35 Burst results for "co-founder"

How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

How I Built This

05:24 min | 3 d ago

How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

"We I spoke with John back in two thousand seventeen but now fast forward a few years and like most of us John is dealing with challenges he never anticipated. But when we spoke a few days ago, he sounded pretty optimistic. Personally, I'm doing okay I. Think you know the business has had a tough time but has seen some really strong recovery since the bottom? We were down about seventy five percent at the peak. In terms of rideshare rides, we now return to little. Half. down. which is actually good progress. We've always been a very long term minded company. We've had hard times before we've always been the challenger brand, and so actually I think moments like this are opportunities for us in our team to shine and so happy to share some of that with you. Yeah I WANNA I wanNA talk about that. Let's let's first talk about like kind of drill down to some of the challenges i. There's no question that this has to be the most challenging time in your you know in your leadership of lift I think it's the most challenging time for any business leader founder around the world today for variety of reasons and as you mentioned, it's been a tough year four left to have some layoffs in May I think about thousand. Layoffs which could not have been easy for you to go through. So as you began to see the pandemic having a significant impact on on your business, what kinds of conversations were you having with your your leadership team with your co founder Logan about ways to kind of begin to to build resilience? What are the conversations that we've had or one of the challenges throughout is how many different audiences groups of people that were working to take care of throughout this right so we have our drivers, we have our riders, we have our employees. With an employee's, there's those that are working in person to help drivers at Parisian centers and there are those that could work from home. So all different populations that we want to take care of. Investors as well who who are judging those decisions we make. So I think that's been a really interesting conversation also the conversations around short term thinking versus long term thinking there are short term decisions we need to make in order to preserve the long term mission that we have as a company. In. Those have been really key decisions. You talked about the dot was very, very difficult. It forced us to make hard decisions some of which I think actually. In hindsight were very healthy for the business but very difficult to make especially for people that are all in this tough time where where the market is difficult those were not easy decisions. Let's talk about some of the short term decisions that you had to take. I mean you are publicly traded company So you're obviously countable to investors and it's everything's on the table you have to review can't hide anything first of all, just to keep the business operating and to. Get. You through this time because this is going to be a challenging year and maybe a recovery next year for you we'll talk about that a moment but you knew this was going to be a tough year. So was one of those decisions to retain as much cash on hand was that one of the initial decisions that you had to take? Yeah obviously. So we look at the cash that we have on hand. We also raised our first debt to add cushion. Quite, a strong position where lucky that we went public when we did. Have a you know near nearly three billion dollars in the bank. What we did to start as we ran all different scenarios we said Okay if we were seventy five percent down for six months or two quarters, you know what would the situation be like for cash if we were down, you know for four quarters what would it be like for cash? We ran the the worst case scenarios, the medium case scenarios and the best case scenarios, and then made the decision that you know raising the debt was kind of a no regrets move but then also to your point preserving the cash that we do have on hand. Making decisions about expenses that we had in the office that were more of a luxury making decisions around certain teams. That we needed to tighten up for example, on on the operating side there were some markets where we had to close some of our centers. What are you finding out from users like why what is what is it? That is preventing them from using lift? Is it basically that they just don't have anywhere to go or is it? Is it the fear of being car with somebody else? It's a mix of both you know. I I think it's people changing their transportation behavior, their actual transportation behavior, and then secondarily It's obviously the questions around health safety and I'd love to walk through what we're doing on on that end as open. The APP we ask both driver and rider to confirm that they're wearing a mask. We ask driving rider confirmed that they haven't been in contact with anyone has covert, and we ask everyone to keep their areas clean and open. Windows if possible. So that's gone a long way. If you zoom out actually the fact that half as many rides are being taken now as before I'm actually quite happy within a strange way because I know many people that are they're not going into the office that's a huge change in transportation. So the fact that one out of two rides are still present even in this environment show some flexibility in the model because we've seen different. Types of rides we've seen a lot of essential workers using this way more because there are other options. Potentially public transportation are things that they're more concerned about from a health safety perspective,

John Founder Co Founder Logan
Huang's Law, the New Moore's Law?

Techmeme Ride Home

02:18 min | 3 d ago

Huang's Law, the New Moore's Law?

"It got all lost in the scramble of other news but remember invidia bought arm and that's a pretty big deal. So to pieces about that, I let me introduce you to. Some, people see as the new Moore's law and it might explain why Invidia is doing what it's doing quoting Chris Mims in the Wall Street Journal who I believe has actually coined the term quote as chipmakers have reached the limits of atomic scale circuitry and the physics of electrons Moore's law has slowed and some say it's over but a different law potentially, no less consequential computing's next half century has arisen. I call it wings law after INVIDIA Chief Executive and Co founder Jensen Wang it describes how the silicon chips that power artificial intelligence more than double in performance. Every two years while the increase can be attributed to both hardware and software it. Steady progress makes it a unique enabler of everything from autonomous cars, trucks, and ships to the face voice and recognition in our personal gadgets between November twenty twelve and may performance of nvidia chips increased three hundred and seventeen times for an important class of a calculation says Bill Daley chief scientists and Senior Vice President of research at Nvidia on average in other words, the performance of these chips more than doubled every year a rate of progress that makes Moore's law pale in comparison and quote. And then also from the Journal, a portrait of Jensen Wang and his founding and stewardship of Invidia as the company has. Just exploded in all sorts of ways. In videos market value has soared to three hundred and nineteen point, eight billion dollars surpassing Intel's valuation of two hundred and fourteen point five, billion dollars even though INVIDIA had ten point nine, two, billion in annual sales in its latest fiscal year compared with seventy one, point nine, seven, billion for Intel. Videos bet on some of the hottest fields, INTECH video gaming and artificial intelligence have fueled investor enthusiasm. While Intel has stumbled with some of its most advanced chips, it's all a long way from nineteen ninety-three when Mr Huang. Dreamed up in video on his thirtieth birthday at a Denny's in San Jose California with two like minded engineers they bet on a future where consumers demanded better computer graphics, which would require specialized high performance hardware that wasn't available at the time and

Invidia Intel Moore Jensen Wang Wall Street Journal Nvidia San Jose California Chris Mims Bill Daley Chief Executive Mr Huang Senior Vice President Chipmakers Co Founder
Next generation nuclear is a step closer to market

Climate Cast

03:38 min | 4 d ago

Next generation nuclear is a step closer to market

"The way we produce electric power is changing Minnesota generated twenty five percent of our electricity from renewables like wind and solar in two, thousand, nineteen and nationally coal electric power has been cut in half in the last decade and many utilities planned to go much further but going completely carbon-free is going to be tricky. Extracting alternatives such as natural gas still emits carbon and many states are looking to retire old nuclear power plants. So engineers are developing a new kind of nuclear last month. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission gave its first ever design approval to accompany working on the technology. That company is new scale power and here to talk about it is co founder Jose Reyes previously, he was the head of the Department of nuclear. Engineering at state. University Jose. Welcome to climate cast. Well, thank you so much for inviting him. Excited to share with you our technology why developed smaller nuclear reactors there are many parts of the world that don't have the grid to support a thousand megawatt electric nuclear power plant or they don't have the capital to invest in such large projects a so it really developed it so that it could reach a wide market and so we're looking at small module reactors. Each of our module of only produces sixty megawatts electric So not power or a forty, five, thousand homes in the US. Now I budget, we designed the plant that would house up to twelve of these modules, but we also have configurations of packs or six packs. So it's it's very flexible in in terms of where we could deploy these designs, Jose? What would these reactor buildings look like? Well, it looked like an industrial building as opposed to the LARCH containment domes that you associate with nuclear power. Each reactor is factory fabricated our containment vessels only about fifteen feet in diameter about seventy feet long So it's a very different configuration. What's the climate benefit of these smaller nuclear power systems? A company called energy, environmental economics each three. They performed a study for Washington state that showed that the least cost path to achieving percents clean energy out by twenty forty five was to include small module reactors. Assault new schedule meets with twenty nine utilities. Every six months utilize from Canada in the US many of them have coal fire plants which needs to retire, but we design our plant so that we can repurpose those coal fire plants and we can also retrain many of their workers to work at a do scale plant. So a twelve module loose gambling. Would avoid over six million tons of CO, two emissions per year, and so that's the equivalent of taking one point three, million cars off the road each year. Are they safe? Yes these are extremely safe reactors. This is a very unique design in that under any a worst case conditions of the reactors will shut themselves down without any operator action without any AC or DC power and Alamein cooled for an unlimited period time without the need to add water. So how soon can we realistically get to reliable carbon-free energy production? Are Design courses now approved and so that means that customers can start looking at how to a reference are designed in their integrated resource plans, and so that's very important. First step sob think we can make a very big impact in helping states, beat their clean-energy holes Jose us with new scale power. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. Thanks so much for having.

Jose Reyes Us Nuclear Regulatory Commissi United States Department Of Nuclear Jose Minnesota Alamein Cooled Co Founder Assault Canada Washington
Former Blackboard CEO Aims to Bring New Features to Zoom Classrooms

Equity

01:32 min | 4 d ago

Former Blackboard CEO Aims to Bring New Features to Zoom Classrooms

"The former CO founder of blackboard, which is a learning system that I don't know if you guys used in college I, used it to check grades and syllabi. You don't like it. Alex terrorizes putting thumbs down on the. Echo version of software ratings I mean is blackboard was notoriously bad. Even ten years ago I can't imagine it's gotten better well, well, thankfully, the CO founder has you know he went to actually precision Hawk which is a drone startup left dot in January is now onto his new company class EDU and their first product is not. So casually called class resume for everyone listening I. Suggest reading my story because the demo does a really good job and I won't be able to do as Greg Griffeth job but the features are basically creating zoom if it was genuinely belt for teachers to lead a class beyond kind of a one on one discussion, which is kind of how Zuma's right now. So some of the features all run to them really quickly as. A teacher can kind of launch live sinement quizzes and tests. Then it can see students complete them. We'll also seeing their desktop few you've to give permission, but we can debate on if that's too much power or not. It can also kind to class or music class, which is good for early learners. Its structure kind of puts the teacher on the left and let's students toggle between different views of the. Friends assignments they're talking about, and then finally it lets students reach out and ask a teacher a question and of do a one on one zoom with them on the side in case there shy and don't want to talk in front of the whole class. So it was a little the big features

Blackboard Co Founder Alex Greg Griffeth Zuma
Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

20 Minute Fitness

05:45 min | 5 d ago

Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

"Guys that's Martin from shape. We're here right now in San Francisco Studio and unconnected to aid today on with the founder of fights cab Saha. Could you why don't you deduce yourself? It'll. Yeah. Awesome. First of all, thanks a lot for receiving me on the PODCAST. Martin. So my name is Lil- I'm the CO founder, CEO Camp and weekly started Fi Kim about a year and a half ago. So. If I is an interactive corn boxing gym, it comes with everything you need to start boxing and actually follow videos that are built by the best trainers of all the west coast they all fighters they all have obviously a tremendous fight expands but they're also great fitness instructor general for the listener on on our show that has never seen. It's what should be should be mentioned punching back and a pair of gloves. So what be? Yes. So it comes with a free standing bag. The best standing back on the market with a pair of didn't win leather gloves made an approved by fighters with a workout Matt, a pair of with be called quick grabs and the special sauce is who? Motion trackers that you put into quick wraps Ma and detract your hands a thousand times per second trek speed and my my punches. How many punches I'm doing per minute of what should I expect? Yes they tracked the type of country throw the measured the speed of the bunches basically build your output profile from one round to the other. What about impact? Not The impact is really the velocity. Okay. The of your hand and which actually throwing and how does like the coaching look like you were mentioning that you have coaches of all over the place and should I imagine like watching them like on my TV or iphone ourselves for me? Yes. So it comes with an APP you can the. Myriad on a large screen TV or you can watch the workouts on an IPAD whatever you prefer, and then from there, it's Kinda like all you can eat buffet. Really. So if you're advanced, you can jump straight into the advanced workouts right away we go and deep into the complex combinations. We'd practice footwork and the workouts very intense. Otherwise, it can literally start at the very first time. You've you're you're throwing your first punch. So we have what we call the prospect where it takes you from zero boxing experience teaches you to six inches and then at the end of the prospect path which. is about a four weeks program you actually know how to six months probably you know how to stand you know the basics Balkan it's mostly regular boxing the offer classes for a time boxing mma Nelson actually were focusing on boxing at the moment but we're having a lot of internal conversations around providing kickboxing as well as a kickboxing in multi, really as a as a an expansion and so so who's like you you're right now is it really like what you just mentioned on the beginners or is it like somebody that's been into boxing all their life or hundred, seventy, four for you Guys. Yeah, it's really seventy five percent beginners, but it's actually very interesting to see like a lot of them are now not beginners anymore So you know we kind of took a bunch of them. You know through the program you get to see videos online and on the social media and they're getting very proper form on have the basics of boxing. Of course, they don't have the in ring experience right visit steely it's a home virtual experience. Yeah. You can't really compete against somebody else right right. So Yeah, you actually can compete but on up put and precision you can't compete on. Actual defense offense. Of course, you're not going to get him. You know and does like a class look like, is it one on one coaching tailored to me or is it like a big class like pedal tone style or yet is really a group class? So it's you'll have usually the video stream will be divided into not that it's divided on the screen per se but vary between having the camera centered on the coach, and then you're getting bureau that is very dynamic. The camera moves around in the class and focuses on the participants taking the class live at our studio in Newport beach. For for me, you know like me having like an iphone like my supposed to put up my iphone like somewhere like on a on a counter, and then look at it while I'm like punching out on my back or how should I mention it? Yeah. That's a very good question like there's not a lot of people use it only with the with the iphone unless they're traveling aren't as they're actually using it in a gym gym or their apartment Jim the vending most people digging each day my cable upload, the Stream directly on on a big screen. TV. Your accent. Yeah. Oh we have a portion of our users. We actually are doing it on the night pat about Apple TV, that works as well Yeah. You can mirror exactly. You can use apple TV to mirror the the stream directly on a big screen TV as well. That's definitely the best experience you're getting very loud sounds and music. You hear the voice really really properly, the nose of the bag doesn't supplant the voice of the trainer lifts. Your stats are displayed very big for you. So like you're really into it, you feel like you're you're being tracked in. Really part of a group experience and it's both IOS and android os mostly s right now. Saying. It's only on ISLA, its and so why are people doing it Do they just WanNa, get a workout and they are not happy with you know like an experience like Peleton or maybe the half a pedal tone and want to supplement it with something else or do they actually want to get into boxing learn those skills forward let's say self defense. Yeah it's interesting. So. Like calm, we have two types of customers. The first type of customers really just will always intrigued boxing They want to do it because it's a work of that Jesse get something out of it even though you would stop working out after a year like you would still acquire the skills and those are self defense skills. You know a lot of people are mystified by you know. How to actually throw a punch and Hudson do properly. So that was one of our customers the other portion of because there is actually coming from the idea that boxing is the best workout to get in shape and the discovered the fundamentals and techniques through fight Cam. So the first reason they joined is for fitness purposes really assuming that boxing is the best workout out there the. Other portion come straight because they want boxing, but they can't attend to have a busy lifestyle. Their young parents hitting the gym is increasingly harder would a busy schedule? so that's the other proposition that they really resonate with and

Boxing Martin San Francisco Founder Apple Newport Beach Instructor Matt Fi Kim Co Founder Hudson Nelson Jesse Ceo Camp JIM
"co founder" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

03:48 min | Last week

"co founder" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"Was summarizing his email. But in essence he had a developer who did some work on it earlier and it didn't work out and basically feels like you know kind of wasted the money early on. So doesn't WanNa make that mistake twice this feels similar to the to the prior to questions where someone has done some validation. Saying I think his questions is a little different. He saying should I find a technical co founder right? Yeah. He's. He's definitely hasn't jumped to the conclusion that he must find a co which I. Actually it sounds like especially since he's already had enough sort of business acumen and skills. To. Developed any has a product that he can bring customers into. So even said, he's already secured thirty customers that want to transfer from the APP they currently use to mind. Awesome do that if you have customers and your APP is going to work for them, then than help them, do the transfer and make them get them starting to pay for it, and then you can start seeing. Okay. Now can I grow this are? There, more customers out there and the downside of course, the doing this, the risks that you're taking is that you you validated with these thirty customers, but that's where it stops. Now I a feeling thirty people who are interested in something is a lot more than a lot of companies start with before going out to actually grow. So that's pretty awesome I. Really think that you ought to try to run with US A. Little Bit, and if you had a developer company that help build the revised version of this APP and it's working, then stick with them like get your customers end, get those thirty customers and maybe try to add on thirty more sixty more one, hundred more or whatever, and then use the money from that to fund further development with this company for a little while longer, it doesn't seem like you need necessarily a technical. Co founder yet because you seem to have a pretty solid base of knowledge and you've already made some mistakes on your own..

co founder developer US
Nikola Founder Resigns as Executive Chairman Amid Fraud Allegations

Techmeme Ride Home

02:21 min | Last week

Nikola Founder Resigns as Executive Chairman Amid Fraud Allegations

"Nikola is one of those electric vehicles startups we discussed recently on a weekend bonus episode it's an electric vehicle startup not named. Tesla remember and Nikola is one of those startups that's also focusing more on trucks. Yeah well, the founder of Nikola Trevor Milton has abruptly resigned as executive chairman of Nikola amid what the Wall Street? Journal. Is Calling fraud allegations quote Nikola, which went public in June through a reverse merger has come under scrutiny. Since Short Seller Hindenburg research released a report earlier this month accusing the company and Mr Milton of making exaggerated claims about the readiness of Nicholas Technology, and how much of it is proprietary doubts about the company's readiness to produce vehicles and questions about its claim to own proprietary technology have prompted US securities regulators and the Justice Department to investigate whether Nikola misled investors. The Wall. Street Journal reported earlier this month citing people familiar with the matter Nikola has called the. report false Mr Milton said in a company statement that he had asked the board to step down. So the focus was on the business not him. He added in a separate statement posted on his twitter account. Early Monday that he intended to defend himself against quote, false allegations levelled against me by outside detractors and quote Mr Milton thirty nine years old founded Nikola twenty. Fifteen and owns nearly one quarter of the Phoenix based companies shares according to fact set he served as chief executive until the company went public at which point he became executive chairman and Mark Russell was appointed as CEO investors have seen Mr Russell as a calming influence over the bullion behavior. Mr. Milton who has frequently vented frustrations and shared ideas via twitter and quote. More. Details I learned about Nikola today while researching this segment GM recently said it would take an eleven percent stake in Nikola in exchange for helping to engineer and build an electric pickup truck called the Badger and Nicholas Stock was down twenty one percent in this morning's trading that nonetheless still gives it a thirteen billion dollar market cap. This just popped up on tech crunch quote news is breaking that Trevor Milton Nikola Co founder, and former executive chairman was arrested by the DOJ FBI at Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix Arizona. This morning this is so far unconfirmed and quote.

Nikola Trevor Milton Executive Chairman Trevor Milton Nikola Co Mr Milton Mr Russell Tesla Founder Twitter Sky Harbor Airport Street Journal Phoenix Fraud Nicholas Technology Mark Russell Nicholas Stock United States Arizona Chief Executive GM Justice Department
How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:41 min | Last week

How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

"This week we've been talking with Bill Gates copy of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is trying to eradicate polio and malaria globally gates created a billion dollar climate investment fund. He has funded multiple factories to find a vaccine for Covid nineteen and the foundation is matchmaking companies around the world to get that vaccine distributed. Gate. Doesn't the position to do all of this because he's one of the world's richest people because he co-founded Microsoft and to be honest that's a little weird. So in part three here I asked Bill Gates how his philanthropy ends up doing. So much of the work of government he said some of it is mission creep take malaria. When we started out, we mostly thought that we would just increase the arm de because. You know for malaria, the people who die which at that time was over a million children a year they don't have enough money to have a voice in the marketplace. So there was no. Science, or willingness to fund on their behalf in a capitalistic system. And there was a little bit of foreign aid but much. So we came in, is the the biggest player in Malaria Ding. At first, I thought our role would just be to create the drugs and the nats. And that we weren't mean to fund the actual delivery side. Because once we have the tools. The uptake would be there in fact, it turned out that. It was much harder to. Have things delivered than we expected. So we were CO founder the Global Fund. Goes after three diseases HIV to Berkeley similar, and we were a founder of this Kavi organization that buys vaccines for the poor countries at the very lowest prices, and so those two institutions which we did in our first two years of existence to learn about delivery so far actually they've probably been the most impactful thing we've done. The R. D. promises to give us some amazing things including the tools that will help ascent malaria and. Make incredible progress on issues but the delivery side I underestimated how hard it was and how we would have to partner up to figure out what kind of axiom would be acceptable. What kind of medical intervention you know even how do you tell people that they really need to sleep under that bed net and that feeds back to the design of the product? Because you're a partner in the delivering, you see what's not working and we thought we could get women to take a daily pill. For, HIV prevention. And the uptake on that very very low, and so now we're working on something that you'd only have to take either a shot or a pill every ninety days because it looks like that would get uptake, but you're driven by the limitations of of uptake, and so that's why we've got to be deeply involved not just in rnd, but also the delivery side at what point do your priorities, the priorities of the foundation end up becoming the priorities for the world, and you've described a sort of a series of unintended consequences that pull you in deeper and deeper to. Ultimately, the work of governments in no case should countries depend on our philanthropy or any other philanthropy to solve a basic need? We can accelerate the RND and so yes, by spending money on malaria supposed to. Some. Fancy. Vacation or something. Yes. The world's resources are going more into malaria now than they did before and those million deaths are now down four, hundred thousand and so yes our values to change what gets funded in this economy and malaria just. was in my view grossly underfunded. You said it was either like it could be either malaria or a luxury. Good. But there's like a lot in between there and do you ever think maybe I. Should Turn My Lens on disinformation or wealth inequality or racism in the United States. Well we spend. We have two big things. We do one of inequity in the US, which is lot about education, and then there's global health I do believe you really have to focus and become expert. We're basically saving a life for less than a thousand dollars per life saved. These miraculous interventions in other fields. People have brackets interventions through the giving pledge. Make sure lots of plant perceived these high impact things some problems. Government's spending way more than plant. Can haven't been able to solve. So mostly flat becomes up with pilots pilots. Of a mentoring program pilots of. How schools could organize a bit differently. So we do a Lotta that but once we've committed to Milorad occasion we're not going to abandon that. Sadly, there's very few fields where you can save millions of lives for small sums of money. Bill Gates is Co Chair of the Gates Foundation.

Malaria Bill Gates Co Founder Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria Ding Gates Foundation Microsoft Global Fund Polio United States Partner Nats Milorad HIV Berkeley Co Chair
Remote Workers are Building Tiny, Gorgeous Backyard Offices

Business Wars Daily

04:19 min | Last week

Remote Workers are Building Tiny, Gorgeous Backyard Offices

"Now, here's a pandemic inspired trend and a business opportunity very few saw coming the backyard office. With the kids and the spouse at home for months, remote workers are struggling with all that new found and occasionally unwanted intimacy so more and more of us are building tiny offices in our yards. are yards that's right and while the smallest of them may be no more than one hundred square feet or so they can be pretty plush while some handy. Do It yourself or designing and building these standalone getaways themselves others are purchasing stylish prefabricated tiny buildings and that's boosting growth for some existing shed companies and sparking some entrepreneurs to start new companies to fill the sudden demand among them modern shed studio shed, and the one with our favorite name. Some elbow. Room I mean for crying out loud elbowroom room right first. Let's get one thing out of the way. The opportunity to build a separate fully electrified heated and air conditioned office in your yard is a privilege that many just don't have for one building an extra room in the yard requires you to have a yard begin with still it's typically far cheaper than adding a room to your house. Those costs can run more than one hundred, thousand dollars at kangaroo. Systems Kangaroo get a prefab builder out of Waco Texas. The cost of their smallest unit called Quick Room starts at five thousand dollars. Modern sheds prices started about ten thousand for a one hundred square foot shed not surprisingly prices begin climbing as customers expand the size and especially the charm of the buildings at a bathroom in your budget expands further that said privacy is obviously valuable these days which accounts for the sales growth prefab shed companies have been experiencing since. The pandemic emerged Mike Caning CEO of Colorado based Studio Shit Tolsey NBC that by May, the company sales had quadrupled over last year. All signs pointed toward that growth accelerating at modern shed sales were up twenty five percent. June as the summer wore on modern shed general manager Tim vaccine interest gauged by download. The company's catalog was up four hundred percent in typical summers. Interest rises about fifty percent. He told USA Today as homeowners consider buying playhouses and garden sheds. This year, you're more likely to put a desk and a couch in your new tiny building than a shovel and a rake unlike sheds of old. These tiny buildings can look like decorators dreams. They arrive prebuilt with fully insulated walls covered with wall, wood, paneling, picture windows, Cedar Shingles and other decorator touches make these miniature houses well worthy of Pinterest and instagram. And while they can be expensive there also a good investment for people considering Resale CNBC says, a Home Office has shot to the top of the must-have list for new home buyers. It's also a lot easier to build separate tiny offices in your yard than it is to add onto your home because of the prefab nature of these products, Mike Caney, the studio shed. CEO told the new. York Times. They've had a building helicopter to a remote in Alaska and even brought up freight elevators in New York. Providing you don't need a helicopter to take delivery of your new office. It can take only weeks to have your new refuge built once delivered, you'll need a crew to install it and hookup electricity and so forth or you'll need to put in some muscle of your own and keep in mind you might need a city permit or at least approval from an Hoa one other piece of advice for entrepreneurs listening this could be a trend worth. Jumping on if you have construction background and access to supplies, designers and labor. That's what Aaron Callaghan. Co Founder, and CEO of some elbow room did with her husband. Patrick. Callahan, she recently started some elbow room in San Antonio there blanketing the area with marketing and expect to make three quarters of a million dollars. This year like modern hsieh studio shed prices started about ten dollars per square foot but back to buying one of these cute little refuges. Whatever you choose get in line, this is a trend that's just starting and it's likely to get bigger fast as we all continue to shed. The High Rise Office for our own twenty foot commute from the kitchen.

CEO Home Office Hsieh Studio Callahan Texas Mike Caney NBC New York Alaska York Times Patrick Cnbc Aaron Callaghan Usa Today General Manager TIM San Antonio Pinterest Colorado
Trends That are Changing AI Hardware and Software - with Marshall Choy of SambaNova

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

04:05 min | Last week

Trends That are Changing AI Hardware and Software - with Marshall Choy of SambaNova

"So Marshall Glad to have you back on with us today, you guys have made some great headway in the last year or so since I had you back on the program and I know today, we want to talk a little bit about trends. You've seen in AI hardware. You guys obviously have finger on the pulse here you raise a lot of money got some of the sharpest focusing industry when you look at what are the trends moving dollars. Moving the smartest technical in this world of AI hardware how do you like identify those are the big ones for you. Thanks for having me on Dan requests. He again, there's a number translator going on in the space day and We've kind of narrowed down on really the three most prevalent trends were seeing to our interactions with customers now in the market and really using our view, these trends kind of inform our internal thinking in our our development processes and so first and foremost. I think you know nobody's probably better qualified to declare this. First friend is our CO founder and chief technologist Kounellis Colton. who was the father of multiple? End. His declarations been the multi processing is kind of reducing in its utility in coming to an end of life as a result of the slowdown things like Moore's Law Dennard scaling. So if you look at a lot of people in the space, they're continuing to build A. Systems processors based on a on a core base approach. As cores themselves become less and less effective, inefficient, just putting more more course together multi courtship minimal ecosystem only fields you in an even more inefficient system, and so what you need is something it's going to be more flexible and more performance than the core approach and so on. This, you know we'll. Just for a second year, Marshall I'm aware that you guys spend a lot of time in the nitty gritty hardware, a lot of our audience they're going to be you know our head of compliance at a bank or head of innovation at our ECOMMERCE. They probably understand you know coors at a very conceptual level like, oh, yeah. Intel has those you know something like that. Yeah. But even for me understanding core and multi-core at a conceptual level defining that, and then I guess contrasting it with with what could be would you mind to finding those churches? The folks at home can kind of imagine this? Yeah, I mean think of it this way right I mean in the past with with. Transactional processing computing core banking taxation like that people assembled systems with many cores were. Had fixed functions and usages for those specific software operators. With machine learning and ai the whole software development and delivery model has changed in acquired a whole different type of computational capability, and what that requires is the ability to have a much more flexible silicon infrastructure to run the applications to effectively provide the software, what it wants needs to do data flow execution operation. So that's really kind of the core difference here. Is really being driven by the software, which is mandating the needs for different types of infrastructure. Why do cores ORC with? Let's say software as it was you know, let's just think of whatever kind of software we want. We want to imagine wise a core suited for kind of traditional it traditional software I. Know You made the contrast with machine learning, but I'd be interested in yeah. Yeah I mean traditional computing is the Very predictable and in in deterministic in nature, it's all about calculating to the degree of accuracy. For example, if you're trying to calculate someone's bank account statement, want that to be you know too many many. Ratchet. As opposed to nation and so with a core approach in a traditional compute approach, you affectively hard code in these functions. Antics of these, you know well known operators that are GonNa be used the software.

Marshall A. Systems Co Founder Coors Intel DAN Moore Kounellis Colton. Chief Technologist
Oracle and TikTok: What You Need to Know About a Deal

The Journal.

03:12 min | Last week

Oracle and TikTok: What You Need to Know About a Deal

"Brad's team broke the news of the Oracle deal and his reporters had lots of questions about it like how much was oracle paying for Tiktok and what exactly was included in the deal They weren't getting a lot of answers neither oracle nor Tiktok have provided details of the deal. How it structured what happens to the algorithms whether any money changes hands all of these are huge issues that have still not yet been resolved as far as we know, it seems like the announcement was made to get ahead of this deadline and say we've decided on Oracle and we're going to work out the rest of the stuff later. We do know some things under the deal tic TACs parent company Bite. Dance would keep a big stake in the APP. And according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin TIC TAC would bring its global headquarters and around twenty thousand jobs to the US but one of the most telling details about the new deal is that neither Tiktok nor Oracle are actually calling it a sail. What would you say it is we're calling it a partnership. Nobody. Really knows, I mean tiktok calling oracle the quote trusted partner as journalists were trying to unpack that but it it seems like it's going to involve oracle. Talks data they're going to provide those services and get big fees for it. and. Does that arrangement address trump's concerns? Previously basically, the trump administration had to take tick talks word for it that it wasn't doing sketchy stuff with this data. Now Oracle's GonNa stand up and say you can take our word for it. One of the things that's striking about this deal at least as we understand it thus far that trump doesn't seem to have gotten two of his major demands he said repeatedly, Tiktok should be sold and that when it was sold the US, treasury would get a sizable payment as a cut of deal. Neither of those are included in the proposal to the US government as we understand it right now. So, will it be enough to satisfy the trump administration's ultimatum? That's the multibillion dollar question we don't know. An answer might be coming soon, a committee led by the Treasury Department that has to assess the deal for national security implications is reviewing it now. The committee will then bring its recommendation to the president. They will look at the proposal and then they will take it the trump and presidents historically do not get involved at all. But this time the President Will Steve Mnuchin the treasury secretary said this week. He will take this deal to trump and that trump will be the ultimate decider when asked yesterday about whether, he'll approve the deal trump didn't show his hand but he praised. co-founder. Decision Pretty. Soon. I have a high respect. Valeria was. Somebody I know he's been really a guy for a long time so we're going to take a look.

Donald Trump Oracle Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuc United States President Trump Treasury Department Tiktok Brad Valeria Steve Mnuchin Partner Co-Founder
What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

TED Talks Daily

05:01 min | Last week

What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

"Hi Hugh Ted Talks Daily today a super cool idea to ensure people have access to the medicines they need to survive and thrive Kia Williams the founder of the nonprofit serum saw both a problem and a solution that exists in the pharmaceutical space and her idea link. The two together should explain in her talk from Ted Twenty twenty. Every day in this country families are forced to make impossible choices when it comes to their healthcare. Like Kimberly who said? There is time I to choose between my food and my pills. It wasn't luxury stuff because I didn't make that much. It was like, can I get shampoo or conditioner? Things you take for granted and Debbie. Who Said you put your medicine in one hand your living costs in the other. Okay. Well, what am I going to do? Am I GONNA get my medicine or am I gonNA pay my bills? Will. I can't live without my medicine but I can't live if I don't pay my bills ten thousand people die every month in this country because they don't take the medicine that they need. More people die from not taking medications than. Overdoses and car accidents combined. But you can't take medicine if you can't afford it. Today the average household spends three thousand dollars a year on medications about a third of folks who are uninsured said that they stopped taking medicine as prescribed because of cost even folks with insurance. If they make under thirty, five, thousand dollars a year half of them report skipping the medications if their insurance doesn't cover it. So there are. Million adults like Kimberly in like Debbie who are forced to make impossible choices every day. We all know that prescription drug prices are too high. In our healthcare system that makes some folks uninsured and other folks underinsured doesn't prioritize people who need access now and need medications. Now, ten million, it's a big number, but it's also a solvable number because there's also ten billion dollars of perfectly good unused medication that goes to waste. So this is an injustice onto sides people not getting the medicine that they need to survive and to thrive. In, that very same medication being sent to a medical waste incinerator to be destroyed this waste is unconscionable, but it also offers an opportunity I started serum a not for profit technology company with my co founders Adam and George. To turn discarded medications into a lifeline, we may not be able to fix all the ways in which our healthcare system is failing us, but we can fix this one. Medications come from manufacturers wholesalers who have safety stock, and when it's short dated, they destroy it. It also comes from healthcare facilities like fiddles pharmacies in nursing homes who end up with surplus when a patient stops taking medication or when they pass away. We can use this untapped source of medications to supply all ten million people who need medications, and we can do this today. Serum get surplus medications by putting recycling bins into the hundreds of facilities that have surplus they fill the been and when the boxes full serum initiates a courier pickup to pick up that medication in we handle the shipping the tracking the manifests in the tax receipt medicine donors want to donate because it's actually cheaper and easier than the highly regulated medicine destruction process. And they're strong tax incentives to actually donate. We then deliver those donated medications to people who needed a new prescription comes in in our platform matches that patient need with the inventory that's available. Our platform then generates a warehouse pick lists. The medications are picked in the prescription spills. We are building the twenty-first-century pharmacy experience that low income families deserve patients can register in under five minutes and have access to over five hundred different medications A. Stable list of medications for everything from heart disease to mental health conditions

Ted Twenty Twenty Kimberly Debbie Hugh Ted Kia Williams Overdoses Founder Adam George
How to Make Your Website Accessible to All

The $100 MBA Show

06:18 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Make Your Website Accessible to All

"Hello My name is Jeff White. And I'm the CO founder of Kula Partners, a marketing and web design, and Development Agency based in Halifax Nova Scotia Canada. We work primarily with BT manufacturers located throughout North America and I'm also the CO host of a podcast called the Kula ring where we interview those manufacturing marketers and learn about their successes and failures and the things that they're most interested are excited about. But today, I'm here to talk to you about how to make your website accessible to all. It's a really important topic and not one that a Lotta people understand or even know. The importance of. But the fact of the matter is. Over thirteen percent of adult Americans have some form of disability with vision and hearing loss being the most prevalent and in this day and age there are actually lawsuits being levied against organizations that do not have. Websites in fact, the same laws that apply to accessible places such as having wheelchair ramps or accessible washrooms the ADA. With disabilities, act applies to the web. So what are we going to talk to you today about how you can structure your site in a way? So that is going to be available and accessible to everyone and I'm GonNa show you exactly what you can do in order to make your site available to all. With thirteen percent of Americans having disability, and the fact that in many beat be sales relationships having eight ten to fourteen. Members of buying committee. There's a very real chance that some of the people that you're trying to sell to actually do have a disability and as such ensuring that your site is available to those people is not only the right thing to do but it also may impact your ability to sell to the companies that you want to sell to. So, let's talk about that. From a foundational perspective. One of the very first things that you need to consider when you're building an accessible website is that your navigation is clear and concise and that it makes sense and adds value to the content on the site. Many. People when they're putting together their information architecture, there's main sitemap navigation? Used general categories such as products services about us, things like that. But those don't really begin to describe what kinds of content you're going to find underneath of them. and. I often urge our clients and others that we work with to use more descriptive language that talks about the actual categories of products at the top level of their site. This ensures that upon first glance or I read through of those navigation categories that someone can actually get more information about what it is that your company does or cells. So I would encourage you to put those key categories into the navigation to ensure that it actually makes additional sense to someone who's breeding it or viewing it for the first time. While it's very important for your navigation to be well-structured and for the link names to be relevant and descriptive of the content that people are going to find behind them. Structuring the page hierarchy of the site is of equal importance. And not only does this help to organize the content within the site, but it also helps to ensure that visitors to the site are able to find where they are in the overall site structure. You need to add signposts, breadcrumbs, and other elements help people exactly what page people are on within the site and what category of content they're looking at it in. This will help them ensure that they know where they are spatially within the site. One of the great things about using semantic. For your navigation is that not only are you going to make it easier to understand in use for all of your site visitors, but it's going to have a positive impact on your on page search as well. So as you're creating this navigation, the second thing that you need to consider is that people with certain disabilities are going to have a hard time navigating the site with traditional tools like track pads and mice, and touch. They're going to be using screen readers and other assistive tools. And they need to be able to move through the site in a way that isn't necessarily the same as what a sighted person would be able to do. So, we like to employ something called keyboard navigation that allows a user to quickly skip past all of the chrome or navigational elements that they can get right to the meat of the site this happened by hitting the tab key and allowing somebody to actually skip directly to the content within the site, and if they choose not to do that, it will actually read to them what the different navigational elements are. So implementing keyboard navigation is one of the quickest things that you can do to actually make your site accessible. If you're looking for a guide to all of the requirements for website accessibility you need look no further than the website content accessibility guidelines or why Cag-. This is a list of all of the available accessibility features and things that need to be built into your site to meet or exceed the accessibility standards. There are currently two core levels that we are concerned about, and that's Aa and. AAA. AAA guidelines actually add additional scope for higher level contrast, as well as devices and considerations for those with cognitive disabilities, not just hearing or sight. And there are two different levels of this. The AA guidelines have less stringent contrast requirements. In. Small text. It's four and a half to one in the triple A. Guidelines looking at a difference of seven to one. So this insures that text that is smaller than eighteen point in Roman or fourteen point in bold has sufficient contrast between the foreground, the background. So as to be legible to those who may not have the ability to see it as clearly as those with regular normal site.

Jeff White North America Kula Partners Halifax Nova Scotia Canada Co Founder Development Agency
Yahoo's Ugly Death

Malicious Life

05:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Yahoo's Ugly Death

"The name is synonymous with a time when all of our lives were simpler when facebook was an actual books full of students faces computers made weird sounds when the connected to the Internet and downloading a one minute long video can take all night. Eddie tight yet who was one of the four or five most popular websites in the world with billions of views, every month and evaluation well, over one hundred, billion dollars. But as the two thousands turned into twenty tens, the web changed massively and your who was faced with the difficult task of changing with it. Their web portal service model was going out of fashion. We all moved to g mail and Google Search, McCain the front page of the Internet. Despite the fact that ask Jeeves was obviously way better. Many of Yahoo's services remained relatively popular, but they were no longer trendsetting no longer growing and the company's market capitalization dropped to a fraction of what it once was any remnant of the mindshare or what we might refer to as v Cultural. Capital they once held fell off. So to those of us on the outside yeah, who's fall seemed utterly quiet gradual and most of all inevitable but was it really Forget what you think. You know at least for a moment and consider this from the peak of the DOT COM bubble. Some say the beginning of the end for Yahoo to two thousand, eight, their revenue increased tenfold that success was no fluke either as print publishers struggled with the incoming revolution of online advertising, Yahu was very much on top of it. They were positioned Willie enough that when Microsoft attempted to buy the company for forty, five, billion dollars in. Two Thousand and eight CO founder and CEO Jerry Yang swiftly rejected the offer it was over the following few years that things would start to ten at the company transitioned through five different CEOS in just four years, and in the meantime Google took over the Internet. This would seem like the end of the story except in two thousand and twelve yen made arguably the most significant tire in its history and new CEO who could finally get things going again. Marissa Mayer. was distant for such a role from the beginning. Some college students have hard time in the job market, but after completing her degree at Stanford, Marissa was offered fourteen different jobs including teaching Gig at Carnegie Mellon One of America's leading engineering schools and consulting role at Mackenzie. Arguably, the world's premier consulting for the Young Maria turned down both those offers to become the twentieth employees at a fledgling startup called Google. At Google, she was star in fact, there's hundred percent chance you've run into her work. She oversaw the design of Google's homepage. You know the one you use probably ten times a day she was also one of the three people behind Google Edwards. It's difficult to overstate the importance of Edwards to the Internet as a whole and to the company itself to give you some sense of it. Though, at one point Edwards provided ninety six percent of Google's entire revenue. In fact, you could argue that Edwards and by proxy Melissa Samaya was at least partly responsible for the fall of. yahoos revenue multiplied tenfold between two thousand and two thousand and eight in no small part because of their online advertising. But he declined even faster when Google they're smaller competitor designed a better wage, you connect advertisers with users based on search results. Edwards. So, by the principle that if you can't beat him, you should join him Yahoo in two thousand and twelve hired Marissa Mayer. It was bald and popular choice. The company's stock rose two percent. The day of the announcement Meyer instantly became an icon for women in an industry dominated by men. Then, she got to work changing the company culture. She opened an online portal for employee complaints a system whereby any office problem given sufficient votes by employees would be automatically investigated by management. She oversaw a personnel shift which brought remote employees back into the company's offices Fortune magazine put her in their forty under forty list and ranked her as the sixteenth most powerful businesswoman on the planet. In short things were finally looking up for Ya. At least from the outside on the inside, however, the really really inside a very different story was about to be reading.

Google Edwards Marissa Mayer Yahoo Facebook Marissa Mayer. Eddie Marissa Jeeves CEO Fortune Magazine Jerry Yang Carnegie Mellon Microsoft Maria Mccain Willie Yahu Co Founder
Ronald "Khalis" Bell, co-founder of Kool & the Gang, dead at 68

Colleen and Bradley

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ronald "Khalis" Bell, co-founder of Kool & the Gang, dead at 68

"Ronald Ronald Police. Bell singer and co founder of the band Cool in the gang passed away yesterday at the age of 68 because of death has not been released and back in 1964 Bell and his brother, Robert Cool Bell, who were just teenagers at the time formed Kool and the Gang in Jersey City, New Jersey. Belle Co wrote the song Celebration among others. So break good. Also get down on it. Jungle Boogie Ladies night and cherish that You're

Robert Cool Bell Ronald Ronald Police Jersey City New Jersey Co Founder Belle Co
Ronald "Khalis" Bell, co-founder of Kool & The Gang, dead at 68

AP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ronald "Khalis" Bell, co-founder of Kool & The Gang, dead at 68

"Man who helped put the cool in the Kool and the gang has died. A publicist for the band says Cools cofounder and singer Ronald Police, Bell dotted his home in the Virgin Islands with his wife at his side. No detail on the cause of his death were released. Kool and the Gang was one of the big recording groups of the 19 seventies with a popular blend of jazz, funk, R and B and pop, and after a brief low, they return to stardom in the 19 eighties. Railroad and composed some of the group's biggest hits, including Celebration Cherish and Jungle. Boogie Bell was 68 years old.

Boogie Bell Kool Virgin Islands Ronald Police
Kool & the Gang co-founder Ronald 'Khalis' Bell dies at 68

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Kool & the Gang co-founder Ronald 'Khalis' Bell dies at 68

"A musician with a popular band has died the man who helped put the cooling the cool and the gang has died a publicist for the bands as cool school founder and singer Ronald police bell died at his home in the Virgin Islands with his wife at his side no details on the cause of his death were released cool and the gang was one of the big recording groups of the nineteen seventies with a popular blend of jazz funk R&B and pop and after a brief lull they returned to stardom in the nineteen eighties the group won a Grammy for its work on the Saturday night fever album they'll road and compose some of the group's biggest hits including celebration cherish and jungle boogie bill was sixty eight years old I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Founder Virgin Islands Grammy Ronald Oscar Wells Gabriel
Ronald 'Khalis' Bell, Kool & the Gang co-founder, dead at 68

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ronald 'Khalis' Bell, Kool & the Gang co-founder, dead at 68

"A cofounder and singer of Kool and the Gang has died at the age of 68. Belle, who also went by his Muslim name police by on died at his home in the U. S. Virgin Islands. That's according to his publicist, who did not release the cause of death. Bell and his brother, Robert, formed the band with their friends from Jersey City in 1964. They went through a number of names before becoming cool in the gang in 1969, Bell wrote. And composed some of the group's biggest hits, including Jungle Boogie Celebration and Summer Madness. The group won a Grammy for their work on the soundtrack for Saturday Night Fever Back in 1978, composer, singer

Bell U. S. Virgin Islands Kool Grammy Belle Jersey City Robert
Black Lives Matter in Honduras

Latino Rebels Radio

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Black Lives Matter in Honduras

"In the case of on Dudas gutty fullness struggle for social justice started long before the coup in two thousand nine. Yet perhaps now, more than ever the illegitimate government has become even more brazen and hostile towards the Honduran community of African descent. So, what's at stake in Honduras? The immediate problem is the kidnapping disappearing in outright murderer of gutty activists and social leaders. The long term problem is the systematic array. Of Garifuna Land Culture and very existence in on us. In addition as is often, the case racism plays a role in state violence. So today's show is out to make it clear their black lives do matter in on Dudas. So whiff on the show today as Gregoria Florida's she is a got food and activist and a CO founder of Gutty community services the. US base in the Bronx New York. She joins us today via skype. Welcome to show Grigoriev Florida's. Thank you so much for having me here. Today is my bless her Oscar could be with you in this. And Lisa great opportunity to me to speak out was really going on in Honduras and especially my community across. Absolutely. It's an honor to have you with us, and there's some immediate things that are happening right now even as we have this conversation in on dudas but before we get to some immediate issues with several gutty phone activists being taken, shall we say by Honduran government officials? Let's begin by explaining to people what is of run For an eighth ow Blackberry Organization in Honduras over Anna's founder because of beggar from the people. Estar. Sophomore in. Cain of that discrimination in the city close to the our community. So offer they work clothes they work with that all reflect community. To, defend and to make sure everybody in the community days enjoying the human rights. And Human Rights is certainly the issue at hand here on this conversation because in recent months has been increased violent possibilities by the Honduran government towards the getty fullness. So I want to the best of your ability if you could. Tell us about the incident that took place on July eighteenth in full delacruz on duress. This is also very historic city or town in under a spaghetti fullness. Correct. EAC. Is One of the forty forty, seven community in Honduras myself funder for one sisters after became often the display from. From The people came first from and. That was a farce espace that people? Does the land after. After that was bringing from San be think. So the after they came to heal and the answer they open the forty-seven community. So why does the across the cruise I'm from? I'm born there for my my parents might. Arrays with my. Sisters and community. Buried Pacific community and the way will come in the community. My aunts my father's tell us at home. Always everybody's coming to Delacour do have to welcome everybody and you have if you have something some food, they provide A. And they need rest from the next day, give the space even the coroner to the person get get rest for the next day to continuing journal. So that's the way our parents. Make us a racing community. So all the time is normal for us to see the Community Fund Anada community that people never for the coming for the city to sell different kinds of. Things and. We have the Pacific living in our community but something happened after the eighty, nineteen, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, nineteen. Ninety nineteen because the. The estar selling, our lance west going on with us because when we request. The. Legal communication about. Our land. That Guerrero Limiting Honduras? They do something. That was nice normal and that was not something they not supposed to do because they increase the land for. Policy and they put our land like a Gary flipper from. Inside the limit of land from municipality that of Taylor. So If that's. Saline, our land. So the organization to develop theories me our community. So that's a time our. Situation, they gained worse on this started the persecution about our leaders in our community.

Honduras Dudas Community Fund Anada Honduran Government Kidnapping United States Taylor Skype Grigoriev Florida Oscar Gary Flipper Gutty Florida SAN Cain Co Founder
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Just you probably just get rid of the people. Just have your best people. They're not managing anybody. The. Other thing I'd say is that you know when you're in the earliest agents like the cost of somebody being bad is super high. Totally Kill Your company. When you're later stage, the cost of somebody being bad is pretty low, if somebody in a role, whatever if they're low performers, who cares? But if one third of your team is a low performer, that's just not going to work right like that just means you're team is low performing so yeah I just be extremely picky you probably the whatever urgency you're feeling around hiring. It's not worth sacrificing for even a B. Plus player in the early days. And that number that like you know grading regimen, whatever it's totally like finger to the air fuzzy, but for the role. You're hiring you WANNA hire somebody who's the best in the world at that role. I will continue my my ran for just one last point which is. Just because somebody says you need to hire, the best person in the world for the role doesn't mean that you need to hire the best person in the world in their discipline, so if you need to hire for example the best. React if you're building a react APP you WanNa hire the best react engineer in the world. That doesn't mean you WanNa hire the guy that works or Gal that works on the react Colonel Ray. Because that person probably doesn't solving problems that you have you wanna find somebody who's the best in the world at the sort of domain that you actually care about you like you necessarily want to hire somebody who is tremendous at writing algorithms. If what you need to do is build, Web APPs. Like their competence in this deep technical domain doesn't help your startup. It might help your ego, but it doesn't help your star and what you really want is somebody who's going to help your start up. How you think about compensation, it was sort of philosophy. Behind. So I thought a ton about this. The way that basically look at it as pre seed. It's basically whatever you can negotiate that person's basic before before you raise any money based prison, basically a co-founder whether you give them. The CO founder title is your decision. Not Mind whatever you negotiate, anything goes. There's no rationality here. Once you've raised some money well. Look at his, you know. If you want a really strong team. You pretty much just straight up. Tell people that they can't be in it for cash like as a seed stage startup if someone comes in, and they're like yeah I need one fifty to start. It's there's just like no way dude..

Colonel Ray engineer co-founder CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

04:02 min | 3 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

"Something, on Rwanda at least I want to walk into a memory that you have of Rwanda because I have never been in Rwanda. And I think a lot of people here so many. Amazing stories of the business ecosystem in wonder. Maybe. If you could. As a closing closing closing I don't know what to call it closing experience four for people listening to you. How! How's your day to day in? Wonder? What is the most? The most amazing either place or thing about wonder that you can share. That has also made your your life as a CO founder. Much more easier or much more enjoyable because you are stationed in in Rwanda maybe something that you can share with us on on what's wonder is like.

Rwanda CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

06:16 min | 3 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"A holiday that marks the end of slavery in America which is why it's been referred to as the true independence. Day I hope all of you were able to honor the day in your own way and reflect on what it represents. I'm so glad you're tuning in because today's episode is incredibly special I know I say that every week, but this week really is. It's with Powell of alleged a pastry chef based in Washington DC and the CO founder of Baker's against racism. The initiative started as simple call to unite bakers in the fight against the unjust treatment of black people in the United States, Paula and her co founders were hoping eighty or so people would join in their bake sale and stead. They sparked a global movement bakers against racism, his ignited solidarity on five continents and seventeen countries, and in forty one states until corona virus devastated the restaurant Industry Paulo was the pastry chef at the critically acclaimed afro-caribbean restaurant, kith and kin, she has creative, charismatic, honest and force to be reckoned with the industry is lucky to have Paula in it, I'm honored to bring you this conversation. So Palo. We're GONNA start at the beginning. I'm telling me where you spent your childhood. So I grew up in the Bronx. In New, York City and every summer for three four months depending on. How my mom felt I would go to the Dominican Republic and lived there. She thought it was really important to make sure that I. Slit my difference Salah I knew my heritage, but also you know experienced the American way of life. And did you stay with family members in the Dominican Republic? Yeah, before everything happened like with my grandmother. Passing away my grandfather fascinating way, we would just stay our family home in the what we call is uncomfortable, and it just means the well. It means camp literally translated, but it just means like the countryside that's where I kind of like learned how to appreciate food, and how to grow my own veg and herbs and appreciate like fresh fruits. You see a lot of that in my desserts. Now I'm so sorry lost your grandparents winter. They pass away. I was young. I was fairly young. You know maybe ten all the so hard. Yeah, it was it was difficult. You know, but my grandmother really with the time that we did have she. impacted my life. Changed. Everything that I thought about you know where before I might have not appreciated food, because when you think about American culture, you think about fast. She kinda like helped me like slow down at a very young age, and really look and see in what the earth against us, and how the world nourishes us from a very very young age I understood the complexities of food, and how we hold our heritage through it. Can you tell us some of the things that she both cooked and grew, she would cook a big meal which consists of rice beans, chickens that we would grow not grow. Her is very traumatic first because they were my pets and then I realized very quickly. The food system was like Oh. You know she would make this huge meal and she would invite everybody in the neighborhood. Everyone that was able to come. If you it didn't matter if you're rich poor, it didn't matter if you're young or old, and we all kind of sit in the front yard in the backyard and eat from my grandmother's food and she had that meal in Cup of Coffee Ready. Ready in the middle of the day for everybody always matter what was going on and our lives. She had that ready, and that's something that we as a family now when we go to the Dominican Republic, we continue as a tradition, so everybody knows our family to be hosts, so it's very fitting that now I work in the hospitality industry. Did Your Grandmother Specialty. Yes, so she would make coconut rice with peace so much Guan Lula cocoa and it was cooked in the woodfire. We had like a house that was open open air that they had bricks that you put your woodfire in, and that's how she would cook. Everything was cooked, by Soviet, Elena, which means over fire while all of my experience in the Dominican Republic I didn't know what stove was in the Dominican Republic. My my brain never made that connection that you could have. A gas stove. 'cause we always use what fire so. How about some of the things that that she would grow you mentioned fruits. You mentioned herbs. What were some of the things in her garden? Her. Garden consisted of this plot of land in front of our house, and behind our house, and we call it in cal-, and cal means the Cacao trees, and it was just rows and rows and rows, and rows of of wild ca cal that would naturally in our backyard laced in between were mango trees, tamarind avocado plantations right next to our house in our well of rain water was guava and passion fruit, which I always like to say whatever fruits like. Like to grow together will always taste good together. We had herbs in the back in the shaded area. Where is anything that you can think of shot? They CILANTRO or no Kulan. Throw and more we had for me. We had lemongrass growing by the side of the House and I would drink that tea, and it would be a natural mosquito repellent so pretty nice, you know. Oh, my Gosh! I'm starting to get the impression that it's no surprise. You became a chef. I I think so? I mean it was a good fit i. feel like I was the only one in my family. That kind of took that same sentiment of food, and being connected with nature like that like my grandmother did and turned it into a way to give back to the community, so I've always been using food. As a way to connect with other people because I'm very shy I don't make like a great first impression is very awkward at first I'm like. Oh, I'm sorry you had to go through that with me. You know, but with food I can show you who I am without.

Dominican Republic Paula CO founder Palo United States Industry Paulo America Washington Powell Salah Guan Lula Baker York City Elena
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

07:46 min | 4 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Take your personal experience in in arbitrage of personal experience. Okay go ahead Eric. If you wrote this today besides the every quicker would it be meaningfully? Different not really. I think I think some of the things have been sped up. Because you know you you. Can Incorporate online stripe is there? No Code is there. I'd probably advised not and and online services much more right because you can get pretty far that I might also say that you know and this is the third model. At which is you might serve the community. So there's idea there's executioners community right so you know nowadays on I've got a following on my twitter removes or what have you and the interaction of them is sort of like you know person community Fit Right. And then that community you can withdraw. A protocol can withdraw a product and so forth. And that's something. I was just less thinking about back in twenty thirteen today but that might be third angle on things you know to take a community. I approach and how about the Kobe requests for startups or anti replacement startups. This shea. Talking about I. What is this graph? This is the Telegraph of thousand days in the life of Thanksgiving Turkey. Life improves improves improves. And then a ridiculous sudden reversal. Okay and we're seeing Thanksgiving Day charts across the economy and where the rubber is orange. Okay and look at that ridiculous Thanksgiving giving day drop and breach by the way has risen dramatically right so uber is now essentially just breeds their second. Business has become their first. That's literally their business. Okay now the thing about this is a reversal business. Plan for you know like fortunately for over it. At least the corporation they can. Disengage drivers when demand plummets. Like those but But that's like a you know ridiculous. Drop right like seventy percent drop revenue. However here's the thing. Notice how we dropped but not breeds one of things. I was short on Uber. Benatti reads is pretty good. It's pretty specific prediction in terms of what to be long insured on. And frankly you know. I never talk about trades online because that's investing Advice River Bellizzi. That if you had reallocated full you listen to me around the time you would have done pretty well right so like for example. X Rays drones antivirals. Cat Scans Autonomy Diagnostics. Facemasks remote were Tele presence bioinformatics at that holds up. One of those were in drones. Me Put an asterisk on simply because there's such supply chain disruption demand me there have been not not the supply we'll have to see. You can make VR headsets in the US but everything else is clearly going especially like Mike. Remote workshops zoom and stuff and then on the short side of things. I think that holds up pretty well as well traveled tender grinder hotels AIRBNB airlines in person. You know blue cities come back it up. Real estate is crashing commercial real estate and blue cities restaurants conferences digital nomads. In the sense of moving around the world. You can't do that anymore. Remember Berates so I think that holds a pretty darn well right and I think that's like let's call it a part of the comp investing thesis if you remember this concept of the digital divide this is the thing in the late Ninety S O. Some people have access to Internet others. Don't right so April seventh. This concept which I think is one mental model. The fiscal divide bright digital is now cheap with billions of smartphones around the world. It's a physical. That's expensive case for last two years. We've made the cost of putting a bunch of transistors on a chip that that's now cheap but putting a bunch of people in rooms now expensive okay so the measure of a competent society is one that can actually hold a rally if you can do that you are. You're confident in the people. There are confident of the steam and the diagnostics. And so on that you know you can have this huge crowd that it's being tested to them into their life and they all come and congregate there right. I from incompetence state and for citizenry. That is not cooperatives. The Commons are attracting. And you can't basically there's a field state in between your house in the next person's House. You have to wear masks you you know you basically house a like like a place where you can't show your face you know. Maybe it's pollution meets infection. It's not the comments aren't actually traversable. So I think this is a powerful mental model for the next several years at least that physical is expensive and one thing that means by the way is digital now cheap physicals now expensive so everybody is GonNa want offer substitute for things because you know Sadler tweet. By the way that I was really surprised. People wild doubt about the I one more question for you which is a CO founders. Are we sort of in the picking co-founder similar to sort of dating before that you're limited to the people that you went to college with or worked with or is that for Co founder? Is that actually good? She's should you stick to that pool. How do you think what's your framework for picking the Right Co founder? Yeah know so so like the way I kind of think about this is having and being like an investor and having seen like lots of these things and whatnot so you should pick somebody who who's is complementary to you okay and there should always be clear. Ceo that's like the most important component the thing about that is like the question of WHO's the CEO. That's like one of the very first conversations you need to have and ideally. It's something where that's obvious between between you but if it's not a for example at the beginning of joint base itself public knowledge but you know Brian and the Guy who helped found blocking didn't so they had a screaming. Send you know what they were outright and basically blocks company and Mrs Good Company. That type of stuff shouldn't be resolved. There's also an ideological dispute watching to be able to have a wallet where they couldn't have the password password reset four the road actually very substantive. It's two different visions of the future. Both of which trinite illegitimate visions of Crypto? Right true product. Difference on on simple thing pastor reset so so that's that's like a good example of a few things. I who's the leader Second Woods A LONG-TERM IDEOLOGICAL VISION THIRD OUR SKILLS COMPLIMENTARY? I do not do these. Co-founder dating sites or whatever. Kids these days you know like I don't know I don't know if that works. I feel some could work but it feels inorganic. Maybe you know I think the best thing to do is to actually work on a project with that person and find that there's an actual division of labor nothing substitutes for that because working with somebody is just very very different from talking to them on. It's like they have to cash the past when you throw it into it. What you meant not necessarily what you said. Lots and lots of little things like that have to tolerate your using 'cause nobody's ever heard strong and every dimension or some people are few and so I think actually doing and shipping project. Ideally one involves money and customer support with them like is is probably the best bet naked or something like that but try to push it all the way through such that book that you have legal liability together or or customers yelling you. That's real trial by fire. Balji thank you so much for coming on give a digital rotten for her volatility. If you're an early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you check us out. Village Global Davi seat..

Co founder Ceo twitter Eric Advice River Bellizzi US Kobe AIRBNB Benatti Mrs Good Company co-founder Sadler Co-founder
"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

The John Roa Show

02:45 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

"This is one of the first major cancellations in America in a major shock to both attendees and the city of Austin, Texas. Canceling south by is more than just calling off a massive event or party. The festival was intertwined with the financial and personal livelihoods of ton of people global. South by two people got record deals where movies were picked up for distribution. Tons of money was raised for startups. Ideas were shared. It's even where twitter. South southbound was also a boon for hundreds and hundreds of Austin based businesses to sustain throughout the year to the tune of almost four hundred million dollars in revenue for the city. Canceling, the event is and will be devastating. To Austin The impacts everyone. The bars, restaurants hotels taxis the performers, free and everyone else in between. The CO founders of south by southwest music producer Roland Swenson writers makeup borrow and Lewis Black. Promoter Louis J Myers started the festival way back in nineteen, eighty, seven to promote and foster local talent. Now, the fate of south life hangs in the balance as does. The festival had to lay off a third of its staff after the cancellation. And fans rightfully called for refunds. South by didn't even have an insurance policy to cover the fallout. And then things went from bad to worse. More than one hundred and sixty thousand would be. Attendees aren't going to get a refund. Instead, it was announced that the badge purchasers for this season. Can. Defer their purchase to. The festival next you. Founder Louis Black, although he's not involved to day-to-day operation to the festival any longer. Says the news of the cancellation still devastated. He's weathered a Lotta stores. Pandemic something entirely different in south by not even the only project he's co-founded. That's taken a hit. Lewis is also the CO founder of the All weekly Austin Chronicle which has taken its fair share financial punches, but is still hanging in there. Somehow. Louis always manages to get back in the game. In two thousand fifteen, even start his own production company Lewis Black productions. Joins me on today's episode from an Airbnb in the small town of Lockhart Texas. To talk about south buys cancelation his retirement in the profound and often unpredictable ways. He helped to transform.

Austin Louis Black Promoter Louis J Myers America CO founder Lewis Black Austin Chronicle Texas twitter Lewis Roland Swenson Lockhart Texas Airbnb Founder producer
"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"To build a mailing envelope. No we're going to buy a gift greeting card and blow. Oh let's go find DVD. Oh I see these close enough And that is. The skill is finding a proxy. Which allows you to begin learning about the world and your ideas your ideas place in it. It does not need to be repeatable or scalable at first at this an organ specific example. If I have time you're really briefly. Yeah so women. Women came to me At at an idea she goes he cool if we could do peer to peer clothing. Rental were basically. I know I have always clothing in my closet and I think I would want to rent that and I could rent. There's and she goes I'm Anita Mesa money and how do I find a co-founder? How do I build my initial APP? And I go. Whoa WHOA. Whoa whoa let's begin seeing some. Let's collide this idea with reality. Go get a piece of paper get a sharpy right on the piece of paper. WanNa borrow my clothes. Knock and pasted on your door right and let's see what happens. Let's see first of all anyone knocks if they do. Let's see what happens when they're looking for your clothes. Is there a fit problem? Is there a taste problem? Let's see if they do bar. You're close. Let's see how you feel when they come back stained or dirty or what you have to do to get them repaired or how you feel about this. Let's begin learning by doing nothing more than writing on a piece of paper with a Sharpie. You can't run a business like this but that's not what you're doing now you're trying to understand. Is this idea real? And she did that and little by little by little. She accumulated evidence about this problem and ways to solve it and so yes six months later when she was going to raise money and someone said how do I know this ideas. A good one. She could talk your ear off about the evidence. She had what people would pay. How long the rentals were how much you'd have to do for cleaning. What percentage And Wow that's the person you WanNa follow you back in invest in. Yeah it sounds like Renaissance Wag. Actually sounds bad. Exact business model but Is that she ever yes. It's a smaller business. Because she's still in school but she is moving ahead and she's moving ahead based on finding a way to. I caught validation hacking away to validate or idea without actually a doing it. For Real Right. I only have like a single story. That is almost a little different. But a friend of OUR EX GIRLFRIEND OF MINE. Her Dad wanted to start a business where he sold a MO mobility scooters and all he did was get business cards printed. He had no had no shop. He had no product. He had nothing he had a little bit. You know he knew you. He used to sell them in the past for a bigger company. Just got business. Cards and went door to door does not under the door until he had enough business where he could take fifty percent deposit and go actually by the scooter. And then he would do all the The the repairs themselves until we hire somebody. It's just everything was just started with a business card. I love that story because it is another entrepreneur. I know he he had an idea. Use at a party is eleven o'clock at night raining and they ran out of beer and all began arguing about who is turn. It has gotten find the beer. The usual Millennial problem Yeah the idea is cutting while ago because basically my phone knows where I am at knows. My taste has my credit card database. Open liquor stores great idea but same thing as your friend rather than saying. I'm going to raise money. I'm GONNA find a technical co founder going to build an APP going to test this. He just had business cards printed up. That said need beer. Call me with a cell phone number eight stand outside apartments on weekends and.

Anita Mesa co-founder co founder
"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

Building A Unicorn

02:42 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

"Your clients. Montana is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer of Quinoa an online platform that allows you to easily create the business documents you need and then send them to your client as individual websites including dynamic pricing information and the ability to sign and accept that proposal. Right there on the web. The core idea behind cua is that Files suck at the way that the documents work in this. This world is sort of based on this like nineteen eighties way of thinking about the documents atmosphere being largely kept in place by the glorious Microsoft Monopoly And so all queries is a way for anyone to create. They had documents especially sort of customer facing documents as Web Pages. And so if you can re imagine a document on the ground As you know what you can do in the web and not have to be in this four rectangle hyper. What can you do you know? Why can't you have analytics? Like buttons? Do things why can't you haven't lived in this world of of SAS in the cloud where it can push and pull data from different systems rather than just being a dominant ugly file. Mock grew up in Sydney and throughout his childhood was surrounded by entrepreneurs. His Dad ran his own architectural business which he grew to around sixty or seventy staff and his uncle also had a number of startups. Mock went to school at Sydney Grandma and low. He was a good student. He couldn't see himself for showing the same kinds of career opportunities that his friends were interested in he wanted to carve his own path. Although he wasn't quite sure what that path would actually be. There was no like plan. There was no like I said. Look back on it like some people have these amazing narrative ox of their their life and their career. And I'm deeply skeptical because I think that really life happens and you. I think people who are very good at adjusting knowing Knowing where on paternity lies and able to dive into it. Sort of an opportunistic in that side. I think I think that sort of rings true to me and certainly I remember being at the end of highschool being like I feel have plan and I kind of really didn't have at university mock studied subjects. He was interested in. He did history and philosophy and also became interested in student politics but he thought maybe he wanted to issue. I curry in business. But it wasn't quite sure what that actually meant so when he's caused finished any trying to work out what to do. He ended up getting some work with his uncle on an e book. Stop cold read how you want. But.

Mock Sydney Chief Operating Officer of Qui Montana Microsoft cua CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

02:12 min | 7 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"Say was interesting. That's when we found the wizard the is Diana Ruth. He was a coo co-founder but she creates all the products. She has an amazing background hard. Candy Bliss. Cosmetics was William Fung for a long time but she is just a creative genius and she will never ever create anything that already exists. She's all about innovation stories. Great Components Ray so we we joined forces with her by then. I remember her first meeting with us. We're all around the table going because we had a lot of. I did get a lot of passion like Rosie. Jody and I kind of just sat there staring at the three. I was going. Oh my God. This is going to be so interesting. She managed to take all this. This energy these ideas these thoughts and make them into tangible products I really think the interesting part of the packaging that sort of push pop idea with clear sight milk. It's very it's a very modern fawn. Yeah exactly it's very transparent as we are as a brand and everything about it. I always lean into the idea. That's for utilitarian so we have sticks. We have dispenses with rolling balls. We have click pens. Everything is extremely easy to use on the go as well because we originally always had the milk goals get ready quick We have so many things going on. They creative ambitious very fast. Paced lives the girl and the guy and we wanted to create something align that they could use very quickly in the back of a cab changed their look five minutes down town and something that you know worked really hard but was kind of Felicita on kind of rewrite. All those. The things that were contradiction terms. We wanted to rewrite. Why can't you get ready? Quick but still have really great payoff. Why can't you have cool products? That are actually still clean. They can still be extremely low maintenance but yeah a high tech.

Candy Bliss Diana Ruth co-founder William Fung Jody coo Cosmetics
"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

13:29 min | 7 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Of girl boss. And you're listening to girl boss radio. Everybody's you know game is on point these days and I know I'm not the only person who loves to see crazy now are on instagram. Whichever way you spin it. The nail game is a pretty big industry but if we go back a few decades time well no Polish used to just be nail Polish. It was bland. There was a thing you grabbed at the drugstore on a whim. Or maybe you got a fresh manicure. You weren't really paying for the brand on the bottle that all changed with a little company called. Opie I yes that OPIE I. It's the go-to Nail Polish for a lot of us in on today's show we're going to hear from the CO founder and Brandon Basseterre for opie. I her name is suzy. Weiss Fishman and. She's known as the First Lady of meals. She actually co-founded Opie I with her brother-in-law and it started out as a dental products..

Weiss Fishman Brandon Basseterre CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:58 min | 8 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"This CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD. AMERITRADE investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD Ameritrade our trade offers two different mobile APPs there's TD AMERITRADE mobile. Which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined? Simplicity or thinker. Swim Mobile. which gives you tools as you need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one? That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE AMERITRADE dot com slash APPs member SIPC bring in show musically. This is squawk Fahd the daily sleep podcast brought to you by the team behind squawk box. CNBC's essential morning chef worked every day. Get the best stories debate and analysis analysis from the biggest names in business and politics today on Squawk Todd. Joe Becky. Andrew are at the World Economic Forum with the planet's the most influential leaders in business and politics. We've got a huge lineup. This week. This is Are Super Bowl for the world of politics and business a roundup of the best sound bound from CNBC's interviews with the CEO's of Verizon Bank of America and steady plus the leaders of some of the best known and largest asset managers and hedge hedge funds in the world and an interview with author investor and Philanthropist David Rubenstein Co founder of one of the world's premier private equity woody firms. The Carlyle Group right. Now I don't see any prospect of a recession in two thousand twenty so pretty good the best of the World Economic Forum Day One plus some behind the sounds from Joe and Becky. We're double Switzerland. The Beautiful Alps beautiful behind us to bed. You guys can see it. I'M CNBC ABC producer. Cameron Kosta it's Tuesday. January twenty first twenty twenty squawk pod begins right now three one. Good morning everybody. Welcome to walk on. CNBC we are live from the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. I'm becky quick along with Joe. Kernan and Andrew Ross Sorkin the World Economic Forum is exactly that an Economic Forum Michael Corbett the CEO of city spoke to Joe Backing Andrew about the trajectory of the global economy. When you look at the growth prognostications coming up while we're here three point three percent global growth down from three point four four prediction but up from two point nine for the year right? So that's that's not horrible if you get some of these clouds to clear. I think they're still runway left here of course at a conference this size with this caliber of attendees there's a diversity of perspective and of advice. Ray dallaglio billionaire founder of bridgewater ladder at the world's largest hedge fund shared some of his firm's investment strategy issue is. You can't jump into cash. Cash is trash. Okay you have to have a well diversified portfolio and first of all you have to be global and you have to have ballots. Think that you have to have a certain amount of gold in your portfolio portfolio or you have to have something tarred another theme today and probably all week trade between the two biggest economies in the world the US and China Steve Schwarzman founder and CEO of Blackstone Group has a long history of business investments in China and was in the room for the phase one signing literally. He's he's competent. That fees to as at least a priority for both parties involved. It's in China's interest as well as the US interest to do a face to deal. Most of the tariffs were not rolled back in this phase. One so there's a lot of incentive if you will to get to face to and They're they're quite serious about that in China all your on Squawk box and certainly as long as we've been delivering use pod guests have been debating capitalism And that theme is no different at Davos. Twenty twenty on the broadcast this morning. Billionaire Hedge Fund manager Paul Tudor Jones. A legendary investor kept corporate responsibility. What's ability at the center of his conversation? We know what's happening right now. As causing millennials not to believe in the system. We know that there's a threat to free markets. I'd much rather see us. change the sharing agreements organically bottoms up where. CEO's put employees. I put with the planet in communities and customers on par with shareholders also calling for corporate. Responsibility was Brian Moynihan CEO Bank of America. He's he's also the chairman of the International Business Council an advisory body to the World Economic Forum itself but of all the companies apartment job is commit the carbon neutrality. That will help drive. I the demand for alternative energies at the power companies need to get them carbon neutral and the final theme today new tech the CEO of Verizon Hans. Berg says five G. is way closer on the horizon than some other things. What comes first? I get a five d phone where I fly on a seven thirty seven. Max We there without five G. You're getting the best of our Davos coverage right here on squawk pot coming up will be investor. Author journalist Philanthropist and Co founder of the Carlyle Group. David Rubenstein if I knew how to solve income inequality I'd be in Iowa. I do think she companies that worry about more than just shareholder return of probably the companies that are going to get more people buying their stocks in the end. And they're probably going to do better. Plus Katie. Kramer is onset in the Swiss Alps with the anchors. Ready by Beck apply Rubinstein's interview and in some behind the scenes of Davos.

CNBC CEO Joe Becky Davos Joe Backing Andrew Carlyle Group David Rubenstein Co China founder Joe founder and CEO Davos Switzerland US Switzerland Beautiful Alps Co founder Hedge Fund Swiss Alps Cameron Kosta
"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

13:12 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Don't get caught up in this perfect thing the test everything try something and fail at it because the failure is learning moment ladies and gentlemen welcome back to short story long first and foremost it is live event time. I'm doing doing the next young reckless live event on October twelfth. Picture live all day live short story long podcast with all my favorite people that have ever been on the show and some who haven't doing keynotes. QNA's panels all of the above. If you want to come just go to events dot young and reckless dot com. Get your tickets also. I'll put the link in the description of the episode. come check us out. I think you'll really really like like I think we did one back in May it was incredible. five hundred people showed up it was sold out and everyone left really positive and there was a really cool energy not in the room of just people there to learn and share ideas and I was really proud of it so this is round two and I couldn't be more excited. Today's guest is Marc. Mark Randolph Mark Grand off is the CO founder and was the CEO of Net flicks and as you can imagine you has a lot of good stories we ran through how Netflix how he even got to the position of when he started Netflix and how Netflix was created and where he was with Reed Hastings the other CO founder when they came up with the idea and decided to go for it that as well as all the challenges of running a company of that size size and trying to scale it and trying to just completely disrupt the entire industry. You guys are GonNa. Absolutely love this episode. Mark has a new book coming out called that will never work with a lot of really good stuff in a lot of good information and a lot of the stories more on the stories that we talk about here on the podcast if you like it if you like any of these episodes share it tell your friends posted on instagram hit me up on Instagram at drama. Let me know you think semi. Dm Tag me in your stories. Literally anything works. I'm reposting and communicating with you guys all day long. Keep that coming. I can't thank you enough. That's it. Let's get into the episode Short Story Long. It could take your whole life develop clarity second patients patients probably whatever you think you don't have you have something else in his the short story mark welcome to the pod. Oh It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so excited. I'm excited because because you know I have a lot of entrepreneurs founders CEOS on this show and some from a lot of well known companies but I think the moment I I kind of saw your stuff and started reading your stuff and saw that you were a co founder and CEO for a little bit of net flicks. It was obviously Lisa like well. This is another level and it may not feel that way to you van to me it does and the way the reason I liked that is because I really like I really live in the world of kind of these. We started up a Lotta apparel businesses and online marketing and stuff like that but I just feel like the things I can learn from someone who has kicked off something on that level. are probably endless and I'm really excited to try to get as much out of you. That can hear well. I mean that's kind of what I mean. The book in many ways is about that untold story Ori because everyone thinks it started out as one hundred and fifty million subscriber screaming giant but for years we were just a DVD by mail company for years. We could could make it work. Yeah I mean I was telling you earlier. I came into the into the building here and like all of a sudden. I got that vibe like Oh my God. This is start feels like a startup and for many years that's what Netflix felt like and that's the part you love. You love that started up energy yeah you know. I sometimes say that. If you're really lucky you kind of figure out two things about yourself like what you're good at and what you like and if you're really lucky you actually get to do you both those things yeah and I kind of figured out. It's early stage companies and it's not just that I like it. I suck at the companies. Get Big. It's I don't know how people do that. How do you manage like thousand people. Just I totally different game. I'm so happy to hear you say that because like I was telling you before before we started recording. I have always just sort of instinctually avoided letting my business get to corporate. I love that startup feeling and even recently the past few years. I've really tried to make sure that you know I'm covering the right basis. Still the right infrastructure is in place and the right you know talent is where it needs to be but I just. I don't know there's something about it the. I've never felt like I wanted to to try to get it to that place. I've I walked into a lot of these massive clothing companies and it just doesn't look fun anymore so to hear you say that makes me feel really feels like I was right. You were so uh-huh on target in fact I'll give you the advice is don't ever start making things more efficient. That is what kills companies real. Temptations -tations are going to be there. I mean you're going to go. Wow you've had this nice stability. We're growing ninety. percent of my orders are coming in a certain way and you're going to start hiring people who are real experts at efficiency agency because we can help. You cut a few points of margin. We can help you ship a little fee. They're really good at that efficiency stuff but the people who are really good at efficiency Z are clueless when all of a sudden your world changes and your world's going to change everyone's world changes yeah and so what you WanNa do is build this culture in this environment fool of people who are really adaptable who are Jacksonville trades who are comfortable with making decisions based on incomplete incomplete information because then when your world's suddenly shifts those are the people who can then okay and they shift in on it again. Yeah that's funny. Would you say that the main reason we all know the story three of these big corporate companies that can't pivot or make a move. Would you say that's because they're built around efficiency of of what used to work unquestionably and if it's a combination of things six that's what gets him into trouble. Is They go wow this is nice for years and years were doing the same sort of thing growing nice and steadily we have this nice to stage age distribution resell to wholesalers celery and so they hire these sales people who are really good at that and the warehouse there are people who are really good at that and then all of a sudden someone comes along who says screw this multi-stage stuff. I'M GONNA sell straight to consumers so and they can't do it. That's part one is that they can't do it but the the worst part is. They're scared to do it yeah because they go. I can't sell direct because my distributors Poke Hilmi and right. Now distributors are ninety five percent of my business business. So you get stuck me it is. I do a lot of I told you before I did a lot. I do some you know speech a speech sometimes and usually by half half the clients. I'd say or big companies who are scared shitless what's happening and the executive see they see it coming and they're trying to rally the people. You've got to be flexible. We've got to be innovative and so I go in and try and rally the troops whatever you can do in an hour so there's that piece and then the rest of my time I am. I'm working with the early startups helping them take down these big companies so it's this form of job security yeah. That's true either way it goes. That's good good stuff with what's interesting. Though is the best way to learn is to be on both sides. I'm sure yeah I'm sure that's amazing because to me now and you had a history and clothing. We'll talk about that but I I see what's happening with you know macy's and Barney's and all of these retailers that were just staples like you never I thought they would ever go anywhere and people are closed indoors and go and bankrupt and do and it's just like at this point this late in the game because you know we've been talking about retail apocalypse for five for six years. I just sit there and I watch and I'm like how are you not doing anything. How are you not like you know what I mean like. How is your literally. Your ship is sinking and you're not ah you know but that makes perfect sense so deeply set up to act one way that it's so hard to pivot. Here's a classic one so take supermarkets okay I so free really frustrating business for a consumer long lines and all that crap and supermarkets have seen what's going on ECOMMERCE and they're going out. That's that is not a threat. No no way no one can replace selling fresh vegetables and having milk and doing what we do and they just and then someone looked at it and said this is crazy having this checkout. Why can't you just go take stuff off the shelves and walk out and was the innovator who came up with that. Safeway or a Kroger knows was Amazon. I mean the fact that they left that open open for twenty years on them. You know so let me ask you to like I mean I just got right into advice part but if you are one of those guys or you you are even a medium or small sized guy that just has your you know your thing figured out and you have a really good thing going. What do you do like do you have. Do you have a department in the back office. That's constantly only trying to figure out how to disrupt your own business or what. Do you do to avoid that happening so I mean I understand. You know large. Your audience is probably not these big companies but all dispense the big company advice right now. Lease problem is you can't do it. Internally people go I want set up skunkworks and all set up a few people in an office Jason and that might work temporarily but as soon as they try and bring that out into the open the immune system is triggered and the white blood cells come swarming and then every department department in this big company kills the start up the only way to do it is to have it happen separately and so the way you really should do it and this is my opinion is as you basically set up a seed fund big company you invest in las a small startups not so that you can own them in certainly not so you can make money but you have a seat at the table big ten to see what they're working on. You get to understand the future. Eventually you can participate and perhaps them. It's really really really really hard because here's what happens in my world I have you know essentially small business and game example of something that happened. We came up using athletes artists and all that stuff to promote our business all of a sudden this thing started happening that we're social media influencers and so we're like okay well. Let's send him a bunch of clothes and we'll I don't know let's just having where a close on Youtube and so we did that but one thing that happened I will admit out from under me that that I didn't spot was it became so easy to make t shirts and so easy to start a shop store and so easy to start a website that now you have I mean there are some youtubers I doing ten million dollars plus a year in Merch and all of that is my business going somewhere else and that's something I could have spotted and I could have had ten indifferent merch lines or these things or whatever and and I didn't spot it and that's a big one where it where it happened for me. You know what I mean but at least you're watching it and seeing it. You're not gonNA catch everything but you're but that was a pretty fast despise us and I can predict what's going to happen. Next of course is right now. The U you too and INSTA- and face we're going to go. Why is this schmuck making ten million bucks a year emerge on our platform and it's GonNa be taken away from them. What do they do about that though they stopped distributing things like how many likes you have. They stopped letting people know what your followership is. I mean they have it. It's a dance because you don't WanNa driveway the people who are building building your platform but absolutely instagram for example and that's what I'm speaking totally off the cuff here. I don't work in-store Server. you know of this is just not stable environment for a company to keep on saying. This is a great deal. We're we're letting leading the influence your make all the money so then it goes back to obviously they want people to spend money to advertise not get it for free so it'll go back to the companies that are advertising on the platform. We'll we'll get the absolutely right so you know you can wear the shorts on the on the on the youtube if you want but the person who's GonNa make the money is instagram advertising whatever they want on the platform good stuff or so. It looks anyway. It's not so much exactly work because quite frankly as I say in the book. Nobody knows anything and electric. He's going back to the very first thing we said is..

Netflix instagram Mark Randolph Youtube CEO CO founder QNA Marc WanNa Reed Hastings Ori macy Lisa Jacksonville Safeway Poke Hilmi INSTA co founder Amazon executive
"co founder" Discussed on OFF RCRD

OFF RCRD

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on OFF RCRD

"Anyone anyone to find that talented student in your dorm you want to build something with you can just do that and so. I think looking where you don't need permission and building their first is going to make you far more attractive two mentors in the future great advice. I'd love to talk about the open door story and how you got connected to co-founders. How did you meet. How'd you get connected two or three or four CO founders? He has three other founders so I was rabbe. WHO's now a general partner at Khosla ventures former CEO of square one of the pay tall mafia keith and I met at a square party at Red Door Coffee Celebrating squares? I were at a million dollars in sales in the platform and if you look at what they're doing today it's almost it's pretty funny to think how small they were then maybe thirty forty people and we got into an argument during this party. I newly was from twitter at the time and we third arguing about fraud loss rates and I was just convinced that they were GonNa make the same mistakes. They made a pay pal where the cared too much about fraud in solving the problem at the expense of customer experience. I don't remember the exact position each of us had but at the end of it he tried to hire me to run the risk team which I thought was funny because I knew almost nothing about risks and certainly nothing about Credit Arctic cards. I just had a passion for the customer experience around it because I decided I was totally unqualified. I said no we ended up becoming good friends and arguing about startups for a few more years and a lot of that time was spent talking about real estate why real estate was broken and what could be done about it and through that he had this idea for a long time called home run where you would go to the site you enter your address and you'd say what you're willing to sell your own four and decided to say yes or no and I I didn't think that was a great idea but I thought had the nugget of a really good idea. Took Keith is telling people about this time eventually connected me and Eric are CEO he had started a company that sold Trulia. He had run a fifty to one hundred home portfolio okay since he was eighteen years old founder market sit with sort of off the charts so we really clicked. I respected how he thought about customers really respected how about customer development and the reason reasoning mentioned. Keep trying to hire me for this risk. Job Is Fourth Co founder Ian Wong who ends up taking that job is leading risk at square and we pulled him out of a out of another small start up to start this company together other so I'd like to ask. How did you buy your first home. How did you know there's demand for this product. was there anything that you did early on to kind of assess the demand for open door yeah. You know it's really funny. I don't think we've told the story publicly before. Selling a home is a really important in emotional moment. If you've never done it before we really did not want to mess it up before before we really launched or even raise any money and did anything we'd be created. This fake brand called simpler sell dot com mostly to figure out we actually do this. Could we offer fair market value on someone's home and would it be a great France for them. We we didn't want to cause any kind of trouble. We didn't WanNa make any mistakes. It worked. It worked really well. Our first customer Josh Brewer out in Phoenix took the plunge with us. You know went to a facebook ad clicked on it entered his home address than sold his Holmdale Sembler Sal I think probably ten people in the company at the time and we've all had this bottle of wine. We mixed blended together called a simpler cellar which I'm aging in my basement right. Now it's great and what do you wish you'd started doing more of much earlier. In your life like typically action with compelling tax I I think I massively underweight the importance of listening to other people and the importance of building relationships around disagreements disagreements instead of using them as a way to get to the truth. I think one of the things I did really poorly earlier in my career I've done. I've totally gotten a lot better at is when I had an opinion whether I was right or wrong too soon for the sake of the argument I was right. I viewed my job as taking someone from their position to mind as efficiently as possible that it doesn't work all that does maybe it does work to a certain extent but it's definitely not the best thing to do and much more effective way to do that as to deeply understand where someone is what what led them to their conclusions and then fill in context sort of draw the path from where you are to where they are and then you can both walk on it and that's a much better way to both get to the truth and also you to build much stronger relationship with that person which allows you to get harder questions in the future. Who would you say some of your mentors. Today is still very much. A mentor of Mine America's a mentor of mine. I Still Keep Joe Mentor of mine. I have a lot of internal mentors at the company. I have my spiritual mentor as my executive coach which I highly recommend to anyone anyone who has a a large team is to get an executive coach you find mentorship in so many places. I think twitter's a great way to get that one way mentorship you. Can you know look to the smartest people in the world feeding incite constantly who will often even engage with you if you just reach out to them that's amazing in a recommend biographies in which biographies you know what's funny about recommending books is that the needs to be at the right moment in someone's life for them to really hit books that have been really impactful for me or sometimes books looks set today would mean absolutely nothing or tomorrow might be the most insightful thing. I could possibly be handed so harshly to recommend any kind of book without knowing where someone is today but recently I've really enjoyed Benjamin Franklin biography by Walter Isaacson. I really enjoyed powerbroker Robert Caro. Yeah I could probably name ten ten or twelve others but against that point in time and when did you start with the executive coach and I'd love to dive deeper into that yeah. I started open-door when I was twenty three years old and I had maybe managed eater so people before I found myself within a larger team and a lot of pressure to go very quickly. I think one of my co founders Keith give a talk during wiessee startup school about operating a business and there's the company growth curve in your personal growth curve. I think whatever you can can do to accelerate your personal growth curve as founder in a company is incredibly important worth prioritizing in so I decided in heard before that an executive coach be a great way to accelerate your personal growth curve and that was worth the investment in when did you get that technical which was right at twenty three when he started the company or is it a year or two or three end. Yeah I think I I interviewed probably twenty or thirty coaches before I settled on the mccutcheon work with today. I believe we've been working together now for about two and a half years so probably about two two years in how big was hoping to our at the very beginning of that period tuneup years ago. Yeah I think probably around forty or so people eighty six people got what are some of the the biggest things that you've worked on with this coach and where you've grown with this coach yeah. I think it's a lot of it is interpersonal. Dynamics less so on like strategy I ah most of that mentorship from Mateen here hiring really great people you know what's interesting as you grow the company from one to ten one hundreds of people that you just have these different chapters when my favorite rules is this like the rule of threes every time the company triples everything breaks just like everything that worked really well is complete disarray in a disaster and set you learn learning by trial and error the first ten people everyone in that group of ten people is going to replicate themselves at least ten times if you're successful all of their strengths all their weaknesses houses and so it's critical that every single person that initial group is someone. You're ready to spend twenty four seven with because you're likely going to do that. The next stage is like this a call like the the band of brothers and sisters stage. It's like that first thirty forty people and they really shaped the culture so I think a lot of founders of the states are hiring for culture fit but you really should be looking. I'm for cultural contribution. It's really crucial that you develop an open dialogue with everyone in that group about what's working. What's not working and what the company can do about it? You want every single person that band of brothers other sisters to be like a missionary for the company in the mission. You want part of their identity. The reason get a coach at the next stages because you hit this. It's all changing stage from fifty to one hundred fifty. People were a lot of companies falter because you're growing so fast and everything is absolutely on fire and there's not enough structure yet. You don't really have necessarily you know a leadership leadership team built out and so at the stage earlier employees who previously were generalists who owned a large swath of the company they feel disengaged because it's no longer that band of brothers and sisters. They don't know everyone anymore but you can turn that into empowerment. You can sit them down when I wanted to say. You're a flagbearer for the company. You are flagbearer for over north culture in everyone who is joining today is going to look to you for how to behave and how to contribute and it's on you to teach them what it means to be a member of the team here because if you don't they're going to change it and I I recommend at that point also sort of reaching out to every one of these missionaries in your company gathering their opinions about what the company's values are and using that bottoms up process where everyone contributes needs to write down and establish a set of like what are your company's values and make sure everyone knows you mentioned that executive coaching is something that you do to accelerate your own personal growth curve. What are some things that you've done to tolerate that growth good question done or doing. I think the biggest thing for accelerating growth curve is just understanding that people draw US incest surrounding yourself by great. People is a single best way to grow yourself. I think the the adages you know your average of the five people you spend your time with your you probably the average of the thirty to forty people you spend your time with probably in proportion to the amount of time you spend with them so be really rigorous but who you're spending your time with and thoughtful who you want to be eh that helps a lot in being able to grow in the ways you. WanNa grow. Let's talk about Keith little. He's been on the show before great episode. What are some of the things that you've learned from him. You know it's funny about Keith is that he's basically a state machine for the right answer but he hasn't always necessarily know why he knows what's right by working with. Keith you sort of this this this cheat code to the answer and then you get to work backwards to why he's right. That's helpful in frustrating. That itself is a huge accelerate. What are some non obvious things that you've done as a founder. Let's make open door successful. I think it's really important once you have a team of probably thirty or so people to do a great job with orientation when when someone joins everyone remembers their first day and being present for that and making sure.

keith founder executive twitter CEO fraud Khosla ventures facebook Red Door general partner Robert Caro Co founder Joe Mentor underweight Mine America Trulia Phoenix Benjamin Franklin Josh Brewer
"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Their businesses from being, you know, hundred thousand dollar businesses to being hundred million dollar businesses. Plus and to give them the real tactical trae. Meaning that they need to move from the beginning to the next step. I could not agree with you more. And the reason I have the conversation at all here is because I want to talk about solutions and approaches that have been successful in. You clearly have found the way to be successful in spite of and I for me, it's really it is a it is a balancing act in my own mind about whether we go there, we don't I don't want to ignore a problem that exists. But I also don't want to talk about it without having solutions on the table. Yeah. I've been thinking a lot about what are proactive things that can be done to equalize. The opportunities for women, and let's just speak about the world of entrepreneurship because that's the world. I know the most. The terms the legal terms that women are given early on in their business. I think are much worse on average than the legal terms that men are given. So for instance, we've been hearing in the media right now about this entire situation with Uber where Travis has kind of shares that are worth ten x the voting power of a single share. And we know that Travis has this and Mark Zuckerberg has this and many other male founders Evan Spiegel at Snapchat has these shares. I've never heard of a single woman having shares that are worth ten x her voting power. You don't have that. I had to I had to work to actually have a vote on my board. If you look at my first term sheets of rent the runway, my co-founder, and I while we were on the board our votes affectively didn't count. And my preferred shareholders held all of the control and sway as to what the future of the business was so we were starting not even from a, you know. Point zero. We were starting from like negative fifty and over the years. Thank God rent the runway took off from the very beginning. And we've been able to negotiate in every subsequent round of funding more rights for ourselves. But all we've wanted was fair rights to what we would be offered as a male CEO or a male co founding team. So what I would love to see is. I'd love to see women, and I'm happy to be the first to do this publicize put online their first seed round term sheets and compare that with the seed round term sheets that men get the and the reason why I say seed round just because at the seed round there's no evidence that any business is going to be successful. You're taking a bet on the founder itself, you're taking a bet on a person..

Travis founder Evan Spiegel CEO co-founder Mark Zuckerberg Snapchat hundred thousand dollar hundred million dollar
"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Janklow had ridiculous name, but it was a very innovative idea at the time, and it was related to another startup called yawn to back in the day and a recruiter from the start up beyond two decided to contact me through this and yawn to actually turned out to be Ari tros company, my co-founder and business partner in X Y O U is one of the only crazy people at the time in two thousand eight actually. Starting a company in two thousand eight when everyone was going through turmoil and running for the hills. Well, yeah. So so you and Ari how did that relationship happened was he the first person that had took a chance on you just like you just said like nobody was saying. Yes, you wanted to get somebody to say, yes. And then how did that relationship build up? That is exactly right. Yeah. He is the first person that said, well, this kid is smart. He's also very humble as well. Yeah. Yeah. You know? You know, he he he saw how passionate I was. And how driven I was. And I think what is kind of the metric and the thing that we care about the most at X Y O. And like what I look for an employees and new employees now is like how much do you care, and you could tell that I cared about what I was doing. I was passionate about technology, and I had zero experience. Right. He didn't even know what the heck he was going to hire me for. But he was like, you know, what I need higher this kid and take a chance, and he is the only one that took a chance on me. And so basically, I have spent especially with the amazing story that X Y O has turned into. I've spent a lot of my time re repaying him and basically making him feel great about taking a chance on me. So he was the first person to say, yes, what was the company about? What was he trying to do? And how did you fit in? Yeah. At the time. This is when the concept or idea of Facebook, apps didn't exist. So it was a brand new concept. He first off he credited technology for my space that allowed you to turn off those annoying layouts and all the color schemes on my space man when you picked your page. Yes. Okay. It was called sanity switch. So you head switch on your page and every single other person's page that you visited it would turn off their annoying glittery layouts home. I he he's a savior. I didn't know he was a say yes now here is what he discovered in doing that he discovered just how big the personalization space is. So he decided to do the exact opposite thing for Facebook. He created the first ever it was called the onto layers the first ever technology that allowed you to add layouts and personalization layers to your Facebook profile, and it caught on like crazy. Well, so I joined him in that technology company, and it was just a wild and amazing ride. So yeah. So what did you do there? What did you learn what did you? Discover about yourself because from starting out as somebody taking a chance on you to be in co founder of a black Shane company now valued at twenty million dollars spot. Number two, fifty I'm Queen market cap. And you're just having amazing party for your.

Ari tros company Facebook Ari Shane company Janklow co-founder co founder partner twenty million dollars
"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

Tech Reports by Larry Magid

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

"If you're just joining us Microsoft co-founder, Paul Allen has died this afternoon. He was sixty five Allen had said earlier this month that he was being treated for non Hodgkin lymphoma. Larry, you have been covering Allen and Microsoft. Since the early days, how would you describe his role in the tech world incredibly important. You know he'd not nearly as well known if Bill gate is or Steve Jobs, wealth, but certainly important pioneer. He and gates co-founded Microsoft back in nineteen seventy five that's year before the apple two came out and he helped he engaged together. We're responsible for Microsoft basic, which was probably the most important of the early early personal computer software languages. And then he remained Microsoft for number of year. I think until eighty two, when he was first diagnosed with Hodgkin non-hodgkin's lymphoma, this is not the first bout that he's had from Canterbury. He been diagnosed back then with three diagnosed and to come to a today, but he's been around he and he engaged from schoolmates. They were fourteen and twelve. They were playing around with computers way back guess what lie in the seventy s and you know, symphony wouldn't invested in sporting teams. You can't go to Seattle without seeing it, influence your mutual impact on the city. So you know an important person. What kind of a relationship did Paul Allen and Bill Gates having in more recent years? You know, I don't know. I, I assume they were in touch because they were both. You know, they're both very active in philanthropy and both in terms of international and and also Seattle. But I really don't know gates course haven't been at Microsoft. I think he's still on the board and it's been many years since Paul Allen resigned from Microsoft board. I think he resigned in two thousand though. I'm sure that they were in touch, but I don't know how closely we're and once he left Microsoft, did he try his hand and another tech business or, oh, yeah. He was involved in a number of interval technologies years ago with doing some very interesting. I can't remember what if any more because it's been so long. But he's been a certainly an investor in a number of tech companies, as well as a number of social entrepreneurs. He's given a lot of money to brain research, but yes, and by the way he wrote a book called idea, man, and that's sort of how fancied himself as you know, gates with the business guy and and Allen thought of himself at the the idea person pretty remarkable career all the way around. Absolutely. And the thing that not one, but two of them Bill Gates and Paul Allen both went on to do so much philanthropy. That's right. And you know, very big contribution again, not as well known if gates, but certainly a person with a huge amount of influence very early on and continuing. I think up until his death..

Bill Gates Paul Allen Steve Jobs Microsoft Hodgkin lymphoma Seattle co-founder Larry apple Canterbury
"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

"The president and co founder of the city blockchain summit got paulson and began with me today thank you so much for being on the shy polls appreciate your time it's gonna be right to have a chat love to be here i'm very happy to engage with you rank end i'm looking for i was looking for this and talking to you look this this the so much going on the spice at the moment it's such an exciting time and you're right there in the thick of it before we get into the actual city blockchain son at what you guys are doing who you're speaking to and i throw about a million questions that you what had liked to if you wouldn't mind poulsen just gives it a little bit of a background on yourself why you're in blockchain what you doing how you come to hear and what your objectives are absolutely greg i'm so i've been into a in the business from at least twenty years now twenty five years actually and republican complication computer user and what we've seen is you know do the today show everybody is afraid to jump on the computers and livable computers all afraid afraid afraid so we put of location he's the pain and and dispose the intimation in a very forced to fifth grade level of writing so it helped them a consumers just understand the technology and be part of the other than being afraid on it so become voted a lot of people into the computer age and then of course we had the big boom of the internet and i see the same cycle happening again in this base blockchain is very robust technology i'd have been around for a while but now that the only other stuff that's going on in the innovation that's happening in the in the industry is more than the full front now some of the big names all the fortune one hundred companies are already in it big time and i feel that again the consumers are left out of the dock and i'll go this to engage the consumers in another way not republication but throwing events in smaller cities and engaging them with the innovation that's happening in in the blockchain space so you've been there through the.

president co founder paulson poulsen twenty five years twenty years