over the past twenty years or that already tell you. I'm gonna take a guess go ahead. Take a guest on five point five percent. See I told me already it's five point six. He's got a bad memory. I wasn't going to hit it. Exactly. Yeah. I know that that I was doing a good. Well, educated seems low to me by. Yeah. It seems load. But it ain't dude because we had a couple of blowups. Remember the couple of them were fifty percent blow ups, and it doesn't take much to mess up. Your overall the twenty years you're including nineteen ninety nine to two thousand nine exactly at virtually no growth at all from point to point draws ten thousand nine hundred twenty eighteen these are twenty year. I know I know. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, there's a lost decade. We have a ten year period of virtually nothing and then a ten year period of great. Yeah. And it proves a couple of really important points is everybody that got freaked out about the dot com. Bubble burst. And also, the huge financial crisis of fifty six. Percent decline. If you got freaked out of the market, then you didn't get anywhere near five point six percent. Because in order to take you from where you were which was probably very near a negative return to where we are today. It's taken fifteen sixteen percent compound return since. Yeah. Let me go through the whole rundown of these very quickly reits real estate investment trusts. Best performing asset class last twenty years since nineteen ninety nine actually I think if you went back to ninety nine eighty nine seventy nine sixty nine fifty nine four probably every five ten fifteen twenty year period of time real estate investment. Trust have been either the top performer or one of the top perform. Okay, why? Well, I can't answer. Exactly why. But I think it has a little bit to do with the fact that you have leverage and inflation all compounding together. And let's face it real estate is a very very attractive class because most people want to get into the real estate market place. But they don't know how to or they don't want to just go buy one condo out in Las Vegas. Something guy its own two or three of them. Sir. No, you can make a lot of money. Even if you bought condos in Las Vegas depends on when you bought them. Right. Well, of course, it's all about timing. So what a real estate investment trust? Does is it gives individuals the ability to gain some kind of diversification in an asset class that in many instances have been under served because everybody buys stocks, but not everybody can go out and buy real estate. Well, yeah, you can talk about institutional real estate you can talk about their dozens and dozens if not hundreds of different types of real estate investment trust. Yes. So we go on to the next one. Which was also surprising gold seven point seven percent over twenty years. Yes, that's per year. No, not that's their annualized, total return. Yeah. Because we had that huge runup member big rive. Okay. Okay. If you don't like. We've had nothing over the take it up JP Morgan do that call him. So you guys are screwed up on gold. Oil was next seven point zero percent. Then the SNP at five point six a sixty forty mix of stocks and bonds five point two percent. A forty sixty mix five point, oh, that's forty percents. Stocks Vons in general four and a half percent. That's twenty year return for bonds twenty returns ninety nine four and a half percent. Yeah. And considering that a lot of those years interest rates were on the decline of say, many if not most of those years interest rates on the decline that doesn't bode all that fantastic for bonds either. No, well, let's see from about ninety nine for sure through maybe two thousand nine ten eleven. Yeah. They kind of bottomed out around that right right about then for about twelve of the twenty they until the the craze over the the the S and P credit rating crisis. I think it was August or something of twenty. Let was then you've got homes three point four percent. Three point four. Four percent for your telling me Golda J P Morgan telling me goal was doing better over twenty years than home. Yes. Nah, come on. And inflation was only two point two percent. Here's the scary part about all this, folks. The average investor over the last twenty years, according to J P Morgan asset management one point nine percent worse than the rate of inflation. And we all know why I'll tell you about the Dow bar study in just a moment. But it has a lot to do with the lack of patience. Dear friends, lack of patience. Okay. Let's move onto the next one time diversification and volatility of returns, I love this one because it pretty much tells you that if you look at one year performance, you could get really scared if you look at twenty year performance, it's not so bad the one year numbers for the US domestic stock market as measured by the standard and Poor's five hundred you could experience a minus thirty nine percent return in any given year that how do they what do you mean? You could experience you. Well, you could in the future if the future could be measured by the past. Okay. Passed in the past the worst one year performance was minus thirty nine. Okay. So that's what it was in the past. It was probably the two thousand. I suspect it was twenty eight I would assume so right. We're talking the S and P or you could in the future. If the future is measured by past gained forty seven percent in any given year, probably two thousand nine so that's a pretty pretty big swing for minus thirty nine to plus forty seven that's over one year. Periods of time now bonds on the other hand, minus eight to a plus forty three. For one year for one year. And of course, if you went to the fifty fifty mix it's minus fifteen percent to the plus thirty three percent, then look at that looking at that over a five year period of time minus three to plus twenty eight minus to plus twenty three and plus one to plus twenty one. So the fifty fifty mix over five year rolling. Periods is never hit a negative return at least not over the last twenty years. And then you go to ten year rolling, and it's minus one to plus nineteen on which one on the stock one on the bond one plus one to plus sixteen and then the fifty fifty mix it's plus two to plus sixteen when we come back from the break, I'll tell you what the rolling twenty year periods are. So that people that got in late or early might be able to forecast. What they may. Or may not generate in terms of returns. Also talk about the fixed income sector factor, performance and correlations. That's all next. Don't go away. In the no, I'm Andy Solomon, a stroke can happen to anyone even a four time Olympic gold medalist after a normal workout less than a year ago. Legendary sprinter Michael Johnson had a scheme. Stroke were.

Golda J P Morgan J P Morgan US Las Vegas crack cocaine SNP Andy Solomon Michael Johnson Olympic twenty years twenty year one year
"crack cocaine" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Sober was addicted to crack cocaine at the worst part of your addiction. How much how many hits a crack? We're doing a day. Oh, I was doing daily, you know, a couple of hundred dollars a day easy. It got to the point that drug dealers branch from. Yeah. Was up for fourteen days. And and they'd stage the center bench, and I said was downtown Minneapolis. And I and I go what are you guys doing? We're cutting you off you've been up fourteen days, and I probably go allow strong winds asleep. I went down to the streets of Minneapolis and two o'clock in the morning, and nobody would sell me crack came back upstairs. And they the one guy sitting up. He says, you know, what he says give me that phone? I'm gonna take your picture. He said you've been prominence for your promising us for years. This pillow is just a platform for God. And you're gonna come back someday. And help us all get out of this addiction, and you're gonna quit near he says, we're not gonna let you die on us. And that guy works for me today. The to this day, your former drug dealer works for you. Two of them. Do how did you had it? When did you make a decision, and how did you get off this? Because a lot of people can't get off the stuff. Yeah. You know, it was mine was it was January sixteenth two thousand nine ten years ago today. And I I knew if I waited one more day they this. My calling would be gone. I my purpose that God plan for me. And I and I prayed that I would wake up in the morning and never had the desire again. And I did I woke up the next morning, never, you know, the desire was gone. But then a couple of months later, I actually went to a faith based outpatient at my sister's church, and I walked in there. I've been in different treatment centers throughout the eighties nineties, but I walked in there, and it was different. So we're not here to talk about how much she did. We want to talk about your childhood. We want to talk about you know, what I said I have childhood and this and I said, well, I was divorced. And they said, let's talk about that in things happen in childhood from follow the does divorce trauma. Like veterans come back, and they've been traumatized people they manifest into addictions, and and that we'll pick it up right there. We'll go you over a couple of minutes on the other side. And and maybe some people that are struggling even today that are listening to this program. There is plenty of help out there. It's a matter of making the right decision for yourself and getting your life together. Eight hundred nine four one Sean more with Mike Lindell on the other side than the rest of the news of the day. News roundup information overload hour, you know, in the midst of all the whining from the left, and you know, all the battles that we have you have to wonder, you know, why in the world would anyone act this way? My guess is that probably most people are cranky. You are listening to the best of the Sean Hannity show and stay tuned more memorable moments. Interesting guests and a lot of fun coming up next. Small steps lead to big changes. And it's.

Minneapolis crack cocaine Sean Hannity Mike Lindell fourteen days two thousand nine ten years hundred dollars
"crack cocaine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Sober was addicted to crack cocaine at the worst part of your addiction. How much how many hits a crack we doing a day? Oh, I was doing a daily, you know, couple of hundred dollars a day easy. It got to the point that drug dealers. Wrench up for fourteen days. And and they'd stage. This intervention I said was downtown Minneapolis. And I and I go what are you guys doing? We're cutting you off you've been up fourteen days. I probably go allow strong winds asleep went down to the streets of Minneapolis and to clock in the morning, and nobody would sell me crack came back upstairs. And they look at one guy sitting up. He says, you know, what he says give me that phone? I'm gonna take your picture said you've been prominence for your promising us for years. This pillow is just a platform for God. And you're gonna come back someday. And help us all get out of this addiction, and you're gonna quit near he says, we're not gonna let you die on us. And that guy works me for me today. The to this day, your former drug dealer works for you. Two of them. Do how did you had it? When did you make a decision, and how did you get off this? Because a lot of people can't get off the stuff. Yeah. You know? It was mine was was January sixteenth two thousand nine ten years ago today. And I I knew if I waited one more day, the my calling would be gone my purpose that God plan for me. And I and I prayed that I would wake up in the morning and never had the desire again. And I did I woke up the next morning, never, you know, the desire was gone. But then a couple of months later, I actually went to a faith based outpatient at my sister's church, and I walked in there. I've been in different treatment centers throughout the eighties nineties, but I walked in there, and it was different. So we're not here to talk about how much she did. We want to talk about your child's bed. We want to talk about you know, what I said I had a childhood and this and I said, well, I was divorced. And they said let's talk about how things happen in childhood from follow does the bores trauma. Like veterans come back and they've been traumatized. This is people they manifest into addictions, and and that. Pick it up right there. We'll hold you over a couple of minutes on the other side. And and maybe some people that are struggling even today that are listening to this program. There is is plenty of help out there. It's a matter of making the right decision for yourself and get your life together. Eight hundred nine four one Sean more with Mike Lindell on the other side than the rest of the news of the day. News roundup information overload hour, you know, in the midst of all the whining from the left, and you know, all the battles that we have you have to wonder, you know, why in the world would anyone act this way? My guess is probably most people are cranky. You are listening to the best of the Sean Hannity show and stay tuned more memorable moments. Interesting guests and a lot of fun coming up next. Small steps lead to big changes. And it's.

Minneapolis crack cocaine Sean Hannity Mike Lindell fourteen days two thousand nine ten years hundred dollars
"crack cocaine" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on WTVN

"Was addicted to crack cocaine at the worst part of your addiction. How much how many hits a crack? We're doing a day. Oh, I was doing daily, you know, a couple hundred dollars a day easy. It got to the point that drug dealers wrench was up for fourteen days. And and they'd stage the center bench, and I said was downtown Minneapolis. And I and I go what are you guys doing? We're cutting you off you've been up fourteen days, I probably allow strong winds asleep. I went down to the streets of Minneapolis and two o'clock in the morning, and nobody would sell me crack came back upstairs. And they look at one guy sitting up. He says, you know, what he says give me that phone? I'm gonna take your picture. He said you've been promised for your promising us for years. This pillow is just a platform for God. And you're gonna come back someday. And help us all get out of this addiction, and you're gonna quit near he says, we're not gonna let you die on us. And that guy works me for me to this day. Your former drug dealer works for you. Yeah. Two of them. Do how did you had it? When did you make a decision, and how did you get off this? Because a lot of people can't get off the stuff. Yeah. You know, it was mine. It was January sixteenth two thousand nine ten years ago today. And I I knew if I waited one more day they this. My calling would be gone. I my purpose that God had planned for me. And I and I prayed that I would wake up in the morning and never had the desire again. And I did I woke up the next morning, never, you know, the desire was gone. But then a couple of months later, I actually went to a faith based outpatient that my sister's church and I walked in there. I've been in different treatment centers throughout the eighties nineties, but I walked in there, and it was different. So we're not here to talk about how much she did. We want to talk about your childhood. We want to talk about you know, what I said, I a fine childhood and this and I said, well, I was divorced. And they said, let's talk about things happen in childhood from follow the does divorce trauma. Like veterans come back and they've been traumatized. This is people they manifest into addictions, and and that. We'll pick it up right there. We'll hold you over a couple of minutes on the other side. And and maybe some people that are struggling even today that are listening to this program. There is is plenty of help out there. It's a matter of making the right decision for yourself and get your life together. Eight hundred nine four one Sean more with Mike Lindell on the other side than the rest of the news of the day. News roundup information overload hour, you know, in the midst of all the whining from the left, and in all the battles that we have you have to wonder, you know, why in the world would anyone act this way? My guess is that probably most people are cranky. You are listening to the best of the Sean Hannity show and stay tuned more memorable moments. Interesting guests and a lot of fun coming up next. Small steps lead to big changes. And it's.

Sean Hannity crack cocaine Minneapolis Mike Lindell fourteen days two thousand nine ten years hundred dollars
"crack cocaine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"On Monday. You may have heard there's some major changes instituted in our criminal code and how we put people in prison. How long we put them in prison for it was a sweeping piece of legislation called the first step act, and it was supported by the president's jerk Kushner kospi you're headed this initiative house and Senate doing their job. And now, it is the law of the land, and we're gonna see major major changes on a federal level. And one of the first if not the first people to benefit from this is a guy by the name of Matthew Charles from Tennessee and Lindsey Marie from townhall joins me against she's written about this. She's she studied this before we get into this case Matthew Charles because this is going to impact people in Indiana. It's going to impact people across the country. What was the goal of criminal reform and do you feel? They achieved it we'll call the first. Step act because this is the first step and many think first step in many things that have to change. Basically what they did was. They changed some of the mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines, they eat those bet that that's saying if you're convicted of whatever you have to serve at least, whatever. Okay. And they went ahead and also started amping up the earned good time credits. So that people that were in prison that were doing things they were in vocational programs that kind of stuff they actually be let out a lot earlier we wouldn't have to keep housing. Non violent offender to incentivize people to get their act together to prove to the correctional facilities to the federal criminal system that you can be released back into society. And we think you'll be okay because the goal of prison for the most part is to go ahead and rehab people. So has it been that's what they say. Okay. So if that's the case, we need to make sure that the goals that were working towards our to go ahead, and we have them and we make the right steps to get them to that point. All right. So tell us about Matthew Charles who is he because he's really the first guy that is going to benefit from these changes in the criminal code. So he's a man from Tennessee that captured the nation pretty much last year. I should say earlier that I guess now it's twenty nineteen. So yeah, Tony eighteen he was charged with selling crack cocaine informant in ninety six and at the time the laws were if you were selling crack cocaine versus powder cocaine you actually giving us differ penalty. So they charged him. I'm sentenced to thirty five years. Do you know why? Like. Newsflash. I've.

Matthew Charles crack cocaine Lindsey Marie Tennessee president Senate Kushner Indiana cocaine Tony thirty five years
"crack cocaine" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on WDRC

"Think that perhaps judges might be able to make an exception and here's why i don't think you find this happening very often at all but this man was sent to prison he had served twenty one years of a thirty five year sentence for selling crack cocaine now one of the things you're not going to hear mentioned very often at all and then i'll get to your calls is that the tougher sentences on crack cocaine came about largely because of you know bill clinton bill clinton agreed to sign off on some tougher sentences why because we are hearing from the inner cities of america mostly that crack cocaine was fueling a wave of violence and drug use and gangs that america had never seen before so we had to have some tough sentences and you aren't gonna find too many people like this federal prosecutors said that matthew charles had originally been classified as a career offender and that he was ineligible for retroactive sentencing reductions that were put in place during obama so here you had bill clinton saying we've got to get tough on crack cocaine because it was causing huge problems and then a decade and a half later barack obama's president he's saying oh i got to do something for my black constituents and this is mostly coming down on black criminals who are engaged in the crack cocaine trade and in the gangs that were really starting to tear apart american cities so he lightened up on it the problem was that they didn't realize that by lightening up on these sentences for.

crack cocaine bill clinton america matthew charles barack obama president thirty five year twenty one years
"crack cocaine" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Britain slashes the amount gamblers can lose on electric slot machines and the robots coming to pack your groceries live from london this is the marketplace morning report from the bbc world service i'm anew on good morning they've been described as the crack cocaine of the gambling world in britain electric slot machines located in regulated betting shops allow people to lose more than one hundred and thirty five dollars every twenty seconds adam bradford's dad was sent to prison for stealing to fund his gambling addiction it's an addiction like any other when it gets into the brain affects the way it works it goes on and on and on until there's nothing left he ended up taking up payday loans credit cards he removes the house it's oppo for his gumbo addiction really let's face it the average working person doesn't have a hundred pounds every twenty seconds available to spend well now parliamentary committee is recommending that the maximum bet prog oh should be slashed to two pounds or just under three dollars might hand cock is the minister responsible every twenty seconds onto the current system people can bat a hundred pounds on these machines and it is a very serious social blight and it's something that needs to be tackled hundreds of thousands of people who lose thousands of pounds on these machines normally the people who don't have thousands of pounds to lose the industry isn't happy the vicki night is from jennings bet we're very concerned about job losses in crisis with the government review two pounds disproportionate to the level they should be is ridiculous that you children will be able to gamble and lose morning are caves on the seaside that adults will be able to have a highly regulated betting shop the legislation now goes before the british parliament let's do the numbers oil prices hit their highest level in more than three years creeping closer to eighty dollars a barrel as tensions between the us and iran simmer asian stocks fell as traders remained cautious ahead of china.

Britain crack cocaine us china london bbc adam bradford british parliament iran twenty seconds hundred pounds two pounds thirty five dollars eighty dollars three dollars three years
"crack cocaine" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on Super Station 101

"All right we got the one and only dr drew we got him on the line brown did you like in this man i love this all right oh i'm not gonna call his time by but we dr drew we had a great i had opportunity be on his podcast and we had a great thing that we had to talk about it's about the black and white issue so let me go and get my good friend dr drew back into the studio dr drew still there everybody all right dr drew you know you and i both we do some controversial type thing so let's go ahead and get into it go let me pray before you go ahead is that this is not this is a predominantly white person's problem and it's really interesting that it is and i got some ideas about why that's so that are also revealing but i think we should look at history at look at the last epidemic that this country dealt with which was the crack cocaine epidemic and we should be ashamed of how we dealt with that as a criminal problem and this one we're looking at as a medical problem which they both are their medical issues their medical solutions but you look back on it it makes me very unhappy that so many people's lives were ruined and criminalised with because they had a medical problem they hit addiction again you're making one molecule okay one molecule bad okay causes an addiction oxycontin causes an addiction it's not the molecule now it has different social context and different behavioral outcomes and things it's still the same disease it's still addiction and when we criminalize it and shame people for it i just it makes me crazy it makes me nuts and you know when i was on your podcast the one thing that i talked about was that you know when we talk about marijuana and the the drug does on the street the doctors are doing the exact same thing but now this america this is a crisis with opioids but when with the marijuana it was a crime again i just because we have a degree and we're sort of i i understand it's a different context and we could argue about the sort of nuances of all this but the phenomenology is the.

brown marijuana america crack cocaine
"crack cocaine" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"I mean the the funniest mike lindell's story and i know you you've told it in a bunch of times but but the idea that you had a taxi a ride in a taxi cab once and i think it was the taxi driver who said i've never heard jesus crack cocaine i and go you know what that was i gave a speech i was actually over in india i had to give a speech and i there was about four hundred people in the audience and and i was with their eyed son this chief minister guy we were doing for this by phone some foundation thing and and i gave this fortyfive minutes beach and there was confusion a lot of these people and this guy came up to he didn't speak very good english she says he says you are the only guy i know who can use crack cocaine he no he says eagles band prince crack cocaine donald trump in jesus all in same speech it's true confusion i know people could write books about you there ought to be a movie about your life and i t i tell the story every time i promote this this incredible product is this pillow that i love so much in fact i'm getting on a plane a couple of hours going to cleveland for some business and i'm going to bring my on my pillow travel pillow with me i i can't now i can't sleep without it it's the best pillow ever made but but you you know you lost everything and you were you were hopelessly mired in addiction and you lost your your home your your livelihood your family you found god you always wear your.

mike lindell crack cocaine india donald trump fortyfive eagles cleveland fortyfive minutes
"crack cocaine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And order what are experts telling you about what they see in this plan at least as it stands so far i mean experts generally like the stuff that trump isn't emphasis emphasizing so the treatment stuff that that's like particularly what if you talk to opioid policy experts that's what they wanna see that's what they want to see the big focus on the new york times recently did this piece on how would you spend one hundred billion dollars over five years and nearly half on average based on talking to thirty experts would go to treatment so that's what experts who really want this to focus on and then there is some talk still about reducing the amount of opioid prescriptions that us still prescribed way more opioids and other countries around the world but the criminal justice stuff that's what experts want and be and besides i mean we've tried these strategies and pass drug crises we tried it during the crack cocaine during method epidemic we try to during the previous heroin epidemic in the seventies and really these policies just don't seem to be very effective i mean we've had these policies in place for decades now and we still have the opioid epidemic so that's that's assignment like these policies aren't very effective and generally that's what they want the emphasize so to some degree what president trump has emphasizes kind of backwards whereas like president the president is emphasizing this criminal justice stuff but experts want treatment stuff and that that seems to be a big conflict right now we'll is the president gonna leave.

new york times crack cocaine trump president heroin one hundred billion dollars five years
"crack cocaine" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on KOIL

"These cops that they knew this guy had an automatic weapon they knew that they were up against tremendous firepower but they did it any way which is why we save policemen are are so courageous because they are this listen to this hey hey we're all gonna crack cocaine no casualty repeated just be advisor to automattic fire fully automatic fire from an elevated addition cake cover political as yet okay hey autodial out of rain out door and he's very an hour week in gear we need to get an honor not guy iran elsewhere wild all right dan you heard the their outside this guy's door on a scale a thousand i'd say in terms of danger that's over a thousand yesterday here in the back of an equity ended up you can tell the the the emotional offer pretension they're failing and you know none of them ran away from that challenge may quick themselves again between the bad guy and they'll protect area i wanted to go to the radio an attack up with them uh a lot of brave individuals who can great work there they really did and i don't know sometimes that we really give these guys the appreciation that they deserve you heard that two sheriff sam page what are you think absolutely well when i heard her then you know i think back in the man whom we've been owned with when you hear automatic fire and it and you gotta make the breach you've got to gobi call your you know your responsibility is stop at active shooter and they were they went growth quarter threatened they stock them you know i wanna ask you dan because i lived on the massachusetts rhode island border when a you know back in the 80s and every time i drive in the massachusetts mandatory oneyear prison said of i happen to bring my legal gone i had a licensed to carry in rhode island across the state wine and i that you were in charge during the boston marathon bombing you at the incident commander at the time and is in.

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"crack cocaine" Discussed on 100:1 The Crack Legacy

100:1 The Crack Legacy

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"crack cocaine" Discussed on 100:1 The Crack Legacy

"And very concentrated focus from the war on drugs on crack cocaine than the connection has been through a change in mandates and police departments and also a chain changes in law i'm curious what you think about my theory i think there is a connection in the sense that the war on drugs just by its very nature shifted resources to drug enforcement massive resources to drug enforcement and because of the crack cocaine epidemic so called to the black community resources worship to to law enforcement the clinton crime bill promised eight billion dollars to put a hundred thousand more police on us streets throughout the '90s local and state police also got federal support in acquiring military great hardware for fighting the war on drugs it then had consequences as well for the law the law that governs the encounters between police and citizens begin to change it used to be many many years ago that you could you obviously could arrest someone on probable cause well that law was changed so that in in cases of the supreme court so that in fact you could inquire of someone unless than probable cause stop unreasonable suspicion well what is reasonable suspicions this reasonable suspicion takes into account your race in all my stereotypes about you and limited information i have about you so when you think about of ba substantial police presence in communities of color focused on young men focused on crack it's not a surprise that these things will happen and then you add to that frankly i think you have to add to the lethal force to some degree on both sides.

crack cocaine law enforcement clinton eight billion dollars