36 Burst results for "contributing editor"

"contributing editor" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

05:23 min | Last month

"contributing editor" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

"I was ready to put on a helmet all hundred and thirty five pounds and that time i was ready to go out and play but i had not taken a single note i mean he had. He had me. Just enthralled. I was and so what i had to do was called stapleton airport and the time timing and do the old white pages telephone will bill mccartney please pick up the white pages telephone and he did and being the good guy that he was he i said bill. I forgot to take not goes. I noticed that you weren't doing your job. And and i said well can we do. The interview over goes well of course of course and though we did the whole interview overly this time i took notes and i wrote the story and i had the scoop. That bill mccartney was in town. This is long before the internet. So we have the scoop. That bill mccartney was interviewing for the job and he was gonna make nebraska. You know his number one rival and and it was turned out to be a very good story. But i mean i i i was the first reporter in colorado the talk to bill mccartney the first person in colorado to get one of his pep talks and i just ca. I completely lost it as i was saying. You go by the way. You're the first person to do the first two interviews bill mccartney in colorado. He was wired fired and inspired. All of my gosh she was it was it was the ultimate then when he leaned down into my face. Are you tired of seeing this stadium. Fuller red extensions thinking. Oh yes yes coach. Yes and i was just. I was completely lost. I was just. I think i was actually still in college and working for the cameron. I got set up there. And oh my goodness. He had me hook line and sinker. Now he packed in you were wet behind the ears. You're not those canal. You're old and cynical. And you're an ink ink-stained wretches today. But then i would sit there and scribble down but yes sure you're going to beat nebraska twenty twenty years mac. I'm sorry to tell you that but you ain't gonna do it. You know what four years later he did and he turned the tables on on the whole big eight. Yeah coach mac. Yeah he he He had me. You had me going the hallway. And and and i still to this day when i talked to coach. Mccartney i i i you know. He gets that look in his eye. And it's you know you forget about everything except what he's telling. You can get a little inside baseball here. So she'll out of practice a couple years ago and that'll were opposite sides of the field and we always get together and kind of compare notes..

Mccartney nebraska colorado today four years later stapleton airport hundred and thirty five pounds twenty twenty years mac bill mccartney single note first reporter first two interviews bill first person couple years ago one cameron mccartney
Fresh "contributing editor" from WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:04 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh "contributing editor" from WTOP 24 Hour News

"The new Ionic by Hyundai for hybrid and electric vehicles You can trust visit fit small dot com Bob Inland Wtlv Trash Storm Team four's Amelia Drink mainly clear and comfortable out there on this Wednesday with temperatures in the seventies for the evening hours and Overnight lows in the sixties. Mostly sunny and warmer tomorrow mid to upper eighties by Friday. We're warming to around 90 degrees, with plenty of sunshine. As the humidity builds back in on Saturday, we could have some late day showers and storms on Saturday Sundays looking driver McGee with highs around 90 and partly sunny skies. Storm team for meteorologist Amelia Draper in Annapolis. 76. Buoys at 72 Bristowe 76 down to the sixties overnight were brought to you by long fence 20% off on savings on fences, decks and papers. Go too long fence dot com Schedule your free estimate today. 8 10. The pandemic has not stopped the hackers of the world Data breaches are up and on pace to set a record for the year. Consumer man, Herb Weisbaum, a contributing editor of checkbook.

Annapolis Amelia Draper Hyundai Saturday 20% Friday Mcgee Today Herb Weisbaum Tomorrow Mid Around 90 Degrees Saturday Sundays 72 Bristowe 76 Seventies Upper Eighties Bob Inland Dot Com Amelia Sixties This Wednesday
"contributing editor" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

04:44 min | Last month

"contributing editor" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

"We made it through our number one. did go k brady might need to look out here. They listen to that that dude. When's the last time he bought a meal zone here in greeley Brown probably monrovia. That guys it's like a i would say about You know walking around boulder. Tad's gonna seeming with brady. You walk around greeley colorado with the brady halls like walking around with elvis. You know the the girls were throwing stuff at him. The guys wanted. Jake is and it's a pretty good existence. Yeah can't be easy in your rule. Though i mean having to cater to neagle deal. It's actually not bad and it's kind of funny because he'll tell you himself that anytime he's ad and around town they're always asking are you. Colfax techs can happen now. I can see how that could happen. Now it's good philippines here today and reading a well-deserved week off and so We got to fill ins all week long but Being here and you kinda knew. Is he her lot of ram talk yesterday. Going to hear a lot of buffalo talk today although here just couple minutes. who were. We're gonna talk. Some denver broncos got jeff legwold coming up from espn dot com ladies has connected as anybody in the national football league. And i say that you know how peter gammons used to be in baseball years ago. I mean he was the guy i mean. If it'd happened in in in in baseball. Peter gammons was together new leggings. That guy and i'm not sure a lot of people realize how connected he is but He's got a phenomenal Rolodex zimba's rolodex z. More do you know what i mean. I'm thirty so i'm kind of played an old guy. Yeah i didn't realize it was dealing with you know seasons citizen here. I remember life before the but you know it's funny. You say that just a couple of days ago. I forget how came up. My wife and i were talking and What am i stops along the way..

peter gammons Peter gammons yesterday Jake jeff legwold today thirty philippines monrovia couple of days ago brady couple minutes citizen denver broncos elvis k brady Colfax years football league greeley colorado
Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

Vogue Podcast

09:26 min | 6 months ago

Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

"She's perfected the art of living in the spotlight. But motherhood has opened digi hadeed up to a new world and a new set of priorities. I'm khloe mao evoked contributing editor. And this is g. G in wonderland knew that i have that animal in me says gee hadeed relaxed. In bright. from december cold the twenty five year old model is astrid colored quarterhorse named dallas. And telling me about the birth of her baby in september here at her home in bucks county pennsylvania following a fourteen and a half hour labor at her side. Were her partner zane. Malik her mother yulong to her sister. Bella and a local midwife and her assistant when you see someone do that you look at them a bit differently. I probably looked crazy actually. She says a giggle tinged with pride. I was an animal woman. Mallet cut the baby. Click that she was out says gee gee gazing forward through dallas alert ears as we plod through the upper fields of harmony hollow. The farm owned by longest boyfriend. Joseph goalie a construction firm ceo. I was so exhausted. And i looked up. He's holding her. It was so cute. She's in a cropped long as puffer stretch. Czar jeans and warned black riding boots and looks like neither a harried mother of a ten week old nor paparazzi ducking supermodel with her hair roped into a smooth bun bear face and tiny gold hoop earrings. She resembles mostly her teenage self. An equestrian who showed jumped competitively while growing up in her hometown of santa barbara. California what i really wanted for my experience was to feel like okay. This is a natural thing that women are meant to do. She planned to deliver it a new york city hospital but then the realities of covert hit particularly sequestering here ninety minutes from manhattan and the limits on numbers in the delivery room which would preclude yolanda and bella from being present. Then she and malik watched the two thousand eight documentary the business of being born which is critical of medical interventions and depicts a successful home birth. We both looked at each other. And we're like. I think that's the call. Gd says they placed a blow up bath in their bedroom and sent their three cats and border collie away when the midwife expressed concern that the sphinx and maine coon felines might puncture the tub with their claws. Malik ask gee-gee what music she wanted to hear and she surprised him by requesting the audio of favourite children's novel the indian in the cupboard. He downloaded the film because it was one of his favorites too and they spent the early hours of labor watching it together. That's something we'd never talked about. But in that moment we discovered we both loved. Gd says bash family. She then tells me that malik. The former one direction star turned solo artist. Who has famously press shy and declined to be interviewed for. This article likened his own experience of her birth to align documentary. he'd seen in which a male lion paces nervously outside the cave. The lion s delivers her cubs z. Was like that's how i felt you feel so helpless to see the person you love in pain. Doom dula malibu high classmate carson. Meyer had prepared her for the moment where the mother feels. She can't go any longer without drugs. I had to dig deep. Jichi says i knew it was going to be the craziest pain in my life. But you have to surrender to it and be like this is what it is. I loved that you'll monda and the midwife coach through the pain there definitely was a point where i was like. I wonder what it would be. Like with an epa darryl how it would be different jichi frankly. My midwife looked at me and was like you're doing it. No one can help you your past the point of the epidermal anyway. So you'd be pushing exactly the same way in a hospital bed so she kept pushing. I know my mom zane. Bella were proud of me but at certain points i saw each of them in terror says she ducking under a leafless branch. Dow also who've sucking in the muddy terrain afterward z and. I looked at each other. And we're like we can have some time before we do that again. The baby girl named kai digi revealed on instagram in january from the arabic for the chosen one was a weekly. She was so bright right away. Gd says adding that. The baby's heart rate stayed consistent throughout the labor. That's what i wanted for her. A peaceful bringing to the world. Kyw's world has so far remained small. Her mother rarely leaves the bucolic corner of horse country where the hadeed put down roots in two thousand seventeen. Malik bought a nearby farm. The shoot for this story. In early december at a studio in manhattan was the first time g g had left her daughter since birth yolanda took over caregiving duties even bringing her granddaughter along to feed the miniature. Ponies mama and mccoo. Gee-gee has no nanny no baby nurse. None of the traditional celebrity crutches of new motherhood during our interview the baby stayed with her father and zan's mother tricia who is visiting from england for a month to help she decided to completely take care of the baby alone says yolanda odd. And i think that bond is so important. The dutch former model turned real housewives of beverly hills. Alum was my welcoming party. When i arrived at the farm booming. Hello her arms wide on the threshold in. Camo print puffer and boots. I'm proud of her face on magazine but seeing her give birth was a whole other level of proud yolanda says you go from looking at her as a daughter to looking at her as a fellow mother. The natural transitions and generational shifts of new motherhood are at play in the household. It is a family happily influx on the sprawling. Thirty two acre property. The handful of cottages are designated for different siblings. But this summer. When g g moved out of her cottage into zan's house bella and brother anwar graduated to larger cottages leaving. The smallest is a guest house. We're still close by says she but we have our space to be our own little family. She hosted thanksgiving dinner for the first time this year with zero mother cooking the turkey g g. A prolific home-cooked herself made banana. Pi and baked yolanda favourite tatham. Bella occurred over stuffing and spiked apple. Cider in the kubota tv g g got her christmas tree early for the occasion dressing it with personal ornaments. That she and malik have exchanged over the years. The most recent being glass nintendo console a reference to a favor quarantine activity. I decorated fully. Without my mom's help. And i think i did her. Gd says they are tribe publicly known for their closeness yolanda the doting den. Mother gee-gee the fresh-faced protective older sister. Bella the edgier veronica deejays betty and aloof baby brother on war joining g g and yolanda in the kitchen for latinos and cinnamon rolls before a horseback ride eyewitness. These rules confirmed. Yolanda has the sink drinking a smoothie and finishing gee-gee sentences when she grasps for word g g threatens to have a connection if anwar eats her cinnamon roll when he ambles out of his cottage. But motherhood is a new phase and it will be up to g g to decide whether it belongs on the silhouettes of social media. I think she wants to be real. Online's as bella twenty four by phone from new york city but until her child wants to be in the spotlight and can make the decision herself. She doesn't want to put her in that position. Bela who splits her. Time between her. Soho loft and the farm and facetime with her niece and sister every morning says she already enjoys reading books. Aloud that jeeves to read to her including the rainbow fish and the very hungry caterpillar. It's pretty nostalgic. Bella says it could be argued that we are all hungry caterpillars this year cocooning and comforting with hope of emerging bright winged vaccinated g. G wants split her time between her condo and no-ho and the first class cabin of airplanes when lockdowns began she had just returned from walking fashion shows in four countries and discovering. She was pregnant on the other end of covid. She will emerge as a mother. Happily headquartered in rural pennsylvania. Still a supermodel. But one determined to lead more secluded less peripatetic life. I always want to be here fulltime. She tells me. I love the city but this is where i'm happiest furious. Speculation and countless think pieces have attended the question of what this time will mean. Will we slow down flee cities for less frenzied. More mindful life in many ways. Gee-gee the bodyman of such ideas. The sheiks glamorous version yes but also a person drawn to reassessment. It feels like now. I'm in a different place in my life. She says and she does seem genuinely at home

Yolanda Malik Khloe Mao Gee Hadeed Yulong Bella Joseph Goalie Zane Dallas Dula Malibu Jichi Monda Kai Digi Astrid Bucks County KYW Manhattan Mallet
Is the internet breaking your parents brains?

The Big Story

05:27 min | 7 months ago

Is the internet breaking your parents brains?

"I'm jordan rowling's. This is the big story. Bonnie christian is a contributing editor at the week. She also writes a column entitled the lesser kingdom at christianity. Today and she is a fellow at defense priorities. Hello bonnie thank you so much for having me. You're very welcome. I think we have A common thread. And i think a lot of people listening who are about our age Probably have it too. So why don't you start by rewinding to a time for me it was late. Ninety s maybe a little later for you but take us back to how the parents of our generation approached the internet. Yeah well so my experience. And i think many people's experience it sounds like your experience was that there was a real Caution a real concern about the early internet particularly children and young adults using it on their own without supervision and you know without good judgment to recognize what could be dangerous concerns about the amount of time that we spent online. There were concerns about I think the the fear back then was like you'd be in an aol chat room and someone pretending to be your peer who's actually like a an adult pedophile is going to lure you out and kidnap you There were concerns about porn. I remember In my high school computer class. They they really drilled into us that yours needed to google before you went to a website because if you just typed in a url and maybe you misspelled it. All the pornographers bought up all the misspellings of the websites. That kids want to go to. So you misspelled disney dot com just like boom. It's going to be the worst thing ever. I never heard that one yeah. I don't think it's shoe but there was a lot of concern and in a sense. You know i think real concern that. There are a lot of bad things on the internet. Did we know At the time what. The real dangers of the rest of the internet would be. I don't think anyone back then anticipated. I mean maybe professionals but in in sort of like the common Understanding don't think anyone anticipated what social media would be like And how it would us and how it would really affect our thought patterns and and the way we consume information and the way we that information Anyone really guessed what that would be like. How did we learn. Exactly what The internet but yeah in particular social media was doing to our brains. And what do we know now about what's happening in our heads. Yeah so there's been there's been increased attention to this For some time. Now one Book i mentioned in my article with his A good read though. I wonder if he's going to put out an updated edition to address more of social media. Because it was it was published in two thousand eleven is about called the shallows what the internet is doing to our brains Written by a guy named nicholas carr and he focuses really on the effects of the medium. How it it changes how we think It makes it shortens our attention span at it. Interrupts our ability to concentrate our ability To just sort of contemplate or meditate with their own thoughts And you know he wrote that a almost a decade ago now You know before twitter was really a thing and the way it is now. Instagram didn't exist. Facebook was was very much like a place for just sort of meaningless little friendly interactions and so since then i think all of the trends that he identified early have only accelerated and The the introduction and increasing ubiquity of social media You know it really is designed to addict us in a sense. I don't think that's too strong a word. It's all very carefully designed by very smart people for return usage to get us picking up our phones five hundred times a day and that's not an exaggeration. Pick up our funds hundreds of times a day. We go to these sites dozens of times a day that that can't help but change how we think and what we think about who is most vulnerable to that kind of manipulation. I guess if you want to call it that yeah we're i think we're all vulnerable. That said i did write the article with a generational angle and did focus on older people My p- my parents are in the boomer generation. As our i think you know The parents of most of my peers. And what's what's different generational only Is that we do find that. Older people are more likely to share misinformation And that like to share it. Unwittingly and that age more than other demographic indicators like education or political perspectives Wealth things like that Age is the by far and away the the most determining factor of that likelihood and anecdotally. That is something that I've encountered again and again with Friends of mine with readers online both before this article came out and certainly after that this is a a a problem and again by no means exclusive to one generation. There are plenty of younger people who have very dysfunctional internet habits In which i very often would include myself but there is a an a sense in which older people can be more vulnerable because of the lack of Digital literacy despite the pure happenstance of how old they happen to be when this stuff came

Jordan Rowling Bonnie Christian Bonnie AOL Nicholas Carr Disney Google Instagram Twitter Facebook
2020: The year in review

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:05 min | 8 months ago

2020: The year in review

"To look at the year's biggest stories. I was joined by three of the newspapers correspondence on the front line. Reporting the huge events of this year and their effects on the art world and a brady is our market editor. He's a buck is our contemporary correspondent and gareth harris is our chief contributing editor inevitably as we tackle the year's event to major global stories dominated the discussions the coronavirus pandemic and the death of george floyd and the fight for racial justice. I'd like to begin by talking about the effective of covid on the market. And and obviously this is your area of expertise. And i want to begin by talking about the fares. Because in a way they've been the marker of this exponential rise in the market over the last decade but they fail just as suddenly this year. I told me about fares on the covid back in march and sort of early mart taper off maastricht happened and it was kind of happened a week beforehand. It might have been okay and had happened week. Afterwards i think it definitely would have been cancelled and myself a lot of other journalists. Went out again. See the fat and it had very strange kind of atmosphere. He sort of jokingly foot tapping and elba bumping. But i think people sort of thought that something viruses affecting the outside world won't penetrate walls in the champagne and kind of that elite nature is. Shut down an exhibitor had got tested positive covid and after that so many people attend to call the virus at the fair and some of them were really radio and in intensive care and i think that was just a for me. That was kind of big wake-up cool overseas in the uk went into lockdown the us. After that the armory we happen to have the same sort of time but it was. It definitely was a kind of think. Reality shock that this is going to be something that really was can affect all of us. It didn't matter our were or whether you were off a this forest and have any kind of respect for face of mesa foundries and it's just as one said to me. Everything kind of fell off a cliff in late off training. And then you just saw this sort of chain of cancellations volvo fairs. I mean it's fair to say that the the big fairs have had a terrible year right. Yes they even had an awful. Yeah i was thinking back to when we speak russia beginning of the doing a year ahead. Podcasts i remember when i was leaving afterwards sending i think maggie a message saying we didn't mention carina. Virus and thousand mistake is at that point. We were recording sort of sauce january and we of it very much. They'll as an asian problem and a lot of the talk then was about whether autism hong kong was going to be cancelled and it was at the end of january but i think people still thought that it was going to be quite contained a there but after that east be the fence being canceled was knees. Now fast. Going ahead is news. Just the just hasn't really been anything since about much aside from these fares in in shanghai in november which did manage to go ahead that is a different world to rest of the world maidment. And i think we're really going to see any until about late. May next year by the looks of aside from say ought to buy which is saying that it will go ahead and march but whether actually will not very much master of debate gareth. That's why isn't it all. The fares are sort of basically postponing. And then there's going to be this glut of that happened in the middle of twenty twenty one. I mean i think the all world is beginning to think about a return to some kind of post virus malady but that's difficult is just said because the twenty twenty one calendar is looking quite crunchy. Really got balls. The hong kong is the first honor scheduled kickoff next. Mary and yams new york is next summer. So think there's about six or seven major phase in a row so within a few weeks within night mates at that tape off maastricht delayed Home call up. Awesome hong kong freeze. Neil and then our puzzle as well and then freeze. La in july. But we've been here before. Yeah i mean but we saw. The september was going to be back to back this year with fairs. That were delayed for the spring valley summer. They weren't they never actually happened. So i sort of we could be faced with the crunch or we could be faced with nothing at all this weird september. It's really hot today. It's difficult isn't because dealers and clubs helps to prioritize where they're going to go next spring some depending on all sorts of things like a vaccine and all other source of corona sort of things. I mean i just wonder how dealers will where to go. I mean i spoke to dominique levy a few weeks ago. And she said she's going to have to prioritize not would be quite difficult to do but i suppose collectors just itchen allow curator's itching to get back to in real life

Gareth Harris George Floyd Carina Mesa Volvo Maggie Russia Autism UK Hong Kong Shanghai Gareth United States Spring Valley Mary Neil New York LA Dominique Levy
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 10 months ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 10 months ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Tax Return Report: Did Trump Go Beyond His Legal Limits?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:23 min | 11 months ago

Tax Return Report: Did Trump Go Beyond His Legal Limits?

"President trump reportedly made hundreds of millions of dollars lived a lavish lifestyle, but yet paid little to no federal income taxes in recent years that's according to a New York Times investigation. So was trump taking advantage of legal loopholes or might have broken the law somehow well, Lee Shepherd is a contributing editor at the publication tax notes and has a law degree from northwestern university in his here's thanks for being here this morning high. So as you've dug into this reporting in the New York Times, do you see evidence that the president might have might have broken laws here? I see mostly factual issues We sort of have a mixed question of law on fact, on his big abandonment loss, which is kind of a hard thing to know because we don't know the circumstances and because it was a big loss as the time says, it has to get a lot of approvals. So the IRS might be nervous about it. So there would be a lot of arguing about it. you also have a bunch of factual questions like did he pay vodka consulting fee and you know was did she do work? You know was that work worth that kind of money things like that So I mean, presumably, some of these questions would be answered in an audit and when you talk about factual questions in Texas I mean, would it just be a matter of you should not have done that you need to pay a big fine now or could there be places where they would say well, this was some sort of evasion that went beyond that was more serious. In an audit, it doesn't mean you did something bad. It means you did a lot of stuff and you have a big tax return and they're curious about it and they wanna make sure everything's. All right. If. You get something that they don't agree with and they think you know you really really should've known better. We have civil fines in our law we have a whole bunch of them. But they're just fines. But yes, on audit you argue about those two. I mean the president has said he was smart. He said that in the past about finding loopholes in in in the tax system to. Take, advantage of would. Would you agree with that? I mean, did he do smart things here or or not? So smart and potentially you know as we say, every legal wrong carryovers are not loopholes. I mean this is. This is the way the law works. The question is, did you did your behavior fit into? You know deductible expenses. Did you prove the amount of this loss you know are you entitled to carry this? Loss? Back. I'm a seventy thousand deduction for hairstyling for time on television show that was sort of eye-popping to a lot of people that the kind of thing you would see in a lot of people's. TAX RETURNS IT'S Entertainers yes. Entertainers fight about that kind of stuff routinely. That would become in the entertainment industry. Oh, good. Lord Gif, and he's also in a weird position because. And they've times points to Saudi sells his lifestyle. As S at that's that's his image even when he was just a real estate developer, that's what he was doing. So you know a certain amount of what looks personal. Maybe deductible.

Donald Trump President Trump New York Times Lee Shepherd IRS Contributing Editor Texas
Lockdown in Honolulu

Travel with Rick Steves

05:06 min | 11 months ago

Lockdown in Honolulu

"Don Wallace is on the line from Honolulu. He tells US authorities they're put in a new set of restrictions because of a recent surge in Cova cases on Oahu justice they were hoping they could start reopening. It's crucial tourism industry. Don's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine and he's updated us on Hawaii tourism in the past and done you're you're out there about twenty five, hundred miles away from anywhere else in the middle of the Pacific. Hawaii depends so much on tourism and I would imagine it's been quite a stressful time with the coronavirus continuing to spread. What's it like in Hawaii right now. Well the whiny started out as soon as thirty thousand tourists stopped coming way did very well on the virus were the lowest in the nation for states. Now we've had a spike starting at the fourth of July and August it began to get up to two hundred cases a day. I know that doesn't sound like much but. you don't have that many hospital facilities. That, we had to do a banning perks, beaches hiking trails and gatherings over ten So is the response and the impact of the corona virus different from different islands. who gets most of it in fact, it's almost miniscule on now big island, the ninety MILICI, those islands, the people can pretty much go cleese they. You wear masks you're allowed to fly into a walk who without according to you. But people who can't find their without of quarantine. What about people in the tourism industry? Are they impatient or they realizing that haste makes waste when it comes to getting over the so they can start making money again. It's a very interesting case people very concerned. There's no voice irresponsibly pushing for white opener light opening deal like Texas, did for instance. And I think that's because the workers sixty seventy percent of the are. No a minimum wage workers they don't have good health plans. They carry the burden of this, and the other part is the Theresa Stop Coming. Can Americans from the mainland fly into Hawaiian vacation if they want to yeah, you can come We get about three thousand a day. And I think the hitch there is you do a fourteen day quarantine and you check into your hotel and you can't leave your hotel room. The impact on tourism would be you're probably wondering around the beaches thinking this is like it was back in the old days. You're very much in nineteen threes, Hawaii. Waikiki is a ghost town. That's not entirely a bad thing We think tasteful Hawaii empty beaches, very clean water clean here you feel like being caress be hanging out with the beach boys. Old School Beach Boys. And if you do go out to dinner, for instance, you may have the restaurant to yourself just one or two people. Magic. So That's interesting. I mean, of course the you've lost the revenue, but you've regained your beaches as far as the locals go there was something in the news and I think you wrote about it about gun toting extremists who are wearing Hawaii shirts. It doesn't seem like the Aloha spirit to me what's Really thought it. Up in the news, there's one of these Gun Group extremists start showing up at the black lives, matter protests and other places. Instead of what they weren't Loescher it's Kinda create a sort of scary dissidence. Then people here reacted really strongly. Ensured is about Aloha Aloha is welcoming. It's inclusive. And it's actually something. I wrote an article about how Hawaiian shirts fight extremism. Hungary magazines. It's a love story about two sisters from Portland. Hawaii's eighteen twenty. Married South Asian immigrants helped create yellow her shirt industry. It's a beautiful beautiful story and it's that Louis Spirit that sort of loved that easygoing nece that caring for others. What a what a dissonance by these? What do they call? Boo Goo Boo Voice Blue Boys. Okay. Well I hope you have to handle and then we can read about that in your article and then very quickly what's open now if you are in Hawaii, museums, clubs, restaurants what's The dishes and Him after limited reopening had to close again. We hooked to get them back up in a couple of weeks neither good their little outdoor cafes and restaurants they've shifted to putting cafe tables out on the sidewalks and even the streets in some cases. So Madonna. Of Lua. And you know, thankfully, why is a very outdoor culture? So eating outdoors is. No big concession. So that lends itself to social distancing done. It's so great to have you on. We'll talk again soon I hope everything goes well with Hawaii and tourism, and your work there done Wallace's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine. He's written the French house about buying a fixer upper on the island and Brittany and he's written articles about what's going on. In Hawaii these days

Hawaii Don Wallace Honolulu Magazine Contributing Editor Aloha Aloha Honolulu United States Old School Beach Boys Cova Oahu Hungary Portland Waikiki Texas Louis Spirit Brittany
DefCon 2020 Recap

This Week in Tech

04:10 min | 1 year ago

DefCon 2020 Recap

"How about let's talk about DEFCON. How's that been used to be Robert? We would prepare for this week. Because, there'd be all. We've learned about all sorts of flaws and security problems, and so forth in this in the talks that black hat and DEFCON. Is What would happen to us? Is that every the the abstracts would come out and every contributing editor who was looking for a headline would right up the end of the world, because XYZ right exploit is coming without ever looking at the talk and then we would feel people for a week until the actual say, well, they really have to get to your system. There actually was one and I don't know if this was a a black, a black half, a checkpoint software revealed Achilles, which is a nasty flaw in the qualcomm snack. snapdragon. I've got snacks my mind after our. Joyful Conversation I snap dragon chip These vulnerabilities affect forty percent of the android market include funds from Google Samsung LG Xiaomi one plus. And more there are patches. Thank God was is a black hat revelation Robert. That was actually a Defcon I'm trying to bring up the slide deck. One of the things that was different about DEFCON. This year was the fact that they provided all of the talks ahead of time. Nice because they're all prerecorded, and so you've got the slide decks. You've actually got the videos. You've got the right up the white papers. That one was was particularly interesting. The talk was hard to follow because the researcher. Definitely wasn't English as a first language. But as you go through, you realize what he's doing. He was able to take complete control of an android device and you could do in such a way that the person using the android device wouldn't actually know. Route control of his device. That's terrible. he is. Now it says it's opponent own qualcomm compute DSP for fun and profit. It's not the current crop of snapdragon chips. Right, it's an older chip. So if you have a phone, you bought in the last couple of years, you're okay. There are patches, but this is the problem, the older you're on the less likely. You're going to get patches. and. It's not necessarily even the older phones because you have to remember when you're talking about a billion plus devices that are sold every year. A lot of those are low cost devices and low cost devices will use these older chips. Yeah. It's a forty percent of the overall smart smartphone market. So this is a lot of phones. that. Need the patch that many of which will not get the patch there six flaws and they give you complete an absolute control. Of those ones how do you get it on their way? Is it with malware with a with a malicious? APP, for instance? the. Yeah. So. There were a couple of ways that they were shown the the one that I was looking at was actually not publicly available. It was a demonstration that was shown to me. Actually part of DEFCON is the the discord they started up this discord that has all of the. Only. Meet throughout the conference and. Organiz. Yeah. Yeah. Just like it would be if you were actually walking through, they have a wall of sheep discord. Gentle. Yes? Yes. Although it's harder to do if you're not there. Yeah spot the Fed on the discord extreme, right? Like it's not just a militias install, you can target it through video street, you're kidding wrecked. Surrender. On the chip, any incoming content. Oh. My God. So this is A. This is A. This is one that you would clutch your pearls. Unforgiving and I think every silicon engineer has this sort of in the back of their nightmare brain because once you well, we saw that with the meltdown inspector, the flaws until chips once it's in hardware. Mitigation is not easy and and more importantly. especially in the world of Android may not there may be no, no cavalry will come or the untouchable. Jailbreak we saw we saw last year for older iphones to it, right.

Qualcomm Robert Contributing Editor FED Researcher Google Engineer Samsung
Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

The Big Story

07:44 min | 1 year ago

Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

"Now is the covid nineteen pandemic continues to grow, so are the parallels being drawn between it and another deadly virus that struck the globe more than a century ago, talking about the Spanish flu. Guys. We've been taking a look at some of the video from nineteen sixty eight. There's a lot of pieces of video that look very similar to what we're seeing today. Implementing the images and emotions coming out of Minneapolis too familiar to what happened right here in Ferguson Missouri in two thousand fourteen George Floyd arrest on a Minneapolis street corner, and his frantic pleas for help have given rise to one of the most turbulent periods in recent American history. The question that I can't stop asking myself. How does this all and You may have heard. At various points this year that we are living history right now. The truth is we're always living history. It's just that some of us can afford to ignore it until it boils over. But when racism and police brutality, and the rage that comes in response to that are laid bare for the world to see. In the middle of a pandemic and martial law is threatened. And nobody gets to look away. Everyone wants to know what happens next. Do, we even have a historical precedent for what's happening in America and around the world right now. What is the larger context of how we arrived at this moment? What are we missing when we watch people discuss it on. Cable News. And what needs to happen now? But does each of US need to do? For this to be a moment that changes the world for the better. That's still possible. I'm Jordan Rawlings, and this is the big story. Andre Demise is a writer and journalist, a contributing editor at Maclean's and a Nathanson fellow in history at York University. He is one of the smartest guests. We ever have on this podcast hi Andre. How's it going toward? It's going about as well as it can more importantly, how are you? doing my best I'm trying to reduce stress as much as I can by hanging out with my children and you know. Occasionally occasionally seeing partner but we're both in school. We've both got tons of homework were both busy plus jobs and everything else so yeah, we're even busier than before. The whole lockdown happened. Figure that and now you're spending this week with white people like me, asking you to please explain the historical context of this well I mean yeah, yeah, I am spending a lot of time explaining shift away, people. I mean I all. I can say I sincerely. Thank you for it. you know I? Just I find you incredibly smart and able to help me. learn some stuff from this. Thanks for taking the time Oh. Stop stuttered. Stop your flattery. I'm about to Leeann as I can plan. Why don't you just start by telling me while you watch everything? That's been happening this past week. What's going through your head? People say things like we've been through worse or we've been here before, and I have to ask the question. When when when of we've been here before we've been here before. Quote Unquote in nine eighteen during the Spanish flu pandemic. We've been here. Nine, hundred nineteen during the May Day riots and during red summer. We've been here before in nineteen sixty eight. But. My question is when when is all this happened at the same time? This is not this is unprecedented. My. Question is what is supposed to look like when when it's all over when the dust settles. Because at some point, there's going to be a change of some kind. Throughout history what happens in the course of a popular uprising that moves to straight up volt. The two methods that the ruling class can use. To try and tamp it down. One is use of force. This is where the Jimmy breaks down. This is where the state has to reveal as violence. And come out against the people with arms, or can try placating the people you can try it for example, the Civil Rights Act. It can try the declaration of the rights. It can try any number of mechanisms. To make that, the populace still has some faith in the state, but what? This looks like I don't know that there's anything to placate like there's I. Don't know that there's any mechanism. The state can try to convince people that social contract is worth upholding. That's the thing that keeps going through my head. Is You know what kind of concession can be made universally across? You know the entire United States that would actually mollify the anger I do know some of the answers to those questions I do know. That and this is something that I've been talking about over the last few years. That capitalism depends on racism to be able to reproduce and propagate itself. It's just plain fact If you beat Donald Harassed, who is a former economist Stanford also happens to be the father of Kamla Harris the former presidential candidate. But apparently they didn't. They didn't really have much of a relationship, but throughout American history. The the use of Racist promises the promising of white rages. what's been described as racial republicanism by scholars like David. What that does is incentivize the white working class against their black peers. It has the white working class essentially the. Generates like we are the only people that deserve to have. Rights. Everybody else is a on a cast below us. And until that cycle is abolished until we move away from a system of capital that accumulates the value of people's Labor and the crews it to a few select people. And then spreads out the rewards among certain other people, and then makes promises to certain people. Until that cycle is broken. I'm afraid we're going to be seeing this for the rest of our lives. I mean you're a fellow in history what? have. We seen that even close to like this in the past that ended with concessions. You have to go back very far. I mean you can. You can look at for example I mean not. Bolivia has been taken over in ashes coup. But if you look at Bolivia for example, the the presidency of evil, Morales and the Movement for socialism in Bolivia, lifted thousands upon thousands upon thousands of people out of out of poverty. It increased literacy rates incorporated indigenous eighty into the broader society. You had the the coca farmers. The the coca does I their their practices and their agricultural methods were incorporated into the broader nation. So that you didn't have eight of. The United States rating forms and burning crops. You headed that this is this is a a plants, but this is also a way of life that is valid, and the fact that it's been twisted into a normal trade has nothing to do with the people that originated the practice, so look at Bolivia for example like that. That was up until very recently and experiments in creating a broader. Social Democracy that was more inclusive and helped marginalized people, so

United States Bolivia Minneapolis Andre Demise George Floyd Coca Farmers Jordan Rawlings Ferguson Missouri America Leeann Partner York University Jimmy Donald Harassed Contributing Editor Morales David
Floppies: The Disks that Changed the World

Command Line Heroes

10:56 min | 1 year ago

Floppies: The Disks that Changed the World

"Jordan Montana is a pack rat. He's the creator of games like karate and the Prince of Persia and he meticulously saved everything along the way journals sketches and storyboards all of it so it came as a bit of a shock to him when he couldn't find something he'd saved and that something was a pretty big deal back in two thousand two magner was working on Prince of Persia the sands of time. The programmers wanted to add the classic version of the game to their playstation two update as an Easter Egg. So they asked him for the original source code but when magner looked in his archives he couldn't find it. He searched everywhere the source code that he'd written on his old apple to the cody was positive. He saved had vanished fast forward. Ten years mechanisms. Dad is cleaning house and buried at the back of a closet is a ratty looking shoebox holding a bunch of dusty old three and half inch floppy disks one is labeled Prince of Persia Source Code Copyright Nineteen eighty-nine and in brackets in all caps. The word original the long lost code found at last it had sat in that box for a quarter century before being unearthed like some archaeological discovery. But this was two thousand twelve. How would he be able to get it off? Those old discs and with the data still be intact. Was it in fact too late to save his work saving our work these days? It often happens. Automatically with programs regularly pushing stuff into the cloud. We don't worry about manually savings anymore. In fact a whole new generation doesn't even know what that save icon represents side note. It is not a vending machine but for many decades saving storing and transferring. Our data had to be done using some physical media when the personal computing revolution took off which we heard about in our last episode on the Altar Eight hundred. There was one piece of technology that became synonymous with saving the floppy disk. It seems so simple. Now but floppies change the course of our history because they helped turn microcomputers into personal computers. I'm surrounded Barak and this is command. Line Heroes Unoriginal podcast from that HAP. Let's put a pin in Jordan Lechner's floppy disk discovery for a moment. Welcome back to it first. Though I want to learn how the floppy disk was born in the first place and how it became such a crucial part of the TECH WORLD FOR ALMOST FORTY YEARS. Our first stop eighteen ninety. Before electronic computers existed there were electrical mechanical computing devices and the method forgetting data in and out of them was through punchcards the size of a dollar bill when electrons computers came along in the fifties. Ibm standardized those punch cards with eighty and twelve roads. A punched hole would form one type of character. No whole meant another for a long while. Those Punch cards were the main method for data input but handling hundreds of cards for bigger. More complex programs was hugely cumbersome. There had to be a better way to save and transfer information next up paper tape which came along in the nineteen fifties to hear how paper tape played a central role in the origin of personal computing. Listen to our last episode. Paper tape had the same punched hole method of reading data as punch cards. Because it's all one tape. No one had to worry about getting cards mixed up it could carry more. Data was much faster to us but as many computers grew in capacity they needed more and more tape to store programs like punch cards. Paper tape eventually met its limit. Enter MAGNETIC TAPE. The key ingredient was mylar a tough flexible material coated with magnetic oxide to make the tape recordable nine tracks could store up to one hundred seventy five megabytes per tape. That was a big deal in fifties and sixties magnetic tape drives of ten and a half inch. Wheels became standard issue for businesses. But the problem take is that it's great for moving large chunks date of one place to another. It's really hard to search on them to find anything in particular when we would install software on our mini computers in mainframes using tate. But it really wasn't that good for anything small and portable or if we wanted to do anything interactive on our with our data that Stephen Vaughan Nichols contributing editor at CBS interactive sure. Magnetic tape could store a lot more data. He was too big and swallow. It was only practical for the mainframe world really again. There had to be a better way and that better way came along in Nineteen fifty-six when launched its very first decide drive the IBM three fifty disk storage unit. It was a component of the three or five ramic mainframe computer a machine that filled an entire room. Here's Dave Bennett. A former IBM disk and storage product engineer. There was storage in core memory. In fact the disk storage device of which ramic was the first was a storage device that permitted random access to give on record as opposed to a tape. Drive interesting thing. That disk drive. Almost didn't see the light of day because it threatened. Ibm's punch-card business but the project was eventually approved. Problem was the drive contained. Discs made of solid metal ramic literally. Wait a ton it had to be moved with forklifts and transport it by large cargo. Not the most convenient storage method but out of that came a better solution of a floppy disk was originally developed for new need and the reason was that there was an intermediate kind of storage originally. There was a computer code and then there was the computer memory. The working memory but with system three sixty there was a new class of memory in between which they called firmware and in system three sixty there was unique technology for the firmware in various forms it was either a special kind of punched card or there was a thing called. Transformer read only storage but the new need was the desire to go from these technologies two semi conductor technology in the days when semiconductor technology was volatile. That means that the memory in semiconductors went away when the power was removed so there had to be a way of recharging bringing the program back into that memory when the power was restored for loading what was called a micro program or that intermediate memory and the need for such a device is what caused the development of the floppy disk dryer so in nineteen sixty seven. A small team of engineers led by David. Noble started developing an inexpensive system for loading those micro-programmes into mainframe computers. The code name for their project was Minna. Noble personally went through all the things that he could think of including various forms of punched cards including use of tape cassettes. And I don't know what else he went through but he hit on the idea of using an inexpensive form of this based on a flexible disc very inexpensive read only mechanism. The Minnow team wanted to be able to mail their micro-programme to various locations. That needed to load it. So the product for sending that program around had to be durable enough to fly through the mail without having its data damaged some kind of casing now what they actually had to do. In order to make it maleable was they decided to put it in a plastic container that was fairly rigid and they would actually read and write the disk while. I was inside of this plastic container like an envelope of plastic envelope. And when you have a coating on a disk and a rigid head you're going to have where and when you have where you have where particles and the problem they had was that as the were particles built up it's kind of caused an avalanche effect. The particles would act as additional abrasive. And then pretty soon with the particles being loose in there. You're where the recording track out and didn't work anymore. So a really smart guy that was on that program men name. Her Thomson came up with a plan that was based on a household dusting fabric that three m soul to housewives for dusting their furniture and he put a sheet of that in there between the envelope and the disk and that material picked up the were particles and they embedded themselves in that fabric and prevented the avalanche effect and really saved the

IBM Persia Persia Source Noble Jordan Montana Magner Cody Jordan Lechner Barak Cbs Interactive Thomson Tate Stephen Vaughan Nichols Dave Bennett
Coronavirus Hot Zone: The View from the U.S. Epicenter

Science Talk

04:36 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Hot Zone: The View from the U.S. Epicenter

"Wayt GIBBS was a member of the board of editors and a senior writer at Scientific American from Nineteen Ninety. Three to two thousand six. He's contributing editor. And he's in a unique position to bring us reporting an insights about the current corona virus pandemic. While at scientific American Gibbs wrote numerous articles that gave him experience highly relevant to the current situation in one thousand nine hundred nine he wrote a piece titled Trailing Virus to research that article. He traveled into the hot zone of the highly lethal Nipah virus outbreak in Malaysia. Like Corona virus that one also spread from bats to people he co wrote the two thousand five article preparing for a pandemic the plan to fight a new flu which has obvious relevance for our current situation. That article is currently available free on our website. He interviewed Bill Gates for two thousand sixteen. Qna called Bill Gates views. Good data as key to global health. That piece is also up on the website and Gibbs wrote the two thousand sixteen article. What ails the human race about a project called the global burden of disease which began a new chapter in academia logical modelling that work originated at the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics in Seattle where it continues to this day. And we're gibbs plans to go for reporting for future podcast which brings us to the second factor that makes Gibbs's situation unique in addition to being assigns writer of great expertise in the area of Gibbs lives in Kirkland Washington the epicenter of the US Corona virus outbreak. So what we envision for. This series of podcasts is a combination of traditional science reporting and first person accounts from Gibbs about the situation in Kirkland and the surrounding area where the virus has so far hit the hardest in the US we plan on posting at least one podcast a week for the foreseeable future as the corona virus situation plays out and now. Here's what Gibbs. There's some weeks when history seems to unfold before our eyes. This past week has been one of those in the United States. And here in Kirkland Washington where I live. We have a front row seat to the fast growing. Coruna virus epidemic. My neighborhood is ground zero the hot zone on February twenty ninth we learned that Cova Nineteen had claimed its first fatality in the US here in this city of about ninety thousand on the shores of Lake Washington just across the bridge from Seattle. Is I read about the man in his fifties who had died at Evergreen Health Hospital but it seemed a distant and abstract threat suddenly felt immediate and berry real. I am a man in his fifties. I walked across my living room and looked out the window at evergreen health just on the hill less than a mile away. I thought okay here. We go we. In Kirkland and King County will be the guinea pigs testing how the public health systems in America cope with a crisis that scientists warned us would inevitably come that we could have planned for but that his founders unready our experts in elected officials and employers are scrambling to keep up with the torrent of new scientific information about cove in nineteen and the virus that causes it which goes by. The name SARS Kobe to here in Washington state. They seem to be doing their best to act on that information as they make tough decisions about what to shutdown what to keep open and what to tell the public in this episode Alexandra one particularly difficult question that officials face when to close schools. I'll talk with the local eighth grader. Who's online petition? To close schools in our district has attracted more than thirty thousand signatures will hear. King County's Public Health Officer explained why urged schools to remain open for now as long as they don't have any confirmed cases of the disease and we'll hear from experts at Johns Hopkins University and from Anthony Voucher. The Director of the National Institute of ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES. About the mystery of why so few children have become seriously ill with cove in nineteen. But I I need to explain what the past week was like. Ear in Kirkland Cove in nineteen role do our city like a psychological sue. Nami sweeping aside other topics of conversation. Actually a a wildfire is probably a better metaphor infections. Have jumped quickly and unpredictably from one spot to another with responders racing behind to catch up like the wildfire smoke that now darkened skies across the Pacific northwest each summer. This epidemic has cast a pall on daily life on the other side of the hill from my house. About a half mile.

Wayt Gibbs Kirkland Washington Nineteen Ninety United States Kirkland Cove University Of Washington Insti King County Seattle Writer Contributing Editor Bill Gates Kirkland Evergreen Health Hospital Lake Washington QNA Pacific FLU Malaysia
"contributing editor" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"The face what I think is that it certainly is going to come as a surprise to many of them because it's filling out a lot of the gaps and it's reinforcing conclusions that were offered previously which are not helpful to the president's defenders well I don't know thank you very much for joining us here today all the best thank you and again I mean speaking with Scott Horton is a professor at Columbia Law School and a contributing editor to hop is in legal affairs and national security he says on the American branch of the international association has represented a variety of journalists and whistle blowers we're getting a restriction record back look into the new evidence by Juliana's co conspirator upon us that might be introduced judicata in the Senate impeachment trial welcome back.

president Scott Horton professor Columbia Law School contributing editor Juliana Senate
Rahm Emanuel Joins The Atlantic, ABC News as Contributing Editor

America Trends

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Rahm Emanuel Joins The Atlantic, ABC News as Contributing Editor

"A democratic mayor who just left office has landed a couple of jobs, USA's, Chris Barnes reports the newly former Chicago mayor and President Obama's first White House. Chief of staff Rahm, Emmanuel as kicked off a post barrel career announcing that he is now a contributing editor for the Atlantic. The democrat Emmanuel will contribute frequent essays to the Atlantic ideas, section, and what's more. The former mayor is also joining. ABC news as a contributor following the path plays by former Republican governor, New Jersey's Chris Christie in joining that network.

Contributing Editor Chris Barnes Chris Christie President Obama White House Rahm Chief Of Staff ABC Chicago New Jersey USA
Why Open Plan Offices are a Bad Idea

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Why Open Plan Offices are a Bad Idea

"The dumbest management fad of all time. That's a quote from Jeffrey Jones, contributing editor at Inc magazine in an article that talks about the research from Harvard that found that in fact, open plan offices are bad for productivity. The reasons they state that people tend to Email and text each other a lot more in these environments than in a traditional environment, traditional office environment and the reasons for that our couple guess Polly's the privacy concern, you don't want other people listening to your conversation or overhearing your conversation. The other part of it is you don't want to distract the more disrupt the office environment. And that's something. I spoke about back in it beside one hundred thirty of this show where I felt that for me open plan offices are a major productivity kill because I just get to easily distracted. I'll go to sticky Nuys icon help listen into other people's conversations. And so it turns out now that have a design these things are actually reality for the same reason. Video conference calls. Don't really work unless you've got a private room set up for it. So the short answer is open plan offices tend to kill productivity because it actually discourages people from face to face interaction, which is a little ironic considering the whole point I created really was doing courage more face to face interaction. The other thing, of course, in an open plan office is you've got that sort of social influence around you because everybody's always watching what you're doing. And so a lot of people, of course, trying to busy when in fact, maybe they're not maybe they need some time to design out. And really think about a problem. It's how to do that plan office eve everyone's looking at you, you're worried the boss things you not doing your job. So next time if your office where you want to get rid of your open plan office environment, the boss wine, have it drop some names on him. You can drop Trent that might not do it. You could drop Jeffrey James, the contributing editor from Inc magazine, also may not do it. But if you drop a Harvard study owning pretty hard to not bag that kind of research. Anyway, that's just my thoughts. Agree open plan offices bad idea or thanks for tuning. I

Contributing Editor Harvard Inc Magazine Polly Jeffrey Jones Jeffrey James Trent
"Meat" Means Only Animal Products, Say States

Business Wars Daily

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"Meat" Means Only Animal Products, Say States

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily and it's Tuesday. April sixteenth. Remember big dairies campaign against the use of the term milk by companies that produce nuts avacado 's anything that doesn't have breasts caused quite a stir in the beverage industry. Well, meat producers are following in the dairy industries big footsteps, four states have now made it illegal to misuse, the term, meet Missouri. Was I followed by Mississippi and South Dakota, the Montana legislature recently passed a similar Bill, which is awaiting that governor signature in those states. The legislation says you can now name food meat only if it comes from an animal, not a plant and most certainly not a cell culture. In addition, ten other state, legislatures are considering similar bans the campaign is a legislative attempt to stem, the tide of consumers choosing to go meatless. The industry site food. Dive reports that seventeen percent of Americans are now vegetarians and another sixty percent say they're reducing their meat consumption. A lot of these folks are switching to plant based alternatives and more recently moved into burgers and other meatless meat products created in laboratories to such alternative meat companies have gotten a lot of Presley, impossible foods and beyond burger are both growing meat substitutes. That are said to look taste and smell like beef. And that's pretty scary to ranchers and meatpackers perhaps the timing of the growing number of state bills is no surprise meet grown in Petri dishes is getting so big that Burger King just put impossible burgers from the company impossible foods on the menu. They called the new item and impossible Walker. When one of the world's biggest hamburger chain start serving non meat meat. Ranchers blanche, the veggie brand tofurkey along with others, including the American Civil Liberties union immediately challenged Missouri's labeling law when that state passed it last year a settlement in that case is expected by may first in Montana, the Republican who sponsored the legislation. There says it's only fair that Montana's know where their food is coming from it doesn't ban. So cultured products just says they can't use the term meet to describe them the ways in which the meat industry's responding can be confusing big companies like Tyson, the chicken producer invested impossible foods rival beyond meat. Think of this the same way big donors contribute to Republican and democratic candidates to make sure they benefit from the eventual winner, but smaller states in producers don't have this kind of clout. And so they are fighting instead meat production is a top industry and many smaller rural States, South Dakota. For instance is. The twelfth largest meat and poultry producer in the nation. Meaning a big swath of that population depends on animals for their livelihood as they gear up for a fight. Ranchers slaughterhouse owners and Packers are also looking beyond. The lab the Montana law is also fending off a growing competition of the six legged kind. It also says you can't call an insect ameet how we name our food may or may not have much to do with what we actually choose to eat. That's a dilemma that will play out over the coming months and years in our shopping carts and on our dinner tables. In the meantime, semantics will continue to play out in the courts in an increasingly hot question for all sides. From wondering this business wars daily. If you think we're the real thing. We'd appreciate you. Spreading the word sheer this episode on social media widget. Thanks, I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneurs heart, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like VC's, Mark, Andrew Jackson, and Ben Horowitz. And Netflix is potty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick harassed co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Montana Octa South Dakota David Brown Missouri Producer PO Burger King American Civil Liberties Union Netflix Packers Mississippi Presley Joshua Davis Walker Tyson Ben Horowitz Andrew Jackson Contributing Editor
Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

Business Wars Daily

04:03 min | 2 years ago

Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business words daily on this Monday, April fifteenth, there are a whole lot of things happening today. It's tax day patriot's day and the one hundred and twenty second Boston marathon, even for non runners the marathon is an institution viewing it or watching the barrage of ads for footwear, athletic, clothing, and sports drinks can inspire even the most dedicated couch potato to go out for a jog. Well, maybe not the most dedicated couch potato for those of us who rather sit than sprint friendly's, the iconic east coast ice cream chain is offering a celebrate Tori marathon Sunday. So what makes it a marathon Sunday? Try twenty six point two ounces of ice cream. That's one ounce for every mile of the marathon, the six coupe red white and blue patriots Sunday costs almost ten dollars will only be offered today in friendlies Massachusetts stores. Offering marathon theme. Treat is counter intuitive and gives friendly's chance of standing out from the outdoor branding mania surrounding the race. But friendly's has been facing just about as many rivals as any top marathon runner from traditional competitors. Like restaurant chain Bob Evans to a multitude of healthier fast, casual restaurants as a result. What's going on in the friendly's boardroom is well anything but friendly in early April at about the same time that it announced its gigantic Sunday friendlies abruptly closed twenty three restaurants in New England and upstate New York, reportedly without warning employees. I the closure sparked controversy over whether the company had complied with federal law requiring sixty days notice of an eminent layoff friendly's owned by a private equity firm has been on a downward slide for years in the last decade is closed more than three hundred locations leaving it today with one hundred seventy four while every company has its own management. Uh-huh. Friendly's is also struggling with dynamics that are squeezing big food brands everywhere. It's an ice cream and burger place in an era when families are searching out healthier lighter foods, it's been in and out of chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. In the last several years. The company says the closures are intended to help the chain and its latest rebranding effort, but the term challenges friendly's faces could be the eighty year old chains. Heartbreak hill. Romm wondering this is business wars daily take a second away from that. I r s deadline and rate and review our show on your favorite podcast Appalachia. We promise it's a heck of a lot easier than those taxes. Thanks bunch. David brown. See you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur heart, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful. Entrepreneurs to get where they are today. People like VC's, Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is potty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Octa David Brown PO Bob Evans Massachusetts Boston Heartbreak Hill Joshua Davis Romm Frederick Carris Netflix New England Mark Andriessen New York Ben Horowitz Contributing Editor Co-Founder Twenty Second
Going Bananas: Chiquita Launches New Snapchat Filters

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 2 years ago

Going Bananas: Chiquita Launches New Snapchat Filters

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From one I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. It's friday. And that means it's time for dancing bananas. We like to think receives about business here, but we couldn't help but chuckle over the campaign Chiquita is rolling out to celebrate world banana day, which is next Wednesday April seventeenth the one hundred fifty year old banana producers been moving swiftly into the twenty first century embracing both Snapchat and augmented reality in its efforts to get teens and young adults to eat more of America's most popular fruit through the end of may the blue sticker on Chiquita's bananas. We'll be adorned with one of three Snapchat snap codes for you, Snapchat, novices out there that means if you have Snapchat on your phone, you can scan the sticker in one of three augmented reality scenarios will play out, according to the company one Lynn's will turn you into a dancing banana character on Snapchat. Another transforms your. Face into Chiquita banana and third game. Fide? Snapchat, lens invites you to catch falling bananas to score points. Sure. It's silly. But the campaign which will appear on two hundred million bananas underscores a couple of trends one is that marketings becoming more and more interactive. But more accompany can get you to engage with something. Instead of just looking at it, the more interest in loyalty, you might feel at least that's the idea and snap Chatters share their activities widely meaning campaigns like this have the potential to create huge ripple effects on social media tiny banana, stickers that turns out our huge business that you keep us nap chat campaign rivals Dole's current heroic effort dole began piggybacking off the captain marvel movie release in March stickers on millions of it's bananas depict comic book and real life heroes, including women farmers anti-hunger activists and more through the end of may like Chiquita the does. Promotion, which includes recipes inspired by comic book. Superheroes. Intended to get shoppers to spread the word through social media peo- back these playful promotional campaigns. And there's a lot of steak. Both companies are vying for the growing organic market, and though the sweet fruit is easy to sell. Neither rival wants to let their produce lose the spot of top banana. I'm wondering this is business wars daily. This week's episodes were written edited and produced by lane Appleton brand Emma Cortlandt is our editor and producer. Our executive producer is Marshall Louis created by or non Lopez for wondering, I'm David Brown. See next week. Business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur is hard, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to IPO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful. Entrepreneurs to get where they are today. People like VC's, Mark, Andrew Jackson, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcasts.

Chiquita Snapchat Octa David Brown Dole Joshua Davis Frederick Carris Netflix Contributing Editor Patty Mcchord Ben Horowitz Lane Appleton America Executive Producer PO Emma Cortlandt Lynn
FDA, Activists Pressure Walgreens to Stop Cigarette Sales

Business Wars Daily

04:47 min | 2 years ago

FDA, Activists Pressure Walgreens to Stop Cigarette Sales

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Thursday, April eleven Walgreen cigarette. Sales could go away in a puff of smoke outgoing FDA. Chief Scott Gottlieb has been criticizing the country's biggest pharmacy chain for continuing to sell cigarettes. In February Gottlieb issued harsh criticism to Walgreens over its high volume of illegal sales of cigarettes to minors. Twenty two percent of its stores were found with sold cigarettes to teenagers in most states the legal age to buy tobacco is eighteen. Now. Some activist investors are pressuring Walgreens to stop selling cigarettes altogether saying cigarette sales put their money at risk of lawsuits. So far, Walgreens says no it has no plans to quit CEO Stefan persona says customers demand cigarettes rival CVS ended. It's cigarette. Sales in twenty fourteen attempting to reposition itself as a health and wellness company. CVS says that choice cost the chain about two billion dollars a year in sales. And here's the rub Walgreens just posted its worst quarter in four years, although sales were up they still didn't meet Wall Street's expectations. Last year. Walgreens announced it would cut costs by a billion dollars by the end of twenty twenty one following its flagging second quarter results at tightened the screws, even more. Now, the company is cutting costs by one and a half billion dollars. Walgreens, doesn't say how much money it makes from cigarettes. Although it does say sales have been falling still when it comes to smoking. Walgreens is caught between a rock and hard place on the one hand it may need its existing tobacco sales on the other hand like CVS Walgreens is trying desperately. To become a health centre rather than it retailer, prosciutto the Wall Street Journal last week. He says future success will Bank on its in-house healthcare clinics and lab testing, not it's retail side. Critics have all green cigarette policy point to the obvious conflict between cigarettes and Walgreens efforts to serve chronically ill patients the company which has ten thousand US locations is piloting tobacco-free stores at about eighteen of them to see how customers react a twenty seventeen study showed that when CVS stop selling cigarettes smoking fell by statistically, significant margins. Whether or not Walgreens, stop selling cigarettes, probably won't move the needle on its financial health the strategic problems facing both Walgreens and CVS are far bigger than the cigarette business. But the issue is a huge public health concern last year the surgeon general declared teen e cigarette use epidemic for Walgreens, it's a branding problem. Will consumers close their rise to the conflict between offering healthcare services and selling cigarettes for the ailing pharmacy chain this issue isn't likely to evaporate quickly. From wondering this is business wars daily. We hope our daily episodes light you up tell us. Why don't you tweet us? Your thoughts about this episode at business wars and thanks alive. I'm David Brown. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneurs hard, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like VC's, Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Walgreens Octa Chief Scott Gottlieb Ceo Stefan Persona David Brown Wall Street Journal United States PO FDA Joshua Davis Netflix Frederick Carris Patty Mcchord Mark Andriessen Ben Horowitz Contributing Editor Co-Founder
"contributing editor" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

10:07 min | 2 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Welcome back. This is the Ben Shapiro show. Obviously, a massive massive election took place yesterday in Israel and a big shock in Benjamin Netanyahu retaining the prime ministership. A big shock for people watching all that closely. And who seems to be following the media coverage from afar of the New York Times desperately hoping that Netanyahu would lease. It would lose his prime ministership to bennigan's NBC news desperately hoping that that was going to happen. In fact, we have a clip of NBC news appraising bennigan's right before the election. The header ahead of the brand new blue and white party who is brand new and political seemed really has no ideas that anybody could actually make out except he had really good military record. Here is NBC news though, saying that he was wonderful mainly because he was tall nothing. Yahoo is always run on this idea of look, I'm Mr. security. Well, bennigan's says Mr. security six foot four, you know, blue eyed son of a holocaust survivor, a hero amount who used to take orders from Benjamin Netanyahu. But he straight. Out of central casting. He is convinced a lot of Israel is that they would be safe in his hands. And it's not just him. Because that is side. He's got two other former chiefs of stuff, so it's three Mr. securities against Benjamin Netanyahu. Nothing yahoos. He's Mr. security is he's he's so Mr. security, and he's tall. He's and then he loses. So joining us to discuss all of this is hard copies, contributing editor for the Jerusalem Post. Thanks so much for joining the Ben Shapiro show. Thanks for having me on. So let's start with as many could sum up. How surprising were the results last night to you even following the polls, look like Netanyahu is making strong moves in late weeks to close the gap with the blue and white party. Where were you surprised by how this broke down? Yes. So I think that cripple the system is so different from the US the multi-party system, and you have to build coalitions in order to have a majority in the parliament. And you know, in the end, what matters is the possibility of building a coalition. And so looking at the polls all along it seems that the Rayleigh right wing going to have a clear majority in the vast majority of the poll that came out that way that the right thing overall. And so even if trailing a little bit behind blue and white and gone like he always had the clearest path towards a coalition. And that's what happened in the end that actually listening ugly cooed party and God's blue and white party are tied. But because the right wing of bigger there are more people who want Netanyahu to be prime minister in the parliament. So it looks like he's going to be prime minister. No, one of the things that that has been kind of funny watching this from from the United States is the because we in the United States don't have the same electoral system as they do in Israel. There is this perception that the blue and white party was sort of a long. Sanding party people seem to have forgotten about labor, the blue and white party for people who don't know the the rivals to Netanyahu here. That's a brand new coalition party formed by a couple of figures. One yet, you're LaPierre who had a different we named party in the last election cycle. And I think had something like fifteen to seventeen seats is that right? And then the other person was Benny guns who just come out of the idea and was now going to be seen as the sort of security hawk lending, some sort of gravitas and credibility to repeat. Yeah. I mean, the blue and white party is it's a block formed a three different parties. And one of them is pretty right way. Having it's like people who used to be the Likud used to work with Netanyahu and had various fogs out with him and others are sort of. I mean, the party is pretty solidly centrist for Israel. And then like Ganz is kind of like the cipher. I mean, you were saying before that he has like no sort of discernible idea that even the party's platform ended up being adopted wholesale from Lockheed old Cardi's platform, but you know, I mean, those are legitimate, political ideas. But it seems like the party has these people coming from all different directions coming together. Just because they don't want to come Yahoo to be prime minister. And that was a strong statement. I mean been prime minister for decades. Now, there's a methods rally wanna change that they were still leading in the polls all the time. They ended up tight with Likud. But. It'll be interesting to see how they survive as an actual parliamentary party will cause at that. Right. You need ideas beyond not liking someone. The media in the United States and in Europe seem to be making this a referendum on President Trump in a way suggesting that if Netanyahu one that it was sort of the Israelis signaling how much they love president from knitting who has long preexisted, President Trump, obviously, it's who's been popular in Israel for a very long time. Even when he was standing up against a president who is significantly more anti Israel in President Obama number one. What is the widespread perception of President Trump himself in Israel, a number two? How much does this reflection? Did this election reflect on President Trump? Trump is a very popular in Israel, and certainly his moving the embassy to Jerusalem was a very very popular move in Israel, and so Netanyahu definitely use a lot of footage at a lot of photographs of himself with Trump in his campaign. I don't think that you could say the campaign was an anti way a referendum Trump because I don't think that if gaps became prime minister right now, he would suddenly not have good relations with Trump the the lines between the US and Israel of, you know, a huge asset for Israel is very important for Israel. And nobody nobody was arguing that you know, we shouldn't be closer have good ties with Trump and any kind of serious way. Then some of the more extreme parties are molested, but for the most part, and so calling it a referendum on Trump is funny. I mean, I think that you know, if legitimate to say, you know, how much I'll be using foreign leaders and his campaign. That's. Debate. That people have a Cam hats, but Italy was not a referendum on Trump. It was a referendum on this on Yahoo. Really most visible have Harkat. She's the senior contributing editor to the Jerusalem Post. So for folks in the United States. There was also this this gap that he heard there from NBC news in you've been hearing from MSNBC that would have really been a radical shift in foreign policy had blue and white been able to pull out in electoral victory here. I don't really see the evidence for that. There was an article by Jim and Lincoln on the week that I thought was actually a little bit late to the ballgame suggesting that the left in Israel is largely dead. It seems to me that the left in Israel has been dead for a pretty long time. Here labor has been markedly. It was d- major party in Israel for most of Israel's early existence. Now, it's one ending want six seats in this latest election, but they've been in significant decline for a very long time Israel has been almost entirely a center or center, right country and foreign policy since essentially the pull out from Gaza ended in tears. Yeah. I mean in the last election labour had a little bit of a revival. They got twenty four seats, and they were the main competitor to leak cooed. But there is a lot of mismanagement that a lot of infighting on the party, basically imploded on very poorly now, and I think it really the end whoever has a formidable leader who can rival the tiny Yaeko becomes the leader of the left-wing bloc. And that's why it's sort of shifted in every election since sort of Netanyahu became prime minister again in two thousand nine so every time it's a different party leading. But labor is the historic leading party on the last, and they you know, let Israel for Israel's I twenty nine years. So it didn't very big deal that now they only have sixty even though it's not so surprising because yeah, the ideological lesson Israel has become very weak. And I it's not just the disengagement and pulling out of Gaza have two thousand five it's the result of it that there has constantly been rockets. Shot at Israel, by HAMAs took over Gaza. And that's people skeptical about this engagement disengaging from the west bake. You know that the same sort of thing could also happen from the West Bank. And that's hurt the sort of pet cause of the left, which is that two state solution. We'll have our senior contributing editors Jerusalem Post. The other big surprised that the election was the shutout for some of the right wing parties that were less openly religious orientated. I'm thinking, of course, if the new right party led by Neftali Bennett, and and gal Shehade who is the former Justice minister. And there's a who'd party, which is a which the weird agglomeration led by Moshe Fagin. We had him on the show a little bit earlier this week talking about legalizing pot. But also building a third temple on the Temple Mount. Those parties were shut out the big upswing was actually in favor of some of the more established religious parties. Did you find that surprising? And why did that happen? You know, I don't I don't believe that demographics are desperately, but the religious parties, it'd be other. They do have a higher birth rate them. So it never surprises me that they'll grow sort of incrementally. And there's also sort of a a level of discipline of of listening to their religious leaders, and it is real these religious leader, certainly ultra-orthodox community. They're not shy in telling people that they go out and vote and who they should vote for. So when you look at the Haredi town, the altar orthodox Panthers very high voting rates much higher than the average of the country general, and then they overwhelmingly vote for one of the two ultra-orthodox parties. But there's the modern orthodox party or when Israeli term known as I religious Zionist party called the union of right wing parties. And I think that they are we're just really successfully getting out the vote because there was this sense that a lot of the right wing parties would not get into the. They wouldn't get enough seats. And so there was a lot of rallying in that religious right-lane community mohawk. She's the senior contributing editor at the Jerusalem Post. Thanks so much for stopping by shedding some light on what is a fascinating election and will have significant ramifications for Israel's foreign policy going forward. Love harkat. Thanks so much joining the show, really appreciate it. Thank you. Well, coming up in just a second. We're going to get to the real explanation for why it is that Israel has moved in such a right wind direction overtime history has something to do with it..

Israel Benjamin Netanyahu prime minister white party President Trump United States NBC senior contributing editor Yahoo Ben Shapiro Jerusalem Post Gaza Trump Mr. security bennigan president New York Times Likud
Sweet Sorrow: Kelloggs Says Ciao to Keebler, Famous Amos

Business Wars Daily

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Sweet Sorrow: Kelloggs Says Ciao to Keebler, Famous Amos

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Wednesday. April tenth brace yourself. This episode could make you hungry for the next. Couple of minutes will be talking chocolate. But cookie business has become one big chess game last week Italian company Ferreiro announced it's buying Keebler and famous Amos cookies from Kellogg. Yes. The Keebler elves are legally any way moving to Italy Ferraro is spending one point three billion dollars to spirit the elves across the pond famous Amos and Kellogg unit that bake some girl scout cookies, we'll go with them Forero known for its new Tele hazelnut spread is quickly becoming one of America's sweetest sweets companies. This is the fourth American cookie or candy brand. It's eaten up since twenty seventeen. Ferreiro bought Nestle's candy division little over a year ago. Those Keebler elves will be joining baby Ruth butterfinger. And many other delicious American trifles. So what's going on Kellogg admits that it was starving? Those poor elves and Amos of resources it was pouring its efforts and money into treats that have sweeter returns on investment from pop tarts to Pringles Kellogg. I started shopping the brands in November it's been trying to figure out how to spur Americans lagging appetites for snacks from big old brand names. In fact, it's been a rough patch for most consumer packaged goods companies. According to NPR, young shoppers, simply aren't brand loyal the way baby boomers were for Kellogg. That means the Keebler name no longer pools. It's weight as American shoppers are increasingly avoiding processed foods Kellogg in its competitors. Are pulling their hair out at least sixteen consumer packaged goods CEO's had left their jobs between twenty sixteen and twenty eighteen the Wall Street Journal reported presumably. They were failing at or exhausted from trying to kick start growth, but if it were just the shift toward healthier food that was hurting cookie sales. Why would Herero be sweetening? It's own desert portfolio apparently will still indulge plenty, especially if the quality is high for railroad specializes in improving tired brands in February and relaunched Nestle's one hundred year old butterfinger candy Barr with more chocolate and no hydrogenated oils. So Ferreiro sees a huge opportunity in our collective sweet tooth as does delay international. Jones. The Oreo Mondays spending more than two billion dollars to buy those yummy. Danish butter cookies dance or rather maker the Kelsen group from Campbell Soup. Campbell's is another legacy food brand that's been struggling to reshuffle. Its portfolio Monday is also buying Australian cookie maker or. Or should we be calling them biscuits? So cookies are not being flattened by celery and carrots, there's still a lot of money to be made in indulgences, but selling them is harder than it's ever been. Which is why cookie chess his getting so aggressive? From wondering this is business wars daily. Hey before you run off to that mid morning snack. Take a second Llosa five star rating on your favorite podcast app for us. That'd be a better gift of box chocolates bags. I'm David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur's heart. And it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like the Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcasts.

Kellogg Amos Octa Keebler David Brown Campbell Soup Nestle Ferreiro PO Wall Street Journal Italy Ferraro Joshua Davis CEO Netflix NPR Frederick Carris Jones
"contributing editor" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Right. We have Andrew McCarthy on with us, contributing editor of the national review. Andy, I was a you are one of the only voices that have penetrated my world when it comes to what's happening with Trump investigation because you have credibility, and I know that you're a Trump supporter so you don't have an ax to grind. And so when you say, I think he's going to be indicted because this is the way this is being written. It carried some weight. And I wanted to talk to you about it. How are you enter Andrew? I'm doing dumb doing just great blend. I'm I'm great. I've been an I don't know if other people feel this way, but I'm really confused with all that's going on because it's all leaks or speculation. And. You know? I'm just waiting for the thing to just when the shoes drop, then we'll talk about it. But you are a federal a former New York federal invest the sorry prosecutor. And so you used to write the things like you just read from Cohen's? What do you call it? Agency memorandum. So you used to write it and those things, and you say, this is very telling can you explain sure I think one year right to be suspicious when you hear the leaked information. Because obviously, the people who leak are telling us the sort of mining the parts of the story they want you to hear in holding back on stuff. Whereas when they do these court filings. This was a forty page document that is customarily filed about a week or two in advance of the imposition of sentenced by the court. You get a full flavor of what the government's theory about the cases where they're going with the investigation. And it seemed to me. That the sentencing memo. Is more directed at President Trump than it is at Cohen. Memos are interesting and in terms of legal filings because they're not kind of dry legal issue oriented submissions. They're almost like jury arguments, except they're meant to persuade the sentencing judge, so they tend to be more forceful and colorful, and sorta filled with their prosecution theory, and here this one reads in the part of it that deals with the campaign finance laws as a testimonial to the importance of those laws, the integrity of the system, and how they are meant to make sure that the rich and the powerful do you don't you surp- all of the tower in the system and designed to fight against public cynicism about money in politics. I mean, it almost seemed to me like a. It was drafted with the president in mind more than Cohen. And then I look at the other attendant situations or tendency circumstances. That you have here. Number one. They didn't really need these campaign. Finance counts on Cohen. His sentence is really driven by the Bank fraud and the tax fraud counts. These Ed Nagle negligibly at most to his case. But they're obviously critical critical in connection with Trump at the guilty plea allocution, they gratuitously had him say that he was directed by Trump in connection with these payments. That is not something that was necessary to the factual basis for Cohen's on plea and ordinarily prosecutors in public proceedings do not go out of their way to implicate uncharged people in felonies. So it seemed to me they will sort of reaching to do that. And it doesn't I don't see that. They have any other purpose of doing that except that they wanna lock calling in on this Berge. Events, and this is there a chance of doing it. And then the other thing I would point to is they have given immunity I believed to four different people in this campaign finance investigation. Campaign finance is not a very serious felony in the greater scheme of things thanksgiving immunity to to people connected to the National Enquirer, and I believe to people connected with the with the Trump organization which relates to the structuring of the reimbursement payment to Cohen. I don't think they give four people immunity to tighten up the case on Cohen that they didn't need. So all right. Okay. So so what does that tell you? They're going to do with Trump. Well, it seems to be they're going to indict him one of the things that I should have said was that. I think there's a lot of misunderstanding about what these two campaign finance counts allege most people I think believe that because Cohen had a twenty seven hundred dollar limit as a normal contributor that these payments were way above that limit. And that's why he had to plead guilty. But very interestingly, the first of the counts is not that Cohen made an illegal payment. It's that he caused a third party, namely be the business entity that controls the National Enquirer to make a to make a payment that was illegal for the national inquirer to make. And the point here is. It's the theory is even if a transaction would be legal as to you. If you did it yourself. It is still illegal to cause a third party to do something that would be unlawful as to that third party. And it seems to me that that answer is directly what Trump's lawyers have been saying about this which is that the president because he was the candidate did not have a limit on what he could spend on his own campaign. Now, always thought that was kind of a flawed explanation because there's two parts of the report and to campaign finance one is the limits, but the probably the more important one is reporting. Even candidate has to report what he said, but for Farrar narrow purpose here if if cone is being directed by Trump, and they have cone plead guilty to causing a third party entity to make an illegal contribution. It seems obvious to me that Trump also has to be guilty of that. So it least looks to me like that case. Right. Okay. So let's pursue this a bit more. Let me just take a quick break. And.

Cohen Trump president National Enquirer Andrew McCarthy contributing editor Andy New York Ed Nagle Farrar fraud prosecutor twenty seven hundred dollar one year
"contributing editor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"All right. We have Andrew McCarthy on with us, contributing editor of the national review. Andy, I was a you are one of the only voices that have penetrated my world when it comes to what's happening with the Trump investigation because you have credibility, and I know that you're a Trump supporter so you don't have an ax to grind. And so when you say, I think he's going to be indicted because this is the way this is being written. It carried some weight. And I wanted to talk to you about it. How are you Andrew Andrew? I'm doing dumb doing just great blunt. Are you? I'm great. I've been an I don't know if other people feel this way, but I'm really confused with all that's going on because it's all leaks or speculation. And. You know? I'm just waiting for the thing to just when the shoes drop, then we'll talk about it. But you are a federal a former New York federal invest the sorry prosecutor. And so you used to write the things like you just read from Cohen's? What do you call it? What was sensing memorandum? So you used to write it and those things, and you say, this is very telling can you explain sure I think one year right to be suspicious when you hear the leaked information. Because obviously, the people who leak are telling you the sort of mining the parts of the story they want you here in holding back on this stuff. Whereas when they do these court filing, this forty page document that is customarily filed about a week or two in advance of the imposition of sentence by the court. You get a full flavor of what the government theory about the cases where they're going with the investigation. And it seemed to me that the sentencing memo. Is more directed at President Trump than it is at Cohen. Sentencing memos are interesting and in terms of legal filings because they're not kind of dry legal issue oriented submissions. They're almost like jury arguments, except they're meant to persuade the sentencing judge, so they they tend to be more forceful, and colorful, and sort of filled with their prosecution theory, and here this one reads in the part of it that deals with the campaign finance laws as a testimonial to the importance of those laws to the integrity of the system, and how they are meant to make sure that the rich and the powerful. Do you? Don't usurp all of the power in the system and designed to fight against public cynicism about money in politics. I mean, it almost seems to me like it was it was drafted with the president in mind more than Cohen. And then I look at the other attendant, situations or attendance circumstances. That you have here. Number one. They didn't really need these campaign. Finance counts on Cohen, his is really driven by the Bank fraud and the tax fraud counts. These add Nagel negligibly at most to his case. But they're obviously critical critical connection with Trump at the guilty plea allocution they gratuitously had him say that he was directed by Trump. In connection with these payments? That is not something that was necessary to the factual basis Coen's on plea and ordinarily prosecutors in public proceedings do not go out of their way to implicate uncharged people in felonies. So it seems to me they will sort of reaching to do that. And it doesn't I don't see that. They have any other purpose of doing that. Except that they wanna lock calling in on this version of events, and this is there a chance of doing it. And then the other thing I would point to is they have given immunity I believe to four different people in this campaign finance investigation. Campaign finance is not a very serious felony in the greater scheme of things they've given immunity to to people connected to the National Enquirer. And I believe two people connected with the with the Trump organization which relates to the structuring of the reimbursement payment to Cohen. I don't think they give people immunity to tighten up the case on Cohen that they didn't need. So all right. Okay. So so what does that tell you? They're going to do with Trump. Well, it seems to be they're going to indict him one of the things one that I should have said was that. I think there's a lot of misunderstanding about what these two campaign finance counts allege most people, I think believe that because Cohen had a twenty seven hundred dollar limit as a normal contributor that fees payments were way above that limit. And that's why he had to plead guilty. But very interestingly, the first of the coun- is not that Colin made an illegal payment. It's that he caused a third party, namely be the business entity that controls the National Enquirer to make a to make a payment that was illegal for the national inquirer to make. And the point here is. The theory is even if a transaction would be legal as to you. If you did it yourself. It is still illegal to cause a third party to do something that would be unlawful as to that third party. And it seems to me that that answers directly what Trump's lawyers have been saying about this which is that the president because he was the candidate did not have a limit on what he could spend on his own campaign. Now, I've always thought that was kind of a flawed explanation. Because there's there's two parts the report reporting to campaign finance one is the limits, but the probably the more important one is reporting. So even a candidate has to report what he said, but for our narrow purpose here if co if cone is being directed by Trump, and they have cone plead guilty to causing a third party entity to make an illegal contribution. It seems obvious to me that Trump also has to be guilty of that. So it's. At least looks to me. Like, that's the case. Right..

Trump Cohen president National Enquirer Andrew McCarthy Andrew Andrew contributing editor Andy New York Nagel Coen fraud prosecutor Colin twenty seven hundred dollar one year
"contributing editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A contributing editor at Vanity Fair previously. She was an investing banking analyst at Goldman Sachs prior to joining fortune magazine as reporter she most infamously wrote the article that pretty much helped bring Enron down. Or at least brought the problems at Enron to a much broader audience that column eventually became smartest guys in the room, the amazing rise in scandalous full of Enron as well as numerous other books. Let's talk a little bit about your writing process. And let me go back to that column about Enron. The first piece that was pretty much the first major mainstream piece that called out Enron for. Hey, maybe. Things are not quite as rosy there. As the company is claiming tell us a little bit about that piece. And what motivated you to turn it into a book? Well, so that piece actually came about because when I started working at fortune. I I'll give you a little bit of extra. I did a column called companies to watch where I was supposed to pick stocks every week that we're going to appreciate twenty forty six. Thankless task. Well, it was remarkably easy because there were no shortage of people coming by fortune from portfolio managers who own the stock to accompany management would lay out these great little stories from me. And I'd write them up because I believed I have any I didn't why would you? Why would I doubt them and had watched in horror is the stock promptly went in the opposite direction? So I started at a pretty early age trying to get to know shortsellers because I was just tired of being wrong. It wasn't. I just I was tired of tired of being wrong and tired of having people. Call me up after peace random, basically saying you idiot. How could you how could you be writing a puff piece about this insane fraud so through that I got to know Jim Janus? And Jim I think in the fall of two thousand said why don't you take a closer look at Enron. And it happened to be one of the interesting things in life because I have a weird background. I was a math major, and I went to work at Goldman is an analyst out of college. And so I didn't have a writing background at all. And so it was kind of serendipity of my weird background actually being incredibly helpful has certainly at that stage. I still knew how to put together elaborate spreadsheets on a company's financials. I was pretty fresh out of out of doing that. So I'd say over my years in journalism. What's changed? I've become far more. Obsessed with characters far more interested in the human story. But I'm still a numbers girl at heart. And so when numbers are contrarian and don't make sense, and aren't what everybody else thinks her show a different picture than what the world thinks is going on like with shale most people think it must be a mentally profitable making gobs of money. And no, actually, it's not. And so I'm really interested. Always in those disconnects that numbers can show you how quickly did you realize something was afoot at Enron? When you started delving into the numbers. So I would say I was skeptical but not skeptical enough. My original piece, I actually think should have won awards for the meekest headline in history because the title was is Enron overpriced. Yeah. Turned out to be true. I just I never would have guessed. I was naive that. I never would have guessed that a company could be so red with overstatements and outright fraud as as Enron was. So the piece was skeptical of pointed out problems and Enron's desma. Speaking of cash flow at pointed out Enron's lack of cash flow at its burgeoning debt load, and the fact that nobody understood how this company actually made made its money. But if you had asked me at that time that I would Enron be bankrupt in six months or nine months. I would've said what now so you're looking at this as an expensive company, not a fraudulent, correct? Right. And how soon was it clear that it was the latter. Another former I think the Enron tail unspoiled in an interesting fashion in August of two thousand and one Jeff skilling abruptly quit is the company's CEO citing personal reasons as everybody does. But the idea that the mastermind behind this company who wants that? I am Enron was suddenly just stepping down was a real sign to people. There were that there were problems. And then the Wall Street Journal did some great work pointing out these off-balance-sheet partnerships that then CFO Andy Fastow was running and the whole thing began to crater pretty quickly. So let's talk a little bit about your writing process at what point obviously as n one blows up clear. Wow. There's a book here. But some of the other books you've written you've co-authored with various people the Enron book. The all the all the devils are here. What makes you decide to work with someone else on a book when you've been so successful writing on your out? Well, so the first two bucks. I did we're both big bucks. The Enron Burke was I was Colorado side when I started that I don't know thirty one, and I'd been a journalist for a few years, but the longest piece I'd ever written was three thousand words and fortune magazine. I never even written a really long story. Let alone written a book and actually collaborating with Peter L kind having my old pal. Jenna Sara edited was was the best decision. I made it's a far better buck because of their input and help. I learned a lot. About investigative reporting from Peter, and I learned a lot about writing from from Joe Joe, and I actually co authored all the devils are here. And it was you know, ten years ago about this day, we are sitting in my house in Chicago just watching the world go up in the financial world. Go up go up in flames. And we were both. We both said we have to do a book. And so it really just came about organically. It wasn't any kind of strategy on on my part. But again, that's a much better buck because of because of just.

Enron fortune magazine fraud Goldman Sachs devils contributing editor banking analyst Vanity Fair Jeff skilling Goldman reporter CFO Andy Fastow Wall Street Journal Jim I Chicago Jim Janus Peter L analyst
"contributing editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A contributing editor at Vanity Fair previously. She was an investing banking analyst at Goldman Sachs prior to joining fortune magazine as reporter she most infamously wrote the article that pretty much helped bring Enron down. Or at least brought the problems at Enron to a much broader audience that column eventually became smartest guys in the room. The amazing rise in scandal is full of Enron as well as numerous other books. Let's talk a little bit about your writing process. And let me go back to that column about Enron. The first piece that was pretty much the first major mainstream piece that cold out Enron for. Hey, maybe. Things are not quite as rosy there. As the company is claiming tell us a little bit about that piece. And what motivated you to turn it into a book? Well, so that piece actually came about because when I started working at fortune. I I'll get a little bit of extra. I did a column called companies to watch where I was supposed to pick stocks every week that we're going to you know, appreciate twenty forty six. Thankless task. Well, it was remarkably easy because there were no shortage of people coming by fortune from portfolio managers who owned the stock to accompany management would lay out these great little stories from me. And I'd rate them up because I believed I I didn't why would you? Why would I doubt them and I'd watch in horror as the stock promptly went in the opposite direction. So I started at a pretty early age trying to get to know shortsellers because I was just tired of being wrong. It wasn't. I just tired of tired of being wrong and tired of having people. Call me up after a piece random, basically saying you idiot. How could you how could you be writing puff piece about this insane fraud so through that I got to know Jim chain us, and Jim I think in the fall of two thousand said why don't you take a closer look at Enron? And it happened to be one of the interesting things in life because I have a weird background. I was a math major, and I went to work at Goldman as an analyst out of college. And so I didn't have a writing background at all. And so it was kind of serendipity of my weird background actually being incredibly. Helpful has certainly at that stage. I still knew how to put together elaborate spreadsheets on a company's financials. I was pretty fresh out of out of doing that. So I'd say over my years in journalism. What's changed as I've become far more obsessed with characters far more interested in the human story. But I'm still a numbers girl at heart. And so when numbers are contrarian and don't make sense, and aren't what everybody else thinks her show a different picture than what the world thinks going on like with shale most people think what must be immensely profitable making gobs of money. No, actually, it's not. And so I'm really interested. Always in those disconnects that numbers can show you how quickly did you realize something was afoot at Enron? When you started delving into the numbers. So I would say I was skeptical but not skeptical enough. My original piece, I actually think should have won awards for that make headline in history because the title was this, Enron overprice. Yeah. Turned out to be true. I just I never would have guessed. I was naive. I never would have guessed that a company could be so readily with overstatements and outright fraud as Enron was. So the piece was skeptical pointed out problems and Enron's business. Speaking of cash flow at pointed out Enron's lack of cash flow at its burgeoning debt load, and the fact that nobody understood how this company actually made made its money. But if you had asked me at that time that I would Enron be bankrupt and six months or nine months. I would have said what now so you're looking at this as an expensive company, not a fraudulent, right, right? And how soon was it clear that it was the latter. Another former I think the Enron tail unspoiled in an interesting fashion in August of two thousand and one Jeff skilling abruptly quit is the company's CEO citing personal reasons as everybody does. But the idea that the mastermind behind this company who once said, I am Enron was suddenly just stepping down was reassigned to people. That there were that there were problems. And then the Wall Street Journal did some great work pointing out these off-balance-sheet partnerships that the CFO Andy Fastow was running and the whole thing began to crater pretty quickly. So let's talk a little bit about your writing process that at what point obviously is one blows up in clear while there's a book here. But some of the other books you've written you've co-authored with various people the Enron book. The all the all the devils are here. What makes you decide to work with someone else on a book when you've been so successful writing on your out? Well, so the first two bucks. I did we're both big bucks. The Enron Burke was I was when I started that I don't know thirty one, and I've been a journalist for a few years, but the longest piece I'd ever written was three thousand words and fortune magazine. I never even written a really long story. Let alone written a book and actually collaborating with Peter L kind and having my pal Joe Sarah editor was was the best decision. It's a far better buck because of their input and help. I learned a lot. About investigative reporting from Peter, and I learned a lot about writing from from Joe Joe, and I actually co authored all the devils are here. And it was you know, ten years ago about this day, we are sitting in my house in Chicago just watching the world go up in the financial world. Go up go up in flames. And we were both. We both said we have to do a book. And so it really just came better Ganic Li it wasn't any kind of strategy on on my part. But again, that's a much better buck because of because of just.

Enron fortune magazine fraud devils Goldman Sachs contributing editor Peter L banking analyst Vanity Fair Jeff skilling Ganic Li reporter Goldman Joe Joe Chicago Wall Street Journal Jim I analyst
"contributing editor" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on WLAC

"McCarthy on with us, contributing editor of the national review. Andy, I was a you are one of the only voices that have penetrated my world when it comes to what's happening with the Trump investigation because you have credibility, and I know that you're a Trump supporter so you don't have an ax to grind. And so when you say, I think he's going to be indicted because this is the way this is being written. It carried some weight. And I wanted to talk to you about it. How are you Andrew? I'm doing dumb doing. Just great Glenn. How are you? I'm I'm I'm great. I've been I don't know if other people feel this way, but I'm really confused with all that's going on because it's all leaks or speculation. And you know, I've just waiting for the thing to just when the shoes drop, then we'll talk about it. But you are a federal a former New York federal invested. Sorry prosecutor. And so you used to write the things like you just read from Cohen's? What do you call it? Sensing memorandum. So you used to write it and those things, and you say this is very telling can you explain? Sure, I think one year right to be suspicious when you hear the leak information because obviously the people who leak are telling you the sort of mining the parts of the story they want you to hear in holding back on stuff. Whereas when they do these court filings. This was a forty page document that is customarily filed about a week or two in advance of the imposition of sentenced by the court. You get a full flavor of what the government's theory about the cases and where they're going with the investigation. And it seemed to me that the sentencing memo. Is more directed President Trump than it is at Cohen sentencing. Memos are interesting and in terms of legal filings because they're not kind of dry legal issue oriented submissions. They're almost like jury arguments, except they're meant to persuade the sentencing judge, so they they tend to be more forceful, and colorful, and sort of filled with their prosecution theory, and here this one reads in the part of it that deals with the campaign finance laws as a testimonial to the importance of those laws, the integrity of the system, and how they are meant to make sure that the rich and the powerful do you don't use surp- all the power in the system and designed to fight against public cynicism about money in politics. I mean, it almost seems to be like it was it was drafted with the. The president in mind more than Cohen. And then I look at the other attendance, situations or attendance circumstances. That you have here. Number one. They didn't really need. These campaign finance council on Cohen is sense is really driven by the Bank fraud and the tax fraud count. These add Nagel negligibly at most to his case. But they're obviously critical critical connection with Trump at the guilty. Plea allocution gratuitously had him say that he was directed by Trump. In connection with these payments? That is not something that was necessary to the factual basis for Cohen's on plea and ordinarily prosecutors in public proceedings do not go out of their way to implicate uncharged people in felonies. So it seems to me they will sort of reaching to do that. And it doesn't I don't see that. They have any other purpose of doing that. Except that they wanna lock calling in on this version of events, and this is there a chance of doing it. And then the other thing I would point to is they have given immunity I believe to four different people in this campaign finance investigation. Campaign. Finance is not a very serious felony in the greater scheme of things thanksgiving immunity to to people connected to the National Enquirer. And I believe two people connected with the with the Trump organization which relates to the structuring of the reimbursement payment to Cohen. I don't think they gave for people immunity to tighten up the case on Cohen that they didn't need. So our feeling. Okay. So so what does that tell you? They're going to do with Trump. Well, it seems to be going to indict him one of the things that I should have said was that. I think there's a lot of misunderstood. Banding about what these two campaign finance counts allege most people I think believe that because Cohen had a twenty seven hundred dollar limit as a normal contributor that these payments were way above that limit. And that's why he had to plead guilty. But very interestingly, the first of the count is not that Cohen made an illegal payment. It's that he caused a third party, namely be the business entity that controls the National Enquirer to make a to make a payment that was illegal for the national inquirer to make. And the point here is. It's the theory is even if a transaction would be legal as she you. If you did it yourself. It is still illegal to cause a third party to do something that would be unlawful as to that third party. And it seems to me that that answers directly what Trump's lawyers have been saying about this which is that the president because he was the candidate did not have a limit on what he could spend on his own campaign. Now, I've always thought that was kind of a flawed explanation. Because there's there's two parts of the report and to campaign finance one is the limits, but the probably the more important one is reporting even a candidate has to report what he said. But for our narrow purpose here if if cone is being directed by Trump, and they have cone plead guilty to causing a third party entity to make an illegal contribution. It seems obvious to me that Trump also has to be guilty of that. So it it looks to me like that's the case the mayor, right? Okay. Glenn? Doc. Do you have any outrage? Addicted people in your life. Oh, you know, what pisses me off about that you want to help them, but you're constantly being thrown. And you don't know how. Try giving them a copy of Glenn Beck's latest book addicted to outrage it's much cheaper than therapy and hurts less..

President Trump Cohen Glenn Beck Trump National Enquirer president McCarthy Andrew contributing editor Andy New York prosecutor Nagel allocution fraud twenty seven hundred dollar one year
"contributing editor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Speaking of somebody who somebody who's a helmet because he's up in hollywood did he take some heat but i agree with literally everything this man says are good pal james hurston culture law business analysts you see him a newsmax as a contributing editor james how are you so hey fantastic were you so late great great to talk to you today as well and i i enjoy if you don't follow james hurston on social media should because he is a renaissance man he not only is a law professor and ernie and has argued in front of the supreme court he also is a musician and i bet he could cook james i'm an expert with the microwave cry at hallmark commercials match can i can i let's talk about let's talk about network television double standards shall we surely we have roseanne barr who with the very popular roseanne television show comes out twenty some odd years later basically the network genius that decided hey you know what half the country loves donald trump the other half hates him well half the country's a big audience you why don't we pander to them with a show that they loved already and they put roseanne on the james take it from there because it's very south from there isn't it yeah no i mean obviously it had huge ratings in middle america i think it had the highest ratings in history tulsa it did very poorly in los angeles it did very poorly in new york i'm talking about the debut of the roseanne show which when you included tibo and the like it was higher than twenty five million people it was a record and so roseanne has an illfated tweet we don't you know you can't get fend tweet or you'll be attacked so we won't defend the tweet but what but what the network did and what disney did was the worst possible punishment that they could meet out they had a lot of alternatives things they could do they could suspend roseanne they could send her to starbucks re education thank you and they even could have fired her.

hollywood contributing editor james hurston james donald trump tulsa disney ernie roseanne barr los angeles new york starbucks
"contributing editor" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"On a weekly basis provide information are contributing editor section i've had very positive feedback on our healthcare section where a present information about what you need to know about obamacare and potential if you will solutions to obamacare and we also have the insight or inside show where we have featured guest every week it's a video audio format i do the first half hour or so just what i call it w t f segment of what's happening behind the curtain that i'm getting from my contacts from over thirty years experience so working with a number of different government agencies and organizations patriots behind the curtain that had been fighting for your freedom for decades that i believe are at a point where the globalist syndicate that has been running the show for many decades is going to be brought to its knees we're in the process of being brought to its knees you know we under under homepage what i've done to give you an example of what we do my good friend bob measor who's a former da agent who brought down pablo escobar the bcci bank in it and dozens and dozens of banksters i recently did an interview with bob bob is the person that the book the infiltrators been written about and also the movie the infiltrator is based on bryan cranston played bob in the movie a well known actor i posted that because i wanted to give you an indication of the depth we go into in our insider in site interviews we can only go so far in our twenty three minutes segments here on operation freedom our live radio show every sunday but there's also another stumbling block we have in there are still some globalists' in the federal government that there would be retribution if i presented some information over live radio and that's what we do at our platform dave gender dot com now it is i believe one if the if not the most secure platform on the internet in a sustained many attacks we have a phenomenal it team led by consulting nick release that also helps guide us with that we have all of our videos protected so if youtube or any other alphabet agency decides to squash are information it will not be on the day janet dot com platform and the interview with bob we get into great detail of who in government who in the.

bob measor pablo escobar bob bob bryan cranston youtube contributing editor bcci dave nick twenty three minutes thirty years
"contributing editor" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Fair contributing editor right that's what it said on his on his biography well a few days ago he ripped into kyle on twitter i pointed this out and ns nbc started losing sponsors and so came out and said well actually we would not hired him for since february twenty since february he hasn't been able to to really do anything since february hasn't been with msnbc so i had to had to remove the ms nbc contributor part of his twitter profile so suddenly just said i walled then the fair contributing editor new york times bestselling author k then yesterday kurt sent me this wild email this wild wild email and here's what it said then i'm working on an article about you and your relationship with kyle cash the kid from parkland i'm not going to be using his name for reasons that will become a parent a few items one he's been actively working to trick journalists he believes work for nonfox television networks into taking any action in something in which is twitter account was linked to his been coordinating with some of the trolls involved with these people three he in fact coordinated with the other guy with the podcast who is demanding my respect he is the same attack on me as the other guy which was unprovoked he used the garbage pushed by conservative media and left us that i'm a fan of tentacle porn and that's that's what he actually wrote because about a year ago it turned out that i can walled tweeted out a link accidentally tentacle porn and i think that's the story and or he tweeted out a picture of himself in the background of his computer was.

kyle msnbc kurt contributing editor nbc twitter new york times nonfox
"contributing editor" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Fair contributing editor right that's what it said on his on his biography well a few days ago he ripped into kyle on twitter i pointed this out and ns nbc started losing sponsors and so came out and said well actually we would not hired him for since february twenty since february he hasn't been able to to really do anything since february hasn't been with msnbc so i had to had to remove the ms nbc contributor part of his twitter profile so suddenly just said i walled then the fair contributing editor new york times bestselling author k then yesterday kurt sent me this wild email this wild wild email and here's what it said then i'm working on an article about you and your relationship with kyle cash the kid from parkland i'm not going to be using his name for reasons that will become a parent a few items one he's been actively working to trick journalists he believes work for nonfox television networks into taking any action in something in which is twitter account was linked to his been coordinating with some of the trolls involved with these people three he in fact coordinated with the other guy with the podcast who is demanding my respect he is the same attack on me as the other guy which was unprovoked he used the garbage pushed by conservative media and left us that i'm a fan of tentacle porn and that's that's what he actually wrote because about a year ago it turned out that i can walled tweeted out a link accidentally tentacle porn and i think that's the story and or he tweeted out a picture of himself in the background of his computer was.

kyle msnbc kurt contributing editor nbc twitter new york times nonfox
"contributing editor" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Good morning everyone thank you so much for coming what a wonderful mix of old friends and and fresh faces my name's jonathan raushan i'm a senior fellow here at the brookings institution and a contributing editor of the atlantic magazine it's my duty and my privilege enjoyed it be the moderator here today on this extraordinary panel before introducing i guess i wanted to do something to slightly unusual and take the temperature of the room just to understand where we stand relative probably the most fundamental question that all of our panelist will be discussing the oath of office of the president of the united states is remarkably concise and effective like everything else in the text of the constitution i will read the entirety it says i do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute the office of the president of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve protect and defend the constitution of the united states that's it it doesn't say that i will do a good job of preserving protecting and defending the constitution or that i will do it in the way that republicans would like it to be done or democrats would like it to be done it just says i will to the best of my ability preserve protect and defend the constitution other words i will really really try so here's the question here's the question that i want to ask the room i'm going to ask you to raise your hand if you think that president trump is really trying to fulfill the oath of office.

jonathan raushan senior fellow brookings institution contributing editor atlantic magazine president united states trump
"contributing editor" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Knew what was bought and paid for a phony salacious russian propaganda dossier in its best data was used to lied to the american people to manipulate the american people in a general election but in its worst state is what we now know that that same hillary clinton bought and paidfor dossier was used as a fundamental basis to obtain eight fis award to spy on an opposition party and campaign and to spy on an incoming president first that the goal was to defeat donald trump with this information that they all knew was phony that they all newest full of lies but they did it anyway and the misrepresentation to the court i have no doubt are going to be addressed at some future point if i was the judge in this case i would be apoplectic today and then on top of it then they used to undermine a president and incoming administration and to create what has been a year of nothing but hallen havoc as a result of what the is they did this abuse of power this corruption the shredding of the to shen anyway joining us now to debate discuss and talk about this we have dan bongino is back with us he's the former secret service agent nypd contributing editor over at conservative review buck sexton is with us he is the host of the syndicated radio talk show american now former cia former nypd intelligence division specialised sarah carter sarah i have the audio you're on my show you we first began this process march eighth of twenty seventeen and here we are now what is your take on the memo i think it was worse than what i even expected it if it were even expected i mean obviously we had come a cropper added rick waiting to be because congressional members at that had view the memo to come out in told us had talked about it public we but really push and fought alongside chairman noon years to get this memo public and get it without any reactions and i'm so grateful for that because now that we look at it as americans we can see that the completes the doj and that the fbi i had that this was going to somehow impede on our national security and revealed the processes by which we obtain these type of warnings was a complete and utter why.

hillary clinton president donald trump dan bongino buck sexton doj fbi shen nypd contributing editor cia rick chairman
"contributing editor" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Well you know he hit hit now we got two he want to hear the stupidest accusation ever um a journalist is now accusing um donald trump junior of um this treating a female preschool teacher when he was three years old journalists virginia heffernan a contributing editor for politico has accused donald trump jr of mistreating a preschool teacher when he was only three years old heffernan tweeted wednesday her friend anna taught trump jr when he was in preschool she asked him to move his matt one day and he said i can't say he was three would was three where did they want from that i am heaven and went on to claim her friend quick teaching forever after that school year because it was extremely disorienting i mean please tell me that this is a fake news story but it sauna some legitimate website and this is a journalist who writes for politico oh dear but this is where we have gone now this is where we ended up as we now got two three forty here of the allegations against threeyearolds and and it just doesn't get any weirder than this at all so we'll say independent journal review they're usually pretty yeah right on in their stories in these this writer is a journalist with political fcc oh sexual misconduct allegations hit espn was waiting for that to happen two top personalities have been named he went to want to venture a guess on who who it is to talk personalities other anchors rather afford from the globes jen abelson details numerous allegations of sexism and locker room culture um that are.

preschool teacher contributing editor virginia fcc writer donald trump jr espn globes
"contributing editor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"contributing editor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Contributing editor of the national review and he is he's also a guy who was the former assistant us attorney for the southern district of new york that uh led the charge judge on the first world trade center bombing and man is a trusted friend of the program so andrew i want to ask you the the right is of sorry the left is dismissing fusion gps and uranium one and both of those seem to be were healy big deals at least to me and nobody nobody in the news media seemed to really care yeah i i think they're are very big deals plan um not only on their own merit but particularly frame by the debate that we've been having for the last year so for example just to take it fusion gps if you strip out the middleman meadows the the law firm that the clinton campaign and then he and c hired and steel uh who is the guy who supposedly healthy connections with few read his gauthier he says that they are high level kremlin connected people what they basically did was get information from kremlin connected official um which would be damaging to the trump campaign there's no difference using it up is there there is no difference in my mind between the trump meeting which i think was wrong and the fusion gps with an exception of that information was laundered but it's exactly the same and they knew it yeah no that's exactly right and it goes to again where you know we we we keep hitting the fame themes but you think may not be illegal but they're very unsavory it may not be illegal to get uh damaging information about your campaign opponents from a biohacking game but uh it's a terrible thing to do and a terrible for american politics so what about the what about the uranium one i am concerned that uranium one of the that the.

new york news media law firm kremlin Contributing editor assistant us attorney andrew uranium one healy clinton c official