17 Burst results for "colonel david smith"

"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:23 min | 9 months ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Peter Smith and colonel David Smith from the United States airforce both of them are fighter pilots and we've been discussing we'll be discussing conquering the wild blue yonder when we took the break how we're just getting to the tail end of your discussing how you've found your way and to if being fighter pilots what I'll start here will go reverse order this time and I'll start with commander Smith tell us a little bit about the training and particularly training when you're going to go into combat and you know just generally what is it that you learn one of the most important things that help you to become up the best you could be when you were facing up some significant challenges in the air your question time so we're talking about fighter pilots and preparing for combat operations the reason our air forces so successful is because we have the the the best trained German in the world and are quite frankly I mean what it comes down to is proficiency professionalism and when I mean my professionalism right I mean knowing your job so in the civilian world it would be knowing your Tasker B. or knowing at your job specifics to the letter whether to get technical order or a manual in the professional world for folks that have advanced degrees understanding their specialties so our airman are highly trained in one and that's not unique to just fighter pilots that currently for Miami that are flying the F. thirty five and a previous refined yes sixteen it really comes down to you professionalism continuing education I constantly training and just being the best you can be in their weapons system which for us is we have sixteen but we also have train leaders so now that's one of the things that's important but I'm that repetitive training allows you to because you're proficient in it once you go to combat it has become second nature I would imagine it's incident were transferred anything of high stress if you have a good quality training and it's repetitive then once you're put under stress you just fall back on what your training I'll put you through over time which is a water amity today an antenna Carl Smith I know there was an incident back a few years when your brother at the time was the squadron commander and you put a F. sixteen into the Gulf of Mexico if you talk a little bit about what you're dealing with at that point in time well it actually my brother with him what became the commander now just after that as far as time goes but the if I my brother was alluding to you know we train into excellence and and in this particular day I was trying to perfect the a mover tactically I I was you know tactically fighter pilot one a one is kind of what we call it you know you're you're trying and be the best at what you do and and in in terms of tactics again against the enemy or or what we have to do so in that regard I was trying to perfect maneuver in the daytime as well as at night time because mom a lot of our stories were now moving towards the evening tactically in the evening time so on this particular evening I just decided that the you know I I I I could practicing in the day I've got to be able to do it at night and unfortunately I didn't weigh the environmental effects and what they could have on me during this maneuver over the water to a high degree of awareness and the freshly turned the water into the sky based on environmental saying I can't really get into all the details but it well I won't have any spatial disorientation scenario where I had to check from aircraft I did my best to survive it but unfortunately and hit the airplane but unfortunately you know one of the things that were taught in our limitations and now with about seven seconds left to live right I decided that it was better to live and so on I hold the Egyptian handle and and learn from it and that was said in the process of learning from and I think yeah our entire cap coming here force did learn from it in terms of my incident and search the soaring patients to make our systems a little bit better at night help us make that decision help us find which way is up but that's all very detail oriented and can't get into much more detail on that so so I it's my understanding from what I've read that about third of all of the crash is in the whether it's the navy or the airforce have to do with spatial disorientation so it's something that's I I I hate to say common but is its least common to those that are that were there are crashes and is that my understanding is that correct maybe have a little higher incidence of a new school let him there and really unforgiving environment constantly with the moving back and at night and recovering on moving back at night and they they do have a higher incidence of sexual orientation they're they're really attacking this problem with systems and technology at a rapid rapid rate there's a program called the cracking in the navy that's doing out incredible job with disorientation in terms of the systems in the airplane having the ability to you know you press a button in the airplane all know which way is up for you and were all getting better and you know that's just like any any kind of highly technical device or equipment you know over time you know we we learn to make it better and you know the finer we're applying for generation airplanes we didn't have the technology that we do today to to make either points overcome human physiological limitations with environmental you know visual illusions and somatosensory problems and these kind of things and flying on a vision goggles and a few of the view and feel the regard problems that we have with the instrumentation all that is getting getting much much better today and why I am very few problems which he should be with the technology is always going to be there but we're gonna have the systems of any ability and the situation awareness to enable and also even warmer unable the systems will back us up and keep us out of trouble and I'm turning it over to a commander Smith you are responsible as I understand it for operationalize in the F. thirty five for the year four separate Heller for space are those improvements have they been made I know you're flying the F. thirty five yourself even as commander of but maybe you can't talk in a general sense and I can't a specific sense a little bit about the F. thirty five and what you've learned after you've come from the F. sixteen of the F. thirty five so hill Air Force base in with our activity partners the treaty eight fighter wing in the four nineteen filing is the first combat operational at thirty five base in the airforce and eventually by FY nineteen that's fiscal year nineteen will have a seventy eight airplanes on the ramp three of four activities warns one reserve squadron that we share the F. thirty five amongst our operators said that pilots and army gainers about the weapon system is phenomenal it's it's the technology is advanced it's leaps and bounds above what we call forth can fortune technology which is your at sixteen fifteen with sore fifty M. platforms in the Air Force had just taken this on on the US airforce and our navy and marine partners because they're all buying the F. thirty five and it's instant ending weapon system that takes us to the next level with regards to combat capability that's required because of some of the adversary so we might face in the future if we were called upon great gonna cut the brake this is the mentors today we're speaking with lieutenant colonel Peter Smith and commander David Smith of the United States airforce US airforce fighter pilots come back we'll be talking about why your child may should.

Peter Smith David Smith United States seven seconds fifty M
"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:58 min | 9 months ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Wild blue yonder our guest mentors today our lieutenant colonel Peter Smith United States airforce retired ninety third fighter squadron which is based in homestead Florida and colonel David Smith United States airforce commander of the four hundred nineteen fighter wing which is based at hill Air Force base in Utah they are brothers they are airforce academy graduates they have been or are reservists are veteran fighter pilots have been combat tested and one not and when not serving our country serve with jet blue David serves as a first officer and Peter serves as a captain with jet blue they will be sharing a behind the scenes look into their journey of becoming the right stuff let me first welcome lieutenant colonel Peter Smith welcome Peter hi Tom tell us a little bit about your journey to where you are today sure I'm happy to a I think my journey it's kind of a unusual sorry but at the same time it's just a kid story from around thirty five forty years ago growing up in South Florida aviation was sort of coming from the pop Beijing to the jet age pretty pretty solidly in the jet age but I grew up with a my father was a pilot and and for an airline at the time and so aviation was part of my family and but the biggest part I think of my growing up close watching the old war movies so I I just was really fascinated by you know happy bowling pin and you know from that forget which show that is but great show battle the midway the red Barron those kinds of shows of aerial dog fighting that kind of thing was always peak my interest as a kid and I used to watch their shows my father growing up and I didn't really have any interest in in an airline flying so speaker I just want to go do what they do but I don't really know how to do that and not really many of my family at the time knew how to do that either embodied sort of quick for me one day my day giving it some flying lessons one sometime and I thought was pretty neat pretty cool and I I went out there and and get it but then it kind of with teenage years kind of fell by the wayside until I saw flying even commercial back in the early eighties with the aircraft carrier an F. fourteen tomcat landing on the aircraft carrier answer kind of put things I liked together there I said I won't I like to travel along the water now looks line so that's why navy and then I started doing the the research in trying to get into that and as one thing led to another doing a lot of questions in seeking out guidance from counselors in the school and talking to my my father's friend my father was not military he was civilian so he didn't really have a good idea of how to do it we just started doing the research and I pursue the Naval Academy but in that pursuit sort of a late pursuit I discovered the airforce academy and was offered a alters nomination to the airforce academy prep school where I obviously leave at the opportunity and from there the rest is history sort of one on from there then you yeah and when you got out of the academy what was your first assignment my first final went to the cat I mean there was a thing I became a glider instructor at the airforce academy and pursue my job really wanted flying fighter jets that was mine my goal my first assignment out of their first come in with your native to engine power train the Germans and Portuguese and rates and we had a heck of a time it was a lot of fun and then I went on the fly begins for a couple years yeah in the Bronco and then from there I went on to the eighty away ten planning on South Carolina South Korea for a year and then it became an instructor in the tent and then as wife as everyone knows in nineteen eighty nine when walking down the the operational tempo sort of picked up in the air force's show it was decision time commitment we can go on for their an animal let's go to your younger brother commander Smith what's your story thank Tom personal thanks for having me on behalf of the all of my arm in her from the four nineteen furthering the pleasure to be with you on your show today but my story so quite simply since my brother Pete so eloquently talked about the influences of his life I am with the near that as the younger brother but really I thought one of the following my brother's footsteps so of course my father and my mother had a lot of influence on us but but I did follow consensually through footsteps through the academy I suspect what you what you want to know Sir that will need the path to where we got two days so after graduating from the airforce academy I was a pilot for many years in active duty to transition to the reserves reserves after eleven years just under eleven years of active duty service and then on cue in during that time flying mostly most the majority of that time flying at sixteen but several other aircraft and then transition to the reserve component flying at sixteen for the full timer and then a part timer where I am and she was a squadron commander and then a group commander and Graham now today which is a wing commander with the airforce reserve command in the fourteenth century and you have how many people reporting to you as commander just under twelve hundred people and lieutenant colonel of Peter the a AU ten is the a town right to work on the war on that's correct and then you made the transition to the F. sixteen after nine eleven correct yes I I I I my wife and I we been married and I have been deployed operation southern watch a couple times in the operational temple is pretty high in the late nineties or the early nineties is six to eight ninety so we had a decision to make we now offer stability for the family so we decided to try the airlines out and and the reserves of the guard and and that so that's kind of what we need to transition three four years later I got a job with the make up at home said fine at sixteen great that takes us right up to the break so I have you ever thought about what it's like to train as a fighter pilot in the United States airforce come back after the break as we talk to our guest mentors the term colonel Peter Smith from the ninety third fighter squadrons and colonel David Smith commander of the four hundred nineteen fighter wing hello I'm I can tell the inventor my pillow and like all of you out there I have problems sleeping pills would go flat I would flip flop all night long I would wake up with a sore neck maybe a headache or feel like I need a nap even though I slept eight hours when I've been in my pillow I wanted to to where you can move the patent Phil to give you the exact support you need is an individual regardless socially position might call will get you into that deeply faster and you will stay there longer it's not about how much time we spend about it's about how much of that quality sleeper yet I do all my own manufacturing right here in the United States I have a ten year warranty you can wash.

Peter Smith United States airf eleven years thirty five forty years three four years eight hours ten year two days one day
"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:27 min | 9 months ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Again with lieutenant colonel Peter Smith and colonel David Smith from the United States airforce both of them are fighter pilots and we've been discussing and we'll be discussing conquering the wild blue yonder when we took the breakout we are just getting to the tail end of your discussing how you've found your way and to if being fighter pilots I'll start here will go reverse order this time and I'll start with commander Smith tell us a little bit about the training and particularly training when you're going to go into combat and you know just generally what is it that you learn one of the most important things that help you to be come up the best you could be when you are facing up some significant challenges in the air your question time so we're talking about fighter pilots and preparing for combat operations the reason our Air Force is so successful is because we have the the the best training Armand in the world are quite frankly I mean what it comes down to is proficiency professionalism and when I mean my professionalism right I mean knowing your job so in the civilian world it would be knowing your castor bean or knowing at your job specifics to the letter whether it be a technical order or a manual in the professional world for folks that have advanced degrees understanding their specialties so our airmen are highly trained in one and that's not unique to just fighter pilots that currently for Miami that are flying the F. thirty five and a previous replying yes sixteen it really comes down to you professionalism continuing education I constantly training and just being the best you can be in your weapon system which for us is the F. sixteen but we also have train leaders so that's one of the things that's important but I'm that repetitive training allows you to because you're proficient in it once you go to combat it has become second nature I would imagine it's incident were transferred anything at high stress if you have a good quality training in it's repetitive then once you're put under stress you just fall back on what your training I'll put you through over time which is water amity today an antenna colonel Smith I know there was an incident back a few years when your brother at the time was the squadron commander and you put a F. sixteen into the Gulf of Mexico if you talk a little bit about what you were dealing with at that point in time well it actually my brother was in the mood became commander now just after that as far as time goes but the if I my brother was alluding to you know we train into excellence and and in this particular day I was trying to perfect the member task we I I was you know tactically fighter pilot one a one is kind of what we call it you know you're you're trying and be the best at what you do and and in in terms of tactics against the enemy or or what we have to do so from that regard I was trying to perfect maneuver in the daytime as well as at night time because I'm on a lot of our stories were now moving towards the evening tactically in the evening time so on this particular evening I just decided that the you know I I I I get to practicing in the day I've got to be able to do it at night and unfortunately I didn't weigh the environmental effects and what they could have on me but during this maneuver over the water to a high degree of awareness and the freshly turned the water into the sky based on environmental saying I can't really get into all the details but it what I wound up in a spatial disorientation scenario where I had to check from aircraft I did my best to survive it but unfortunately and save the airplane but unfortunately and one of the things that were taught in our limitations and now with about twenty seven seconds left to live right I decided that it was better to live on and so on I hold the Egyptian handle and and learn from it and that was good begin the process of learning from it and I think yeah our entire yeah comedy are forced did learn from it in terms of my incident and search the soaring patients to make our systems a little bit better at night and help us make that decision help us find which way is up that's all very detail oriented and can't get into much more detail on that so so I it's my understanding of from what I've read that about third of all of the crash is in the whether it's the navy or the airforce have to do with spatial disorientation so it's something that's I I I hate to say common but is its least common to those that are that where there are crashes and is that my understanding is that correct maybe have a little higher incidence of adverse because they're from him there and really unforgiving environment constantly with the moving back and at night and recovering on moving back at night and they they do have a higher incidence of specialists are impatient they're they're really attacking this problem with systems and technology at a rapid rapid rate there's a program called the cracking in the navy that's doing out incredible job with disorientation in terms of the systems in the airplane having the ability to you know you press a button in the airplane all know which way is up for you and were all getting better and you know that's just like any any kind of highly technical device or equipment you know over time you know we we learn to make it better and you know the finer we're fine fourth generation airplanes we didn't have the technology that we do today to to make these airplanes overcome human physiological limitations with environmental you know visual illusions and somatosensory problems and these kind of things and flying on night vision goggles and a few of the view and feel regard problems we have with the instrumentation all that is getting getting much much better today am I I am very few problems which he should be with the technology is always going to be there but we're gonna have the systems of any ability and the situation awareness to enable and also even warmer unable the systems will back us up and keep us out of trouble and turning it over to your commander Smith you are responsible as I understand it for operationalize in the F. thirty five for the year four separate Heller for space are those improvements have they been made I know you're flying the F. thirty five yourself even as commander but maybe can't talk in a general sense and I can't a specific sense a little bit about the F. thirty five and what you've learned after you've come from the F. sixteen of the F. thirty five so hill Air Force base in with our active duty partners the treaty eight fighter wing in the four nineteen fighter wing is the first combat operational at thirty five base in the airforce and eventually by FY nineteen that fiscal year nineteen will have a seventy eight airplanes on the ramp three full activity squadrons one reserve squadron that we share the F. thirty five amongst our operators said that pilots and army gainers about the weapon system is phenomenal it's it's the technology is advanced it's leaps and bounds above what we call forth can fortune technology which is your at sixteen fifteen with sore fifty M. platforms in the Air Force had just taken this on on the US airforce and our navy and marine partners because they're all buying the F. thirty five and it just didn't any weapon system that takes us to the next level with regards to combat capability that's required because of some of the adversary so we might face in the future if we were called upon great gonna cut the brake this is the mentors today we're speaking with lieutenant colonel Peter Smith and commander David Smith of the United States airforce US airforce fighter pilots come back we'll be talking about why your child may should consider the Air Force.

colonel Peter Smith David Smith United States twenty seven seconds fifty M
"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:15 min | 9 months ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Wild blue yonder our guest mentors today our lieutenant colonel Peter Smith United States airforce retired ninety third fighter squadron which is based in homestead Florida and colonel David Smith United States airforce commander of the four hundred nineteen fighter wing which is based at hill Air Force base in Utah they are brothers they are airforce academy graduates they have been or are reservists are veteran fighter pilots have been combat tested and one not and when not serving our country serve with jet blue David serves as a first officer and Peter serves as a captain with jet blue they will be sharing a behind the scenes look into their journey of becoming the right stuff let me first welcome lieutenant colonel Peter Smith welcome Peter hi Tom tell us a little bit about your journey to where you are today sure I'm happy to a I think my journey it's kind of a unusual sorry but at the same time it's just a kid story from around thirty five forty years ago growing up in South Florida mediation was sort of coming from the pop Beijing to the jet age pretty pretty solidly in the jet age but I grew up with a my father was a pilot and those kind of shows of aerial dog fighting that kind of thing was always peak my interest as a kid and I used to watch those shows my father growing up and I didn't really have any interest in in an airline flying so speaker I just want to go do what they did but I didn't really know how to do that and not really many of my family at the time knew how to do that either embodied sort of quick for me one day my dad gave me some flying lessons one sometime and I thought was pretty neat pretty pretty cool and I I went out there and and get it but then it kind of which engineers kind of fell by the wayside until I saw flying needing commercial back in the early eighties with the aircraft carrier and F. fourteen tomcat landing on the aircraft carrier three things I like together there I said I won't I like to travel along the water now let's line so that's why navy and I started doing the the research in trying to get into that and as one thing led to another doing a lot of questions in seeking out guidance from counselors in the school and talking to my my father's friend my father was not military he was civilian so he didn't really have a good idea of how to do it we just started doing the research and I pursue the Naval Academy but in that pursuit sort of a late pursuit I discovered the airforce academy and was offered a alters nomination to the airforce academy prep school where I obviously leave at the opportunity and from there the rest is history sort of one on from there then you yeah and when you got out of the academy what was your first assignment my first final went to the cat a mean there was a thing and became a glider instructor at the airforce academy and pursue my job really wanted flying fighter jets that was mine my goal my first assignment out of their first come in with your needle to inject pilot training the Germans and Portuguese and rates and we had a heck of a time it was a lot of fun and then I went on the file became for a couple years young in the Bronco and then from there I went on to the eighty away ten planning on South Carolina South Korea for a year and then I became an instructor and you can and then as wife as everyone knows in nineteen eighty nine when the wall came down the operational tempo sort of picked up in the air force's show it was decision time and commitment we can go on for their an animal let's go to your younger brother commander Smith liked your story thank Tom personal thanks for having me on behalf of the all of my year man hunt for the four nineteen Carter when it's a pleasure to be with you on your show today but my story so quite simply since my brother Pete so eloquently talked about the influences of his life I obviously near that as the younger brother but really I thought one of the following my brother's footsteps so of course my father and my mother had a lot of influence on us but but I did follow consensually through footsteps through the academy I suspect what you what you want to know Sir that will need the path to where we got today so after graduating from the airforce academy I was a pilot for many years in the active duty to transition to the reserves reserves after eleven years just under eleven years of active duty service and then on cue in during that time flying mostly most the majority of that time flying at sixteen but several other aircraft and then transition to the reserve component flying at sixteen to the full timer and then a part timer where I am and she was a squadron commander and then a group commander and Graham now today which is a wing commander with the airforce reserve command in the forty five and you have how many people reporting to you as commander just twelve hundred people and lieutenant colonel Peter the a AU ten is the a town right to work on yeah the world that's correct and then you made the transition to the F. sixteen after nine eleven correct yes I I I I my wife and I we been married in that had been deployed operation southern watch a couple times in the operational temple is pretty high in the late nineties or the early nineties is six to eight ninety so we had a decision to make we now offer stability to the family so we decided to try the airline Downton and the reserves of the guard and and that so that's kind of what we need to transition three four years later I got a job with the makers and homestead finance sixteen great get Texas right up to the break so I have you ever thought about what it's like to train as a fighter pilot in the United States airforce come back after the break as we talk to our guest mentors the term colonel Peter Smith from the ninety.

Peter Smith United States airf eleven years thirty five forty years three four years one day
"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

10:52 min | 1 year ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"It's the day graham show w._d. F._m. and a._m. We are back for the second hour program on this august the eighth two thousand nineteen thursday morning and wanna take another minute here with colonel david smith vermont air national guard because we got a question from hills in duxbury right at the top of the hour there and we had to the go-to news and it didn't really have a chance for the colonel to to address the concerns voiced by the caller and colonel glad you stay with us another another minute or two and and just <hes> he was he seemed to be concerned that their that because of changes in instrumentation at the airport there is a flight path that goes right over his house in duxbury and he's not much what's going on here yeah and i think there's a little cutout just with the that transition there but i think i got the gist of the question you know i flew the f sixteen for twenty five years in in burlington and sola instrument approach changes and i think <hes> what nails is if i got the pronunciation right is hearing is <hes> you know in inclement lament weather <hes> and at night if the active runway is landing to the north runway three three the instrument approach procedure and it's it's published. It's not by our choice. It's what the procedure is. Brings us almost right over camel's hump when you're on the approach of it's good weather. You look off your right. Weighing in camel. Trump is right there so you're twenty he twenty five miles almost thirty miles south coming in on a really long straight in approach. I'm assuming that the caller is home is probably on that approach and that's also approach that civilian airplanes fly as well so i'm a i'm pretty sure that's what he's hearing and that's really driven by you know are using new approaches driven by weather and darkness. Frankly <hes> for safety think. Mills may be back with us <hes>. Are you else thank you. I wanted to clarify what i was trying to say. <hes> th that description is completely -pletely accurate commercial as well as private in military stuff <hes> flies up right up above point i was trying to make is <hes> when i got in touch with the light kernels at the at the garden and talk to them. They would say well two things they would say. We fly is quietly as we can and the f._a._a. Tells us what to do the guys in the tower b._t._v. or giving us our approach back and that's what we follow <hes> when and i got in touch with the f._a._a. They said oh no guard tells us what they wanna do and we we produce <hes> <hes> the the paperwork and what have you <hes> <hes> to to let them come and go as they say so my my take from that is i wasn't getting a straight answer from the garden. I wasn't getting a straight answer from the f._a._a. And that's why i come up with the term sandbagging there's probably less polite terms for it but at that moment and this goes back sixteen or seventeen years. I've got in touch with our congressional delegation. They were completely absolutely no help at all <hes> and despite the fact that i probably voted for them all uh-huh and i realized that even top management at g. tang wasn't being honest <hes> their claim that they're claiming last just last sentence promise their claim that they attempt to be good neighbours in my view is is <hes> not backed up by their activity and and the way they carry on that's all i have to say thanks for okay. Thank you go well as colonel yeah. No we are actually being honest and what i would say to your to your question. I think think there was one in there. Was it really depends so sometimes we ask the air traffic control specifically how we wanna fly into the airport but in your situation if inclement weather or night radar vector two very specific points on that instrument approach procedure for safety that <hes> were vectored onto in the air traffic control control does it so it's really a combination we do fly the airplane as quietly and to mitigate our impact as best we can <hes> to the community and then <hes> and we fly sometimes we were able to ask for specific procedures sometimes air traffic control dictates so it's a combination but there's dishonesty in responses or on on that i'm going to have to change our <hes> our topic here. We've got <hes> bob ney from talk media news on the line. I do wanna get the bob. Thank you very much for coming in. I really appreciate it colonel. David smith of the <hes> vermont air national guard and he has been our guest for the last half hour so the dave ramsey show. Let's change over now to our good friend above me from as emission from me news good morning bob good morning how are you. I'm doing pretty well over <hes> we've been having a little conversation about <hes> both military and civilian air traffic traffic into our <hes> burlington international airport up here in vermont so if you were really curious what you're talking about. That's that's what's that's the subject anyway. I wanted to change over here ear to your presentation. Which in you all as i mentioned you send me very kindly sent me. An email shows up early in the morning. Tell me a little bit about what we're talking about. It looks like a couple of the democratic candidates candidates. Are maybe raising us. <hes> started out with the white nationalist to now. We're going straight to the white supremacist from this is <hes> charges against president trump for beta o'rourke end is senator elizabeth warren <hes> and anybody else piling on by now well. No i mean joe. Biden has sent some things about the you know. President is stirring things up and about raising things but the two hardest hitting <hes> from what i've seen so far of the twenty is definitely those worn born and beta award and of course beethoven orca to some percent elizabeth warren so you know higher in the polling i only mention that because sometimes when the one percent or two percent as we're calling them people say something <hes> that that's sort of like okay they're saying something just to get up there but but <hes> elizabeth warren obviously has a lot of <hes> of of points and stature within the democratic constituency so yeah they come out pretty hard hitting of course the president you know being the president will punch back. I haven't seen that much back at elizabeth warren warm but i did with beta prime make fun of his name. The nickname dato which is a a you know a spanish. I think latino <hes> name for short for roberto as i am it's actually robert and they're all any and and i think he <hes> he gets a little bit of credit that goes beyond the one or two percent and wherever he's at the polls <hes> because he is actually from el paso so this is we're talking from yeah so and and then you tell us why it matters several twenty twenty candidates have denounced trump for racism but the communists warned iraq mark the strongest condemnation yet of trump job in his divisive rhetoric and anti immigration policies <hes>. I guess they're sort of the leading edge of this thing right now. Then is is that right or they are of this course by like set binding <hes> you know his office has some things and and every democratic candidate is going to be naturally ask the president is he leaves. Nothing unanswered. He didn't go back at every single thing even when some times he should let things go you know he he won't now on these. He's what i believe. I don't think he's obviously going to let things go or would you know with with what they're saying so he's gonna hit back out notice time when all the dust settles on this though the issues out there a gun legislation what happened with it yeah and that is that is sort of the other aspect of this thing is what will change if anything on the ground i mean you know you can argue all day about the degree to which the president is the race a racist or white supremacist or whatever his defenders as we'll say neither is true i think if you look at the record of <hes> you know his activities and statements going back to the nineteen seventies when he was sue his landlord in new york for refusing to rent the people of color in central park jogger case and all all these different utterances as president <hes> equating counter protesters stories with the white the white <hes> the neo nazis who marched on charlottesville just a couple of a couple of years ago <hes> on and on i mean it seems like there's an awfully offi long record there for someone who wants to claim not to be a white supremacist or a racist but anyway <hes> your your take on this right now. Is that <hes> woman. What is likely is anything like that happen on on for instance gun control legislation well. Here's what's gonna make fascinating <hes>. If you look at <hes> ah you know. I don't claim to have known <hes> trump because i don't <hes> but i do know people that have worked. You know obviously for <hes> president trump and you try got it. Learn a little bit about the psyche of the person. I think we all know his psyche now how he kind of operate but if you look at history look he was not the republican choice if you say conservatives and republicans say ted cruz or lindsey graham. You don't say you know you really don't even say jeb bush but you don't take donald donald trump for sure and trump's had a history of certain things at the convention he came out for l._b._j. Writes <hes> right at the podium. I was aired intervention hurting and and then the gun the gun lobby and <hes> also people you know who supports second amendment and against gun control. Do you ever way you wanna frame it. They've all all be really suspicious trump because he's a new yorker you know i heard that he was criticized today by some within the because assis- coming out and talking about background checks and things so my bottom line to that is i think he is pliable on certain things i think he is and i think if congress this acts that they may get re receptivity to this issue because again he's not a forever died in the the wall. You know second amendment guy now. If you wanna comparing this what the right we'll tell you if you want to compare numbers with war you know well. I can't say bernie sanders. He's had a different ever record but elizabeth warren or something on the issue then yeah then trump's going to be a big second amendment person but in all reality he may signed some things yeah that's interesting something would have to come up onto the congress meaning getting so getting absolutely yeah yes and and and that may be where the we're the roadblock would be on this kind of stuff right. I think so and but then again they have twenty two seats open the senator rob portman of ohio. This has happened in his assam state dayton ohio. This puts a lot of pressure on people to do something. Yeah now trump's going after the mayor of dayton. I guess now is that right. Yeah this this one i didn't i really didn't well. There's a couple of things i didn't get first of all senator sherrod brown. I have known for forty years. I served with even three different capacities. I've known her forever <hes> and so shared said.

donald donald trump President senator elizabeth warren vermont lindsey graham duxbury colonel david smith bob ney elizabeth warren burlington international airpo bob dayton senator ohio David smith burlington congress sherrod brown Mills
"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Tell you what i from a noise perspective. You know we had four f thirty five's diverted into burlington back at the end of may and i stood at <hes> you know where the airplanes were running alongside the runway. When they took off for my experience experience. It was a fighter airplane taken out of burlington and i think it's important that <hes> you know that our community educates himself on the environmental impact statement and then and then really determines for themselves. You know what the impact is. I understand. We're fully aware that you know flying fighter airplanes out of burlington has an impact on the community and we continue to look at are flying operations nations to <hes>. How can we best mitigate. Our impact is as community members. I mean we're right there with everybody else. So it's important really important to us that <hes> we work with the community we work closely closely with airport team there to really minimize and mitigate our noise impact community so nothing on that day when you heard them taken off made you say holy cow. That's that's a different for an animal made me really excited. Actually landed there was a lot of energy on the base and i have heard the f. thirty five before but he always wanted here on the base and we weren't planning on that event to happen <hes> and <hes> so yeah i was. I was curious to see okay. They're gonna take off out of burlington with a power setting that we're going to use <hes> were flying it and <hes> i was pleasantly surprised. I was surprised i was i was <hes> that experience i thought was very reflective of of an f. sixteen <hes> taking off that we've had for so many years let's go to a caller a jennifer from south burlington on good morning jennifer i live about a mile and a half from the airport and outside of the so-called noise impact zone and i heard it loud and clear in my neighborhood the day that it took costs and <hes> based on research we know that it is four times larger than the f sixteen there was even an article in popular mechanics that came out this week about the noise impacts and <hes> other research shows us that the f thirty five is eight times the crash risk and that's coming in <hes> over a highly populated area <hes> also originally the air force <hes> didn't want to base it here because they knew it would put civilians at risk so my question is wise vermont air national guard supporting a project that put civilians at risk when there are their role is to protect tapped off. We know that our homes aren't yet retrofitted. So i'm glad that the arts people will be getting the training and preparation they need but the civilian population near the airport and in the entire region <hes> is not yet prepared for this so how can it be that this is the proper timing timing for such a project and it's most certainly not the right location for it. I will let me let me let me reason a lot of issues here. I wanna i wanna i wanna get into one and by one year at least some of them in one of the things i think you said was that there's a there's a crash rates. That's eight times higher with the f thirty. Five then with the f sixteen is at the claim that that's based on research. It's because of the khun currency issues with the way the plane was developed and i really hope that you're doing the same research and looking at the <hes>. We're we're is that what what is the research. I mean what have you been the project on government oversight and other <hes> other other <hes> <hes> organizations have looked into the fact that <hes> because this plane was patched together during a period where there was so much technological innovation. There's all types of systems on the plane and it's not fully tested so it's beginning to be based here before it's entirely tested galt. Let me bring in colonel smith and ask you colonel <hes>. What about this this. This <hes> worried that these planes are <hes> have eight times a crash risk what we've seen before yeah. No i mean i know here's what i know for sure. The the f thirty five's been flying for over ten years. <hes> there's been over four hundred airplanes delivered <hes> and have flown over two hundred thousand hours and i'm not sure where the data what this source is for the eight times <hes> crash chris but that's certainly not what i've seen when i look at the current <hes> and i'm talking air force because it's an air force because the models of airplanes matters so there's three variants of the f thirty five the models what's coming vermont when i look at the accident rate take on that it's very similar to the accident rate of the <hes> <hes> <unk> separate of the f sixteen over its lifetime so i certainly haven't seen or aware of any data <hes> that supports that there's an eight-time crash i just <hes>. I don't believe that destroy. I'm not sure where that data comes from with respect to noise. I'll say just what i said before we we're going to continue to work to minimize their impact was respect to the base new says the decision was made back in twenty thirteen through a very thorough and delivered environmental mental impact statement and secretary force basing decisions so that that decision was made after a lot of scoping meetings in public forums to do you know how many bases around the country our <hes> housing the the thirty five right now i do the f thirty five flying in nineteen basis globally globally countries that are involved in the in the program and <hes> it's a real global program and like i said there's over four hundred airplanes and <hes> over eight hundred pilots and eight thousand maintenance professionals that have been trained in anything. Thank you know when you look at when the thirty five and i've received questions as the f thirty five is the fighter aircraft to replace the fifteen the f sixteen the a ten <hes> f eighteen and number of fourth generation we call older fighter so when you look out twenty years <hes> the you know the air force is buying over seventeen hundred f f thirty five's and they're going to be at air force bases and guardian is in the gardell make up about half of the operational squadrons in the air force so they're going to be at communities all around the country are are they being <hes> <hes> based in mainly populated areas are in less <hes> less populated areas a lot. I think that's a challenge frankly from even even the remote air force bases that i was at as a young officer or now more populated and certainly when you look at the air national guard who's a full partner <hes> and with concurrent fielding as the air force i mean guard <hes> basis are are built primarily on joint use airfields there at international airports it you know large cities look across the country. You know <hes> houston texas <hes> <hes> jacksonville florida madison wisconsin. Who's the preferred alternative for the next round of your basic so <hes> f thirty five will be populated dairies. They already are there at at valparaiso egland florida in phoenix arizona. That's a huge metropolitan area and there's over one hundred airplanes there so it's going to be part of the air forces <hes> fighter <hes> inventory for decades and is there a <hes>. What is the what is the mishap record like with the f thirty five's i've scene. I guess i'd say mixed reports why you know when you look at the <hes> beat a mishap data is based on different things it's real it's based on value so when you say crashes ashes. It's the way the air force tracks mishaps is not specifically crashes. There's <hes> it could be <hes> engine damage to <hes> you know a bird going down engine and it's it's based on a value so what the airforce it's all based on per one hundred thousand flying hours and like i said earlier it's very similar to the sixteen is and then the environmental-impact will tell you that that historically <hes> to the caller's point that that maximum rates are higher early on in <hes> <hes> it with new airplanes but when you look at the f thirty five that's not what i've seen in on what the data shows and it's got a very similar right now to the history of sixteen and also add he when you look at <hes> our unit <hes> you you know for our period flying the f sixteen for three years our safety rate was four times better than the f sixteen saved across the air force over the same period and that's that's to boast a little bit but it's also a real tribute to the the skill and the professionalism far airmen we have a lot of experience in the guard from our pilot cadre and our airmen and it makes it really we really big difference and we saw that with sixteen and i'm really confident we'll see that with you have thirty five thirty five is a really capable very safe airplane in its show not in his first ten years of late. I <hes> we we are down in the last few minutes here. I wanna make sure we get one quick question answered which we haven't gotten to yet and then we'll talk to nils from duxbury colonel. David smith is my guest. He's with vermont air national guard up in <hes> the the burlington international airport. That's where the the base is and we're talking about. The arrival beginning next month the f thirty five fighter jets jets <hes> which are according to some reports capable of being armed with nuclear weapons and kernel that is a concern to some vermont who have been <hes> you know i fairly late in the review process here really have tried to raise that as an issue <hes>. What should they be thinking yeah. No i understand the concerns but wh what we've said publicly in meteorology sneezes r f thirty five do not have a nuclear mission so <hes> we've said that right and that is the way we don't so when you look at <hes> the vermont national guard the f thirty five so we're getting do not have a nuclear mission..

south burlington vermont colonel smith burlington international airpo duxbury secretary valparaiso egland florida texas arizona officer jacksonville partner florida wisconsin madison ten years two hundred thousand hours twenty years three years
"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Hear it you can always go to our podcast. We have an excellent service there where you can listen anytime day or night to pass past segments whole programs really of the day graham show here w._d. E._v. f._m. and a._m. Go to go to the the station's website is w. Devi radio dot com. You can follow the link from there. There's a link right on that homepage to the day graham. Show scroll down on a bit when you get there and you will find a list of our recent programs by topic and guests and figure out what you wanna hear already. I wanna move onto the next segment of our program now in last last week. We had a <hes> <hes> doctor. I'm blanking on the first rower. <hes> come in talk to and talking to us about concerns that have been voiced by critics of a plan to bring thirty five fighter jets to the <hes> vermont air national guard base at the brompton international airport and <hes> at the time i i did try to line up a <hes> someone from the guard to come in and sort of act as a counter and gives both sides of the story that day <hes> couldn't schedule that right off but <hes> <hes> decided that while the thing to do is to get somebody from the guard on on the show <hes> in subsequent days in here. We are on a subsequent day. Hey thursday august the eighth two thousand nineteen and with me this morning's colonel david smith a thirty one year veteran of the vermont vermont national guard and we're gonna be talking with colonel smith about <hes> i i think maybe efforts to allay concerns about <hes> the arrival of the f thirty five's which actually be in a next month so let's let's first start out with just the the outline of the plan year colonel smith thanks. Thanks so much for joining me yeah. Thanks dave <hes>. It's it's a pleasure to be here. I really look forward to updating you in the community on where we are with respect to the f thirty five and so <hes> the the the the planes they made a brief cameo appearance a month or so ago but but <hes> they real officials schedules starts in september right. That's correct yeah. We <hes> we we're. We're just over a month out now. We don't have the exact date solidified but we anticipate mid-september sometime. The.

colonel smith vermont vermont national guard colonel david smith vermont brompton international airport dave thirty one year
"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

15:50 min | 1 year ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"From radio vermont it's the dave graham show on w._d. It's your show about the people places and the issues that matter the most to you now. Here's your host dave graham good morning. Vermont did is thursday august eighth. Two thousand nineteen and we are so glad to have you listening listening to our program this morning. We're gonna have an interesting show. I think i'm going to hand it off to a guest host <hes> the first half hour of the program this morning our our good friend. Jack lyons the summer internet w._d. E._v. He's been doing a really excellent job here and we decided just to hand him the controls for the next half hour or so he's going to be <hes>. I'll i'll let him introduces guest and <hes> we'll have a good conversation. <hes> there and then later on i'll be coming back in taking over the mike in and i'll be interviewing colonel david smith of the vermont national guard <hes> he's going to be i think talking with us to try to allay some of the concerns we heard about last week <hes> interview you about the f thirty five coming to the vermont national guard base at the burlington international airport and <hes> he <hes> the guard it has wanted a chance to reply some of the criticisms raised about noise about <hes> the possibility that some of these planes may be <hes> armed with nuclear weapons et cetera and <hes> so we'll be hearing from colonel smith in part of this hour <hes> later on believe. We're going to be opening the phones and letting some listeners weigh in on whatever topics are on your mind out there folks course. You're always welcome to call the program. <hes> so nice is easier to take the calls and others because we just have an open phone line etcetera two four four one seven seven seven is the local number here in waterbury one eight seven seven to nine one eight a two five five and with that. I'm gonna hand it off to my good friend. Jack lyons a student at notre dame university. He's from south burlington and he is doing an excellent the job force here as a summer intern w._d. Take it away jack. Well thanks dave our first guest. Today is jeff tieman. He's the president and ceo of the vermont association of hospitals and health systems there in advocacy advocacy group dedicated to representing the state's nonprofit hospitals and we're going to talk to him today about the future of rural hospitals in vermont jeff are you there. I am all right good morning. Good morning. Thanks for having me on so i guess no problem so i i guess our first question would be <hes> can rural hospitals in vermont survive over the for over the coming decades and what some of the changes that take place be to enable able that so i think i it's a great question and it really important one for our state and important jack. I think to acknowledge right off the top. That vermont is really entirely rural. <hes> we think of rural areas and less rural areas or urban areas like burlington but it's really hard in a small state like ours to even separate that out even the teaching hospital in burlington serves rural populations and is actively involved in coordinating care for people in rural areas throughout the state so and all or other hospitals are doing that as well so i think it's important to understand that that we really are <hes> a rural state and <hes> that rural hospitals and all of dr hospitals across the state are vital in their communities <hes> not just as caregivers but also as a big employers often the largest employer in community and as community builders in the work. They're doing <hes> in what we call community benefit and health reform to try to reduce the cost of care and make it better for the patient all of that said real hospitals face big challenges as you probably know <hes> not just here in vermont but across the country we've seen rural royal hospital closures <hes> throughout the country in the past several years <hes> and there's a lot of reasons that happens but certainly cause for concern and the reason reason that we have our our i carefully on this. You know there's even a a task force that was created by the legislature to look into the future of real healthcare in vermont where represented on that task force as are all of the other major stakeholders in our state so this is a conversation that's well underway sure and you mentioned that all hospitals in vermont are auroral hospitals just because our state is in very populated but <hes> what is what is the difference in the challenges that are seen at a small hospital like copley hospital in mooresville bill and the challenges that are seen at medical center in burlington yeah so another good question and when we looked into when we did some research into what can can happen with small rural hospitals understand <hes> particularly in other parts of the country 'cause we haven't had as many closures here in vermont or new england thankfully but in trying to understand dan what can what can precipitate financial problems or or even something as severe as closure. There's a lot of factors that are unique to two smaller. Rural hospitals goes up rating in smaller communities for example <hes> they tend to have <hes> a lot more people on medicare and medicaid and we know that those public payers there's <hes> for hospitals just do not reimbursed at the same level and so hospitals literally receive less income to take care of those patients and that becomes a part of the financial mantra problem. These hospitals are often <hes> typically operating on razor thin margins. That's certainly true here in vermont either either razor thin margins or or as we have right now many with negative margins they face declining volume as population shifts to the city and and in vermont. We have <hes> <hes> an aging population. I think we're second or third in the nation <hes> as far as <hes> the the age of our population <hes> and then i think we're all hospitals are also managing aging the challenges <hes> that are not necessarily unique to rural areas but but can be even more difficult to manage in those places like opioid addiction and and reaching reaching out beyond the hospital walls to to make sure people are healthy. You spoke about razor thin margins at hospitals and i think that <hes> segues well into the conversation about rate rate hikes. <hes> a lot of the hospitals are feeling some pressure from the green mountain care board not to increase their rates a lot but at the same time they're dealing with those razor thin margins you just talk about <hes> how that how that <hes> bargaining works between the green mountain care board in hospitals sure i think i i would point out as you as you did at the top of the show so that we are a nonprofit system so i think we just need to always remember that when we talk about margins those are not profit margins but those are the margins funds that enabled the hospital to do things like reinvest facilities and equipment make sure they're always providing the most modern cutting edge care <hes> and that and that they are also also as i said <hes> available to the community that said i think i think jack that are hospitals are proposing budgets to the green mountain care board for twenty twenty the they are proposing the budgets they need to continue meeting patient need and and to continue serving their communities in an effective way while also making sure they are financially healthy and sustainable for the long term so that they can always be there for those communities so the the process with the green mountain care board is for those hospitals for all of our hospitals to to present their proposed budget for next year and to have a dialogue with green mountain care board about why the rates they've asked ask for are necessary to do what i just said to make sure they continue to serve patients effectively be there for their communities and know that there's a sustainable plan for the future sure so. I think you're going to hear that dialogue. Take place with the green mountain care board and and hopefully our hospitals will be able to convey kind of the full set of of challenges changes that they face <hes> from the reimbursement issues. I mentioned with medicare and medicaid <hes> to significant workforce challenges across our state <hes> that make <hes> healthcare both a little more expensive and and challenging to deliver because we don't always have the right people in the right places and can't fill so many open in slots <hes> and also at the same time well hospitals are managing those challenges. They're trying very hard to to stay focused on health reform here you're in vermont which is really to make healthcare better for the patient by focusing on wellness instead of illness and trying to move from a system that now pays for the number of procedures and office visits and and and all of that to assist him that really pays for quality outcomes and and wellness and so i think in trying to do all of those things at once <hes> and keep rates low is is the constant challenge and i think our hospitals have struck the best possible balance they can and you'll not that play out during the budget hearing later this month how much as we're looking forward to these these budget hearings. How much of a dialogue is that. I mean is is there a certain number that <hes> you know the green mountain care board is is not going to allow or is there a certain number that the hospital's not going to go the low. You know what how does that dialogue walk work well. The the agreement and care boy does set in their what they call budget guidance <hes> set a rate for the growth of net patient revenue <hes> and and the hospitals then propose what they think they need for their for their coming budget and those differences or if there is a difference between what the green mountain care board expect and and what <hes> what the hospital <hes> is proposing than than that does become a discussion as part of the hearing so that the hospital hospital has an opportunity to explain the factors that are involved <hes> and to try to persuade the green mountain care boy that the budget they're proposing the one that's really needed <hes> <hes> to to ensure the future of their organization and <hes> and and be able to serve patients the way they want to and what is when we're talking about rate increases. What is a significant rate increase well. I think you know i would probably rather than try to get into numbers. I think we should all acknowledge. That healthcare is expensive. <hes> there's there's no two ways about that and whether we're talking about insurance premiums or <hes> <hes> rate increases that that hospitals <hes> are looking at or we're talking about the cost of pharmaceuticals and supplies all of the stakeholders in our system have a role to play <hes> in in trying to make the system or affordable and i think vermont <hes> yes we are encountering rate increases. <hes> <hes> that you know premiums are expensive for people and that is a challenge. We're all trying to manage together. I think in vermont we're doing that in a way that's <hes> <hes> incredibly compelling and may not produce all the results we want tomorrow but is definitely the direction that the country <hes> that both parties believe we need to move in to to really again focus on keeping people well <hes> addressing the social determinants of health like housing and food security and other things that keep people healthy in the first place and then doing a better job jack on also managing chronic conditions once people are sick. There's a lot of technology and <hes> new patient physician outreach. That's made possible by the work. We're doing here. <hes> to keep people healthier theory prevent emergency room visits all of those things eventually reduced costs while also just making life better for the patients we serve so <hes> you spoken about a wellness as opposed to treating wellness as opposed to illness and more sustainable long-term care provided by hospitals. I <hes> <hes> spoke yesterday with senator richard westman <hes> we try to get him off of the segment. Unfortunately he had a prior commitment but i got some good background information from him. He's a message board member at copley hospital and mooresville and he's also <hes> as a senator on the health and welfare committee and <hes> he spoke about some the things copley hospital has done recently to <hes> to to promote what you're saying that uh a stable long-term wellness care <hes> he talked about community health initiatives serves and also they've <hes> they've now started doing orthopedic surgery. They invested you know in the short term some money on on getting the infrastructure to do orthopedic surgery and they're hoping that by by offering that they can they can <hes> you know bring more patients in the door and help them do that and and stay open. What other initiatives have you seen throughout the state <hes> like that that are focusing on sustainable long term care and how essential are these two to keeping serving rural hospitals open so i think you're seeing a lot of initiatives from one like the one like those you just described to <hes> across our are hospitals. You're seeing a huge focus on expense management and always doing everything possible to to minimize expenses to join purchasing coalitions nations that can bring down the cost of supplies equipment..

Vermont Jack lyons vermont association of hospita vermont copley hospital vermont national guard rural royal hospital dave graham hospital hospital burlington mooresville waterbury burlington international airpo notre dame university jeff tieman senator richard westman colonel david smith medicare
"colonel david smith" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Free KTAR news partly sunny today, make that partly cloudy with a high of eighty two sunshine tomorrow with a high of eighty three and in between partly cloudy skies tonight with a low of fifty nine your weather is brought to you by Howard air. Arizona votes in-depth, and it's seven forty three. We're being joined on the phone on our newsmaker line with Arizona. Governor Doug Ducey who is seeking a second term tomorrow. Governor thanks for being with us here. I know getting down to the wire very close. Let's let's start off with us talking about the campaign. Can you explain to voters why you're still out there dogging your democratic opponent? David Garcia in commercials. Even though the polls show, you up double digits kicking a man while he's down or you're just making sure he stays down. Jim. I got out of the the speculation business in two thousand and sixteen races are over till there over. Okay, none of these polls matter acceptable poll that happens tomorrow night at eight PM. So I wanna earn every vote, and I want people to know tomorrow's election day, it'll be decided tomorrow or nothing spend decided yet. So I'm getting out making the case to secure Arizona's future. And like I said we've got a record of accomplishment achievement. And not only do I want to get over the finish line. I want Martha mcsally to be our next state Senator I think we've got a great ticket here. Mark bird bitch. Frank riggs. They need your help is as well. So I want everyone to get out their vote. Yes. On prop real five as well. Boy, not not just sounding like the governor. You are sounding like the defacto leader of the Arizona Republican party there. So what what is it going to be your top issue? If you get reelected. Well, education's always going to be a top issue in this state. I mean, it's it's the number one line item in our budget. We were able to get a twenty percent pay increases for our teachers by school. You're twenty twenty. We were able to do that Jim because our economy is booming here in Arizona, and I don't see any reason there should be an end in sight. So you always want to prepare for the worst and plan for a rainy day, but we have such a momentum in California continues to do things wrong. People continue to move their Maricopa County right now is the fastest growing county in the nation. We're not punch through seven billion in terms of population. So we have things to do like infrastructure, roads and bridges. We're actually going to have to build some more schools because we've got that many new families coming here. These are all good problems to have don't forget it wasn't that long ago. We were getting out of a billion dollar hole. Now, we have a billion dollar surplus. So I liked the direction last time you were here. I don't think I got an answer to this. Question are you willing to raise taxes if things for education if things don't keep going? Well, there's a lot of things in the economy. They're out of your control. Not raising taxes. Okay. Why would I raise taxes what we have a billion dollar surplus right now when you say when things are going, well, why would what things are going? Well, people are struggling why would you say we're going to take more from you? That's that's a California model. That's why there's an exodus out out of that state. We've got low taxes here and light regulation. What we wanna do is make sure we properly spend the dollars. We collect we've reformed our government. It's more efficient and effective. We actually have two hundred sixty thousand new private sector jobs in the state of Arizona and last three plus years, but we have fewer government jobs, and that's because we're using technology. And there's people retire, we're finding efficiencies. So I wanted to continue to do that. I came from the business world. I don't want to take or money from our hardworking taxpayers. I wanna make sure we collect more through a growing academy and growing paychecks. Thank goodness. Arizona paychecks the third fastest growing paychecks. In the nation. Why would you consider raising taxes and that kind of environment? Colonel Frank mills said, the director of GPS you appointed told Bruce St James and Pamela Hughes that the troops that are headed to the border will not be armed because they'll be in a support role much like the national guard troops that you've sent to the border. So this idea that the president suggested rock-throwers being fired on by active duty, military members isn't a scenario that can happen, right? I think that the president actually adjusted tho those comments and yes, the the military presence at the border dash doco guard and department of defense are there in a support role. They allow the border agents to get out of Eddie administrative or support role and actually put those boots on the ground in a way that would allow people to cross the borders where that where there is intrinsic we're talking with governor Doug Ducey who is seeking a second term in tomorrow's election. Have you been given any further details on on the on the mission of active duty, military personnel? At our southern border. We had a brief earlier this week where I'm sorry late last week with the Colonel David Smith and talking about projected troop deployments. The operation will be run out of Davis Monthan in Tucson. And then we're gonna have a briefing later this week we've been focusing so much on the governor's race your race also on the Senate race and the house races. What we haven't talked much about the legislature here in Arizona. Do you think you were in any danger of all of not having enough legislative votes in the state house or the state Senate come two thousand nineteen? I've been working with both sides since I was elected ninety percent of the legislation. We passed last year was was BI partisan. But when you look at a race like say a Kate ropy McGee and L D twenty eight she's she's the Republican ticket. She wants to work with me. She's also on the side of the teachers, those are racists that I hope people will will vote for the right legislator. I think if you if you vote Republican in this election, this is a legislature that I've been able to work with balance the budget, protect a child, safety and protect public safety. So I work with the legislature that the people give me, but it's it's a day before the election. I wanna make sure I've advocating for the best people the best possible policies, and I really want to encourage everyone to get out in vote you can't mail in your ballot. You've got to deliver or show up at the at the polls tomorrow and the people need to find their polling location or make sure their early belt was verified, they can go to Doug Ducey dot com. Com slash vote. And I'm asking everyone further vote. All right. Thank you very much. Governor Doug Ducey joining us here on Arizona's morning news. It's seven forty nine. And let's get over to the valley Chevy dealers traffic.

Arizona Doug Ducey Jim California Frank riggs David Garcia Howard Martha mcsally Maricopa County Senate Chevy David Smith Mark bird president Tucson Colonel Frank mills Senator Republican ticket Kate ropy McGee
"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

"Hiring people is probably the worst part of my job is such a house although searching a sorting to resumes most people don't have the right experience we started using his their park rooter about three months ago right from the star you can tell it was in a make hiring a lot easier one click and my job was pressed into a hundred plus john boards all the top flights all the candidates kinda my dashboard and it's easy to compare them thumbs up of from like down thumbs down if i didn't know we nelson attachment spring up doc's phone calls none of that and i couldn't believe the number of great applicants we got i had the personally needed within one week i don't know how we hired before zip or crater whether you're looking to fill one position or twenty find a pass candidates with separate for where your job is just one click away from one hundred plus job sites separate for the fastest way to hire and right now you can triceps recruiter free just go to zip recruiter dot com slash talk that zip recruiter dot com slash talk zip recruiter dot com slash talk did you man you into basin weather forecast than the stuckey the route to you by base in your against him your hometown here decent specialists will rain is likely in the forecast today mainly in the morning hours thing gradually clearing as we move closer into the evening let nephew and how did a mere sixty calling to the mid fifties through the remainder of the week eleven overnight low near thirty eight happy halloween please he's extra caution on driving around our neighborhood streets that evening and that's whether on one of four point five at them and twenty am kiki yeah this is colonel david smith commander of the airports reserve for nineteen try to win it was facing military experience can agree with your life and provide many events are many exciting part turns out to be here forst reserve which will allow you to advance are sitting career the age occasionally receive excellent training and other benefits her to start your adventure airports reserve by going a f reserve dot com or call eight hundred two five seven on two one two this messages.

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"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

"Hiring people is probably the worst part of my job it's such a hassle the searching the sorting to resumes most people don't have the right experience we started using his that part krueger about three months ago right from the star you can tell it was in a make hiring a lot easier one click and my job was posted two hundred plus john boards all the top sites all the candidates kinda my dashboard and it's easy to compare them some of the like them bounced out of biden no we nelson attachment spring up doc's phone calls none of that and i couldn't believe the number of great applicants we got i had the personally needed within one week i don't know how we hired before zip or crater whether you're looking to fill in one position or twenty find a pass candidates with separate for or your job is just one click away from one hundred plus job sites step recruiter the fastest way to hire and right now you can try zip recruiter three just go to zip recruiter dot com slash talk that zip recruiter dot com slash talk zip recruiter dot com slash talk did you and you into basin weather forecast than the stuckey the route to you by base in your against him your hometown here decent specialist will rain is likely in the forecast today mainly in the morning hours thing gradually clearing as we move closer into the evening let me afternoon high did a mere sixty calling to the mid fifties to the remainder of the week eleven overnight low near thirty eight happy halloween please extra caution on driving around our neighborhood streets this evening and that's whether on one of four point five at them anthony yeah this is colonel david smith commander of the air force reserve for nineteen writer when you know airforce base military experience can agree with your life and provide many of benched for many exciting part time jobs air force reserve which will allow you to advance or studying career continue education wide receiver excellent training in other benefits hurt you start your venture efforts reserve i going am reserve dot com or call eight hundred two five seven twenty one.

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"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

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"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

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"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

"He went amazing weekend weather forecast sunday go country one oh five five he y brought to you by night family denzel and roosevelt it was the doctor nine and gailey hank earlier sunday's guys and wore i'm comfortable temperatures in the base in this weekend you'll enjoy a some wonderful temperatures in the lower eighties today warming to the mid eighties throughout monday an overnight low than amid the game was called up if you're out driving and have yourself been awesome weekend hi this is colonel david smith commander of the airports reserved for nineteen try to win it first base in utah military experience can agree with your life and provide many of penchant for many exciting part time jobs in the air force reserve which will allow you to advance are sitting career or continue education wide receiver excellent training and other benefits purchase start in the air force reserve by going to the afc reserve dot com or call eight hundred two five seven one two one three this messages sponsored by the air force users in here but utah association of broadcasters and the station americas most exciting radio talk show those averaged an agent cole mope orders one who and period.

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"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

"This is colonel david smith commander of the airports reserved for nineteen try to win it it was facing new tom military experience can agree with your life and provide many adventure many exciting part time jobs in the air force reserve which will allow you to advance are sitting career or continue education wide receiver excellent training in other benefits her to start in the airports reserve by going to the afc reserve dot com or call eight hundred two five seven one two one three this messages sponsored by the air force users in here but utah association of broadcasters and the station those savage nation cole mope orders one culture and period the winner of the national radio hall of when award michael seven is this average hollywood in the media today having lunch together on the savage nation if you're on the west coast is lunchtime of course unfortunately for those of you on the east coast really not dinner time to three clock the five but i just didn't have live our and onions which was my improves to inexperience for the day because i need to put up of my adrenaline with limit i know it's like crazy are right now i just want i i felt i needed the iron and the other nutrients the night amid a that source of item in them again i'm own pills not quite the same thing so in this hour will continue to talk about who you despise the most medium white would you hate not only were the most in line what movies of the mater acted in the provoked crime murder drug abuse anti merkley has an answer all.

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"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

"This is colonel david smith commander the air force reserved for nineteen writer win at hill air force base in utah military experience can agree with your life as it has mine in provide many adventures there are many part time jobs in the air force loser here in utah which will allow you to advance recently in career for continue your education was serving close to home the air force reserve offers positions with excellent training including working with its new it spider yeah thirty five lighting team as you learn new skills he received competitive pay wish assistants and many other benefits anchored future starter adventure airports reserve by going two eight f reserve dot com college eight hundred two five seven one two one to that eight hundred two five seven one two one two this messages sponsored by the affords users erred by the utah association of broadcasters and the station carroll foot lab was pleased to be a sponsor of the kbo cy one time club you know your feet hurt awfully difficult pft who's develops forty one years ranking earlier forty one year we've been held to you publicly we started his custom lakers couldn't unlikely into learned inside as a lot more to happy so i get the porsche were more important to you enter was raring rituals over the years latest so now we know people do the things change from boston where to custom orthotic clinical excellence only for your still seen as a boom i do not understand it how it human as you ball despite i still make the case some of the runs more than two is just know that there's probably another option pharmacy defensively but were as close as we are here and jason one can stay in business forty one years us will tell you and three people right if your feet are giving you trouble you all of me and three zero seven nine registration.

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"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"colonel david smith" Discussed on KVEL News Talk Sports AM 920

"The pain in life also comes altered numerous doctors without success by phone randy miller on inner in on reading a positive testimony also i knew we could hold me i drove action at your to your job expecting unwilling has been vows in zone customary boots when there's a man of injury murray slowly custom boots instead of custom orthotics to fit in my own which he taught me the marvel is what we're doing because i'm not to boots when i arrived in general i was working with it with organix to first i was ninety percent pain free him in the third i was with him for the first time in twenty i was able award for them in decades by regimen renewed anymore new starters with fourteen or difficulty watching haven't seems closer wanted those honored to stand tall reunion all four labs nine three oh seven nine hi this is colonel david smith commander the air force reserves for nineteen writer win at hill air force base in utah military experience can agree with your life as it has mine can provide many adventures there are many part time jobs in the air force reserve here in utah which will allow you to advance recently in career for continue your education while serving close to home the air force reserve offers positions with excellent training including working with its new it spider the f thirty five lighting team as you learn new skills he received competitive pain which assistants and many other benefits anchored future starter adventure airports reserve by going two afc reserve dot com we're calling eight hundred two five seven one two one tear eight hundred two five seven one two one two this messages sponsored by the air force users erred by the utah association of broadcasters and the station four six six.

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