35 Burst results for "columbia law school"

The Life of Florynce Kennedy

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:46 min | 4 months ago

The Life of Florynce Kennedy

"Florence rey kennedy or flow was born on february eleventh nineteen sixteen in kansas city missouri to wiley zella kennedy while he made his living as a pullman porter and leader started taxi. Company the kennedy family experienced poverty during the great depression and racism from the local ku klux klan after a house in a majority white neighborhood but flow nevertheless described her childhood as an incredibly happy one. Her parents were exceptionally supportive of their daughters flow. Once said my parents gave us a fantastic sense of security and were by the time the big. It's got around to telling us that we were nobody. We already knew. Somebody flow was an excellent student and graduated at the top of her class after high school. She and her sisters opened a hat shop together. In kansas city flow also started getting involved in local political protests. She helped organize a boycott against a local coca cola. Bottler who refused to hire black delivery drivers in nineteen forty two flows. Mothers ella died of cancer afterwards flow and her sister. Grace moved to new york city and rented an apartment together in harlem in nineteen forty. Four flu started at columbia university or she majored in pre law after graduation flow applied to columbia law school but was denied admission. According to the dean of the law. School the denial was a result of flow being a woman not because she was black flow wasn't buying it and threatened to sue at which point the admissions board changed. Its mind she was one of only eight women and the only black woman in her law school class

Florence Rey Kennedy Wiley Zella Kennedy Pullman Porter Kansas City Ku Klux Klan Missouri Kennedy Depression Coca Cola Ella Harlem Columbia Law School Columbia University New York City Grace Cancer FLU
Lina Khan, Prominent Big Tech Critic, Will Lead the FTC

Marketplace

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

Lina Khan, Prominent Big Tech Critic, Will Lead the FTC

"Federal Trade Commission. As NPR's Bobby Allyn tells us, Khan becomes the agency's top enforcer after getting bipartisan support for her nomination from Congress. Lina Khan is a 32 year old Columbia law school professor who rose to prominence after writing on how decades old antitrust laws are capable of policing tech companies like Amazon. Her approached, adored by progressives, and some on the right has been dubbed hipster antitrust since it Bucks tradition. Most legal cases focus on whether a company's practices are raising prices for consumers but can argue that it doesn't matter if companies like Amazon are in fact making prices cheaper, She says the company uses press The Tory tactics to lock in its dominance and limit choice. Con is expected to be a guiding force on the FTC as it reviews acquisitions by companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon. That's Bobby Allyn reporting. This is NPR.

Bobby Allyn Lina Khan FTC Columbia Law School NPR Khan Amazon Congress Bucks Google Facebook
Surrogacy on the Stand

HISTORY This Week

02:29 min | 9 months ago

Surrogacy on the Stand

"When carol sanger started teaching at columbia law school in nineteen ninety-four surrogacy was really uncommon. In fact it barely existed. There wasn't the technology for it. And i remember that i made of a question with surrogacy in it on an exam but it was like hypothetical because there was no such thing. One of sanger's academic specialties. Is she puts it odd issues. In family law family law covers things like marriage divorce adoption custody and unin exam. She's trying to push students to think about some situation that they've never even considered something that sounds familiar but actually anything they've ever seen before. Wow and you're you're sort of craziest hypothetical you could think of surrogacy that people could create a baby as they call them then in a test tube and implanted in the mother who gave the ads and then all sorts of questions arise from that. And then you you end up watching as that sort of most obscure difficult legal question becomes this real legal question. Yes the first formal surrogacy contract in the us was drawn up in nineteen seventy six the same year carol sanger got her law degree and it was for an arrangement known as traditional surrogacy. They there's a couple that wants to have a baby. But maybe a woman in the couple is infertile or being pregnant would-be medically dangerous for this couple so they decide to use a surrogate that surrogate agrees to be artificially inseminated but the egg belongs to her so genetically. She's the mother she gets pregnant carries a child to term and then gives it to the other couple today. Most surrogacy doesn't happen this way. Lots of couples now use. What's called justitia surrogacy where the surrogate is not genetically related to the baby inside couples can use egg and sperm from themselves. And or from donors the ed guts. Fertilized in the lab and the embryo gets implanted in the surrogate through in vitro fertilization. Back in nineteen seventy six. That technology did not exist so that i nineteen seventy-six because he contract was for a traditional surrogacy arrangement and it was put together by a man named knoll keen. He was from michigan. He was a lawyer and he became known as the father of surrogacy

Carol Sanger Columbia Law School Sanger United States Michigan
Supreme Court rejects Trump attempt to shield taxes from New York City District Attorney's Office

John Landecker

00:38 sec | 10 months ago

Supreme Court rejects Trump attempt to shield taxes from New York City District Attorney's Office

"Today rejected former President Donald Trump's effort to keep his private financial records out of the Manhattan district attorney's office, Michael Grant says professor of tax Law at Columbia Law School I don't think these air unnecessarily limited to tax crimes. They're also maybe insurance fraud issues or bank fraud issues or wire fraud issues that have to do our mail fraud issues that have to do with over evaluations of property. Speaking in an ape INTERVIEW. The D A's office says the documents are necessary for a grand jury investigation into whether the former president's Cos violated state law. The script's

Manhattan District Attorney's Michael Grant Donald Trump Columbia Law School
"columbia law school" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on AP News

"And Columbia Law School and a longtime Democratic foreign policy presence serving on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration. Before becoming staff director for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee when Biden was chairman, Ben Thomas Washington Lincoln has aligned himself with numerous former national security officials, who have called for a major reinvestment in American diplomacy and a renewed emphasis on global engagement after four years in which President Trump questioned long time alliances, Blinken recently told The Associated Press Democracy is in retreat around the world, and unfortunately it's also in retreat at home, he says. President Trump has been taking a two by four to the nation's institutions and values but adds Our friends know that Joe Biden knows who they are. So do our adversaries. That difference would be felt on day one. And Thomas Washington. This'll is AP News. I'm Rita Fall away. AstraZeneca will immediately apply for emergency approval of its New cove in 19 vaccine, It says it's up to 90% effective. This is now the third company to roll out a potential vaccine. Theeighties Charles Valadez meth from England, where AstraZeneca has been partnering with the University of Oxford at the W. H O special Envoy David Nabarro. Welcome the news. It's a vaccine that can be stored in the fridge temperature for longer periods. It's a vaccine that has high effectiveness in one of the dosage rations that have been tried out. The vaccine news follows last week's announcement from Fizer and Madonna. Saying result show their covert 19 vaccines were almost 95% effective. Charles Deliver asthma, London lowest Clay Baker volunteered to get the AstraZeneca vaccine and she says, this could change everybody's life. Let me like the big things like there's not gonna be people in intensive care anymore. Small things like people can have their relatives with hospital again and then even smaller things like I can get the train into my parents and not worry about it. I think it's gonna change everything. Lois Clay Baker in London. But here in the U. S, the Trump administration is still refusing to cooperate with the incoming Biden administration on a transition. The AP, Shelly Adler has more on ABC is this week run claim, the chief of staff for President elect Joe Biden says they need information. Our transition isn't getting access to agency officials helped develop our plans, and there's a lot of focus on that vaccine rollout plan that's gonna be critical in the early days. Of abiding presidency. I'm showing Adler Tony Blinken reportedly is President elect Biden's choice for secretary of state. Blinken was deputy secretary of state in the Obama administration. The Biden team expected have their first Cabinet announcements tomorrow. This is AP News. The Titans win it in overtime, beating the Ravens. 30 to 24 Derrick Henry rushed for a 29 yard touchdown with 5 21 left in overtime to give the Titans a come from behind 30 to 24 win over the Ravens. Henry finished with 133 yards on 28 carries after rushing for just 44 yards through three quarters. Quarterback Ryan Tannehill threw for 259 yards and two touchdown passes. The Titans have lost three of four coming into the game. And despite being down 21 to 10, Tannehill says they never gave in There is kept plugging away, you know? Missing opportunities early in the game on just kept was it kept pounding away on the run game, taking shots through the air, and then you know things started finally going our way there towards the end of the game. The Titans moved to seven and three on the season, while the Ravens fall to six and four. Craig Heist Baltimore and I'm Rita Foley. AP News.

Joe Biden President Trump AP News Titans Tony Blinken President AstraZeneca Charles Valadez Ryan Tannehill Ben Thomas Washington Lincoln London Senate Foreign Relations Commi Thomas Washington Ravens. Columbia Law School AP National Security Council Lois Clay Baker Fizer Clinton administration
"columbia law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Take This is a Bloomberg Business Flash Stocks Jumping in a broad rally is Americans vote in an election that is broken records for voting early by mail and apparently in person on Election Day. Let's see how We're doing this far is investing is concerned. The S and P 502.2% of 72 thous up 2.4% of 641 and the NASDAQ is up 2% of 215. 10 Years down 14 30 seconds. The yield is 300.89%, West Texas Intermediate crude oil is up 2.8% of 37 85, a barrel comics rolls up 7/10 of a percent of 1905 80 announced. Dollar yen window for 50 to the euro dollars 17 38 the British found dollars 30 76. That is a Bloomberg business Flash. I'm great, Jerry. Election day is here. It is time now to go to somebody who knows a lot about what might happen in the aftermath of this particular election. Richard Default is professor of litigation at Columbia Law School. Professor for you and all of our listeners. We have dysfunction on the Bloomberg, which shows you the most read stories. And in the last hour and indeed, eight hours, the most read stories many of them have to do with Attention, court cases, court battles suits and so on. So USPS finding ballot delays in battleground states Republicans and Pennsylvania suing alleging early vote counting. Just how many lawsuits are we looking at tomorrow? That's hard to say. There have been, I think, by one count over 400 lawsuits filed in the course of this election year, I think, remember, we'll see tomorrow will turn to some extent on just how close to the election is and how many states Uh oh. They're always grounds for litigation. The real incentive is, if the if the account is closed is close enough in any given state that of the litigation might change the result. Well, no, that better by tomorrow. So, Professor. You know what I assume that this is going to be a very close election and based upon what we know from 2000, Florida and some other places, give us a sense of how the timing may play out. Of as litigation winds its way through the system. Sure, well, part of the first step, of course, is to receive and count all the ballots. On that will probably take longer this year, at least in some states than in prior years because of a very large number of absentee ballots, the ballots that have been mailed in even even many states allow those ballots to be counted. Even if they arrive after election Day, provided they're postmarked by election Day and may be more controversially. This year. A number of states that normally don't allow that. I've chosen to allow it. That's one subject of litigation in those states, which have either on their own or the result of a court order have have pushed back the deadline for the receipt of mailed in ballots again, they often postmarked By election day, but they can come in later. So that will certainly mean that there'll be a later count in some states. Also the thing with mailed in ballots, Although some states they begin to process some before election Day in no state or they counted before Election Day, But some states that could get them processed that is out of their envelopes, check for validity and ready to run. In the tabulating machine in a number of the battleground states like Pennsylvania. They won't even be able to begin that processing until today. So my guess is that sensor, then you hate to make guesses, But it's a safe guess that I think that the counting pencil then you will take a long time. What states other than Pennsylvania will be difficult Court case wise, So what state Legislature is will provide sort of the most difficult, drawn out judgments. All the ones with the other state, where there seems to be at least sort of a champion at the different medication. Besides Pennsylvania, right now is a North Carolina sorry. North Carolina is another state. In which there was an extension of the deadline for the receipt of mailed in ballots that the Supreme Court declined to intervene before Election day. But some members of the court indicated they might be willing to step two. Review those ballots of the legitimacy of the legality of those ballots after election day. So North Carolina is another state where we may see something there's currently actually into street pending in Texas. About the use of drive thru voting or curbside voting. My guess is that Pennsylvania I think will be at the top of the list. There may be two streets in other state, I think again, it's The closeness of the state is typically an invitation to litigation, even on less dramatic things. Just challenging with a particular ballots were received on time, whether their signatures on the outside match those on file If it's if it's close in any given state will be a big incentive on the part of the party that that's on the losing side to challenge some of the ballots being counted for the party on the winning side. So Professor Over the last four years, President Trump has appointed Singh upwards of 200. Judges and also going up to the Supreme Court. How concerned should the Democrats be? To the extent they want to really pursue litigation strategy. I have a sense of Democrats will have no choice on litigation because the Republicans were elected for civil litigation strategy. Um, they're the ones who've made most of the noises about challenging ballots and challenging election so the Democrats will be on the defensive. But you're right, one of things that's been amazing watching the litigation over the last six months. That in a number in many of these cases, lower federal cords or a state court was sympathetic to the argument that the pandemic delays in the Postal Service overwhelming of local boards of elections by requests for mailed in ballots to a degree they've never seen before. Justified some one time only 2020 only relax ation of some of the rules governing absentee ballots to deal with the flood of requests and balance to deal with the delays in the Postal Service. And nearly all of those were over stopped or overturned by appellate court judges or the Supreme Court, Um, many of whom consisted of Trump appoint of Trump nominees. People appointed during which the trump term so I think we are seeing some consequences of that Some decisions got through, typically if they came out of a state court, um, but there was a very high fraction of the the winds that voting rights and Democrats got in the lower courts. Overturned by the upper courts. How late will you stay up tonight? And I never really wanted to go to bed early. Get up fresh on Wednesday. Oh, well, I suppose my point is. Is there any point in saying it doesn't pay to stay up late? I don't know. Yeah, exactly. Well, it's always good to get an expert opinion. That's what super fault Joseph P. Chamberlain, professor of a litigation our legislation at the Columbia Law School, based in New York City, of course, and Bonnie You know, it's a real question here. I think the real action may occur. You know, start tomorrow when you know we get a sense of how close the election is and what states as the professor was mentioning of certain key states. Led by Pennsylvania, which states there. There may be some contention. Yeah, we know there's going to be contention. In many states there already is. The question is whether it actually means that somebody can't declare victory won't declare victory or somebody won't accept victory. You know any of these possibilities are there this time round on? Many of them weren't last time because they were just Rules of the game etiquette and so on that dictated these things, But that etiquette seems to be going out the window and certainly just let's go. Nancy Pelosi reiterated the Democrats already if Trump tries investigation on the votes, Yes, but we will certainly bring all that to our election coverage beginning this evening, provided Quinn not Paul. Sweetie, We'll have more coming up. This is Bloomberg..

Pennsylvania professor Supreme Court Bloomberg President Trump North Carolina Um Columbia Law School West Texas Intermediate Jerry Postal Service Nancy Pelosi Richard Default Florida
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
"columbia law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"I A lot of people get they basically are their own worst enemy because they tend to talk talk talk lab lab lab so much and then you're not giving chance to could just six subjective bias right? You think that because you think something that the other person is right there with you on the same on the same program and almost ten out of ten. Times you're actually wrong and people get in their own way because they just wanted to hear themselves talk 'cause it's uncomfortable or quartered, right? Yeah. And yes, I mean and that is and that's where you run into difficulties and it's ironic because I cut you off and I cut you off because I got so excited to talk about. Are you ready for this silence? Because when you said that you know we talk talk talk sometimes it's because we want to hear ourselves talk but other times it's because we're scared of what's going to happen if we allow there to be silence and I'm wondering if you've seen that as well. It's happened to me I mean I've seen it of people with me than it to them. It's one of those things that it's again. It's like very stylish can be very uncomfortable and awkward right and it's very difficult to get over that Hump of being okay with silence and that's why people say once they find a partner that they can just like be in basically just you quiet with. Like Yappy FBI round, they've found their happiness because out of out of that like like uneasiness we end up. going. On and on I, do it a nauseam all the time. But I wanNA talk about.

FBI partner
"columbia law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"Of It what it is is ask for more or this is how you do it. There's like an actionable staying and is practical ways to to get what you want, which is why I really enjoyed the book and why I wanted to talk to you before I even asked you those things I'm curious how did you become a negotiator? How did you figure this out on your own? So I didn't I had help and if you're reading, I figured this out with the advice of a senior woman when I I negotiated my salary. So Jen, like I said, I used to be this person who was so great at negotiating for other people but felt really awkward or uncomfortable doing it for myself. Once hill the moment I went in to negotiate my first salary I walked in. All nervous. They came in with a great offer and I didn't know what to do. So I called a senior woman in my field and I said, hey. What to do? They came in with a great offer and she said I'm going to tell you what to do Alex. you're going to go in and you're going to ask for more. Because when you teach someone had a value you, you teach him how to value all of us. So if you'RE NOT GONNA ask for yourself I want you to go in there and do it for the woman coming after you do it for the sisterhood. And that was the moment I realized that asking for more for myself was not a selfish act quite the opposite it was an act of service. It normalizes it and I make it easier for the woman and the person who is coming after me. Well. That's so true because I feel whenever I negotiate on my own behalf right I always end up was much less money much less of what I want because I think human nature is you feel guilty feel bad asking someone else because that direct contact you know. So when you give it to someone else to do it, you always end up much more successful in your in that in that deal structure, which is why this is why these questions are so valuable, right because it gives you the template still be you can take ownership of what you want and when you that's absolutely right. I definitely wanted the book to inspire but. More than that, I wanted to give people a roadmap to take the mystery out of it being as I found that a lot of people knew kind of things they should do when they negotiated, but they didn't know how or in what order, and so this is basically ten easy steps that you can follow. That will help you for any negotiation whether you're dealing with your kids over screen time in the home or whether you're.

Jen Alex.
"columbia law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"I. Love The name of Your Book We have today on habits and Hustle we have Alexandra Carter the book ask for more. The title is amazing. I mean I live by this motto my entire life though I was it caught my eye right away. And you're also a college professor. You're you're a negotiator for a lot. Was it for for Fortune Five, hundred companies and for Why don't you take it from here, give us a little bit of the background story on you, and then we can kind of dive into the questions I have for you. Yes sure. So I'm a fulltime law professor I'm a Professor at Columbia Law School where I teach negotiation and mediation. I. Also train diplomats at the United Nations I talked to Fortune five hundred companies. Basically, I've spent the last decade helping thousands of people around the world learn to negotiate better and feel more confident doing it. and. What I loved about my I started the book I mean a lot of people who listen to this podcast. No negotiation is right because that's more or less my audience. However I love the way that you define negotiation because that's not what let's not typically how we say it. So would you say your steering the conversation? So kind of tell us what, what, how you what's your definition of what a negotiation is? Yeah. Well, this goes back to my honeymoon in Hawaii actually in two thousand six ages ago and my husband, and I got in a Kayak on the why Lou River beautiful scenery. And the guy looked back at us and says, please negotiate your kayaks to the left. So we can wind up on that each and that Jen was the moment I realized that there's more than one way to think about negotiation it's not just the back and forth over money right before you sign a contract with the client or that once a year conversation you have with your manager negotiation is actually steering. It's any conversation in which you are steering a relationship and. That includes the relationship you have with yourself. You know I think it's so interesting. I. Love the title of Your podcast Right Habits and Hustle, and I think when I think about habits, you know we talk about fueling ourselves with.

professor Alexandra Carter Jen United Nations Columbia Law School Professor Lou River Hawaii
Delaying COVID-19 relief could do lasting damage

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Delaying COVID-19 relief could do lasting damage

"We are not going to hazard a guess here about what is going to happen with negotiations on an economic relief bill the negotiations that the president shutdown yesterday afternoon, and then tried to restart piecemeal. Last night what we are going to do is deal the facts as we have them now, which is that there are no negotiations and as far as anybody knows, there is no help coming for this economy till after the election and maybe longer. So that being case two stories today on that topic, and then a political insight marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets going with story number one the. Big Picture. Back, in March Washington sent three trillion dollars coursing through the economy's veins. One of the biggest infusions was six hundred dollars a week in extra unemployment payments to more than twenty million jobless Americans that expired midsummer and George Washington University economist J Shamba says the amount of cash going out to laid off workers cratered it fell from one hundred, ten, July two, thirty, four, million dollars in September. So there's this massive drop off to the economy and also to the most vulnerable households those twelve hundred dollar relief checks from the spring have been spent with most of the federal pandemic relief now gone. Slowing retail sales and personal spending Joseph Bruce. RSM Consulting says. A quarter of small businesses have closed. He predicts without more federal support including lending to small businesses more will fail and state and local governments won't be able to keep teachers and other essential workers on the payroll says Michael. `grats. At Columbia Law School. The loss of civil service jobs will disproportionately affect minority because they've been hired into those jobs. Bottom Line says Dan North at credit insurer, Euler Hermes, North America. Okay. Let's say we don't have a stimulus package. The economy gets pretty severely damaged in the short term probably for five years to get back on. The burden falling to families that are running out of time and money says Columbia's Michael `grats people are facing eviction. Difficulty paying for food and lodging. This is a desperate situation. One that the chaos in Washington isn't making any

Washington Joseph Bruce Michael Mitchell Hartman George Washington University President Trump Columbia Law School Euler Hermes Rsm Consulting North America Columbia Dan North J Shamba
President Trump's diagnosis throws election into chaos

Bloomberg Law

05:24 min | 1 year ago

President Trump's diagnosis throws election into chaos

"For the Corona virus has roiled the country. Perhaps throwing even more chaos into an already frenetic election year. Trump has been casting doubt on the validity of any election results for some time, and during Tuesday's debate, he suggested that the presidential election will be contested and that it might get ugly. If he doesn't win. I am urging my people, I hope it's going to be a fair election if it's a fair election what I am 100% onboard, but if I see tens of thousands of ballots being manipulated I can't go along with that. Joining me His elections law expert Richard Bro Fault a professor at Columbia Law School, which start by explaining how the law gives states the power to take electoral votes back from the voters. Everyone knows the election for president is really an election decided by the electoral college, and every state has provided that its electoral votes will be determined by who wins the popular election on November 3rd. However, under the constitution, the state legislatures have the right to decide how their electoral votes are going to be capped. And although this has never happened soon, state legislators have collectively defined entrust this decision. The popular vote. The issue has been raised about whether or not after Election Day, the state Legislature of any given day could decide to cast that state's electoral vote on it. That issue has never come up before. We don't know what would happen if the state Legislature after Election Day half of the law that we're giving our electoral votes toe someone so but that issue has come out, partly because of Effort's raised by the president and others to cast a cloud over the legitimacy of the popular vote at a time when more people than ever are going to be voting by mail. One issue is how long will it take to get the popular vote tabulated and what issues are going to be raised about that? And to what extent Trump on the Republicans going to try and deny the legitimacy of the popular vote goes against them? The way of justifying an action by state legislature stay like in Pennsylvania or with conference to get its electoral votes to trump. So what is the timetable for this look like the timetable for this is partly driven by something called the Electoral Count Act. So in 18 87 following the disputed election of 18 76. Congress passed a law trying to bind itself in the future and how it would deal with disputed of electoral votes. And what it said is that so long as the state revolved any dispute about who's won its electoral votes by six days before the electoral college is supposed to meet this year is number 60. Provided that the state results always excused by six days before that, Congress has pledged to except the winner of the state's electoral votes that sometimes called the Safe Harbor deadline. They still take those results leader. There's nothing that prohibits him from accepting layer results. Those deadlines are really an artifact of Congress, but it's effectively about five weeks after Election Day. And one question is, well. Five weeks be enough time not just a tad mate all the absentee votes but also resolve the many challenges that likely to be brought against President. Trump has also said that on ly the votes that are known on election night matter, why is he saying that? Well, part of this I think relates to it is sometimes called the blue shift, and this year is being called the Red Mirage. All in the past. I don't think I made a big difference between Democrats. Republicans who vote by mail in recent election cycles. Think you've been seeing a slightly higher percentage of Democrats by now? Now that the election night numbers will be a bit more Republican, then the total numbers. This has been true nationally because the states have the heaviest of mail in ballots on the West Coast. Washington, Oregon, California And so you may remember in 2016 Hillary Clinton's election I popular vote margin of about a half a million or more grew over time to about 2.5 million. As more and more votes came in from the West Coast. So the assumption is especially this year with the president basically telling Republicans not the vote by mail that the election night vote in the close state We'll show Republican lead, which will be offset over the next couple of days as the nail and both are tabulated. He's basically saying we should. If you were the late vote, we should ignore the mail in votes. Now. An article in the Atlantic said that Republicans in the swing state of Pennsylvania have considered how the state Legislature could appoint electors of their own, choosing in the absence of a clear election night win. At what point does the law gives them the authority to do that? It's not clear that it would ever be legitimate, though it might be constitutional in that, right. Remember, for example, in Bush versus Gore, it took some five weeks to figure out who in Florida and even then that hadn't really figured it out. The Supreme Court came and stopped account. So we have had many elections in which the result was not known on election night or even a week later. Remember also that under federal law, military ballots are entitled to be received and counted off until 10 days after election Day to, actually under federal law, you really can't have a final results until 10 days after Election Day, whether or not what the legislation could just step in and declare a winner in a couple of questions come up one is is that the state Legislature alone or what about the governor has a Democratic government? What if you tried to veto this? President Trump has set a new

President Trump Legislature Congress Pennsylvania Columbia Law School West Coast Richard Bro Supreme Court Washington Florida Democratic Government Hillary Clinton Professor Bush
"columbia law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"But I had a wonderful professor Columbia law school later moved to Stanford, Jerry he was in charge of getting clerkships for Columbia students and I called every federal judge in the second circuit in the Southern East Eastern District of New York, and he was not meeting with success. So he called a Columbia graduate, Edmund, who was Colombia undergraduate, Columbia Law School graduate and always took from Colombia and Say. I strongly recommend that you engage Ruth bid against Palmieri's response was I've had women markers. I know they're okay. But she's a mother and sometimes we have to work on weekends, even on a Sunday, so professor said. A chance that that she doesn't work out. A young men in her class who's going to a downtown firm will jump in and take over. So that was the carrot. There was also a stick and the stick wass. If you don't give her a chance, I will never recommend another Columbia Columbia graduate as you are. That's the way it.

Columbia Columbia Columbia Law School Columbia Colombia Palmieri professor Jerry Stanford Edmund New York Ruth
"columbia law school" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on KGO 810

"We knew this day was coming, but So much to say and, you know, certainly the media's job I think tonight they're already following That pattern is to do three things at once. That's the first thing is what you talked about, Honor her legacy and talk about what she'd been ultimately for, uh, civil rights and equal rights for women. And just in the span of her lifetime. Sometimes we put to the very distant past. You know the time when women did not enjoy full equality. We need somebody there to say. Hey, I graduated from Columbia Law School. At the top of my class, she said, And I couldn't find a single law firm in the entire city of New York. That would hire me because I was a woman. She goes. I have three strikes against you. I was a woman. I was Jewish, and I was a mother. And think about this. You and man, I spoke to every law firm. I went to said you can't be a mother and be a lawyer because you'll spend all your time at home. You think we're not on the Andrew thoughts were these but then I realized that's probably like my father's generation right, not far removed. Not so far, not no, not very far removed. Yeah. In fact, I think it's probably think it's probably still in attitude that they that they have in in many law firms. It isn't a business in general, this debate about about women and getting pregnant and having kids and burning and the like. And you know, I was the thing on a talk radio. Not that long ago, maybe six months ago, and I would hear people like Rush Limbaugh on others talk about how in radio they remember a time when they were coming up in radio in their twenties and thirties. And they felt pressure pushed aside by women because there was a need to hire women not necessarily on air, but in radio on production jobs and in front office jobs. You think you know for baby boomer men for baby boomer man, and I'm a member of Generation X if you're a baby boomer. Yeah, you You did begin your journey into adulthood at a time when women were not Given anywhere near the kinds of opportunities they have now and brisket. Bater Ginsberg was a real champion for changing that the second thing that we're going to do tonight. Let's talk about, you know, in the media and like is it because you said the politics of it? What it means to be facing a Supreme Court vacancy. This close to an election will be a lot of comparisons to Merrick Garland. Other discussions about what happened last time what could happen next time and we'll see a lot of situational ethics and people changing the script on what they argued before they'll argue differently now. And lastly, there should be a conversation probably and there will be In time, just about The overall changes on the court going forward. And what the new justice might do on certain important cases and what kind of conservative majority you might have going forward and also what kind of replacement you might be looking at younger and be hearing a lot of names already over. Should should President Trump feel compelled to put a woman in that position. I believe he should. I think you can find a good qualified conservative Republican woman Female candidate for that you should Ruben Navarette is a syndicated opinion columnist. Washington Post and read is working in the Chronicle is well, Reuben E. I thought it was really interesting..

Ruben Navarette Bater Ginsberg Columbia Law School Rush Limbaugh Merrick Garland President Trump New York Supreme Court Washington Post Andrew Reuben E. Chronicle
The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

10:03 min | 1 year ago

The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

"The purpose of today's hearing is to examine the dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. Roger the covert 19 pandemic. These corporations already stood out as titans in our economy. As American families shift more of their work, shopping and communications online, These Giants stand to profit. Locally owned businesses. Meanwhile, Mom and pop stores on Main Street facing economic price is unlike any in recent history. Rhode Island Democrat David Cellini, opening today's House hearing with the heads of the world's big tech companies. Amazon's Jeff Bezos out of Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google Sunder Pitch I. The foremen faced hours of questions from House lawmakers over whether they've used their superpower status to crowd out competition. And enrich themselves. The House Judiciaries Antitrust committee, which Cellini chairs has been looking into that question for the last year. Joining us to talk about the hearing today is tech expert Tim Woo. He teaches at Columbia Law School and is the author of the book The Curse of Bigness, Anti Trust in the New Gilded Age. Him welcome back to press play. Thanks for having me here. Well, you've argued for a very long time that the's tech giants have gotten too big. What do you think today's hearing accomplished in terms of getting more support to break them up? Well, they I think there are you know, for the first time, putting the most intense documents right in front of them and seeing how they react, and I think what we've gotten out of them, especially on Facebook. Is already some admissions of anti competitive intent that to my mind, make the case for filing a complaint even stronger. And what were some of those admissions that you heard today. Well, Ah. Mark Zuckerberg was questioned about by Jerry Nadler about the his. Ah, why he bought Instagram and pretty much Zuckerberg admitted they were ah, dangerous competitors. We sought to eliminate them at Natalie reminded him that it's illegal to buy off competitors because I don't want to compete with them, and they left it there. But, yeah, that was, I think a big admission and the main thing I've taken from the hearing so far. But isn't that part of business of hostile takeovers and trying to squeeze out the competition isn't part of the American way of doing business, so there's a difference between beating out your competitors and buying them. And since about 18 90. It's been illegal to buy a company just because you're sick of competing with him. You know, you could imagine. Let's take Coke was tired of Pepsi People's Children, Coke and Pepsi, you know and said, All right, forget it. We'll just buy each other and, you know, settle the so so Now it's been illegal since 18 90 or so. Right. So when it comes to Facebook, what about the issues of how it Spreads misinformation, especially campaign misinformation, and, you know, fake news for lack of a better term. Yeah, I know. It hasn't so far. Um, it has a little bit sorry, especially hate speech. I think the big issue there that they're focusing on and Is this idea that that Facebook has an impunity because they have such a secure market position that they're not really afraid of advertising boycotts. They're not really afraid of people leaving That's the least a point that the House representatives were trying to make, and so therefore they don't really have an incentive to clean up their act. What about the other companies? Amazon that also has incredible market share. Can you first catalogue just how big Amazon is and how much bigger it's gotten since the current virus epidemic? Yeah, you know, the Amazon has closed in on the market cap of 1.5 trillion They have 280 billion in revenue. They have increased dramatically. Actually, stock prices increased since the beginning of the Corona virus by I don't know the exact percentage don't want to get it wrong, but by a tremendous amount, in fact, And there was one day in which Jeff Bezos gained $13 billion personally, so they are the biggest of big attack for the first part of hearing they didn't get any questions, but representative Dia Paul brought it in accusing them. Of lying in front of Congress about how they treat third party sellers and pressing bass. Those hard on how he runs his marketplace. So they they, they've got some of they've got some fire. Coming in. Yeah, I guess the problem. There is not only well they sell, you know products from third parties always there slow selling their own products, and so they are. I guess in competition with 1/3 party supplies on their own platform. How does that work? I mean, that's I think the acquisition or the problem is that people worry that Amazon has become more or less the dominant online retailer. They have some competition Homer, but you know, more or less dominant. So you make it on Amazon are Or you don't make it at all. And if that's the marketplace, the prospect of You come up with successful thing? I don't know Better mousetrap, and then Amazon makes their own copy of it. So the Amazon version of it and then sells it for less. You know, that turns into a sucker's game, and I think that's been the main complaint about Amazon is ah, less that they You know about their competitors or something but more that they have turned the marketplace into something of a rigged game for their own products. Right and a sweet noted Jeff Bezos is the world's richest man. Right now, the company is you outline is just so big. It's hard to even wrap your mind around it. Is there any way you could break up Amazon or hasn't just become too big to break up? That's a good question. You know, it hasn't been subject to a lot of discussion, probably for the reasons you suggest. Most of scrutiny of Amazon is how they treat the marketplace. I think for a true old school antitrust type who just believes that too much power to concentrated should always be broken. Would want to switch, you know, break Amazon into some kind of pieces. One way might be to break off their Web services division, which is a dominant in its space. You could also imagine, as with it and t breaking it into baby Amazons. I guess that are supposed to compete with each other. But I know it hasn't been unlike Facebook and even Google. Has been talks about how would you break them up? Think Amazon. It's been more about can they? Can you get them to run their at their market place better? And then Google. Obviously a search giant and it's become a verb. It's such an intimate part of who we are at this point again. How would you break up Google if you could It's a good question. Let me let me say that Google has come under fire this hearing both from Sicily knee on the idea that they are essentially eating their ecosystem That is to say. You know if you if you like like with Amazon actually similar that if You know, you could come up with a really successful Web service of some kind in your sort of small enough that Google will make a version of it and then send all the traffic to it so that that's the accusation against them. As for you know, what would you do to Google one You could say, don't do that. That's what the Europeans are trying to dio. Another would be to say, Well, listen, it Google, you run the search part and just leave it there. Don't do everything else. Okay. Maybe run Gmail, maybe right maps. But all these other little things that are just clones of other companies. Stay out of that, or make them be independent companies. I should add. By the way, there's you know, I'm maybe we get to this, but there's been AH, Google face us a lot of Republicans during the hearing, talking about different issues. Trying to get Google to admit that it Ah Is too friendly to China. Eyes too unfriendly to the US Pentagon. That's been another theme of this hearing is that I think should be mentioned. Well, you bring up China, and I guess the argument against breaking up these companies is that they're competing against Chinese companies, which In many cases have the backing of the state and there's there's no limit to their monopolistic practices. And so if these are global companies, should there be different rules when it comes to monopoly now than there were, you know, back in the 19th century. Yeah. Or the 20th? Yeah, that is the argument. So you know, kind of goes like this. If you break up Facebook or make fix books, life difficulty the Chinese will take over. It's kind of a national champion like argument. So we have to have our guys. Um I don't find it convincing at all. Last time we heard that kind of argument was when Japan was the all great mighty power that was going to take over everything in America. And they said it so you can't break up the tea and you can't break up IBM. I think we've had a better track record. Forcing American companies to be competitive. It's not breaking them up, at least putting him under heavy scrutiny like Microsoft and hoping a new generation arises. So yeah, I think that's a pretty lame excuse not to enforce the law that put it that way. So what do you think is going to come out of this? You know, I think from what I've heard there was some documents that were coming out of this that nobody has seen. And I think they put more pressure on the administration and also the states to file complaints. I would not be surprised if Google ends up on the receiving end of an antitrust complaint before November. And after this hearing, I wonder of Facebook's gonna get 12 or whether that's going to be something that the election decides. But, yes, I think it adds to the pressure to file actual cases as opposed to talking about it.

Amazon Facebook Google Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg House Judiciaries Antitrust Co Columbia Law School David Cellini Tim Woo Rhode Island Tim Cook Titans Roger Apple Jerry Nadler Congress Microsoft Natalie Coke
The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

03:35 min | 1 year ago

The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

"The purpose of today's hearing is to examine the dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. Roger the covert 19 pandemic. These corporations already stood out as titans in our economy. As American families shift more of their work, shopping and communications online, These Giants stand to profit. Locally owned businesses. Meanwhile, Mom and pop stores on Main Street facing economic price is unlike any in recent history. Rhode Island Democrat David Cellini, opening today's House hearing with the heads of the world's big tech companies. Amazon's Jeff Bezos out of Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google Sunder Pitch I. The foremen faced hours of questions from House lawmakers over whether they've used their superpower status to crowd out competition. And enrich themselves. The House Judiciaries Antitrust committee, which Cellini chairs has been looking into that question for the last year. Joining us to talk about the hearing today is tech expert Tim Woo. He teaches at Columbia Law School and is the author of the book The Curse of Bigness, Anti Trust in the New Gilded Age. Him welcome back to press play. Thanks for having me here. Well, you've argued for a very long time that the's tech giants have gotten too big. What do you think today's hearing accomplished in terms of getting more support to break them up? Well, they I think there are you know, for the first time, putting the most intense documents right in front of them and seeing how they react, and I think what we've gotten out of them, especially on Facebook. Is already some admissions of anti competitive intent that to my mind, make the case for filing a complaint even stronger. And what were some of those admissions that you heard today. Well, Ah. Mark Zuckerberg was questioned about by Jerry Nadler about the his. Ah, why he bought Instagram and pretty much Zuckerberg admitted they were ah, dangerous competitors. We sought to eliminate them at Natalie reminded him that it's illegal to buy off competitors because I don't want to compete with them, and they left it there. But, yeah, that was, I think a big admission and the main thing I've taken from the hearing so far. But isn't that part of business of hostile takeovers and trying to squeeze out the competition isn't part of the American way of doing business, so there's a difference between beating out your competitors and buying them. And since about 18 90. It's been illegal to buy a company just because you're sick of competing with him. You know, you could imagine. Let's take Coke was tired of Pepsi People's Children, Coke and Pepsi, you know and said, All right, forget it. We'll just buy each other and, you know, settle the so so Now it's been illegal since 18 90 or so. Right. So when it comes to Facebook, what about the issues of how it Spreads misinformation, especially campaign misinformation, and, you know, fake news for lack of a better term. Yeah, I know. It hasn't so far. Um, it has a little bit sorry, especially hate speech. I think the big issue there that they're focusing on and Is this idea that that Facebook has an impunity because they have such a secure market position that they're not really afraid of advertising boycotts. They're not really afraid of people leaving That's the least a point that the House representatives were trying to make, and so therefore they don't really have an incentive to clean up their act.

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg David Cellini Jerry Nadler Amazon Google Apple Tim Woo House Judiciaries Antitrust Co Titans Roger Jeff Bezos Tim Cook Coke Rhode Island Pepsi Columbia Law School Natalie
"columbia law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The faithless elector explained by election law expert Professor Richard Default of Columbia Law School. But first let's get a market check with Charlie Fella. I thank you very much. David Western. Here's what's going on on this. Tuesday, July 7th gold closing in on $1800 the ounce right now, with 17 96 it is up 7/10 of 1%. Most stocks are falling technology shares are gaining the tech giant's air are performing a NASDAQ is at a record right now we have got the S and P 500 index down nine, retreating from yesterday's rally, down by about 3/10 of 1%. The Dow was down 194 points, down 7/10 of 1%. NASDAQ Holding on to a 14 point game, It is up by 1/10 of 1%. 10 Europe 7 30 seconds, with a yield of 300.65%. Hold up $11 he ounce of 17 96 again. That's a game now seven tense West Texas enemy, the accrued up 4/10 of 1% 40 79 for a barrel of West Texas and immediate crew. Job openings edged higher in Maia's state or local authorities started to lift pandemic restrictions and with more here's Bloomberg's Vinny del Jude ice The government reports. Job openings rose to 5.4 million nationwide, led by accommodation and food services, retailing construction. Even so, the total is well below the start of the year when employers reported seven million job openings. Job opening set involved workers We called furlough Spartan counted in the tally, assign a potential strength. Any doubts you dice. Bloomberg Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is meeting today with leaders of the C P the Anti Defamation League and color of change to address a range of concerns about Facebook. Movie theater operators, AMC Entertainment, Cinemark Holdings and Regal Cinemas are suing New Jersey for keeping cinema's closed due to the risk of Corona virus spread while allowing stores, shopping malls and churches to reopen. Recapping equities are trading mixed S and P 500 index down eight the drop of 3/10 of 1%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That's a Bloomberg business. Flash balance of power continues..

Bloomberg Charlie Fella David Western Professor Richard Default Facebook Columbia Law School Charlie Pellet West Texas Europe Maia AMC Entertainment Mark Zuckerberg Cinemark Holdings CEO New Jersey Regal Cinemas
Zoom Call Eviction Hearings: 'They'll Throw Everything I Have Out On The Street'

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Zoom Call Eviction Hearings: 'They'll Throw Everything I Have Out On The Street'

"Moratoriums are now expiring in parts of the country and some courts are now using zoom calls to hold remote fiction hearings for people late on their rent NPR's Chris Arnold reports and a vision hearing in Collin county Texas this week was like many other zoom calls full of first timers audio problems general confusion could have trainees receive respected galaxy in Rome that's the judge who's trying to figure out who's who with a bunch of different people on the call I'm sorry I was talking can you hear me now hello wave your hand yes it would be almost kind of funny except that what's at stake here is not renters are in this soon hearing with landlords who want to evict them renters like Dino Brock's oops re reason why your rep yes Sir my company closed due to the pandemic and you have to have a letter from your employer to prove that you were affected by the corona and I was getting the run around I haven't been able to get unemployment or anything the judge said since Brooks lives within the city of Dallas he wanted to review the current rules and evictions there so her case got moved in next week her landlord declined to comment we followed up with the abrupt after the hearing she's a navy veteran and she says she has a heart condition and it she says she has no friends or family that you can move in with and I'm scared now grow everything I have outside on the street I'm gonna start crying it's a nightmare that nobody wants to go through and a lot of times people don't know what their rights are renters may have protections right now but the rules are complicated and differ from state to county the city and in this room call hearing at people who did not dial in and their landlord did it they were just out a lock I'm gonna go for this one because I don't have it here and just tell me thank you have a default judgment position background and for default judgment that basically means you didn't show up we're giving your landlord the right to evict you that happened a five people in just this one a zoom call hearing now for some people doing the zoom call might be easier than getting to the court house but some legal experts say that for other people this could deny their right to due process which includes the right to be heard what if somebody doesn't have a decent smart phone or computer or online access the elderly can have trouble connecting on video calls Emeli Benford's a professor at Columbia Law School a missed call or not being able to log into remote hearing is the equivalent of failing to appear remote hearings may not only be the loss of basic rights they could also be the difference between housing and homeless miss Deena Brooks the navy vet and Dallas is worried herself about not having a home I have nowhere to go but I feel like very depressed rest out and I did I don't know what to do so these soon call hearings are happening because it's not safe enough to gather in court but apparently it's okay for people to be put out in the street in the midst of a pandemic okay that's cool it's a cruel situation Matthew Desmond heads at Princeton university's eviction lab today is announcing a new tracking system to monitor what's happening omits the pandemic and already with some moratoriums expiring he says eviction filings are rising in Milwaukee for example the kids are out thirty eight percent last week from where they should be on a typical week in June in Milwaukee with millions of Americans still out of work due to code red at me says even actions it should not be the answer here some landlord groups agree policy now is a vice president with the national multifamily housing council we should be working to help those who have been impacted by club in nineteen through robust government assistance like she says an emergency plan from Congress for renters and landlords meanwhile the zoom eviction hearings continue but law professor Emily band for expects that legal

Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:53 min | 1 year ago

Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

"Your host for the program is David. Cosso a DC based healthcare policy analyst. And we invite you to comment on the program by visiting the healthcare policy. Podcasts DOT COM. Now here's David. Welcome to the healthcare policy. Podcast I'm the host David Intro Cosso during this podcast discussed with Professor Michael Burger Executive Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change at Columbia Law School. The trump administration's efforts to unwind the nation's environmental regulatory rules and the status of Climate Crisis Related Litigation. Professor Burger. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Professor Burgers by was posted on the podcast website on background to state the obvious we interact with the environment constantly as a result. We are exposed to harmful animal-borne germs like viruses bacteria parasites or so called zoonotic diseases. Scientists s made more than six out of every ten known infectious diseases and three out of four new or emerging infectious diseases. Come from animals. Think Dengue Malaria Rabies covid nineteen according to the National Academy of Sciences. The environment is responsible for thirty percent of premature deaths. He Fi far higher percentage than healthcare prevents. This explains why minority Communities Face Higher Kobe. Nineteen related mortality. Upwards of three times their immune systems have already been compromised by degrade environment for example poor air quality despite for recognizing the adverse effects. The environment has on our health. The for example environmental impact statements. The trump administration has worked aggressively to gut the nation's environmental protections according to the Save Insanity Administration has unwound or ten zone wind approximately one hundred environment regulations ranging from power plant and car and truck. Co Two emissions. Mercury and hydrofluorocarbons emissions. Who was protecting wetlands from oil and GAS LEAK RULES REGARDING PESTICIDE? Use drilling fracking and coal leasing rules offshore oil and gas drilling rules etc concerned. The climate crisis listeners. Mary call my having discussed research. Polishing Twenty sixteen that concluded the adverse health effects resulting from the healthcare ministries greenhouse gas or carbon emissions our response properties Roberts of nearly one hundred thousand deaths annually in the US alone with begin discussing ministrations attack on Varma deregulations centers. Michael Burger so with that Professor Burger. Let me start by asking. If you can briefly describe the same incentives work sure The Saban Center is a think and do tank housed at Columbia Law School. We focus on Climate Change Law across the board meaning. We look at both mitigation related issues. How to go about reducing greenhouse gas emissions as well as adaptation issues to respond to climate change impacts that are already happening that will only increase in intensity and frequency over time. We are not policy shop so we don't do policy analysis. We're really team of lawyers. That focus very much on the on the legal aspects of climate policy. I and we do this at all. Scales of government from the from the local to the global We have a number of different things. We do On the side of our think and do tank We do what thinks generally do we produce a original research and writing on a range of climate law related topics we also produce An put up on our website free for public. Use a number of different resources for researchers lawyers policy practitioners students and others. These include our climate change litigation databases both US and non us. Our silencing science tracker our climate deregulation tracker which we launched on inauguration day in two thousand seventeen our legal pathways deep decarbonisation database which includes Hundreds of model laws setup for governments at all scales to adopt To achieve deep decarbonisation in the number of other tools on the do side of our thinking do tank We engage actively with partners including international organizations Domestic and international NGOs. Political staffers And representatives other academic institutions And others to leverage our expertise to have an impact on the real world so in this regard be Senate comment letters on environmental impact statements to end proposed regulations. We filed amicus briefs On behalf of scientists coalitions cities and others in big climate cases And we regularly seek to influence an inform public decision making around climate law and policy. So you're busy. Yeah we have our hands especially these days. Yes Okay. So let's go to these days So my next question. Let's get to the meat of this Though would take hours to detail the administration's assault on the environment. Let's focus on air quality since among other things accounts for a seven million deaths worldwide or degraded air-quality so Let's focus more over again on this subject. So what's the administration's policy toward amongst other issues Power Plant emissions. This was the Obama. Administration's Clean Power Plan Auto Tailpipe pipe and particularly as well of course methane emissions which is a much more potent greenhouse gas.

Professor Burger David Intro Cosso Policy Analyst Columbia Law School United States Professor Michael Burger Save Insanity Administration Professor Burgers National Academy Of Sciences Barack Obama Assault Sabin Center Mary
Is this country ready for 2.5 million jobless claims in a week?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Is this country ready for 2.5 million jobless claims in a week?

"Know there is a thing that happens when a big story like this lasts for a while and I figure we are just about at that point now where it's happening so it's time to clue y'all in so we all know what's going on everything starts to sound the same like you've heard all the news updates before us for instance you've probably heard on this program. I don't know half a dozen times in the last week alone. That a number we are going to get tomorrow morning called first time. Claims for unemployment is going to be gigantic. Maybe two and a half million people filing claims against a normal week where it's two hundred and fifty thousand tops. I send that again because the big rescue bill that Congress still hasn't found a way to pass is throwing billions of dollars at unemployment insurance but every one of those two and a half million people who are GonNa Follow. More is a story in an unemployment system that is deeply deeply stressed from our bureau in Portland Oregon Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman Gazza's go so when we want this to go on here yeah okay. That's violin last. Friday was Steve Bench. Eros last day of work at the violin shop where he's fixed instruments for thirty years with music performances cancelled and business down. The shops closed indefinitely. We could use some work at home and we can do repairs but yeah. It's not exactly a Tele Commuting Business Ben. Shapiro didn't apply for unemployment right away. He'd heard horror stories of the Oregon website crashing. He finally tried last night and after some initial glitches got his claim. Filed Congress is sending money to the states to beef up staffing and administration but many states make qualifying for and receiving benefits. Difficult says Michael `grats at Columbia Law School since the great recession some states have reduced unemployment payments and eight states. No longer offer the standard twenty six weeks of benefits. So we've got poor and inadequate finance very inadequate coverage. It's just an archaic ineffective system. The Senate's new stimulus bill will send billions more to the states. Says Michelle Evermore at the National Employment Law Project? I think this will go a long way to smoothing the transition into into the next recession. It will pay benefits to workers staying at home to care for family members plus the self employed and independent contractors. This bill also will give everyone whether they're on the new pandemic unemployment assistance program or traditional unemployment insurance an extra six hundred dollars a week for four months that increases huge evermore says the goal is to replace workers pre corona virus paychecks and make sure people remain eligible for benefits without having to go out and look for work the last thing they should be doing during a pandemic. I Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. Another thing that people who two weeks ago had jobs but now don't have another thing they have to worry about is how they're gonNA get healthcare coverage from the workplace cultured as Marketplace's Megan McCarthy Carino has that one one week ago Sonia Zanardi was laid off from her job as a bartender in Washington. Dc. She's scrambling to apply for unemployment. Figure out how shall pay rent and what she's going to do about health insurance since her employer stopped. Subsidizing it on April Eleventh. Probably the scariest part of it for me. Because has we're going into a pandemic. She figures she'll get insurance on the health care exchange but in the past. That's cost four hundred dollars a month for a plan with a four thousand dollar deductible. She hasn't figured out. If she'll qualify for Medicaid but for now Cobra is just too expensive. I don't ever been this scared about my financial situation. But at least her former employer has paid for insurance for the next month. That's what Asher. Scofield is doing for five former employees of his shuttered gift shop the Frog toad in Providence Rhode Island being covered at a time. Like this is very scary. And we just want to make sure that everybody's taking care of through this that even before the pandemic more than twenty seven million people in the US had no insurance that includes many part time freelance and GIG workers who don't get health care or other benefits through an employer but might not qualify for public assistance. What is transpiring now is underscoring the critical need for us to refashion the social safety net. Nyu Business Professor Aroon soon. Dhiraj on says the reliance on traditional fulltime employers to deliver safety net benefits for workers was breaking down long before the current crisis. I'm Megan McCarthy Carino for marketplace. There was big rally today on Wall Street on news then. Economic Rescue Package was going to get done and then it didn't get done still up though we'll have the details when we do. The

Congress Oregon Steve Bench Mitchell Hartman Gazza Megan Mccarthy Megan Mccarthy Carino Shapiro Mitchell Hartman Michelle Evermore Senate Portland Day Of Work Economic Rescue Package Asher Columbia Law School United States Self Employed Dhiraj
Trump declares himself 'chief law enforcement officer' of America

Bloomberg Law

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Trump declares himself 'chief law enforcement officer' of America

"After commuting the sentences of former Illinois governor rod the glade vision former New York police commissioner Bernard Kerik among others president trump seem to take his authority one step further yesterday I'm actually I guess the chief law enforcement officer of the country but I've chosen not to be involved my guest is former federal prosecutor Jennifer Rogers who teaches at Columbia Law School so chief law enforcement officer is the designation usually given to the U. S. Attorney General can trump claimed that title as president I don't think so I mean he's not a law enforcement officer at all I mean he's the head of the executive branch of course and you know it is true to say that there's no legal barrier to him presiding over and involving himself in the department of justice's work but that's not the same thing as saying he's the chief law enforcement officer which suggests that he actually has not just the authority but a reason to do that like he's supposed to be involving himself in that matter he said this after he granted clemency in several politically charged cases without going through the established pardon process what do you see this ad is it trump flouting his authority is it from setting up future pardons for friends or something else well I think both of those things I mean it you know some of the people pardoned or granted commutation yesterday did have relationships with him I mean rod Blagojevich for example was on celebrity apprentice with him years ago so it's certainly some of that but I think it's also the first point you make which is I don't care about how things are supposed to be done I don't care about the men and women of the justice department who worked so hard in these cases and who in the normal pardon process would give me the benefit of all of their wisdom about these cases I'm just going to do whatever I want to DO and guess what no one can do anything about it I mean that's a big part of the message here that he's not only flouting the regular kind of establish procedures by you know kind of thumbing his nose at all of us in a way there's nothing we can do to stop it well he also contrary to the stated preferences of Attorney General William Barr he continued his tweets about the Roger stone case and denigrated the judge in that case you have to wonder where he's going with that yeah I mean this is also part of a pattern he has been denigrating judges since he was a candidate you know remember he what he said about the judge who had part of the fraud case against his trump university so they know this is part of the pattern for him and the and again it's you know I can do what I want no one can stop me not even you know I'm I'm not even considering off limits that another branch of government you know he'll go ahead and denigrate judges and challenge them and of course the judiciary is you know a separate and co equal branch of government so that's part of his pattern as well I don't think the judge Amy Berman Jackson is or will be intimidated or wait at all by what the president is saying so won't have that particular impact but again it's part of him telling the rest of us you know I am I can do whatever I want I'm uncontrollable and he's going to continue to be that way I think what does this do to the career prosecutors at the justice department he's commenting on cases and judges and granting clemency without going through the process have you talked to colleagues in the justice department to see where they're at yeah it's really demoralizing for people at the justice department I mean I certainly spoken with many former colleagues of mine and I know also that people still in the department are just very concerned about what's going on you know they are taught from day one we all were that your job is to do the right thing it is in a political job you don't take those issues into account and you're not supposed to do favors for people you know friends of people in power just like you're not supposed to go after the political enemies of the people in power and so to see the president urging those things that are so contrary to the fair administration of justice as all people in the justice department swear to uphold is really concerning and so I think that the department is really revealing right now which is part of the reason that Bill bar with I think trying to calm people down with the statements that he made the other day there are also rumors that bill Barr was going to resign as Attorney General of course the department spokeswoman said he has no plans to resign with those rumors possibly aimed at an audience of one president trump I have no idea you know whether that was aimed at at trump to push back on him a little bit or aimed at the men and women in the department to say don't worry I take this very seriously and I'm ready to resign if you know our independent our ability to do our job continues to be meddled with by the president but I also hate those statements of the rumors of those statements with an entire shaker full of salt because you know it seems to me that bill Barr has been doing exactly what he had wanted to do in terms of increasing executive power at the expense of his own department since he came into the job so the notion that as successful as he's been seeking really exactly these results that he's working on now you know that he would resign now seems to me a far

Bernard Kerik Illinois New York President Trump
Exxon to face trial in New York investor fraud lawsuit

Morning Edition

02:11 min | 2 years ago

Exxon to face trial in New York investor fraud lawsuit

"Exxon Mobil goes on trial in New York today in the state says it misled shareholders about the risks that the company faces from climate change it's a civil lawsuit and more cities and states are doing the same thing they're trying to hold oil companies accountable for climate change and pears laurel Wamsley has the story new York's Attorney General is suing Exxon Mobil arguing that he defrauded the public for years by misrepresenting how carbon regulation would affect the company's financial outlook the case goes back to twenty fifteen when reports found that while Exxon scientists were in Ridley researching climate change to plant operations the company was outwardly casting doubt on global warming then New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman told PBS newshour how its investigation could lead to legal action there's nothing wrong with with advocating for your own company which you're not allowed to do is commit fraud the state argues that acts on used two different ways to calculate carbon costs and wasn't clear when it was using one or the other which had the effect of making its assets appear more secure than they really work that in turn affected it share price the lawsuit says and defrauded investors that would be a violation of a New York statute known as the Martin act it's the same law that's been used by previous Attorney General in the state to bring charges against big financial firms there's not a general law for better or worse against lying in general but there is a law against lying to shareholders that's Michael Gerard the climate law expert at Columbia Law School he says one focus in the case will be excellent investment and the carbon intensive Canadian oil sands project some investors worried won't make financial sense under tougher climate regulations and all the details get a little wonky this is a case with potentially big consequences this is the first case on alleged securities fraud about climate change over to go to trial Exxon says the lawsuit is politically motivated and driven by anti fossil fuel activists the company says it was honest with shareholders about how it calculated carbon costs Effexor loses a could be vulnerable to a string of lawsuits in other states that's because it had to give New York thousands of pages of documents and a lawsuit elsewhere will be able to use what comes out in the trial to build their own arguments laurel Wamsley

Fraud Laurel Wamsley Martin PBS Attorney Exxon Securities Fraud Columbia Law School Michael Gerard Exxon Mobil Eric Schneiderman Ridley New York
"columbia law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"But I had a wonderful professor at Columbia Law School later moved to Stanford Jerry center he was in charge of getting clerkships with Columbia students and he called every federal judges in the second circuit in the seventies is the district of New York and he was not meeting with success so he called a Colombian graduation and commentary who was it Columbia undergraduate Columbia Law School graduate and always took his friend from Columbia and he said I strongly recommend that you engage with baby things for the primaries response was I've had women law clerks I know their own Kinney but she's a mother and sometimes we have to work on weekends even on the Sunday soon professing themselves said give her a chance and if he doesn't work out a young man in her class who's going to a downtown firm jump in and take over so that was the can there was also a state and this one is if you don't give her a chance I will never recommend another Columbia Columbia graduate as yeah way not so ancient days for women the big hurdle was to.

professor Columbia Law School Stanford Jerry center New York Columbia Kinney Columbia Columbia
"columbia law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"No secret in during a with law then I met Melanie as at a time when the best to green that a girl could have was not her BA or JD it was her MRS money was the most unusual fellow I've said many times he was the only boy that every new up till that time who cares that I had a brain and we met under the best circumstances Marty had a girlfriend at Smith College and I had a boyfriend at Columbia Law School and our friends so it was a long cold winters no we were going to use is the best of friends of ever I wanted to go to the movies alkaline as or we often went to the college spot to gather this to talk about anything and everything but the thing about money it was city and such confidence in himself it was very comfortable with who he was and he never regarded me as any kind of a read on hi Kerry M. monitor that I must be really special and he wanted to spend his life with me so no same issues he was always my biggest booster so did you negotiate divisions of labor at home and around the family the him knowing knowing there though she Asians but we just and did what needed to be done and at different times hi Karen the labor in or at home and Marty was determined to become a partner in his girlfriend of five years which he did and so during those years in most of the childcare and that continued until he did make part and then it switched when the women's movement came alive at the end of the sixties and money realize that what I was doing was very important so he took on more of the homework than he had before I was in the town to face and the kitchen at an earlier.

Melanie Marty Smith College Columbia Law School partner Kerry M. five years
"columbia law school" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Mukherjee thank you thank you for having me goodbye goodbye lauren mccurdy is the head of the columbia law school human rights clinic we reach professor mccreadie in new york dying from collide leonard he's the raptor the canadian fans were most hoping would choose day north of the border and he's not even a player today messiah jiri the raptors president any architect of the teams championship run spoke at a news conference for the first time since the victory over golden state and although he's had a lot of interest from other teams around the league he confirmed but for now he's not going anywhere for me m b it's always been about toronto i love it here and my family loves it here m my wife loves his yeah which is very important a my kids are canadians and you want to win more a for me i'm gonna continue to address teams wanting me or and all those things you know like that not a blessing in in in life and and i don't use it in in in those kind of in a way that 'em for me the blessing is is is being warranted here and finding a place that makes you happy and and finding finding challenges that really make you grow as a person and this place has made me grow as a person i identify we've this first place and i and i love it i know so in in my mind i'm here that was the toronto raptors president messiah jerry at a press conference in toronto today he was also asked about an allegation from police in california that he pushed a deputy as he was trying to get on the court area after the raptors championship chip when he said he respects authority but said he would wait for the results would be ongoing investigation before saying anything else she's not my type that's how you as president donald trump responded yesterday to a sexual assault allegations levelled against him by e gene carol carol is a long time advice columnist last week new york magazine published an excerpt from her forthcoming book and it was she writes about her alleged assault by mr trump she describes an incident in the mid nineties where she ran into mr trump at a luxury department store in new york city she alleges he cornered her and one of the change room and raped her she's the sixteenth woman to alleged sexual assault or unwanted sexual touching by president trump and i guess just wondering why mainstream media didn't seem to give the story much coverage molly jong fast as a journalist and author we reached her in new york city molly there are now several women accusing donald trump of sexual actual misconduct and the latest accuser to that accuser the precedent says she's not my type what do you make of that response i mean it's a very trumpy response and he actually said that about someone else to i can't remember member who the larger question is like yeah idea what he's saying when he says that is that it's not rape that's problematic it's her appearance which i think is preposterous i mean i think it shows his complete lack of any moral you know he had no morality so anyway you're talking about the president's united states yes i mean depending on the map you do it somewhere between fifteen and twenty two women have accused him of sexual misconduct so it's hard to i mean now.

Mukherjee lauren mccurdy columbia law school
"columbia law school" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Another guy. No busted. I'm Monica Ricks. Live from the twenty four hour KFI newsroom. A woman has sued UCLA over a doctor who's been charged with sexual battery the lawsuit claims the university had multiple warnings about the OBGYN in the years leading up to his arrest court documents allege, the doctor had been investigated for misconduct in two thousand fourteen that's several years before he was accused of abusing to patients at UCLA health. The former doctor pleaded not guilty earlier this week to charges that he sexually abused patients in two thousand seventeen and twenty eighteen UCLA says the man retired right before he was to be fired last year. Andrew mollenbeck, KFI news Garcetti has ordered all LA city flags. Be lowered to have staff through Wednesday. It's an honor of an LAPD officer who is in honor rather, of the LAPD officer who died over the weekend, after having surgery related to an on duty car crash in two thousand fifteen the LA county sheriff. Stephanie who shunned the head has died in the hospital? Sheriff Alex us as a shooting in Hambro was random a motive rationale from the suspect that this million dollar question. Investigators say the killer shot the off duty officer Monday at Jack in the box. The LAPD says the man may have killed another person in LA. The man's also suspected of carrying out a series of armed robberies in San Diego. A business partner of rap mogul shook night has pleaded. No contest to charge of conspiracy to obstruct Justice. Mark Blankenship, was accused of arranging to celebrate a fatal hit and run that was under seal in nights murder trial can ship was sentenced yesterday to five years of formal probation, and he has to pay fifty five thousand dollars in restitution a woman charged in that case got the same plus community service night was sentenced in October two twenty eight years in prison for the fatal crash count trans has been digging out debris from a landslide on the Angeles crest highway there will be fewer rubbing engines, more birds and crickets, rolling the soundscape here until September. Number contrast, targeted this month to finish the job spokesman, Eric many VAR says the job site is hazardous enough to need a spotter and all I do is look at that mountain and whenever something comes down the yell and make sure that they get the crews protected. Many of our says crews use this special excavator called spider for the grades. It's slowly climbs across the hill and on top of the hill, just like a spider far says the delay to this fall is to build a new retaining wall in the Angeles national forest Chris ancarlo KFI news. The White House says a federal watchdog agency has violated presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway's rights by saying she should be fired. The office of special counsel unrelated to special counsel, Robert Muller says, Conway has repeatedly violated a law that bans federal workers from certain partisan activities off his calls Conway a repeat offender because she disparages democratic presidential candidates in media, interviews, and on social media President Trump says he'd be open to another country, given dirt on his rival in the twenty twenty election ABC's, George Stephanopoulos, asked Trump, whether his. Campaign would accept research from country like China or Russia and report it to the FBI. I think maybe do both. I think you might wanna listen. I don't this nothing wrong with listening seven apple mentioned that Al Gore, once called the FBI when he received a stolen briefing book, but Trump said theft is different from opposition research. Give me a break lifeless director says that's what should happen. The FBI director is wrong. Trump says he may call the FBI depending on the situation but he says a country offering opposition research is not the same as that country interfering in an election. These leader of Iran says his country is not interested in do over of nuclear talks with the US. I told the Ali Khamenei claims that Iran does not want a nuclear weapon. But even if it did America could do nothing to stop it from happening, the tola made the comments while visiting with the Japanese Prime minister who's been trying to have cooled down tensions between the US and Iran and lead prosecutor in the central park, five case has quit her job as part as a part time lecturer. At Columbia law school, Elizabeth letter says she's resigning, because of the negative negative publicity from a new miniseries that dramatizes the case when they see us tells the story of five teams from New York City, that were wrongfully accused of raping and beating a jogger in central park in one thousand nine hundred eighty.

Trump FBI LAPD KFI Kellyanne Conway officer LA UCLA Iran Monica Ricks Ali Khamenei director LA county Mark Blankenship San Diego US Alex us Columbia law school Al Gore
Payday Loans And Debt Traps

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:58 min | 3 years ago

Payday Loans And Debt Traps

"So her job is in high demand. Getting work was not a problem, but covering all her expenses. That was a problem. Amy was living in Detroit with her husband and three little kids. She says the bills had started to feel crushing we were barely making it, and I came across something about a payday loan, and I called my husband. And I said, you know, we have so many bills right now and taken out this six hundred dollars would really help us right now. Amy went into the payday lending store to just see if she could get alone just a little one just six hundred dollars to get them through this tough month you walk in and it just looks like a Bank. There's chairs all around and there's a place for your kids to collar coloring books and play. It's just the friendly feeling type of deal anyone up to the round counter and asked the receptionist. How to get a loan? She says she told them what her paycheck was. And they said sure you can have six hundred dollars. How did you feel when you took out the first loan? I felt like yes, I can pay this Bill Amy says it felt like she could breathe again at least for a couple of weeks that is when she needed to pay the payday lender back with interest. Of course, have the pace six seventy six forty five. That's a lot of money. Still remember the amount six seventy six forty five. Just now popped in my head. Like, that's how much we paid that extra seventy six forty five was just the interest on the loan for two weeks play that out over year. And that's an annual interest rate of more than three hundred percent. In other words, if Amy had kept the loan for the full year and paid the same interest rate. She would have owed more than eighteen hundred dollars in interest. But for the moment, it was just six seventy six forty five and Amy had every intention of paying it back. But when she went back into the payday loan store a couple of weeks later it felt like she couldn't pay it back quite yet. So she took out another payday loan to pay off the six seventy. Six forty five because something else went wrong, you know, or one of our cars died or we needed. We needed something fixed that the house. It was always something something coming up which is life week after week. Amy was doing this taking out loan after loan. It's goes on and on. But is the feeling when you would go in. Did it feel like a relief when you get the money every week? Did it feel like no I was so mad at myself all the time. Oh because I was doing this constantly to myself. And it went on for years to people calling you on the phone. You know, you gotta pay this payday loan. You get into this really bad place financially, Amy and her husband started using payday loans to pay off credit cards and credit cards bath, payday loans, and the amount they owed kept climbing and climbing. It's crushing to it's crushing. It's it's hard. It's you feel defeated. Like wouldn't us ever going to end my ever going to be financially stable, am I ever gonna get their home? I going to take care of my family this cycle Eimi found herself in it's the cycle that most of the people who take out a payday loan find themselves in a study from the center for responsible lending found the fully half of payday loan borrowers default on a payday loan within two years of taking out there. First loan. This is of course, why the CF PB the consumer financial protection bureau had planned to put payday loan regulations in place later this year. Those new rules were announced under the Obama administration would have restricted who payday lenders could lend to namely, they would only be able to lend to people who could prove a high likelihood that they could immediately pay the loan back. How much of a difference with those regulations have made an industry. A lot of different. Ronald man isn't economist and a professor at Columbia law school. He spent more than a decade studying payday loans and Ronald says the regulations would have basically ended the payday loan industry because it would have eliminated around seventy five to eighty percent of payday loans customer base. He says payday lenders are in the business of making loans to people who can't really afford the loans that they take out if you take away that group that customer base than the whole industry would pretty much start to vanish read these products that are there's a fair chance. People are going to go to pay them back Ronald says that is exactly why about twenty states have either banned payday loans entirely or really restricted them. But he says the problem with the federal ban on payday loans is that it's not really financial regulation so much as a kind of ethical regulation, and he says in a free market. There's an argument that the government should be really careful in that area sort of controversial that we should keep people from boring money today. Lead that they need because we think that the wrong thing. Needed course, one option would be just cap interest rates after all payday lenders make a lot of money they lend about forty six billion dollars a year and taken about seven billion dollars in fees. But Ronald says, it regulating interest rates would probably have a similar effect as just banning them. It would put them out of business and Ronald 'as payday lenders are serving a huge community of people who can't really get money. In other ways, often they're borrowers with bad credit who can't get a loan from a Bank or a credit card things like that and lending people in this way, he says it's a risky business and payday lenders have to charge a premium for taking on that risk. Now. A lot of states do limit the interest rates that lenders can charge Ronald says in those states. There are not a lot of payday lenders on the other hand more than thirty states. Don't really have restrictions at all on payday lending, and in those states payday lending has gotten huge or you might say super sized. The number of petty loons towards about the fame if a number McDonald's, that's a lot. Actually, there are more payday loan stores than McDonald's or Starbucks. There are nearly eighteen thousand payday loan stores in this country right now. And that is today's indicator nearly eighteen thousand payday lending stores in the US Rhone says the problem with shutting down this behemoth. Is that demand won't go away? The industry would probably just move online. Where would be really hard to regulate? He's a real question. He thinks we should be asking is why there is so much demand for these loans in the first place you ruined to step back and say or a half. One other so many people in our Connie that are struggling so hard that they desperately need some money to pay medical bills or make a car payment people like Amy Marano, she and her husband got deeper and deeper in debt they had to declare bankruptcy and they lost their house. The turning point for me was having two at forty three live with my mother again and not being able to take care of our family the way that we wanted to and not having a home of our own was the worst feeling in the world. It's devastating Amy says at that moment, she decided no more payday loans, ever, she went through bankruptcy. And since then she says, she has been incredibly disciplined about her budget. She and her family have their own place again, and she's currently working two jobs. She says they all live on really strict budget. Just necessities. Of course, Amy says, she hasn't escaped payday loans entirely. I see this one. This these commercials all the time. It's like, you know, three people standing in a robe and then pops up up above their head. How much they're going to get. And it's like at the end of them like, no. It's not worth it. It gets you into a bad place. Find a different solution. A better solution.

Bill Amy Ronald Man Detroit Amy Marano United States Eimi Obama Administration Mcdonald Columbia Law School Professor Starbucks Connie Rhone Six Hundred Dollars Forty Six Billion Dollars Eighteen Hundred Dollars Seven Billion Dollars
Antitrust 3: Big Tech

Planet Money

03:47 min | 3 years ago

Antitrust 3: Big Tech

"Today's show is part three of what I have been calling the planet money antitrust trilogy. The show we much better. If you go back and listen to the first two episodes. If you do not here is the text that scrolls on the screen at the beginning of the movie. United States government used to us antitrust law a lot to protect small companies against big companies in the name of competition. Then there was a backlash led by judge named Robert Bork. He wrote a book called the antitrust paradox. That argued antitrust enforcement had gotten out of hand and the government needed to back off now in the past couple of years as a few tech companies have gotten very big and very powerful a backlash to the backlash has begun. My name is Lena Khan, and I'm an academic fellow Columbia law school in a senior fellow at the open markets institute. And you're a lawyer I'm a lawyer when Lena Khan was in law school two years ago. She wrote a paper for the law review. What was the title of the paper Amazon's antitrust paradox an allusion to that Bork book the antitrust paradox? Why did you choose that title? I was interested in exploring how Bork's approached antitrust had enabled Amazon's rise and the paradise. Talks with Amazon seemed to me that here we had a company that was amassing dominance in various markets. But our current approach to antitrust law was really keeping us blind. So that dominance, and so that to me seemed like an interesting tension or current approach to antitrust law. Bork's approach is known as consumer welfare, and the basic idea is low prices and lots of choices are good. If consumers are getting these things, then there's no antitrust problem and clearly Amazon has delivered low prices and lots of choices. So it hasn't run into much trouble with antitrust law in the United States, and yet Lena argued in this paper, there are things that Amazon has done that have been bad for competition. So her wonky article comes out, she hears from a few antitrust lawyers. Then her article gets mentioned in the New York Times that spurred kind of a new wave of interest. And so I just started receiving more and more emails somewhat modest about this, which I respect that. Tremendous amount. Even though it's not good for our story. What she is not saying is that this student law review article completely blew up. I mean, I know you didn't go on Ellen or whatever. But we're did you go. I got big. We know it got big Lena. Con learn that the rise of a few giant tech companies had made this very wonky thing antitrust policy, suddenly feel urgent and important to lots of ordinary people. Is it bad? These companies are so big are they assigned that the free market is failing us and competition is disappearing. Do we need to think about antitrust in a new way congressman wanted to meet with her the Washington Post in the Atlantic wanted to profiler CNBC NPR, and she joins me now to talk about how antitrust law handles Amazon. Lena, thank you for being with us. Good to be here. Let me first say Amazon is among NPR's corporate sponsors, right? We're going to have to talk about that. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm Jacob Goldstein. I'm Kenny Malone today on the show, Amazon one of our corporate sponsors and Facebook, also corporate sponsor and Google. I think a corporate sponsor Nata corporates. Oh, okay. But all of this is kind of the point these three companies are suddenly everywhere, they have an incredible amount of money and power and Lena is part of this new wave of thinkers who are starting to say, maybe the rise of these giant tech companies is a sign that antitrust is broken, and we need to fix it.

Lena Khan Amazon Robert Bork United States Columbia Law School NPR Ellen Kenny Malone New York Times Jacob Goldstein Senior Fellow Facebook Google Washington Post Congressman Cnbc Two Years
"columbia law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:42 min | 3 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're listening to Bloomberg law, June Grosso. A federal investigation into Weiwei technologies for allegedly stealing trade secrets from US companies is ratcheting up the pressure on a company already reeling after the arrest last month of its chief financial officer on charges of defrauding banks and the arrest two weeks ago of an employee in Poland for spying for the Chinese government. It follows a long history of suspicion towards the Chinese telecommunications giant joining me is John Coffey, a professor at Columbia law school, Jack. What do we know about this investigation by federal prosecutors in Seattle well, much, more than usual? This is a case and Yogi Berra's phrase of deja vu all over again. Because all of this was in a trial back in two thousand seventeen when T mobile sued while we on the grounds that had stolen the technology research surrounding a robot testing device that t mobile used to test. All of its cell phones on a mass scale and the jury found for the plaintiff for T mobile in that case. And so we're now we're seeing this thing sort of cloned or reproduced as a criminal case. And the criminal case would give the government great power to do in number of things. I don't know. I don't have any inside sense what they're trying to do. But if they could get defendant to plead guilty to theft of trade secrets they would probably want to have a remedy such as a corporate monitor apart who would review everything and make sure there wasn't any more ongoing theft or espionage. They might want to have a compliance plan created there were other interventions they could make within the company if they got a criminal pleaded guilty didn't accompany admit in two thousand three that it had stolen parts of software that runs computer networking equipment from Cisco systems. Did that result in any kind of fines or anything don't assume? This is just one company both in Europe and the United States. There is a broad belief that Chinese companies often actors agents to the state and engage in technology, espionage to get trade secrets to give back to the government and other Chinese companies as a result. Last year, the US congress passed legislation making it far more difficult for a Chinese company or any foreign company to make even a minority acquisition of shares in a high tech company that was based on the judgement that there was systematic theft of trade secrets going on. And Europe has basically the same attitude is this a ratcheting up of pressure on wild way and other Chinese companies from the China issue, although it does begin with T mobile successful suit standpoint of the government. This evidence has already been jury tested at work with one jury, and it gives you competent this likely to work again with a criminal jury. So they're ratcheting up the pressure to be sure and not all of this is espionage. You you mentioned the chief financial officer being arrested in Canada and you sticking extradition. That's over Iranian sanctions. They're the claim is that the company was helping Iran violate sanctions by misleading. American banks and getting money flowing through Aram. So Jack while way is a front runner in the race to develop next generation wireless equipment is the US targeting wa because of that and because of possible concerns about spying or because it's one of the biggest criminal actors in this field. Of course, there can be multiple reasons. Individual US attorneys, usually aren't pursuing the foreign policy of the United States. I think this is all coming out of Seattle and in Seattle, there was this sense that T mobile had been cheated. And did it was serious enough to deserve a criminal prosecution. A criminal prosecution would allow you to intervene within the company with some kind of compliance plan some kind of corporate monitor to hope to preclude future violations. We've been hearing about Chinese theft of intellectual property for years, and certainly through at least three White House administrations. Have they made any dance in the problem through? The litigation changes and to China initiative. Well, this'll be the first real criminal case. And if anything we'll make a dent it's a criminal prosecution that probably will cause more US companies to back away already most US tech companies. Don't want to use equipment produced by Hawaii because they fear that they'll be used to spy on them. Or the information will be siphoned off, and such as customers names and addresses and given to the government. So I think what you'll do is raise the profile of a company and stigmatize it in a fashion that may make it more difficult for it to compete. How would you describe the problem of Chinese theft of intellectual property, I'm afraid it's pretty systematic? No the country is rivaling them in the amount of continuing and pervasive theft of technology. And of course, China is not a a laggard China probably farther along in the race torch artificial intelligence than any other company. Got at least a little lead over the United States. So we're seeing them both creating their own technology and trying to systematically steal technology from others. And that could justify the minds of the government, the use of the criminal sanction, although I'm not ready to suggest to conclude that this was done for foreign policy reasons. It's quite possible for US attorney just to say, I've got good criminal case here, and I to pursue it while ways billionaire, founder wrenching Fe broke years of silence in order to dismiss the accusations that the company helps spy for China's government, the fact that he broke his silence does that tell you about how critical this case is well, there's so many things going on at once there been people who've now been arrested who employees for espionage, which looked like more traditional kinds of espionage. Sometimes the Chinese company doesn't have a clear sense of where the company's interest in and the states interest began and they act as an agent of the state, and I think that's going on here to some degree. Are there any particular US attorney's offices that are focusing? On this because it's happened out in Silicon Valley, and we have here we have Seattle and New York is usually involved and intellectual property theft would see it in the northern California in Washington and in New York because New York generally leads the pack in terms of white collar, criminal enforcement. Is there a specific division in Justice department, that's focusing on this, and I'm not aware that you know, maybe there should be one. Maybe that will happen because we have specific divisions within issues turn his office that focus on drugs and organized crime and political corruption and securities fraud, you could well society to give a permanent staff and each office or in certain offices to what I'll call commercial theft of trade secrets it's certainly seems like there's enough going on in this area for a special division. Thanks for being on Bloomberg law, Jack, that's John Coffey, a professor at Columbia law school coming up on Bloomberg law. The supreme court this week the court allows Trump's trans. Gender military band to take affect and agrees to hear a challenge to New York City rules that sharply limit where licensed handguns may be taken. It's the first time the court has taken up a second amendment case since twenty.

theft US China Seattle US attorney Jack T mobile Europe chief financial officer Columbia law school Chinese government Yogi Berra US congress Bloomberg John Coffey professor New York
"columbia law school" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:05 min | 3 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Of Justice league of America is a graduate of the university of Michigan and Columbia law school. He currently lives in Florida. His new book is another anti gravity device. You can't put it down. It's called the first conspiracy. The secret plot to kill George Washington. Brad meltzer. Welcome back to coast to coast AM. How are you? I'm good always great to be back. I gotta tell you after I finished with the escape artist. And we talked about that the last time you were on I gave that book to my mother-in-law to read and she's in her eighties. She's a voracious reader and then every morning at the breakfast table. That's all she wanted to talk about for weeks. Was the escape artists. And when she reads she'll highlight, and she writes in the margins and so forth. It's incredible. So in the first conspiracy while I know that that's what I'll be talking about at the breakfast table for the next month or so so thank you for that. I appreciate it. I appreciate you know, we've been working for the past few months on the sequel to it's you can tell her. I you heard it here first coming in. And obviously the book is now paperback. So she can even save some money for another copy terrific. We I I like how you you play with and we've into your your books little arcane pieces of history you've talked about in previous books of the Lincoln assassination the secret code Thomas Jefferson used, but this is the first time you've really gone in depth with an historical piece of nonfiction. Why did you wait for so long? Yeah. This is as you mentioned, our first nonfiction book that I've ever done and the truth was I never found a story that was big enough and good enough for an entire book and those who know me from history channel doing decoded and lost history. This is this book is really liked the coded, but in book form, and when I found this story with nearly a decade ago. That's how long it's that. With me. I found the story in the footnotes, which is all where so many great secrets hide from our history. And I remember seeing some combination of those where it said the secret plot to kill George Washington. And my first thought was real is fake. What is it? And and let's just be clear. It is real in seventeen seventy six. There was a secret plot to kill George Washington. When George George Washington found out about it, it gathered those responsible he built the gallows. He took one of the co conspirators and he. Hung him in front of twenty thousand people largest public execution at that point in North American history. George Washington brought the hammered down was like do not mess with me. I'm George Washington. I'm going to be on the money one day. That you know, and and you know for me. It was it was just stepped me on this path or thinking I have to write about that. How does it? No one. No this story. And this is a little known aspect about the revolutionary war and the birth of our nation. What was it like to dig into this piece of history? And why is it so shrouded in mystery? Yeah, let's deal with affect western. I a great question. How does no one? No it right. There's a secret Papa kill George Washington. And nobody knows it. And and obviously, you know, that was the first question I had when you look at the date of one the hanging happened that gives you a big part of the answer the hanging took place on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six. Yes. What else was happening right then in America on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six the first draft of the declaration of independence is handed him after that the British are literally coming on that same day, and it is one of those moments with headlines like nap where this hanging in front of twenty thousand people truly becomes a footnote and at the beginning. One of the first things I did is I went to. Pulitzer prize winning author Joseph Ellis, and I had Jim do, you know, the story about this profit chill Washington? He said he knew the story heard of it. There was no modern book written on the subject that was fully was a full book on it. And he said to me this is a book about George, Washington spies. He told me that you can find right now xactly how many slaves George Washington owned, but you'll never find all despise. And he's told me that day by nature. What you're searching for brab will forever be allusive. But he did take a shot at the best situation. You'll you'll get a book out of it at the worst. You'll have an adventure. And that was my goal. And that all that research has led us as you said to this first nonfiction book, which we call the first conspiracy because it truly was America's first conspiracy was the first conspiracy here the secret plot to kill George Washington. And most of the story takes place in New York. So that was the plot hatched there. And who were the? Spiritus? Yeah. The plot was hatched in New York. And you'll see that they of all people to kick it off. It's the governor of New York was one of the main masterminds behind who is the governor under British rule when he gets taken out of power. Neil to say, he's not happy. He wants his job back. He wants his power back in the best way to get that. If the take out this rebel army and who's leading the armies George Washington. But here's the thing that really blew my mind and this mystery, and and and in this plot is George Washington at the time had his own private bodyguards. And what are you done is? He went to all of this hop regiments. And he said give me your four best, man. He wanted what they call drilled men. The best of the best George Washington himself, narrowed it down to about fifty men and that became what they call the the generals guards. They call them the commander's guards. But the name that actually stuck with a life storage. That's part.

George George Washington Washington Justice league of America Brad meltzer Florida America New York university of Michigan Pulitzer prize Columbia law school commander generals Lincoln Thomas Jefferson Joseph Ellis Neil Jim one day
"columbia law school" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

15:33 min | 3 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on WTVN

"Breathe more snow less sleep better. Brad Meltzer is the author of the number one New York Times bestsellers the escape artist. The inner circle the book of fate and other bestselling thrillers. His nonfiction books heroes for my son in heroes for my daughter. Also, New York Times bestsellers, he's the host of the history channel series. Brad Meltzer decoded and the Eisner award winning writer of Justice league of America is a graduate of the university of Michigan and Columbia law school. He currently lives in Florida. His new book is another anti gravity device. You can't put it down. It's called the first conspiracy. The secret plot to kill George Washington. Brad meltzer. Welcome back to coast to coast AM. How are you? I'm good always great to be back. I gotta tell you after I finished with the escape artist. And we talked about that the last time you were on I gave that book to my mother-in-law to read and she's in her eighties. She's a voracious reader and then every morning at the breakfast table. That's all she wanted to talk about for weeks was the escape artists. And when she reads she'll highlight, and she writes in the margins and so forth. It's incredible. So in the first conspiracy while I know that's what I'll be talking about at the breakfast table for the next month or so so thank you for that. I appreciate it. I appreciate you know, we had been working for the past few months on the sequel to it's you can tell her. I you heard it here. First stab it's coming in. And obviously the book is now paperback. So she can even save some money for another copy terrific. We I like how you you play with and we've into your books little arcane pieces of history you've talked about in previous books of the Lincoln assassination, the secret code Thomas Jefferson used, but this is the first time you've really gone, you know, in depth with an historical piece of nonfiction. Why did you wait for so long? Yeah. This is as you mentioned, our first nonfiction book that I've ever done and the truth was I never found a story that was big enough and good enough for an entire book and those who know me from history channel doing decoded and lost history. This is this book is really liked the coated, but in book form, and when I found this story with nearly a decade ago. That's how long it's that. With me. I found this story in the footnotes, which is all where so many great secrets hide from our history. And I remember seeing some combination of those where it said the secret plot to kill George Washington. And my first thought was this real is it fake? What is it? And and let's just be clear. It is real in seventeen seventy six. There was a secret plot to kill George Washington. When George George Washington found out about it gathered those responsible he built the gallows he took one of the co conspirators, and he. Hung them in front of twenty thousand people the largest public execution at that point in North American history. George walking brought the hammer down was like do not mess with me. I'm George Washington. I'm going to be on the money one day that you know. And and, you know, for me, obviously, it was it was just set me on this path or thinking I have to write about it. How did no one? No the story. And I mean, this is a little known aspect about the revolutionary war and the birth of our nation. What was it like to dig into this piece of history? And why is it so shrouded in mystery? Yeah, let's deal with the second question. I a great question. How does no one? No it right to a secret Papa kill George Washington. And nobody knows it. And and obviously, I you know, that was the first question I had when you look at the date of when the hanging happened that gives you a big part of the answer the hanging place on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six. Yes. What else was happening right then in America on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six the first draft of the declaration of independence, this handed him after that the British are literally coming on that same day, and it is one of those moments with headlines like that where this hanging in front of twenty thousand people truly becomes a footnote and at the beginning. One of the first things I did is I went to. Surprised winning author Joseph Ellis. And I had do, you know, the story about this plot to kill Washington. He said he knew the story heard of it. There was no modern book written on the subject that was a fully was a full book on it. And he said to me this is a book about George, Washington spies. He told me that you can find right now xactly how many slaves George Washington owned, but you'll never find all despise. And he's told me that day that by nature what you're searching for brab will forever be allusive. But he said take a shot at the best situation, you'll you'll get a book out of it at the worst. You'll have an adventure. And that was my goal. And that all that research has led us as you said to this first nonfiction book, which we call the first conspiracy because it truly was America's first conspiracy. It was the first conspiracy here the secret plot to kill George Washington. And most of the story takes place in New York. So that was the plot hatched there and an who were the conspirators. Yeah. The pot was Ashton New York and you'll see that they of all people to kick it off. It's the governor of New York was one of the main masterminds behind who was the governor under British rule when he gets taken out of power. Needless to say, he is not happy. He wants his job back. He wants his power back in the best way to get that is to take out this rebel army and who's leading the armies George Washington. But here's the thing that really blew my mind and this mystery, and and in this plot is George Washington at the time had his own private bodyguards. And what he has done is. He went to all of this hop regiments. And he said give me your four best, man. He wanted what they call drilled men. The best of the best George Washington himself, narrowed it down to about fifty men and that became what they call the the generals guards. They call them the commander's guards. But the name that actually stuck with a life storage. That's part of their job was to guard, George Washington's life, and these were the men who turned on George Washington. These were the ones who were plotting against him. And I don't care if you become the greatest general, I don't care if you become the first president. Cow strong. You're supposed to be that is a moment. That is devastating George Washington. Take me back to what Washington was was facing leading kind of a ragtag army. Most people probably thought that this. This war was absolutely unwinnable. The the British army the greatest forces ever amassed in history. I mean, it must have been and he had he had that to deal with. And then all of a sudden now, he's finding treachery. Amongst the people that you know, he's counting to be the most loyal to him. It must have been. So demoralizing. Yeah. You know, one of the first things Washington does is he creates a and you're gonna love this. And I think the readers of this at the listeners of the show because this is what I responded to this is what got me is Washington, very quickly create the secret committee, and this committee is called the committee on conspiracies. That's the name of it, and eventually narrowed down to three people that are part of the secret committee, one of them is John J one of them as governor Morris and one of them is Philip Livingston. And we all know John Jay becomes eventually at the end of the war. The first supreme court Justice. But at this moment in the war younger, ma'am. And he runs the committee on conspiracies and what they do is. They're investigating this plot against Washington and they're kicking down doors. They're investigating who's involved grabbing them from their houses, interrogating them. But what they're also doing at the time unknowingly, of course. But what they're doing. Make no mistake is there Bill. America's first counterintelligence agency. People think that today if you say asked historians where does the CIA what's the precursor to the CIA people tell you? It's the OSF, but it's not not at all. It all actually starts here in the revolutionary war seventeen seventy six when the committee on conspiracies is formed and those methods that they're using using civilians as opposed to use a military people George Washington knows he needs a great offense. He has a great offense in the military. What he also knows. Is you need a great defense. Now, you need someone to tell you what's coming with intelligence and to this day in CIA headquarters right now in Langley Virginia. There is a room that is dedicated to John Jay who they call the founding father of counterintelligence it starts all in this moment. But as for George Washington what he's facing is something that he's never seen before. And we love to tell the story. Let's be clear. We love to tell that story. You just told right? The rag tag group, we love that word who came together, we believed in democracy. We held hands we dreamed and wished and click their heels hard enough, and we took down the greatest fighting force the British that had ever existed at the time, and that's a wonderful story. But it's not the real story. We're a country founded on legends and myths and the legends and myths we love most our own we love to say how easy it wasn't. How terrific it was. But as you said it was so correctly. It was not easy. It was a disaster. This war was a meth and one of the things that happened is at the time. We think we're divided right now is the country. We were just as divided back. Then. At the time of seventeen seventy six in New York City. There were nearly as many loyalists on the British side as there were patriots on the American side your neighbor, you didn't know if you were friends with them where they wanted to kill you and your sleep, right? They could have been on the British side and one of the end of you, and it was no different than our own military. We were divided there too. Because we were a bunch of regiments, we weren't one big military. So the regimens from Connecticut, and you know, there was a regiment from, you know, from Massachusetts thinking along with the regiment's from Virginia one of my favorite scenes in the book is this moment when the regiment's from Massachusetts, meet the regiments from Virginia, and they all meet in Harvard yard, they're all getting together. George Washington's there as well. And the regiments from Virginia they wear a kind of a frilly thing on a uniform. We didn't even have the same uniforms right today. We have one uniform for all of our military back, then some people were showing up at work shirts and everything. Regimen had their own their own uniform, and they're making fun of these guys from Virginia. And of course, a fight breaks out. And they're all fighting each other and George Washington comes racing in on his horse jumps off the horse grabs two of the guys by the neck, and he's shaking them and fame basically fighting with each other or on the same team. And if ever there were a metaphor for where we are today there it is. But again, as you said we Warren tied together. What your George Washington was facing was a giant mess. At the time ten thousand troops. And this is at the time when the pod against George Washington. And it's happening ten thousand troops are descended on New York City to fight on the patriots side. So fight the British all the wealthy people. There get outta town. They're like, I don't need this headache and ten thousand men descend upon New York City doing what of course, ten thousand men do when their wives and girlfriends aren't there. They want to gamble. They wanna drink. They wanna go see prostitutes and George Washington is a proper Virginian gentlemen. He's horrified by this. And when you look and see how he reacts immediately. He's trying to get make order out of this chaos. He issues what they call general orders and his general orders are the rules of the day. There aren't you know, the army isn't even built he's trying to build it midstream right there and some of his first general order stay, no gambling, Washington. Hate a gambling stopped drinking. Stopped going to prostitutes. It is total cast and there were no United States back. Then George Washington had to build them putting his arms around all this chaos and trying to pull us together that same, you know, all these regiments finally each other trying to pull them all together. And make no mistake. It's a battle even within our own military. And in the midst of all this is the secret plot to kill George Washington. That's raging in the background. So, you know, we love to tell the story that it was so easy. We tell our kids in school that it was so easy. Now, we all came together. Oh that does nothing for us. What we do with our heroes. Today's we dip them in granite. And we make statues of them, but we kill them when we do that. They don't become people anymore. They just become statues. And we do them a disservice because it wasn't easy back then. And if it was easy. Why study at what's all more interesting to me is what you said that it was hard match. What's something that's worth fighting for especially when it's hard. And I love that you get to see that in this book. I love the you get to see not just a secret plot against George Washington. But you get to see just how this war was one had this plot succeeded, and we'll get into more details about the nature of this plot. And and who was behind it who funded in its cetera. And what the what the actual conspiracy was how they intended to kill Washington. But had it succeeded is it in your estimation. Fair to say. Had it succeeded. There would have been no United States. Yeah. You know, we when you read the first conspiracy. We do spend some time trying to say what happens 'cause it begs the question, right? There's a secret plot to kill George Washington. You can't help but ask if he dies what happens to America. What happens to our? They're United States. We hit constitution to we get a president. And I'll tell you my theory. One of my theories is I think we could win because we were stubborn enough. And and you know, one of the things you see that. I think is so important is that George Washington he keeps having to retreat retreat and retreat retreat. The one thing he won't do he won't give up, and I think that that most Americans back then in the war just did not want to give up. So maybe we win. But here's where I think history would change. Is I think George Washington's greatest legacy is not that. He's the president not that he won the war. Even his greatest legacy. Is that when the war was over what he did?.

George George Washington Washington America New York City Brad Meltzer New York Times United States John Jay Virginia president Florida Justice league of America British army CIA Joseph Ellis university of Michigan Ashton New York Columbia law school
"columbia law school" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

09:19 min | 3 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Brad Meltzer is the author of the number one New York Times bestsellers the escape artist. The inner circle the book of fate and other bestselling thrillers. His nonfiction books heroes for my son in heroes for my daughter were also New York Times bestsellers, he's the host of the history channel series. Brad Meltzer decoded and the Eisner award winning writer of Justice league of America is a graduate of the university of Michigan and Columbia law school. He currently lives in Florida. His new book is another anti gravity device. You can't put it down. It's called the first conspiracy. The secret plot to kill George Washington. Brad meltzer. Welcome back to coast to coast AM. How are you? I'm good always great to be back. I gotta tell you after I finished with the escape artists. And we talked about that the last time you were on I gave that book to my mother-in-law to read and she's in her eighties. She's a voracious reader and then every morning at the breakfast table. That's all she wanted to talk about for weeks was the escape artists. And when she reads she'll highlight, and she writes in the margins and so forth. It's incredible. So and the first conspiracy while I know that that's what I'll be talking about at the breakfast table for the next month or so so thank you for that. I appreciate it. I appreciate you know, we've been working for the past few months on the sequel to it's you can tell her I heard it here first coming in. And obviously the book is now paperback. So she can even save some money for another copy terrific. We I I like how you you play with and we've into your your books little arcane pieces of history you've talked about in previous books at the Lincoln assassination, the secret code Thomas Jefferson used, but this is the first time you've really gone in depth with an historical piece of nonfiction. Why did you wait for so long? This is as you mentioned, our first nonfiction book that I've ever done and the truth was I never found a story that was big enough and good enough for an entire book and those who know me from history channel doing decoded and lost history. This is this book is really like the coated, but in book form, and when I found this story with nearly a decade ago. That's how long it's that. With me. Found this story in the footnotes, which is all where so many great secrets hide from our history. And I remember seeing some combination of those where it said the secret plot to kill George Washington. And my first thought was this real is it fake? What is it? And and let's just be clear. It is real in seventeen seventy six. There was a secret plot to kill George Washington. When George George Washington found out about it, it gathered those responsible he built the gallows. He took one of the co conspirators, and he hung them in front of twenty thousand people largest public execution at that point in North American history. George Washington brought the hammer down was like do not mess with me. I'm George Washington. I'm going to be on the money one day that you know. And and you know, for me, it was it was just set me on this path or thinking I have to write about that. How did no one know the story? And this is a little known aspect about the revolutionary war and the birth of our nation. What was it like to dig into this piece of history? And why is it so shrouded in mystery? Yeah, let's deal with the second question. First a great question had no one. No it right to the secret Papa kill George Washington. And nobody knows it. And and obviously, I you know, that was the first question I had when you look at the date of when the hanging happened that gives you a big part of the answer the hanging took place on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six. Yes. What else was happening right then in America on June twenty eight seventeen seventy six the first draft of the declaration of independence is handed him after that the British are literally coming on that same day, and it is one of those moments with headlines like that where this hanging in front of twenty thousand people truly becomes a footnote and at the beginning. One of the first things I did is I went to. Pulitzer prize winning author Joseph Ellis. Jim, do you know the story about this plot the kill Washington? He said he knew the story heard of it. There was no modern book written on the subject that was fully was a full book on it. And he said to me this is a book about George, Washington spies. He told me that you can find right now, how many slaves George Washington owned. You'll never find all despise. And he's told me that day that by nature what you're searching for brab will forever be allusive. But he did take a shot at the best situation. You'll you'll get a book out of it at the worst. You'll have an adventure. And that was my goal. And that all that research has led us as you said to this first nonfiction book, which we call the first conspiracy 'cause it truly was America's first conspiracy. It was the first conspiracy here the secret plot to kill George Washington. And most of the story takes place in New York. So that was the plot hatched there. And who were the conspirators? Yeah. The pop was hatched in New York. And you'll see that they of all people to kick it off. It's the governor of New York was one of the main masterminds behind the who is the governor under British rule when he gets taken out of power. Needless to say, he's not happy. He wants his job back. He wants his power back in the best way to get that. It's a take out this rebel army and who's leading the armies George Washington. But here's the thing that really blew my mind in this mystery. And and and in this plot is George Washington at the time had his own private bodyguards. And what he has done is. He went to all of the top regiments. And he said give me your four best, man. He wanted what they call drilled men. The best of the best George Washington self narrowed it down to about fifty men and that became what they call the the generals guards. They call them the commander's guards. But the name that actually stuck with a lifeguards just part of their job with the cigar, George Washington's life, and these were the men who turned on George Washington. These were the ones who are plotting against them. And I don't care if you become the greatest general, I don't care if you become the first president. Cow strong. You're supposed to be that is a moment. That is devastating George Washington. Take me back to what Washington was was facing leading kind of a ragtag army. Most people probably thought that this. This war was absolutely unwinnable. The the British army the greatest forces ever amassed in history. Must've been and he had he had that to deal with. And then all of a sudden now, he's finding treachery. Amongst the people that you know, he's counting to be the most loyal to him. It must've been so demoralizing. Yeah. You know, one of the first things Washington does is he creates and you're gonna love this. And I think the readers of this listening to this show because this is what I responded to this is what got me is Washington, very quickly create the secret committee, and this committee is called the committee on conspiracies at the name of it, and eventually narrowed down to three people that are part of the secret committee, one of them is John J one of them as governor Morris and one of them is Philip Livingston. And we all know John Jay becomes eventually at the end of the war, the first supreme court Justice. But at this moment in the war is younger, ma'am. And he runs the committee on conspiracies. And what they do is. They're investigating this plot against Washington and they're kicking down doors. They're investigating who's involved grabbing them from their houses, interrogating them. But what they're also doing at the time. Unknowingly, of course. But what they're doing. Make no mistake. Is there a building America's first counterintelligence agency? People think that today if you say ask historians where does the CIA what's the precursor to the CIA people say, oh, it's the OSF. It's not not at all. It all actually starts here in the revolutionary war seventeen seventy six when the committee on conspiracies is formed and those methods that they're using using civilians as opposed to using military people George Washington knows he needs a great offense. He has a great offense in the military. What he also knows. Is you need a great defense. Now, you need someone to tell you what's coming with intelligence and to this day NCAA headquarters right now in Langley Virginia. There is a room that is dedicated to John Jay who they call the founding father of counterintelligence starts all in this moment for George Washington. What he's facing a something that he's never seen before. And we love to tell the. Story. Let's be clear we love to tell that story. You just told right? The ragtag group. We love.

George George Washington Washington Brad Meltzer America New York Times John Jay Florida Justice league of America Pulitzer prize New York British army university of Michigan NCAA writer Columbia law school CIA Joseph Ellis Lincoln
"columbia law school" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"columbia law school" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Seventy K L I F. Brad Meltzer is the author of the number one New York Times bestsellers the escape artist. The inner circle the book of fate and other bestselling thrillers. His nonfiction books heroes for my son in heroes for my daughter were also New York Times bestsellers, he's the host of the history channel series Brad meltzer's decoded and the Eisner award winning writer of Justice league of America is a graduate of the university of Michigan and Columbia law school. He currently lives in Florida. His new book is another anti gravity device. You can't put it down. It's called the first conspiracy. The secret plot to kill George Washington. Brad meltzer. Welcome back to coast to coast AM. How are you? I'm good always great to be back. I gotta tell you after I finished with the escape artist. And we talked about that the last time you were on I gave that book to my mother-in-law to read and she's in her eighties. She's a voracious reader and then every morning at the breakfast table. That's all she wanted to talk about for weeks was the escape artists. And when she reads she'll highlight, and she writes in the margins and so forth. It's incredible. So and the first conspiracy while I know that that's what I'll be talking about at the breakfast table for the next month or so so thank you for that. I appreciate it. I appreciate you know, we've been working for the past few months on the sequel to it's you can tell her. I you heard it here first coming in. And obviously the book is now paperback. So she can even save some money for another copy terrific. We I I like how you you play with an we've into your your books little arcane pieces of history you've talked about in previous books, the Lincoln assassination the secret code Thomas Jefferson used, but this is the first time you've really gone in depth with an historical piece of nonfiction. Why did you wait for so long? Yeah. This is as you mentioned our first nonfiction book that I've ever done and the truth wasn't. I never found a story that was big enough and good enough for an entire book and those who know me from history channel doing decoded and lost history. This is this book is really like the coated, but in book form, and when I found this story with nearly a decade ago. That's how long it's that. With me. I found this story in the footnotes, which is all where so many great secrets hide from our history. And I remember seeing some combination of those were said the secret plot to kill George Washington. And my first thought was this real is fake. What is it? And and let's just be clear. It is real in seventeen seventy six. There was a secret plot to kill George Washington..

F. Brad Meltzer George Washington New York Times Thomas Jefferson Florida Justice league of America Eisner writer university of Michigan Columbia law school Lincoln Seventy K
N.Y. sues Exxon, says it lied to investors on climate risks

Morning Edition

02:21 min | 3 years ago

N.Y. sues Exxon, says it lied to investors on climate risks

"About Exxon refusing to write down the value of its fossil fuel assets that are still in the ground two sets of books. One. Incidentally that. They were keeping. So that they understood what reality was and another more nuance three hours. If you will for the investment public the allegation really is that the company is not as big as it says it is. And it's not worth as much as it says, it is Exxon declined to comment to NPR but released a statement that said in part, these baseless allegations or a product of closed door lobbying by special interests, political opportunism and the attorney general's inability to admit that a three year investigation has uncovered no wrongdoing. Exxon Mobil has moved to thwart the investigation by attorneys general in three states, alleging it's a conspiracy involving the Rockefeller Foundation. Tort lawyers. Environmentalists said democratic Agee's Michael burger is a professor at Columbia law. School who specializes in climate change law burger doubts Exxon. Conspiracy theories are going to hold up in court. This is about climate change. It's about the risks that regulation poses to the fossil fuel industry over the next half, century or more. But this particular complaints is about corporate fraud at the end of Wednesday's trading on Wall Street.

Exxon Exxon Mobil Michael Burger Rockefeller Foundation Fraud Columbia Law Agee NPR Attorney Professor Three Hours Three Year
New York Sues ExxonMobil

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:56 min | 3 years ago

New York Sues ExxonMobil

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything are the energy giant. Exxon Mobil is accused of misleading. Investors and shareholders analysts about the cost of climate change to the company's bottom line, New York's attorney general Barbara Underwood is suing the company for defrauding shareholders and NPR's. Wade Goodwin has the story. The lawsuit doesn't hold Exxon Mobil liable for helping to create climate change. It accuses the energy giant of misleading. The investing public about how global warming was affecting the value of the company's fossil fuel assets around the world, what the attorney general is essentially saying is you kept two sets of books. Thompsons Ello is the director of finance for the institute for energy economic. And financial analysis and former New York state comptroller Santillo says the allegations are about Exxon refusing to write down the value of its fossil fuel assets that are still in the ground two sets of books one in certainly that they were keeping. So that they understood what reality was and another more nuanced reality, if you will for the investment public the allegation really is that the company is not as big as it says it is and it's not worth as much as it says, it is Exxon declined to comment to NPR but released a statement that said in part, these baseless allegations or a product of closed door lobbying by special interests, political opportunism and the attorney general's inability to admit that a three year investigation has uncovered no wrongdoing. Exxon Mobil has moved to thwart the investigation by attorneys general in three states. Alleging it's a conspiracy involving the Rockefeller Foundation. Tort lawyers environmentalists and democratic Agee's Michael burger is a professor at Columbia law. School who specializes in climate change law. Burger doubts Exxon's conspiracy theories are going to hold up in court. This is about climate change. It's about the risks that regulation poses to the fossil fuel industry over the next half, century or more. But this particular complaints is about corporate fraud at the end of Wednesday's trading on Wall Street. Shares of Exxon Mobil were down about three percent. Wade goodwin. NPR news Dallas support for NPR. And the following message. Come from circus. Oh, crystal a frozen playground of world-class ice skating and stunning acrobatics. See it live at Capital One arena from December fifth to ninth tickets

Exxon Mobil Exxon NPR Wade Goodwin Attorney Michael Burger New York Comcast Rockefeller Foundation Thompsons Ello Capital One Professor Barbara Underwood Santillo Director Of Finance Fraud Comptroller