35 Burst results for "co-founder"

Group aims to pinpoint sources of carbon pollution

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 9 hrs ago

Group aims to pinpoint sources of carbon pollution

"Almost every country in the world has committed to reducing their carbon pollution but they know surprisingly little about precisely where those emissions come from is. It's not like nobody has any idea of what the emissions are but the fundamental status quo around the world for most types of emissions. Is you ask. The people doing the polluting. Hey how much did you pollute. And yet hope they're telling the truth and maybe you can sometimes get audited. Double check parts of it. That's gavan mccormack co founder of. What time the nonprofit is one of the founders of the climate trace coalition a group that includes high tech startups that are working on an independent way to monitor carbon pollution using satellite images machine learning and artificial intelligence. The group aims to track carbon pollution worldwide in real time mccormack expects the group's data will be live and freely available in june of twenty twenty one and it will be able to identify specific sources of pollution. Tremendously clarifying humanizing about showing someone a picture of pollution. And saying here it. So the trays. Coalition's effort can help the public. And policymakers identify and hold polluters accountable.

Gavan Mccormack Climate Trace Coalition Mccormack
Zoom is Apple's most downloaded app of the year

Talking Tech

02:52 min | 14 hrs ago

Zoom is Apple's most downloaded app of the year

"Every year. Apple comes up with the chart of the most downloaded apps of the year. And this year. The number one you guessed it. Zoom cloud meetings the app. Change the way we work in learn from home. It's the most downloaded iphone and ipad app of the year. now apple doesn't release sale stats four year end charts but it just notes which apps were more downloaded than the others ready for the list. Scott a lot of familiar names in their tiktok the controversial social app that president donald trump sought to ban is number two followed by disney plus youtube in instagram last year. Youtube was the number one most downloaded app now. The rest of apple's top five has some more familiar names like facebook. Snapchat facebook messenger g mail and the cash app which is a social payment app like then mo. I've always wondered because i do this year. How is it possible that somebody didn't have facebook on their phone that somebody was new to g mail that somebody was nudie youtube. How these apps like old. But that's the way it is on the ipad. Zoom was also the top app followed by disney plus youtube netflix. Google chrome tiktok amazon. Prime video g mail hulu in google classroom. You'll notice ipad. Google chrome even though people had the safari browser. They preferred having google chrome which is interesting now apple also at this time of year comes up with aditorial picks for what they think are the best apps of the year. Let's run those down iphone app of the year wake out. That's an exercise app that offers quick workout routines that can be done in minutes as short breaks such as using pillows or pots and pans. You'll have to pay for the app. It starts at five dollars monthly the mac after the year. Fantastic how this is another app. That's been around for a long time like ten years. It switch to a subscription format and twenty twenty. It cost forty dollars yearly. There is a free version but most of the good stuff comes with the payment. It's a great app. i've been playing with it. And i'm actually hear more about Fantastic health tomorrow with an interview with michael simmons simons who's the ceo and co founder of the app. His idea is to have a more robust calendar app and the subscription brings in use among max iphones ipads and apple watches and features like extended weather forecasts and adding and starting zoom meetings within the app. The apple tv app years. Disney plus the top game is against an impact which is a role playing game from chinese developer me jojo and it was selected for the iphone. Google play also selected it as the best android game.

Apple Youtube Google Disney Donald Trump Facebook Instagram Scott Hulu Netflix Amazon Michael Simmons Simons
Dallas mayor launches task force to attract entrepreneurs

The Dallas Morning News

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Dallas mayor launches task force to attract entrepreneurs

"Eric. Johnson created a new task force yesterday to examine how to make dallas. A top city for entrepreneurs task force will be led by mandy price and trae bowls two significant figures in the dallas fort worth startup. Seeing bulls has spent the last decade working in the space mentoring entrepreneurs and developing programs to support them in his work as ceo of the dallas entrepreneur center. Price is the ceo and co founder of canaries. A platform where employees can anonymously review company's performance on issues like diversity inclusion and equity in the workplace canaries recently received funding from google through its startup accelerator program for black founders in

Entrepreneurs Task Force Mandy Price Trae Bowls Dallas Dallas Entrepreneur Center Eric Johnson Bulls Canaries Price Google
Virgin Hyperloop's Jay Walder on the Future of Transportation

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:05 min | 5 d ago

Virgin Hyperloop's Jay Walder on the Future of Transportation

"Hyperloop began as a sketch by elon. Musk which i think he barred from. Nineteen eighty seven. James bond film. It's a capsule you put someone in and send them hurtling at dramatic speeds through a long distance pipeline sons. A little sci fi but seven years later the leading company developing it. Virgin hyperloop has at its helm. Jay walder a guy who has been in charge of the subway systems of new york london and hong kong. that's one way to gain credibility so welcome jay. Thanks for being here a wilson. Thanks for having me. So how did it happen. You get a call from the company's lead investor dubai port world and they were like what you're interested in overseeing a some sort of to brockett the line that i often repeat which came from the the The head-hunter is he set out. Something i wanna talk to you about. But it's not for the faint of heart and he wasn't lying. It's just incredible and it was a great great opportunity and and to be able to move from doing the things that i've done in my career in the to now really have any opportunity to fundamentally reshape the way we think about mass transit. That's just amazing. But what was it like. What was the thing that. What was the one piece that sparked you that you said okay. This isn't just drawings on on on a piece of paper we. We went through like russian. Finally someone said to me any get on a plane. Come alka las vegas our co founder and cto. Josh neidl will meet you there. And come out to see the test in las vegas and that was the moment i mean. I shouldn't be given us away. But i was at that point just totally locked and it was so real. It's very hard to grasp without seeing it. I think of you guys teased a video to us. That i got the chance to watch but unfortunately we are not allowed to show on this this program today and it showed Kind of like it looked like some sort of emirates air check in room. You know a big gorgeous atrium where people were passengers were walking in. They kind of get on this things. It looks like a really fancy disney ride they shoot off and the speedometer says six hundred plus miles an hour. Meanwhile they're sitting there enjoying their coffee in working on their laptops. You know getting to there seems like a major journey but you recently on november eighth hit a milestone. what was that yes a look. Let's let's break it down a little bit the test facility that we had in las vegas. We have run over four hundred test that test facilities. It's a five hundred meter hyperloop tube of full-scale working hyperloop that the company is built and and really demonstrated improving the that that hyperloop works. We that had already been accomplished but but the question we were asked most often that i was asked most often is. Is it safe and we set out on a journey really about eighteen months ago to be able to show that it is safe and to put the first people in a hyperloop pod that really was. I think a huge step so what what happened on november eighth remember aids two of our colleagues real people. Josh geigo are co founder they said sarah lucian who is the director of our passenger experience. They got in a hyperloop pod together and we had the first run of people in hyperloop loop and really being able to look at this and say we have now. Demonstrably answered that question. It is safe so can you just take us through this again. It's twenty twenty. Originally guys said twenty twenty five having a certified program but now you're looking to have production by twenty thirty something actually in the works so so let me let me take a couple of steps back on this and then then take your question. Because i think there's several things embedded in their first off. You see a test with with real people showing that we can do it. Our goal in this is to have a customer experience. That feels truly special right to have something in which you you are going into an environment. That is is quick and convenient for you. That it's flexible more. Like ride hailing than the way. We think about the tyranny of train schedules. I always like to point out environmentally friendly right. We want to be able to think of this as twenty-first-century transportation that's not polluting. The air that we breathe and in certain locations. I think we can literally disconnect from the grid and that's an amazing statement to be able to make about doing this. The foundation of any monitoring station system has to be shared mobility. There's no question about that and to go back to what you were saying before. Why am i here right. I'm here to connect what what is an incredible technical development program. That's part of the point. You're making with what it takes to be. A transportation system in between that is is really proving. The safety in the certification creating the customer experience and allowing all of those things to happen to be able to do it. Our path forward is to have the certification of the system by two thousand twenty five. We recently announced that we will move forward to build the hyperloop certification center in west virginia. Usually excited about this look. I'm a. I'm a kid from new york. I'm not sure. I would have ever guessed that we would be going to west virginia to do this so we're going to. We're going to build that out and literally. I've got people there right now. Working to be doing this simultaneous. What we're doing right now. We should have that certification by twenty twenty five and then when you refer to the end of the decade by the end of the decade. I want hyperloop projects that are that are in us that we are actually running

Virgin Hyperloop Jay Walder Brockett Alka Las Vegas Josh Neidl Elon Musk James Bond Las Vegas Josh Geigo Sarah Lucian Hong Kong Dubai JAY Wilson Hunter New York London
Are You Bringing Emotional Intelligence Into the Workplace?

Women Worldwide

04:23 min | 5 d ago

Are You Bringing Emotional Intelligence Into the Workplace?

"So how are you putting your emotional intelligence hat on your e. I hat in all of your interactions whether your word with friends with your family and how much are you. Harnessing your emotions. Well this is the perfect segue to my special guest today. Joining me on the show is andrea hoven. Andrea is the co founder and learning at. Og lice. laugh she's also a certified coach and a speaker and she helps professionals to hard as their emotions injury. I it is so nice to have you on my show. Welcome thank you. Thank you for having me. It's really wonderful to be here in. Share a little of what i know with women worldwide. We're happy happy because emotional. Intelligence is really important you know for any person professionally and personally is being able to get a handle on your own emotions so that you can work with others and that is something that you're doing quite a bit and before we dive into e i in all of your great work. Maybe you can just share a little bit about how you got to wanting to go down. Career path of emotional intelligence in helping professionals in coaching. Yeah sure it's the kind of a long circuitous journey like most are bank But i i started my career in corporate america and climbed the ranks as a sales manager and became a regional vice president with a big thirty million dollar territory and found that the part of that job that i loved the most was training people to be the best they could be. And when i could see light bulbs go on and see that. That was magic for me. And so that that led me down a path wanting to do that work more often And so eventually became responsible for job skills training at the organization. I worked at and found that my passion fell into the leadership development and coaching area. Where i work with people so that we could have more of those breakthrough moments and insights together. That help them do the things they wanted to do. And be the person's and people that they wanted to be so that's That's what led me to get certified as a coach to work as a coach to leave that organization and work independently for a while And and realizing along the way that emotional intelligence really is such a foundational set of skills that set the stage for so much more of what we wanna do as leaders or as people or as of families etc. You have to have your ability to recognize what you feel some self awareness around what's going on inside so that like you said you can harness their power and their wisdom of ear emotions to help you accomplish what you want to accomplish. So that's a little bit about how i got to this point. That's excellent and in. You did definitely just pinpoint something. That's so important around the emotional intelligence discussion. The fact that you have to be aware of what's going on with you and you know what is it. There's there's a lot going on in our world where emotions do run high zoa. People are feeling challenged in whether it's affecting you and your your work environment or your home environment. What are some of the ways it. Perhaps you can get to being more aware or more emotionally intelligent. Yeah well let's. I like name this moment as you just said. Two thousand twenty is such a crazy year and at the beginning of the year we started. We pulled You know hundreds of people across the united states to ask them what was the most predominant emotion that they were experiencing back in march. The answer then was anxiety. Which makes logical sense. You know it at. The heart of anxiety is feeling of uncertainty. That things that matter deeply to us are out of our control

Andrea Hoven Andrea America
Streamlining the Hiring Process for Nurses With Dr. Iman Abuzeid of Incredible Health

How I Built This

05:04 min | Last week

Streamlining the Hiring Process for Nurses With Dr. Iman Abuzeid of Incredible Health

"The genesis of incredible health came from my background right. So i am an md a lot of friends and family members that are doctors as well who were often complaining about understaffing at the same time. My co founder. Who's a software engineer from. Mit import. lock. His sisters are nurses and they were saying. Hey i'm experienced and qualified and still takes me two three months to get my next job. I applied a ten fifteen places. I often don't hear back. This is a very common experience for nurses by the way even today and so we just figured there just has to be an easier way to solve this problem so essentially the problem you identified. Was this kind of the process. Right of hiring. Nurses was broken. Which doesn't make sense right because you would think you know with the shortage and hospitals needing nurses they would bring him on but hospitals are also big bureaucracies with lots of different challenges. So i guess it does make sense. You identified this problem. Which was the hiring the on boarding process and and all the bureaucracy involved. You decided to figure to streamline it and that was the genesis of incredible health. That's right and it's now expanded beyond just the place where a nurse finds the job. It's the place where he or. She manages their career. I mentioned continuing education earlier. We also have free salary estimators. We have a couple more services than are launching at the end of this year as well. That's exclusively for nurses. So it's it's really become the place where you manage your entire career on incredible health. Well i'm wondering him on. How does the business model work do. Hospital subscribe pay subscription fee to the site. Or do they pay you know. Every time they hire somebody you get a fee sort of kazakh model designed as a subscription and then that the hospitals are picking are selecting different. Tiers that are based on volume of one hundred percent free for the nurses when nurses go and work at hospitals. Do they tend to stay at the same hospital for a long time. Or is there high turnover. Are they moving around to different hospitals. Yeah so for our platform specifically we only do permanent workers right. We don't do any contract. Workers now look nursing in general is known for high turnover right so usually it's seventeen percent is a national annual turnover right now and so retention is also a hot topic and a very important topic for these for these employers as well and we'll try to do whatever they can to try to keep their nurses so let's go back to the beginning of this year. At what point. Did you realize that this pandemic is going to be a major problem and that the service you offer was was potentially going to be in high demand. I figured this out. Put this altogether. Probably in january february and now is because i was on twitter on and honestly the most amount of information was coming from epidemiologists. Md's and public health experts around the world because we weren't getting real time data here in the us so twitter twitter was actually the my source for figuring this out. I know you've got a team of about thirty people. You're based in san francisco right. We are headquartered in san francisco. Our team is in different parts of the country. So when you realize that this was potentially going to be a huge issue did you see an immediate spike in demand for your services. We did a certainly by april. There was a spike in demand for specific types of nurses. If you're an icu nurse. Or e deaners the hiring for that like increased by three x on our platform like right away and we saw a drop. For some of the other specialties because surgeries were getting canceled but since then since july august the demand for every single role has dramatically increased because not only are hospitals operating at full capacity also dealing with this pandemic. So how did you start to position your your company and your business to meet that demand so there were few things that we did We a few months ago. We launched what we call the pandemic hiring sweet right and what that is is a a range of features and tools that even more dramatically accelerates the hiring and really helps. The hospitals reduce costs because they had gone through some very severe financial hardship. Right so a couple of the things that we did was we added in automated interview scheduling remote interviewing. Because that's just what you have to do. During a pandemic in-app chats enhanced are matching algorithms. All of these with the goal of accelerating the hiring even further so we got down to twelve days now and on average we save every hospital that we work with at least two million dollars because they dramatic try to reduce their travelers costs as well as our overtime in asia. Our costs so essentially last year or the year before. If you were nurse using your platform you would have done and in-person interview at least one. You've traveled to the hospital. And that of course has gone away. That's gone so that's not even a feature anymore. Now everything is happening. Virtually correct and

MIT Twitter San Francisco MD United States Asia
Working With Your spouse: Noura Sakkijha, co-founder and CEO, Mejuri

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:22 min | Last week

Working With Your spouse: Noura Sakkijha, co-founder and CEO, Mejuri

"Your co founder is your husband. You're not the first person on this show. Who's coders their spouse. But i really like. It's something that. I cannot fathom working with your partner so and i know what it is like to have a co founder but i also am very protective around like keeping keeping parts of my life separate. So what is that. Like to work with your husband. It's crazy for us. To be honest. I think a lot of people do it says together because it's so hard to start a business that i used to work sixteen seventeen hours a day and so if my partner wasn't in a similar lifestyle i don't know how things would have worked out to be honest with us. I think in that sense. It was really a positive. Obviously you know it gets stuff because we had to put rules around the separation exactly like you said going back home in going on a date. I don't necessarily wanna talk about strategy. We really had to set boundaries and and really be honest with each other like. I don't wanna talk about work now. Can we talk about something else and so try to figure out. How do we create the separation. But i think over time it just becomes part of your lifestyle like i. I just think of juries part of us and so we became a lot more comfortable especially as the company grew and we started to have our own vary obvious roles and responsibilities. And i think that is actually something that i would recommend for anyone. Who's working with their partners to make sure that you have clear roles and responsibilities. And who essentially is that decision maker on certain areas versus the other. How do you split up the responsibilities. So he's The presidency oh and he works on all the revenue generating areas of the business. And i have all of the other areas. We essentially put the strategy together. We worked closely together. But we have very different cassettes. I'm like i said i'm an engineer. He's more he's from finance background. I have knowledge in the jewelry. Industry saw work closely with creative with product culture in hr a ceo whereas magid is really focused with the marketing team at retail and international expansion. And so there's definitely a division that didn't happen overnight as the company grew. It was more obvious where we wanna put revenue generation. Where do we wanna put the structure of the company the culture and so that's how essentially things came boat. The good thing between us is that we have difference consents.

Magid
Bill Gates looks back at ‘The Road Ahead’ after 25 years and some hit-and-miss tech predictions

Techmeme Ride Home

02:38 min | Last week

Bill Gates looks back at ‘The Road Ahead’ after 25 years and some hit-and-miss tech predictions

"Is sometimes cop to the criticism that on this show. We tend to focus on the horse race between the big tech companies. Who's up who's down. Who like roadblocks might be a godzilla of the future and who like maybe intel seems to be sliding towards being an irrelevant dinosaur of the past. The way i like to think about it is that we're covering the evolution and creative destruction of capitalism in real time keeping score of who's the richest person in the world is probably less relevant to that task but only obliquely so for what it's worth. It's worth noting that elon. Musk has overtaken bill gates to become the world's second richest person behind. jeff bezos. Quoting the verge. The tesla ceo net worth now sits at around one hundred twenty eight billion dollars after increasing by one hundred billion dollars this year alone. There is a sizable gap between. Musk and the number one spot which is currently held by amazon ceo. Jeff bezos who has reported net worth of around one hundred and eighty two billion dollars in january. Musk ranked thirty fifth on the list. Bloomberg reports musk's rapid ascent up. The list has mainly been driven by tesla share price. The car company currently has a market cap of almost five hundred billion dollars after starting the year at under one hundred billion dollars. The guardian reports that tesla has the highest market cap of any car company in the world despite producing a fraction of the cars of more established automakers. This year it expects lose. Five hundred thousand cars compared to around ten million for a company like toyota around three quarters of musk's net worth consists of tesla shares according to bloomberg but musk's other major venture space x has also seen recent success last week the company transported for astronauts to the international space station aboard. It's crew dragon spacecraft that follows the company's first crewed flight to space in may of this year bill gates sat atop the billionaires index for years until he was overtaken by jeff bezos in two thousand seventeen bloomberg notes. That gates would probably have a higher net wealth right now if he hadn't given so much money to charity including the over twenty seven billion dollars. He's donated through the bill and melinda gates foundation since two thousand six gates. Moscow have had some high profile disagreements this year in september. Musk said gateshead quote no clue about the viability of electric trucks after the microsoft co-founder said that electric semi trucks along with electric cargo ships and passenger jets will probably never be practical earlier. This year gates told cnbc that musk should avoid making big predictions about areas. He's not familiar. After the tesla's ceo downplayed the risk of the covid nineteen pandemic. Musk overtook facebook. Ceo mark zuckerberg last week when he became the third richest person on. The billionaires index zuckerberg has since fallen to fifth in the rankings. After he was overtaken by french businessman bernard arnault and quote

Tesla Jeff Bezos Musk Bill Gates Elon Intel Bloomberg Bill And Melinda Gates Foundat The Guardian Amazon Toyota
Living in Gratitude With Deborah K. Heisz

Live Happy Now

05:40 min | Last week

Living in Gratitude With Deborah K. Heisz

"Welcome to episode two hundred eighty eight of live happy now. This has been the most unusual and for many the most difficult year in recent memory. What's gratitude got to do with it. This is paula phelps. And this week as we celebrate thanksgiving as seemed like a great time to talk about how important gratitude is not only at thanksgiving but as a daily practice live happy ceo and co founder. Deborah highs sits down with me to talk about gratitude and other practices to make this unusual thanksgiving more meaningful deborah. Welcome to live happy now once again. You bala it's great lear- especially this time of year. I'm really loud. This is where my times a year. And i'm really excited for checker broadcast. I think we have a lot of talk about. Yeah because anyone that's listened to this awhile knows at both you and i are gratitude junkies so who knows what happens when we get together and talk about it. We're getting more grateful for each other. That's there you go well. This year is been unusual so it puts gratitude in kind of a different light for a lot of people because there are so many people are dealing with loss whether that's loss of loved ones lhasa. Work loss of the freedom that they had to move around and see people so in your life and in what's going on in your world. How are you approaching this thanksgiving and and with your gratitude loss. And i think the one that we're all feeling and not the biggest loss in terms of scale obviously losing a loved one is much more significant loss but the biggest loss in terms of one that i think everyone is feeling a little bit of is a loss of community and as we're going into the holiday season i think that's even more intensified where we might get together with large family gatherings in our family can't travel in or is uncomfortable traveling in or you know for whatever reason were not going to be able to have the typical large family gatherings holiday party corporate outings. Happy hour's wage cycle bureau were be sprayed. I think we get a lot of our sense of community for mos activity. So when we're talking about what we're doing for me. It's what we do work place that to make sure that number one. We are expressing our gratitude. It is the time of thanksgiving after all but also what are we going to replace that so we don't lose out on that sense of community one of the great things you can do and i got a couple of days. This is not my own idea. Is you can take the time to do something. That is a little archaic. And i've gotten a couple of gratitude notes from soups and written letters. Telling me how regretful it is that we won't be able to get this year. How much we're looking forward to getting together next year. And how much more forward and then sharing your on in your life fashion letter to knees. A great idea. Xpress browser this holiday season and the person who receives it one. I i was just talking with someone this morning. About how on a male junkie. And i was like i am too you know and so when we get something. That's handwritten these days. That's incredibly exciting to receive is and you don't have gotten that one that not only was it. Handwritten but person full photos of their social media of jehovah's used it on the computer and talk to me about how much you know and it was family member said how much they were regretting that they were to get together with us this year but they had all these positive memories of last year that he thinking of us and we couldn't wait till next year we put on game that simple but it really took time and energy on their part i or we know from evidence base that even the act of writing that liar heightened their gratitude heightened their happiness low. An it certainly certainly heightened mine. It was a wonderful surprise to get to that in the make so if someone that is a great practice in an earlier this year we had talked to the woman who did the three hundred sixty five days of. Thank you notes and she wrote. Thank you letters to people. So if someone's going to do this there are certain things that you should include are certain practices that you can do to that will trigger more gratitude for you. Is that correct yes. There are more gratitude. So you're speaking about the interview that you did with. Nancy davis cup i at the hankyu project on. Yeah there's a lot of chips about how bright the right thank you and right branching water but one of the things that that is. My favorite is specity. B very specific in order for it to resonate. It's like when you think back to your childhood. You can think back to your childhood in general doesn't resonate on a single something and then you can start team sabre that you remember the way set way. Something smell away. Something felt when you're writing a gratitude letter if you can be specific about what you're grateful for a moment in time or something. The person the reader is the opportunity to savor that memory. As do you you get the opportunity to save that memory and it just heightens the sensation of a tube. Ecorse cruiser overall wellbeing. It's great. I love

Paula Phelps Deborah Highs Lhasa Deborah Nancy Davis
Elon Musk becomes world's second richest person

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:32 sec | Last week

Elon Musk becomes world's second richest person

"Elon musk is rich. Okay, He's richer Musk is now the second richest person in the world. The Bloomberg Billionaires index shows the Tesla founder has edged past Bill Gates with a net worth of $127.9 billion. Gates, the co founder of Microsoft is worth 127. $0.7 billion, Bloomberg notes. Musk added over $100 billion to his net worth this year, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos is still far and away the leader with roughly $182 billion in net worth Undying

Musk Elon Musk Bloomberg Tesla Bill Gates Gates Microsoft Jeff Bezos Amazon
Bootstrapping a Commodity SaaS

Startups For the Rest of Us

05:40 min | Last week

Bootstrapping a Commodity SaaS

"You are. The co founders of gio khodyo which you're h one reads hassle-free geo coding straightforward and easy to use geo coding reverse geo coding and data matching for. Us and canadian addresses for folks. Who don't know you can enter an address or you can enter like a latitude. Longitude and it'll give you back the opposite one and i'm guessing that's probably how the service started way back in the day but at this point you have integrations to where you will correct misspellings and us. Canadian census data congressional districts state legislative district school districts timezones all. That kind of stuff. Is that something. That i'm imagining. That didn't come on day. One and you've built that out all out over the years. Yeah that's been added slowly. How we often describe it. Is that a computer doesn't understand and address. It only understands the coordinates or do you codes. And so what we do at a very basic level is converting an address into coordinate. So a computer can understand it and coordinates into an address so a human can understand it and then where our niche in the market is. There's a lot of data that is only unlocked by having the coordinates so as you mentioned time zones for example you can only get that data if you have the coordinates so you may be using coordinates to make a map online for example but you may not even care about maps and you may just want to know the time zone for particular location and that makes a lot of sense and you know a service like gio. Khodyo is is something. That my co-founder derek. And i when we were running drip we wanted to give people the ability to say like had an author who was going to go on a book tour and he was going to go to san francisco and la these various cities and he asked us. They're away i can go into drip and query you'll which email subscribers within sixty miles you know hundred mile radius of san francisco and of course we would have needed either their address or their. I mean you can turn an ip address into a quote unquote location. Not exact but it would probably good enough for this purpose and so we did actually look into two services like this. We never want a building that feature out. But that gives folks. If you're listening to this one particular use case of why you may want to use a geo. Coding service and so you guys launched it six and a half years ago in january of two thousand fourteen as a side project. Essentially on hacker. News is what i see. My sister producer. Found the original hacker news thread which was generally positive. Sometimes those things go really sideways. There was a comment or two. About how because you were saying. Hey geo cody is aimed at developers and it's less expensive way to do this and someone came in kind of little bit. No it all comment of like. Oh if you use. I don't remember what service was. It'll be this inexpensive blah blah blah and pretty quickly both chimed in with with factual data and references. Like no. actually. We are less expensive and we don't have restrictions on your data and you don't have to use their maps as you want and that it was a pretty elegant interaction. I'm curious did you guys come away from that launch feeling. Pretty good about the reception. Well there's definitely a love constructive feedback threat but also as you said a love positive comments and i think the biggest takeaway we had was wo- we aren't really the only people with this problem to be want to get solved. We didn't realize how big potential market would be. I think is really showed us that there are some potential year. Yeah i remember. We got hundreds of emails from people after that threat. It was what i remember that day. Just being absolutely wild. Like i think everybody does. When you put something on hacker news you send it to your friends and you're like hey up voters and then if he gets five votes and you get ten people visiting your product you feel pretty good about it and so seeing that kind of sit on the front page all day we it was just unbelievable and and then we got so much feedback from people about everything from things they wish we did two complaints about our competitors and how they were so glad to see something like this we even had. The emanate team from a major product. Reach out to us because they were unhappy with their coating. And of course you when we launched our product really. Wasn't that great context. It was really really terrible. Product will be launched it and it was barely something we could actually use ourselves like. We only use it as because we just couldn't have fallen feels really right but it was. It was really not a very good product like you wasn't that like the data wasn't very high quality high accuracy and things like that. We've come a long way since then just so cool to see that. Even despite if a crappy prototype there are still so much interest in this right. And i think as you said rob some of those commenters pointed out that with jakoda. Yes the the accuracy of the locations is important. But what really differentiates us from. Many other services is that people can use the data without restrictions. They're allowed to store it in their database. There aren't these overly cumbersome cashing limitations and requirements about using it with a particular brand of map public facing only and more expensive pricing. If it's private facing only all of these things and kind of developers are those really. That's that's annoying and nobody wants to deal with that and we don't want to deal with that and then perspective of of being the customers ourselves is something that we have carried with us

Branson Beats Musk in Human Hyperloop Test

Business Wars Daily

03:05 min | Last week

Branson Beats Musk in Human Hyperloop Test

"A week ago a man and a woman got into a metal pod sat down on vegan leather seats and strap themselves for a trip. Unlike any other the pod was then levitated by magnets and shot through vacuum tube at one hundred seven miles per hour in roughly six seconds. Talk about a wild ride and it was actually an historic first. The two brave souls are employees of virgin hyperloop and they were the first humans to test. The new technology virgin hyperloop focuses on the high speed transportation concept billionaire. Richard branson's virgin group is a minority investor before testing the system with humans virgin hyperloop conducted more than four hundred unmanned tests. Hyperloop has been called the future of transport. The systems are designed to be giant low pressure tubes floating pods or suspended by magnets and carry passengers from point. Eight point at theoretical speeds of up to seven hundred miles per hour. Here's how it works. The pod network uses magnetic levitation two sets of magnets both repel the pod in the tube and help move it forward and the vacuum system used to help accelerate to high speeds is similar to the system. You use to send your documents to the teller at your bank. drive through. Popular mechanics explains inside the pod. G forces were more than three times that of an airplane but the passengers said the ride was smooth. New york times reported ultimately groups like virgin hyperloop hoped to deploy the technology to transport people and cargo. The speed would reduce the time. It takes to get from los angeles to san francisco to less than an hour. The times report says that's faster than a direct flight. When the hyperloop debuts it will be the first truly new transportation technology and more than one hundred years the independent reports branson isn't the only billionaire dabbling in hyperloop technology. You may have heard of a fellow named elon musk. He's credited with conceptualizing the technology nearly a decade ago and he is boring company. Boring as in boring tunnels underground has a test tunnel california that it's using to test. Its hyperloop and other technology. Each year musk's spacex holds a hyperloop pod competition where university students compete to make prototypes of high speed transportation. Pods last year. Students from the university of munich won the competition there. To um hyperloop pod set a new speed record for the competition of nearly three hundred miles per hour a longer track could help teams reach even higher speeds. Musk says virgin. Hyperloop is already designed to route between london. Borough branson says the uk route would be quicker and cheaper than the high speed rail system being put in now. The independent reports and richard geddes co founder of the hyperloop advanced research partnership believes that. There's an opportunity for a hyperloop. System linking abu dhabi and dubai in the united arab emirates. For now the hyperloop is still a theoretical transport system with more than a dozen companies working on bringing it reality and when you have competitive billionaires behind for bragging rights about being first to market things have a way getting done

Virgin Hyperloop Richard Branson Popular Mechanics Branson Elon Musk UM New York Times The Times San Francisco Los Angeles Musk Richard Geddes Co California London UK Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates
Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

Charlie Parker

00:30 sec | Last week

Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

"The A L S Ice Bucket Challenge. Has died. Pat Quinn died at the age of 37 yesterday after seven years with the disease. Quinn and the late Pete Frates started the challenge after being diagnosed with a L S, which is known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The ice bucket challenge raised over $250 million Since it took social media by storm in 2014. Those of you do not know

Pete Frates Pat Quinn Quinn Lou Gehrig
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:47 sec | Last week

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"J. Powers, Fox News Another co founder of the Ice Bucket Challenge, has died. Pat Quinn, motivational speaker and co founder of the Ice Bucket Video Challenge for a less died Sunday morning at age 37. He battled Amy a traffic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013 the video challenge taking social media by storm in summer, 2014. Quinn talking to Fox News radio in 2015 disease that has no hope at the moment, but The ice bucket challenge is revamped that outlook the challenge so far raising more than $250 million worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for a less a fatal progressive nervous system disease, which impacts nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing loss of muscle control.

J. Powers Ice Bucket Challenge Traffic Lateral Sclerosis Fox News Lou Gehrig's Disease Pat Quinn AMY Quinn
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

John Batchelor

00:46 sec | Last week

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"And another co founder of the Ice Bucket Challenge has died. Pat Quinn, motivational speaker and co founder of the Ice Bucket Video Challenge for a less died Sunday morning at age 37 He better of India Tropic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013 the video challenge taking social media by storm in summer, 2014. Quinn talking to Fox News radio in 20. 15 disease that has no hope at the moment. But the Ice bucket challenge revamped that outlook, the challenge so far raising more than $250 million worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for a less a fatal progressive nervous system disease, which impacts nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing loss of muscle control boxes.

Ice Bucket Challenge Lateral Sclerosis Pat Quinn Lou Gehrig Quinn Fox News India
Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:26 sec | Last week

Pat Quinn, co-founder of viral Ice Bucket Challenge, dies from ALS at age 37

"Pat quinn. The co founder of the viral ice bucket challenge died on sunday at the age of thirty seven quinn and the late pete. Freights were both diagnosed with a rare and fatal disease and started the ice bucket challenge to raise money and awareness about the condition. The disease has no hope at the moment but the ice bucket challenge revamped that outlook the ice bucket challenge helped raise more than two hundred million dollars to fund research and treatments for the disease.

Pat Quinn Quinn
Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

The Voicebot Podcast

04:12 min | Last week

Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

"You have four square. It's has this consumer heritage you've been using it from and From an enterprise standpoint for several years and then you went ahead and launched an alexa skill and google assistant up You said you didn't really get much traction from it now. Do you think you didn't get much traction from it because there's just a big discovery problem because consumers don't wanna use this because it was a It's designed initially as a mobile solution. Most people are using alexa and google assistant or at least alexa. google systems. More split like in home as opposed to on the road. What did you attribute to that like. Not being an appropriate channel for you to be pushing out foursquare functionality. Good question you know. We built it because we we experiment with every platform. That's out there and a big part of the foursquare labs the rnd group is. I want us to build for every platform because it enables us to have an informed opinion about what is good or not good. What works what doesn't work with that right so even if we something nobody uses it i can still win for us. We built for that. We understand it. We did it. You know now we can speak intelligently about it going back to the voice skills like when we were building this in the end parse out the the actual command to fire up to four foursquare skill like. Hey hey hey alexa ask foursquare to tell me the best restaurants he's village. It's just not something that real people are gonna do and you know. Visually look at the data for what people use these voices for in their homes. It's like you know what's the weather today. What time is it. Set alarm for your mac and cheese that i'm cooking In a place a music like it's not these complicated queries and so we tried it in an opinion about. And we kinda just shelved it right. Because i didn't think that was like the just wasn't wasn't worth throwing a lot of resources behind now if you'd would The default solution. I'm one of these platforms where they could have said Invoked the voice assistant of choice. And just ask the question without saying ask foursquare. Do you think that that would have made a big difference. I think it would have made some distant difference but also like you know planning where to go might not be the task you do in your living room in so it might be not the most appropriate thing to ask one of these things that sits on your like you know living room table in a when you talk about siri in having serious decibel on your phone or your airpods. Like you say he hit. Hey siri now. Just kind of cool. I think that as my theory goes off at more meaningful But i think we got We got some signals from apple early on that there was no intention to really like in its to to say. Hey i ask a question About a map past that over to forswear in so you would still have that mouthful of a sentence like a siri as where to do this thing which is just it. Just doesn't roll off the tongue Do that have you played with syria shortcuts at all a little a little bit but not not enough to fully comment on it. You have to install shortcuts though right as a user to to enable them at the very least so you could create a shortcut for four square and then basically publishing and then users could enable it or users can actually enable their own shortcuts for certain types of features at least two open apps we did. We played played with this. I mean probably a year ago it feels like forever. It'd be about the right team. we were. We were frustrated with the amount of hoops at the user to jump through to enable it. and it's like real arc de this early will do it but

Google Alexa Apple Syria
interview With Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

The Voicebot Podcast

04:54 min | Last week

interview With Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

"Okay. Dennis crowley welcome to the voice. Podcast thanks for the beer. Yeah it's really good to see you again so we were just talking before we got on the bike in the video here that we met very briefly. I think we talked for about ten minutes after voice. Camp by beta works. Which i believe was june of twenty seventeen hundred times ago. Who has a lot of things happened since then and that was fun. I mean yeah. Companies like jovan came out of that. So there's a lot of listeners to my podcast very familiar with jovo and egg voice. I think was there as They're doing really well in the in the custom assistant space rag culture so that was a really Really good event. Very early on is reputed. We're starting to build custom assistance. And you're on stage. I don't remember exactly what your Your comments and prognostications were. But i'm sure they came true. I think we were talking about Voice skills at the time. I think i let alexa was opened to you. Know building your own voice skills. And i think we were. We force for likes learning with like. Should we make something there or not. Yeah and you'd never did correct. We did we made something for actually made something for google. Whatever google on google home google. Now whatever it's called sugarless assistant yet but we we. We launched them but we never really promoted it. I don't think. I even know it still works to be honest. We saw very williams at with that stuff as it's tough because you really have to say a mouthful just to get the thing to work like. Hey google assistant foursquare this. That's just not what normal people do. You know. That's really interesting So actually why don't we. I think most of the people who are listening are probably familiar with foursquare. But why don't we talk a little bit about your journey with foursquare what that does how that lets you up to the assistant. We'll talk about that. And then obviously. We want to spend a lot of time on mars. Because i think that's a really interesting solution. But for the people who aren't up to speed on the foursquare journey you know what you're what you're quick summary about how you got to where you are because you know a tremendously important company in many ways At least from my perspective And you know really at the at the onset of the bubble revolution in particular. And now we're in voice and you're doing something else in the space so i think it's really interesting. How you're jumping these technology curves. Yeah i mean we've been doing foursquare for for twelve years now and so forth. What has been a lot of different things in those twelve years kind of typical startup journey of trying a little bit of everything until you really figure it out but started as a consumer app Back in two thousand nine audience maybe fifty sixty million users which still wasn't enough In terms of you know running a at canal a product radio ads in the product. And so that's really when we started to understand that the destiny of the company was becoming more of an enterprise providing tools and technology to develop partners providing data a building advertising marketing solutions in robust analytics around types of people have been to what types of places You know really a lot of the things that he saw the consumer equitable to spin those into very valuable Tools and technologies for for others to use and company has has been doing really well since we've really figured out how that business works really changed the company to better serve those opportunities. Yes it was really a social connectivity app. I would say in the beginning. And it's moved into that data location business. Yeah you're you're you're working with enterprises. I will say that i still use the foursquare out. Yes why there's tons of people still use the apps and i think that consumer dna still runs very strongly. The company which i think gives us A unique perspective. When we're building had of these enterprise tools like normally think of enterprise stuff is like oh it's just software for companies but like we approach it as As as you would if you were building it for for end users and i think that allows us to be more thoughtful like more clever with it more playful with it sometimes And you know he was still a team here that works on the consumer apps. Like my my job now is run the the rnd team here which just makes weird stuff with the tools and technology in the most of that we are stuff is meant to be used by end users. Just people that are walking around was was phones or airpods. Whatever

Google Dennis Crowley Jovan Alexa Williams
"co founder" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:02 min | 2 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Today's Wednesday. September thirtieth. America's blood pressure is up Disney theme park jobs are down and we're focused on one of Silicon Valley's most controversial companies. Earlier today Pantene tear technologies went public on the New York Stock. Exchange. It did so via a direct listing rather than an IPO. But that's not even the interesting part except to finance nerds instead it's because Pailin tear has long been known as secretive and controversial and to be honest unique with within tech industry known for Copycat. ISM. Penalty was created in two thousand and three to apply information technology to anti-terrorism campaigns by a group of founders who included current CEO, alcs, carp current venture capitalist, Joe Lonsdale, and Peter Thiel, the well-known facebook director, and inform advisor to president trump. Also pledged to help secure people's data from their own governments kind of philosophy of we'll help them find you. But only if you've done something really bad. As Alex Kerr recently told axios on HBO. If the US government targets somebody with a drone strike chances are that talents your software was used somewhere along the way. Pound tears since. Moved into work with government entities like ice, which obviously doesn't make it to popular in large swath of liberal Silicon Valley. It also works with governments if foreign. And a growing number of businesses which represents around half of its revenue. Oh and speaking of revenue and balance sheets pound. Cheers unprofitable despite a massive valuation and a longtime in business. So we want to dig into what Palette here is and what it isn't with company CO founder Joe Lonsdale, who no longer works pound here but who continues to be paid a consulting fee and who holds a whole lot of Pailin tear stock that conversation in fifteen seconds. Bridge Bank knows the INS and outs of business ups and downs and remains dedicated to providing financial solutions to the risk takers, the game changers, and the disrupters those committed to leveraging innovation to make the world a better place bridge. Bank is a division of Western Alliance, Bank ridgeback be bold venture wisely. We're joined. Now by Joe Lonsdale a CO founder of technologies also, a venture capitalist who runs Eight v C.. So Joe, what was kind of the mission when you help found Pailin tear basic idea was to take a really competent technology culture that had gotten way ahead of Washington D. C. and to apply to solve the most important problems going on at the time, which was basically to help bring together data to solve. Problems and stop terrorism stock attacks while protecting civil liberties the protecting civil liberties you obviously well, no kind of some of the criticism of Pailin tear, which is this idea that has gone from as you say, kind of protecting US troops overseas to enabling whether it be ice or NSA to spy to a certain extent on Americans how do you respond to that because it seem to be kind of a fundamental mission creep? Well, if you look at what we're doing, we're helping augment the human mind to act on data and act on data they're allowed to act on and to me it's really ironic that is seen as problematic that way because the whole idea was, let's build in such a way that people are only allowed to see share they're allowed to see in share. So there's audit trails you can watch the watchers. It's a rather than like the show twenty four were Jack Bauer goes and just whatever he wants to get the bad guy let's have a system. That only lets them use the data legally only the way they're allowed to you, and that's the whole point is helter is a privacy engine that lets you only see what the rule say allowed to see. How does Powell to your protect that data from talent here basically set up there, and it's very clear how pounder works with whoever's in charge always see who's accessing what so I mean I suppose it is possible that if the people using it are doing. So in a way, it's it's hidden from pounds here in charge all the way up the top could be involved in. Something, they're not supposed to be doing that is the power they have. However, it's designed such way. It's very hard for any small bricks to get away with anything. They not supposed to do because people talk about full control and can't see what happened. What was access isn't that one of the concerns that when you've got a company that's collecting and analyzing and kind of merging so much data that even though whether it be ice or the NSA or some corporate customer doesn't have access, there is somebody who has access and it does open the possibility of there being a bad actor somewhere. Well it makes it a lot harder to have a bad actor. If you haven't information infrastructure that's tracking everything tracking exactly how it's used and the has pounds here itself doesn't have access to all the data that people are using pounds here to work on. So it's not like talent you're sitting in the middle is able to see everything. You're always when I read a story about that, it's referred to as the secretive silicon valley technology company I know this bothers me a lot and you know what it is. Helen chairs culture is really good at getting the most talented engineers technologists in the world and saw the really hard problems in these really cool missions they go on with their customers to work on penalty here does not have very sophisticated and built out PR group. In fact, the PR strategy seems to be to avoid talking to the press I. Guess that makes us secretive but it's funny because we go to their site they explain. How the technology works explain when it's it's really complicated. Building information infrastructure is not easy. It's not complicated most of us don't understand it so I think rather than secretive is that it's doing something that is just relatively Tarik most people, Alex Carpet Interview with my colleague Mike. Allen for our HBO show about a month or two ago, and he talked about how even within his own family certain things pound here has decided to do have been controversial for you. Are there things are their customers their clients at has taken on that? You think man if I was in charge, we wouldn't have done that. It's an interesting question. Actually I don't have full information on exactly how it's working western countries in the Middle East I tend to be very pro enforcing the laws in the US never they are working with our allies works with thirty to forty nine over five countries probably were forty point. I'm very allying with talents here. Don't China don't work with Russia Iran Etcetera. Obvious one son other allies in the Middle East I. Don't know exactly how they're using it. I. Always get a little bit of a queasy feeling myself. Exactly what people do in certain countries where my values are not aligned with their pounder has a strong set of principles internally but I've actually not privy conversation since I can't say for sure that I, agree with every. Choice. They've made their but in general I support with Algiers done number like trout and all these things they've done does that include ice and I guess I asked the question because the company originally was kind of founded at the time of the Iraq war and as you said, was kind of an anti-terrorism thing in part it seems correct me if I'm wrong about this. The part of its technology is being used by not to identify violent criminals, but to identify people whose sole crime is crossing a border but not violence. Well, in general, the company has to make a choice he's going to support US laws are not you know I was actually when I started we joke, maybe we shouldn't be helping the IRS depending on different people have. Different views morally of that, and of course, it does out the IRS while I think in general helping the government do what does better is right thing to do I personally am very against some art immigration laws that said minor standing as the Obama Administration worked with here with ice and they actually ended up stopping a lot of child traffickers and caught law child. Traffickers, thanks their works Joe Your Day job now is being venture capitalist, identifying new tech companies which to invest. Do you see baby palim tears coming up from behind it? Because from my perspective on the outside, I don't seem to see much you've got a lot of big data companies but not ones that are aiming at the same sorts of markets found series. That's A. Really good question and actually gets the heart wise special company. It's actually something very similar to what we did without a apart is we took a bunch of really talented people and we worked on a problem that take four or five seven years to really solve properties very, very hard problem to take these things that used to be services and to make into products there's. One hundred billion dollars year services everyone around the world does that nobody else has been able to turn as many of them into products such a hard technical problem. So ideal hope to have somebody else spent hundreds of billions of dollars with equity driven team of the very top talent to be able to pounce here does I have not seen people.

Joe Lonsdale US NSA Middle East Pailin CO founder Silicon Valley America Pantene HBO New York Stock Western Alliance IRS Jack Bauer Alex Kerr Algiers alcs better place bridge
"co founder" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

03:48 min | 2 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"Was summarizing his email. But in essence he had a developer who did some work on it earlier and it didn't work out and basically feels like you know kind of wasted the money early on. So doesn't WanNa make that mistake twice this feels similar to the to the prior to questions where someone has done some validation. Saying I think his questions is a little different. He saying should I find a technical co founder right? Yeah. He's. He's definitely hasn't jumped to the conclusion that he must find a co which I. Actually it sounds like especially since he's already had enough sort of business acumen and skills. To. Developed any has a product that he can bring customers into. So even said, he's already secured thirty customers that want to transfer from the APP they currently use to mind. Awesome do that if you have customers and your APP is going to work for them, then than help them, do the transfer and make them get them starting to pay for it, and then you can start seeing. Okay. Now can I grow this are? There, more customers out there and the downside of course, the doing this, the risks that you're taking is that you you validated with these thirty customers, but that's where it stops. Now I a feeling thirty people who are interested in something is a lot more than a lot of companies start with before going out to actually grow. So that's pretty awesome I. Really think that you ought to try to run with US A. Little Bit, and if you had a developer company that help build the revised version of this APP and it's working, then stick with them like get your customers end, get those thirty customers and maybe try to add on thirty more sixty more one, hundred more or whatever, and then use the money from that to fund further development with this company for a little while longer, it doesn't seem like you need necessarily a technical. Co founder yet because you seem to have a pretty solid base of knowledge and you've already made some mistakes on your own..

co founder developer US
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:40 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Just you probably just get rid of the people. Just have your best people. They're not managing anybody. The. Other thing I'd say is that you know when you're in the earliest agents like the cost of somebody being bad is super high. Totally Kill Your company. When you're later stage, the cost of somebody being bad is pretty low, if somebody in a role, whatever if they're low performers, who cares? But if one third of your team is a low performer, that's just not going to work right like that just means you're team is low performing so yeah I just be extremely picky you probably the whatever urgency you're feeling around hiring. It's not worth sacrificing for even a B. Plus player in the early days. And that number that like you know grading regimen, whatever it's totally like finger to the air fuzzy, but for the role. You're hiring you WANNA hire somebody who's the best in the world at that role. I will continue my my ran for just one last point which is. Just because somebody says you need to hire, the best person in the world for the role doesn't mean that you need to hire the best person in the world in their discipline, so if you need to hire for example the best. React if you're building a react APP you WanNa hire the best react engineer in the world. That doesn't mean you WanNa hire the guy that works or Gal that works on the react Colonel Ray. Because that person probably doesn't solving problems that you have you wanna find somebody who's the best in the world at the sort of domain that you actually care about you like you necessarily want to hire somebody who is tremendous at writing algorithms. If what you need to do is build, Web APPs. Like their competence in this deep technical domain doesn't help your startup. It might help your ego, but it doesn't help your star and what you really want is somebody who's going to help your start up. How you think about compensation, it was sort of philosophy. Behind. So I thought a ton about this. The way that basically look at it as pre seed. It's basically whatever you can negotiate that person's basic before before you raise any money based prison, basically a co-founder whether you give them. The CO founder title is your decision. Not Mind whatever you negotiate, anything goes. There's no rationality here. Once you've raised some money well. Look at his, you know. If you want a really strong team. You pretty much just straight up. Tell people that they can't be in it for cash like as a seed stage startup if someone comes in, and they're like yeah I need one fifty to start. It's there's just like no way dude..

Colonel Ray engineer co-founder CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

04:02 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

"Something, on Rwanda at least I want to walk into a memory that you have of Rwanda because I have never been in Rwanda. And I think a lot of people here so many. Amazing stories of the business ecosystem in wonder. Maybe. If you could. As a closing closing closing I don't know what to call it closing experience four for people listening to you. How! How's your day to day in? Wonder? What is the most? The most amazing either place or thing about wonder that you can share. That has also made your your life as a CO founder. Much more easier or much more enjoyable because you are stationed in in Rwanda maybe something that you can share with us on on what's wonder is like.

Rwanda CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

06:16 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"A holiday that marks the end of slavery in America which is why it's been referred to as the true independence. Day I hope all of you were able to honor the day in your own way and reflect on what it represents. I'm so glad you're tuning in because today's episode is incredibly special I know I say that every week, but this week really is. It's with Powell of alleged a pastry chef based in Washington DC and the CO founder of Baker's against racism. The initiative started as simple call to unite bakers in the fight against the unjust treatment of black people in the United States, Paula and her co founders were hoping eighty or so people would join in their bake sale and stead. They sparked a global movement bakers against racism, his ignited solidarity on five continents and seventeen countries, and in forty one states until corona virus devastated the restaurant Industry Paulo was the pastry chef at the critically acclaimed afro-caribbean restaurant, kith and kin, she has creative, charismatic, honest and force to be reckoned with the industry is lucky to have Paula in it, I'm honored to bring you this conversation. So Palo. We're GONNA start at the beginning. I'm telling me where you spent your childhood. So I grew up in the Bronx. In New, York City and every summer for three four months depending on. How my mom felt I would go to the Dominican Republic and lived there. She thought it was really important to make sure that I. Slit my difference Salah I knew my heritage, but also you know experienced the American way of life. And did you stay with family members in the Dominican Republic? Yeah, before everything happened like with my grandmother. Passing away my grandfather fascinating way, we would just stay our family home in the what we call is uncomfortable, and it just means the well. It means camp literally translated, but it just means like the countryside that's where I kind of like learned how to appreciate food, and how to grow my own veg and herbs and appreciate like fresh fruits. You see a lot of that in my desserts. Now I'm so sorry lost your grandparents winter. They pass away. I was young. I was fairly young. You know maybe ten all the so hard. Yeah, it was it was difficult. You know, but my grandmother really with the time that we did have she. impacted my life. Changed. Everything that I thought about you know where before I might have not appreciated food, because when you think about American culture, you think about fast. She kinda like helped me like slow down at a very young age, and really look and see in what the earth against us, and how the world nourishes us from a very very young age I understood the complexities of food, and how we hold our heritage through it. Can you tell us some of the things that she both cooked and grew, she would cook a big meal which consists of rice beans, chickens that we would grow not grow. Her is very traumatic first because they were my pets and then I realized very quickly. The food system was like Oh. You know she would make this huge meal and she would invite everybody in the neighborhood. Everyone that was able to come. If you it didn't matter if you're rich poor, it didn't matter if you're young or old, and we all kind of sit in the front yard in the backyard and eat from my grandmother's food and she had that meal in Cup of Coffee Ready. Ready in the middle of the day for everybody always matter what was going on and our lives. She had that ready, and that's something that we as a family now when we go to the Dominican Republic, we continue as a tradition, so everybody knows our family to be hosts, so it's very fitting that now I work in the hospitality industry. Did Your Grandmother Specialty. Yes, so she would make coconut rice with peace so much Guan Lula cocoa and it was cooked in the woodfire. We had like a house that was open open air that they had bricks that you put your woodfire in, and that's how she would cook. Everything was cooked, by Soviet, Elena, which means over fire while all of my experience in the Dominican Republic I didn't know what stove was in the Dominican Republic. My my brain never made that connection that you could have. A gas stove. 'cause we always use what fire so. How about some of the things that that she would grow you mentioned fruits. You mentioned herbs. What were some of the things in her garden? Her. Garden consisted of this plot of land in front of our house, and behind our house, and we call it in cal-, and cal means the Cacao trees, and it was just rows and rows and rows, and rows of of wild ca cal that would naturally in our backyard laced in between were mango trees, tamarind avocado plantations right next to our house in our well of rain water was guava and passion fruit, which I always like to say whatever fruits like. Like to grow together will always taste good together. We had herbs in the back in the shaded area. Where is anything that you can think of shot? They CILANTRO or no Kulan. Throw and more we had for me. We had lemongrass growing by the side of the House and I would drink that tea, and it would be a natural mosquito repellent so pretty nice, you know. Oh, my Gosh! I'm starting to get the impression that it's no surprise. You became a chef. I I think so? I mean it was a good fit i. feel like I was the only one in my family. That kind of took that same sentiment of food, and being connected with nature like that like my grandmother did and turned it into a way to give back to the community, so I've always been using food. As a way to connect with other people because I'm very shy I don't make like a great first impression is very awkward at first I'm like. Oh, I'm sorry you had to go through that with me. You know, but with food I can show you who I am without.

Dominican Republic Paula CO founder Palo United States Industry Paulo America Washington Powell Salah Guan Lula Baker York City Elena
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

07:46 min | 6 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Take your personal experience in in arbitrage of personal experience. Okay go ahead Eric. If you wrote this today besides the every quicker would it be meaningfully? Different not really. I think I think some of the things have been sped up. Because you know you you. Can Incorporate online stripe is there? No Code is there. I'd probably advised not and and online services much more right because you can get pretty far that I might also say that you know and this is the third model. At which is you might serve the community. So there's idea there's executioners community right so you know nowadays on I've got a following on my twitter removes or what have you and the interaction of them is sort of like you know person community Fit Right. And then that community you can withdraw. A protocol can withdraw a product and so forth. And that's something. I was just less thinking about back in twenty thirteen today but that might be third angle on things you know to take a community. I approach and how about the Kobe requests for startups or anti replacement startups. This shea. Talking about I. What is this graph? This is the Telegraph of thousand days in the life of Thanksgiving Turkey. Life improves improves improves. And then a ridiculous sudden reversal. Okay and we're seeing Thanksgiving Day charts across the economy and where the rubber is orange. Okay and look at that ridiculous Thanksgiving giving day drop and breach by the way has risen dramatically right so uber is now essentially just breeds their second. Business has become their first. That's literally their business. Okay now the thing about this is a reversal business. Plan for you know like fortunately for over it. At least the corporation they can. Disengage drivers when demand plummets. Like those but But that's like a you know ridiculous. Drop right like seventy percent drop revenue. However here's the thing. Notice how we dropped but not breeds one of things. I was short on Uber. Benatti reads is pretty good. It's pretty specific prediction in terms of what to be long insured on. And frankly you know. I never talk about trades online because that's investing Advice River Bellizzi. That if you had reallocated full you listen to me around the time you would have done pretty well right so like for example. X Rays drones antivirals. Cat Scans Autonomy Diagnostics. Facemasks remote were Tele presence bioinformatics at that holds up. One of those were in drones. Me Put an asterisk on simply because there's such supply chain disruption demand me there have been not not the supply we'll have to see. You can make VR headsets in the US but everything else is clearly going especially like Mike. Remote workshops zoom and stuff and then on the short side of things. I think that holds up pretty well as well traveled tender grinder hotels AIRBNB airlines in person. You know blue cities come back it up. Real estate is crashing commercial real estate and blue cities restaurants conferences digital nomads. In the sense of moving around the world. You can't do that anymore. Remember Berates so I think that holds a pretty darn well right and I think that's like let's call it a part of the comp investing thesis if you remember this concept of the digital divide this is the thing in the late Ninety S O. Some people have access to Internet others. Don't right so April seventh. This concept which I think is one mental model. The fiscal divide bright digital is now cheap with billions of smartphones around the world. It's a physical. That's expensive case for last two years. We've made the cost of putting a bunch of transistors on a chip that that's now cheap but putting a bunch of people in rooms now expensive okay so the measure of a competent society is one that can actually hold a rally if you can do that you are. You're confident in the people. There are confident of the steam and the diagnostics. And so on that you know you can have this huge crowd that it's being tested to them into their life and they all come and congregate there right. I from incompetence state and for citizenry. That is not cooperatives. The Commons are attracting. And you can't basically there's a field state in between your house in the next person's House. You have to wear masks you you know you basically house a like like a place where you can't show your face you know. Maybe it's pollution meets infection. It's not the comments aren't actually traversable. So I think this is a powerful mental model for the next several years at least that physical is expensive and one thing that means by the way is digital now cheap physicals now expensive so everybody is GonNa want offer substitute for things because you know Sadler tweet. By the way that I was really surprised. People wild doubt about the I one more question for you which is a CO founders. Are we sort of in the picking co-founder similar to sort of dating before that you're limited to the people that you went to college with or worked with or is that for Co founder? Is that actually good? She's should you stick to that pool. How do you think what's your framework for picking the Right Co founder? Yeah know so so like the way I kind of think about this is having and being like an investor and having seen like lots of these things and whatnot so you should pick somebody who who's is complementary to you okay and there should always be clear. Ceo that's like the most important component the thing about that is like the question of WHO's the CEO. That's like one of the very first conversations you need to have and ideally. It's something where that's obvious between between you but if it's not a for example at the beginning of joint base itself public knowledge but you know Brian and the Guy who helped found blocking didn't so they had a screaming. Send you know what they were outright and basically blocks company and Mrs Good Company. That type of stuff shouldn't be resolved. There's also an ideological dispute watching to be able to have a wallet where they couldn't have the password password reset four the road actually very substantive. It's two different visions of the future. Both of which trinite illegitimate visions of Crypto? Right true product. Difference on on simple thing pastor reset so so that's that's like a good example of a few things. I who's the leader Second Woods A LONG-TERM IDEOLOGICAL VISION THIRD OUR SKILLS COMPLIMENTARY? I do not do these. Co-founder dating sites or whatever. Kids these days you know like I don't know I don't know if that works. I feel some could work but it feels inorganic. Maybe you know I think the best thing to do is to actually work on a project with that person and find that there's an actual division of labor nothing substitutes for that because working with somebody is just very very different from talking to them on. It's like they have to cash the past when you throw it into it. What you meant not necessarily what you said. Lots and lots of little things like that have to tolerate your using 'cause nobody's ever heard strong and every dimension or some people are few and so I think actually doing and shipping project. Ideally one involves money and customer support with them like is is probably the best bet naked or something like that but try to push it all the way through such that book that you have legal liability together or or customers yelling you. That's real trial by fire. Balji thank you so much for coming on give a digital rotten for her volatility. If you're an early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you check us out. Village Global Davi seat..

Co founder Ceo twitter Eric Advice River Bellizzi US Kobe AIRBNB Benatti Mrs Good Company co-founder Sadler Co-founder
"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

The John Roa Show

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

"This is one of the first major cancellations in America in a major shock to both attendees and the city of Austin, Texas. Canceling south by is more than just calling off a massive event or party. The festival was intertwined with the financial and personal livelihoods of ton of people global. South by two people got record deals where movies were picked up for distribution. Tons of money was raised for startups. Ideas were shared. It's even where twitter. South southbound was also a boon for hundreds and hundreds of Austin based businesses to sustain throughout the year to the tune of almost four hundred million dollars in revenue for the city. Canceling, the event is and will be devastating. To Austin The impacts everyone. The bars, restaurants hotels taxis the performers, free and everyone else in between. The CO founders of south by southwest music producer Roland Swenson writers makeup borrow and Lewis Black. Promoter Louis J Myers started the festival way back in nineteen, eighty, seven to promote and foster local talent. Now, the fate of south life hangs in the balance as does. The festival had to lay off a third of its staff after the cancellation. And fans rightfully called for refunds. South by didn't even have an insurance policy to cover the fallout. And then things went from bad to worse. More than one hundred and sixty thousand would be. Attendees aren't going to get a refund. Instead, it was announced that the badge purchasers for this season. Can. Defer their purchase to. The festival next you. Founder Louis Black, although he's not involved to day-to-day operation to the festival any longer. Says the news of the cancellation still devastated. He's weathered a Lotta stores. Pandemic something entirely different in south by not even the only project he's co-founded. That's taken a hit. Lewis is also the CO founder of the All weekly Austin Chronicle which has taken its fair share financial punches, but is still hanging in there. Somehow. Louis always manages to get back in the game. In two thousand fifteen, even start his own production company Lewis Black productions. Joins me on today's episode from an Airbnb in the small town of Lockhart Texas. To talk about south buys cancelation his retirement in the profound and often unpredictable ways. He helped to transform.

Austin Louis Black Promoter Louis J Myers America CO founder Lewis Black Austin Chronicle Texas twitter Lewis Roland Swenson Lockhart Texas Airbnb Founder producer
"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

04:00 min | 7 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"To build a mailing envelope. No we're going to buy a gift greeting card and blow. Oh let's go find DVD. Oh I see these close enough And that is. The skill is finding a proxy. Which allows you to begin learning about the world and your ideas your ideas place in it. It does not need to be repeatable or scalable at first at this an organ specific example. If I have time you're really briefly. Yeah so women. Women came to me At at an idea she goes he cool if we could do peer to peer clothing. Rental were basically. I know I have always clothing in my closet and I think I would want to rent that and I could rent. There's and she goes I'm Anita Mesa money and how do I find a co-founder? How do I build my initial APP? And I go. Whoa WHOA. Whoa whoa let's begin seeing some. Let's collide this idea with reality. Go get a piece of paper get a sharpy right on the piece of paper. WanNa borrow my clothes. Knock and pasted on your door right and let's see what happens. Let's see first of all anyone knocks if they do. Let's see what happens when they're looking for your clothes. Is there a fit problem? Is there a taste problem? Let's see if they do bar. You're close. Let's see how you feel when they come back stained or dirty or what you have to do to get them repaired or how you feel about this. Let's begin learning by doing nothing more than writing on a piece of paper with a Sharpie. You can't run a business like this but that's not what you're doing now you're trying to understand. Is this idea real? And she did that and little by little by little. She accumulated evidence about this problem and ways to solve it and so yes six months later when she was going to raise money and someone said how do I know this ideas. A good one. She could talk your ear off about the evidence. She had what people would pay. How long the rentals were how much you'd have to do for cleaning. What percentage And Wow that's the person you WanNa follow you back in invest in. Yeah it sounds like Renaissance Wag. Actually sounds bad. Exact business model but Is that she ever yes. It's a smaller business. Because she's still in school but she is moving ahead and she's moving ahead based on finding a way to. I caught validation hacking away to validate or idea without actually a doing it. For Real Right. I only have like a single story. That is almost a little different. But a friend of OUR EX GIRLFRIEND OF MINE. Her Dad wanted to start a business where he sold a MO mobility scooters and all he did was get business cards printed. He had no had no shop. He had no product. He had nothing he had a little bit. You know he knew you. He used to sell them in the past for a bigger company. Just got business. Cards and went door to door does not under the door until he had enough business where he could take fifty percent deposit and go actually by the scooter. And then he would do all the The the repairs themselves until we hire somebody. It's just everything was just started with a business card. I love that story because it is another entrepreneur. I know he he had an idea. Use at a party is eleven o'clock at night raining and they ran out of beer and all began arguing about who is turn. It has gotten find the beer. The usual Millennial problem Yeah the idea is cutting while ago because basically my phone knows where I am at knows. My taste has my credit card database. Open liquor stores great idea but same thing as your friend rather than saying. I'm going to raise money. I'm GONNA find a technical co founder going to build an APP going to test this. He just had business cards printed up. That said need beer. Call me with a cell phone number eight stand outside apartments on weekends and.

Anita Mesa co-founder co founder
"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

Building A Unicorn

02:42 min | 7 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

"Your clients. Montana is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer of Quinoa an online platform that allows you to easily create the business documents you need and then send them to your client as individual websites including dynamic pricing information and the ability to sign and accept that proposal. Right there on the web. The core idea behind cua is that Files suck at the way that the documents work in this. This world is sort of based on this like nineteen eighties way of thinking about the documents atmosphere being largely kept in place by the glorious Microsoft Monopoly And so all queries is a way for anyone to create. They had documents especially sort of customer facing documents as Web Pages. And so if you can re imagine a document on the ground As you know what you can do in the web and not have to be in this four rectangle hyper. What can you do you know? Why can't you have analytics? Like buttons? Do things why can't you haven't lived in this world of of SAS in the cloud where it can push and pull data from different systems rather than just being a dominant ugly file. Mock grew up in Sydney and throughout his childhood was surrounded by entrepreneurs. His Dad ran his own architectural business which he grew to around sixty or seventy staff and his uncle also had a number of startups. Mock went to school at Sydney Grandma and low. He was a good student. He couldn't see himself for showing the same kinds of career opportunities that his friends were interested in he wanted to carve his own path. Although he wasn't quite sure what that path would actually be. There was no like plan. There was no like I said. Look back on it like some people have these amazing narrative ox of their their life and their career. And I'm deeply skeptical because I think that really life happens and you. I think people who are very good at adjusting knowing Knowing where on paternity lies and able to dive into it. Sort of an opportunistic in that side. I think I think that sort of rings true to me and certainly I remember being at the end of highschool being like I feel have plan and I kind of really didn't have at university mock studied subjects. He was interested in. He did history and philosophy and also became interested in student politics but he thought maybe he wanted to issue. I curry in business. But it wasn't quite sure what that actually meant so when he's caused finished any trying to work out what to do. He ended up getting some work with his uncle on an e book. Stop cold read how you want. But.

Mock Sydney Chief Operating Officer of Qui Montana Microsoft cua CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

02:12 min | 9 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"Say was interesting. That's when we found the wizard the is Diana Ruth. He was a coo co-founder but she creates all the products. She has an amazing background hard. Candy Bliss. Cosmetics was William Fung for a long time but she is just a creative genius and she will never ever create anything that already exists. She's all about innovation stories. Great Components Ray so we we joined forces with her by then. I remember her first meeting with us. We're all around the table going because we had a lot of. I did get a lot of passion like Rosie. Jody and I kind of just sat there staring at the three. I was going. Oh my God. This is going to be so interesting. She managed to take all this. This energy these ideas these thoughts and make them into tangible products I really think the interesting part of the packaging that sort of push pop idea with clear sight milk. It's very it's a very modern fawn. Yeah exactly it's very transparent as we are as a brand and everything about it. I always lean into the idea. That's for utilitarian so we have sticks. We have dispenses with rolling balls. We have click pens. Everything is extremely easy to use on the go as well because we originally always had the milk goals get ready quick We have so many things going on. They creative ambitious very fast. Paced lives the girl and the guy and we wanted to create something align that they could use very quickly in the back of a cab changed their look five minutes down town and something that you know worked really hard but was kind of Felicita on kind of rewrite. All those. The things that were contradiction terms. We wanted to rewrite. Why can't you get ready? Quick but still have really great payoff. Why can't you have cool products? That are actually still clean. They can still be extremely low maintenance but yeah a high tech.

Candy Bliss Diana Ruth co-founder William Fung Jody coo Cosmetics
"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

13:29 min | 9 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Of girl boss. And you're listening to girl boss radio. Everybody's you know game is on point these days and I know I'm not the only person who loves to see crazy now are on instagram. Whichever way you spin it. The nail game is a pretty big industry but if we go back a few decades time well no Polish used to just be nail Polish. It was bland. There was a thing you grabbed at the drugstore on a whim. Or maybe you got a fresh manicure. You weren't really paying for the brand on the bottle that all changed with a little company called. Opie I yes that OPIE I. It's the go-to Nail Polish for a lot of us in on today's show we're going to hear from the CO founder and Brandon Basseterre for opie. I her name is suzy. Weiss Fishman and. She's known as the First Lady of meals. She actually co-founded Opie I with her brother-in-law and it started out as a dental products..

Weiss Fishman Brandon Basseterre CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:58 min | 11 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"This CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD. AMERITRADE investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD Ameritrade our trade offers two different mobile APPs there's TD AMERITRADE mobile. Which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined? Simplicity or thinker. Swim Mobile. which gives you tools as you need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one? That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE AMERITRADE dot com slash APPs member SIPC bring in show musically. This is squawk Fahd the daily sleep podcast brought to you by the team behind squawk box. CNBC's essential morning chef worked every day. Get the best stories debate and analysis analysis from the biggest names in business and politics today on Squawk Todd. Joe Becky. Andrew are at the World Economic Forum with the planet's the most influential leaders in business and politics. We've got a huge lineup. This week. This is Are Super Bowl for the world of politics and business a roundup of the best sound bound from CNBC's interviews with the CEO's of Verizon Bank of America and steady plus the leaders of some of the best known and largest asset managers and hedge hedge funds in the world and an interview with author investor and Philanthropist David Rubenstein Co founder of one of the world's premier private equity woody firms. The Carlyle Group right. Now I don't see any prospect of a recession in two thousand twenty so pretty good the best of the World Economic Forum Day One plus some behind the sounds from Joe and Becky. We're double Switzerland. The Beautiful Alps beautiful behind us to bed. You guys can see it. I'M CNBC ABC producer. Cameron Kosta it's Tuesday. January twenty first twenty twenty squawk pod begins right now three one. Good morning everybody. Welcome to walk on. CNBC we are live from the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. I'm becky quick along with Joe. Kernan and Andrew Ross Sorkin the World Economic Forum is exactly that an Economic Forum Michael Corbett the CEO of city spoke to Joe Backing Andrew about the trajectory of the global economy. When you look at the growth prognostications coming up while we're here three point three percent global growth down from three point four four prediction but up from two point nine for the year right? So that's that's not horrible if you get some of these clouds to clear. I think they're still runway left here of course at a conference this size with this caliber of attendees there's a diversity of perspective and of advice. Ray dallaglio billionaire founder of bridgewater ladder at the world's largest hedge fund shared some of his firm's investment strategy issue is. You can't jump into cash. Cash is trash. Okay you have to have a well diversified portfolio and first of all you have to be global and you have to have ballots. Think that you have to have a certain amount of gold in your portfolio portfolio or you have to have something tarred another theme today and probably all week trade between the two biggest economies in the world the US and China Steve Schwarzman founder and CEO of Blackstone Group has a long history of business investments in China and was in the room for the phase one signing literally. He's he's competent. That fees to as at least a priority for both parties involved. It's in China's interest as well as the US interest to do a face to deal. Most of the tariffs were not rolled back in this phase. One so there's a lot of incentive if you will to get to face to and They're they're quite serious about that in China all your on Squawk box and certainly as long as we've been delivering use pod guests have been debating capitalism And that theme is no different at Davos. Twenty twenty on the broadcast this morning. Billionaire Hedge Fund manager Paul Tudor Jones. A legendary investor kept corporate responsibility. What's ability at the center of his conversation? We know what's happening right now. As causing millennials not to believe in the system. We know that there's a threat to free markets. I'd much rather see us. change the sharing agreements organically bottoms up where. CEO's put employees. I put with the planet in communities and customers on par with shareholders also calling for corporate. Responsibility was Brian Moynihan CEO Bank of America. He's he's also the chairman of the International Business Council an advisory body to the World Economic Forum itself but of all the companies apartment job is commit the carbon neutrality. That will help drive. I the demand for alternative energies at the power companies need to get them carbon neutral and the final theme today new tech the CEO of Verizon Hans. Berg says five G. is way closer on the horizon than some other things. What comes first? I get a five d phone where I fly on a seven thirty seven. Max We there without five G. You're getting the best of our Davos coverage right here on squawk pot coming up will be investor. Author journalist Philanthropist and Co founder of the Carlyle Group. David Rubenstein if I knew how to solve income inequality I'd be in Iowa. I do think she companies that worry about more than just shareholder return of probably the companies that are going to get more people buying their stocks in the end. And they're probably going to do better. Plus Katie. Kramer is onset in the Swiss Alps with the anchors. Ready by Beck apply Rubinstein's interview and in some behind the scenes of Davos.

CNBC CEO Joe Becky Davos Joe Backing Andrew Carlyle Group David Rubenstein Co China founder Joe founder and CEO Davos Switzerland US Switzerland Beautiful Alps Co founder Hedge Fund Swiss Alps Cameron Kosta
"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

13:12 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Don't get caught up in this perfect thing the test everything try something and fail at it because the failure is learning moment ladies and gentlemen welcome back to short story long first and foremost it is live event time. I'm doing doing the next young reckless live event on October twelfth. Picture live all day live short story long podcast with all my favorite people that have ever been on the show and some who haven't doing keynotes. QNA's panels all of the above. If you want to come just go to events dot young and reckless dot com. Get your tickets also. I'll put the link in the description of the episode. come check us out. I think you'll really really like like I think we did one back in May it was incredible. five hundred people showed up it was sold out and everyone left really positive and there was a really cool energy not in the room of just people there to learn and share ideas and I was really proud of it so this is round two and I couldn't be more excited. Today's guest is Marc. Mark Randolph Mark Grand off is the CO founder and was the CEO of Net flicks and as you can imagine you has a lot of good stories we ran through how Netflix how he even got to the position of when he started Netflix and how Netflix was created and where he was with Reed Hastings the other CO founder when they came up with the idea and decided to go for it that as well as all the challenges of running a company of that size size and trying to scale it and trying to just completely disrupt the entire industry. You guys are GonNa. Absolutely love this episode. Mark has a new book coming out called that will never work with a lot of really good stuff in a lot of good information and a lot of the stories more on the stories that we talk about here on the podcast if you like it if you like any of these episodes share it tell your friends posted on instagram hit me up on Instagram at drama. Let me know you think semi. Dm Tag me in your stories. Literally anything works. I'm reposting and communicating with you guys all day long. Keep that coming. I can't thank you enough. That's it. Let's get into the episode Short Story Long. It could take your whole life develop clarity second patients patients probably whatever you think you don't have you have something else in his the short story mark welcome to the pod. Oh It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so excited. I'm excited because because you know I have a lot of entrepreneurs founders CEOS on this show and some from a lot of well known companies but I think the moment I I kind of saw your stuff and started reading your stuff and saw that you were a co founder and CEO for a little bit of net flicks. It was obviously Lisa like well. This is another level and it may not feel that way to you van to me it does and the way the reason I liked that is because I really like I really live in the world of kind of these. We started up a Lotta apparel businesses and online marketing and stuff like that but I just feel like the things I can learn from someone who has kicked off something on that level. are probably endless and I'm really excited to try to get as much out of you. That can hear well. I mean that's kind of what I mean. The book in many ways is about that untold story Ori because everyone thinks it started out as one hundred and fifty million subscriber screaming giant but for years we were just a DVD by mail company for years. We could could make it work. Yeah I mean I was telling you earlier. I came into the into the building here and like all of a sudden. I got that vibe like Oh my God. This is start feels like a startup and for many years that's what Netflix felt like and that's the part you love. You love that started up energy yeah you know. I sometimes say that. If you're really lucky you kind of figure out two things about yourself like what you're good at and what you like and if you're really lucky you actually get to do you both those things yeah and I kind of figured out. It's early stage companies and it's not just that I like it. I suck at the companies. Get Big. It's I don't know how people do that. How do you manage like thousand people. Just I totally different game. I'm so happy to hear you say that because like I was telling you before before we started recording. I have always just sort of instinctually avoided letting my business get to corporate. I love that startup feeling and even recently the past few years. I've really tried to make sure that you know I'm covering the right basis. Still the right infrastructure is in place and the right you know talent is where it needs to be but I just. I don't know there's something about it the. I've never felt like I wanted to to try to get it to that place. I've I walked into a lot of these massive clothing companies and it just doesn't look fun anymore so to hear you say that makes me feel really feels like I was right. You were so uh-huh on target in fact I'll give you the advice is don't ever start making things more efficient. That is what kills companies real. Temptations -tations are going to be there. I mean you're going to go. Wow you've had this nice stability. We're growing ninety. percent of my orders are coming in a certain way and you're going to start hiring people who are real experts at efficiency agency because we can help. You cut a few points of margin. We can help you ship a little fee. They're really good at that efficiency stuff but the people who are really good at efficiency Z are clueless when all of a sudden your world changes and your world's going to change everyone's world changes yeah and so what you WanNa do is build this culture in this environment fool of people who are really adaptable who are Jacksonville trades who are comfortable with making decisions based on incomplete incomplete information because then when your world's suddenly shifts those are the people who can then okay and they shift in on it again. Yeah that's funny. Would you say that the main reason we all know the story three of these big corporate companies that can't pivot or make a move. Would you say that's because they're built around efficiency of of what used to work unquestionably and if it's a combination of things six that's what gets him into trouble. Is They go wow this is nice for years and years were doing the same sort of thing growing nice and steadily we have this nice to stage age distribution resell to wholesalers celery and so they hire these sales people who are really good at that and the warehouse there are people who are really good at that and then all of a sudden someone comes along who says screw this multi-stage stuff. I'M GONNA sell straight to consumers so and they can't do it. That's part one is that they can't do it but the the worst part is. They're scared to do it yeah because they go. I can't sell direct because my distributors Poke Hilmi and right. Now distributors are ninety five percent of my business business. So you get stuck me it is. I do a lot of I told you before I did a lot. I do some you know speech a speech sometimes and usually by half half the clients. I'd say or big companies who are scared shitless what's happening and the executive see they see it coming and they're trying to rally the people. You've got to be flexible. We've got to be innovative and so I go in and try and rally the troops whatever you can do in an hour so there's that piece and then the rest of my time I am. I'm working with the early startups helping them take down these big companies so it's this form of job security yeah. That's true either way it goes. That's good good stuff with what's interesting. Though is the best way to learn is to be on both sides. I'm sure yeah I'm sure that's amazing because to me now and you had a history and clothing. We'll talk about that but I I see what's happening with you know macy's and Barney's and all of these retailers that were just staples like you never I thought they would ever go anywhere and people are closed indoors and go and bankrupt and do and it's just like at this point this late in the game because you know we've been talking about retail apocalypse for five for six years. I just sit there and I watch and I'm like how are you not doing anything. How are you not like you know what I mean like. How is your literally. Your ship is sinking and you're not ah you know but that makes perfect sense so deeply set up to act one way that it's so hard to pivot. Here's a classic one so take supermarkets okay I so free really frustrating business for a consumer long lines and all that crap and supermarkets have seen what's going on ECOMMERCE and they're going out. That's that is not a threat. No no way no one can replace selling fresh vegetables and having milk and doing what we do and they just and then someone looked at it and said this is crazy having this checkout. Why can't you just go take stuff off the shelves and walk out and was the innovator who came up with that. Safeway or a Kroger knows was Amazon. I mean the fact that they left that open open for twenty years on them. You know so let me ask you to like I mean I just got right into advice part but if you are one of those guys or you you are even a medium or small sized guy that just has your you know your thing figured out and you have a really good thing going. What do you do like do you have. Do you have a department in the back office. That's constantly only trying to figure out how to disrupt your own business or what. Do you do to avoid that happening so I mean I understand. You know large. Your audience is probably not these big companies but all dispense the big company advice right now. Lease problem is you can't do it. Internally people go I want set up skunkworks and all set up a few people in an office Jason and that might work temporarily but as soon as they try and bring that out into the open the immune system is triggered and the white blood cells come swarming and then every department department in this big company kills the start up the only way to do it is to have it happen separately and so the way you really should do it and this is my opinion is as you basically set up a seed fund big company you invest in las a small startups not so that you can own them in certainly not so you can make money but you have a seat at the table big ten to see what they're working on. You get to understand the future. Eventually you can participate and perhaps them. It's really really really really hard because here's what happens in my world I have you know essentially small business and game example of something that happened. We came up using athletes artists and all that stuff to promote our business all of a sudden this thing started happening that we're social media influencers and so we're like okay well. Let's send him a bunch of clothes and we'll I don't know let's just having where a close on Youtube and so we did that but one thing that happened I will admit out from under me that that I didn't spot was it became so easy to make t shirts and so easy to start a shop store and so easy to start a website that now you have I mean there are some youtubers I doing ten million dollars plus a year in Merch and all of that is my business going somewhere else and that's something I could have spotted and I could have had ten indifferent merch lines or these things or whatever and and I didn't spot it and that's a big one where it where it happened for me. You know what I mean but at least you're watching it and seeing it. You're not gonNA catch everything but you're but that was a pretty fast despise us and I can predict what's going to happen. Next of course is right now. The U you too and INSTA- and face we're going to go. Why is this schmuck making ten million bucks a year emerge on our platform and it's GonNa be taken away from them. What do they do about that though they stopped distributing things like how many likes you have. They stopped letting people know what your followership is. I mean they have it. It's a dance because you don't WanNa driveway the people who are building building your platform but absolutely instagram for example and that's what I'm speaking totally off the cuff here. I don't work in-store Server. you know of this is just not stable environment for a company to keep on saying. This is a great deal. We're we're letting leading the influence your make all the money so then it goes back to obviously they want people to spend money to advertise not get it for free so it'll go back to the companies that are advertising on the platform. We'll we'll get the absolutely right so you know you can wear the shorts on the on the on the youtube if you want but the person who's GonNa make the money is instagram advertising whatever they want on the platform good stuff or so. It looks anyway. It's not so much exactly work because quite frankly as I say in the book. Nobody knows anything and electric. He's going back to the very first thing we said is..

Netflix instagram Mark Randolph Youtube CEO CO founder QNA Marc WanNa Reed Hastings Ori macy Lisa Jacksonville Safeway Poke Hilmi INSTA co founder Amazon executive
"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Their businesses from being, you know, hundred thousand dollar businesses to being hundred million dollar businesses. Plus and to give them the real tactical trae. Meaning that they need to move from the beginning to the next step. I could not agree with you more. And the reason I have the conversation at all here is because I want to talk about solutions and approaches that have been successful in. You clearly have found the way to be successful in spite of and I for me, it's really it is a it is a balancing act in my own mind about whether we go there, we don't I don't want to ignore a problem that exists. But I also don't want to talk about it without having solutions on the table. Yeah. I've been thinking a lot about what are proactive things that can be done to equalize. The opportunities for women, and let's just speak about the world of entrepreneurship because that's the world. I know the most. The terms the legal terms that women are given early on in their business. I think are much worse on average than the legal terms that men are given. So for instance, we've been hearing in the media right now about this entire situation with Uber where Travis has kind of shares that are worth ten x the voting power of a single share. And we know that Travis has this and Mark Zuckerberg has this and many other male founders Evan Spiegel at Snapchat has these shares. I've never heard of a single woman having shares that are worth ten x her voting power. You don't have that. I had to I had to work to actually have a vote on my board. If you look at my first term sheets of rent the runway, my co-founder, and I while we were on the board our votes affectively didn't count. And my preferred shareholders held all of the control and sway as to what the future of the business was so we were starting not even from a, you know. Point zero. We were starting from like negative fifty and over the years. Thank God rent the runway took off from the very beginning. And we've been able to negotiate in every subsequent round of funding more rights for ourselves. But all we've wanted was fair rights to what we would be offered as a male CEO or a male co founding team. So what I would love to see is. I'd love to see women, and I'm happy to be the first to do this publicize put online their first seed round term sheets and compare that with the seed round term sheets that men get the and the reason why I say seed round just because at the seed round there's no evidence that any business is going to be successful. You're taking a bet on the founder itself, you're taking a bet on a person..

Travis founder Evan Spiegel CEO co-founder Mark Zuckerberg Snapchat hundred thousand dollar hundred million dollar
"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Janklow had ridiculous name, but it was a very innovative idea at the time, and it was related to another startup called yawn to back in the day and a recruiter from the start up beyond two decided to contact me through this and yawn to actually turned out to be Ari tros company, my co-founder and business partner in X Y O U is one of the only crazy people at the time in two thousand eight actually. Starting a company in two thousand eight when everyone was going through turmoil and running for the hills. Well, yeah. So so you and Ari how did that relationship happened was he the first person that had took a chance on you just like you just said like nobody was saying. Yes, you wanted to get somebody to say, yes. And then how did that relationship build up? That is exactly right. Yeah. He is the first person that said, well, this kid is smart. He's also very humble as well. Yeah. Yeah. You know? You know, he he he saw how passionate I was. And how driven I was. And I think what is kind of the metric and the thing that we care about the most at X Y O. And like what I look for an employees and new employees now is like how much do you care, and you could tell that I cared about what I was doing. I was passionate about technology, and I had zero experience. Right. He didn't even know what the heck he was going to hire me for. But he was like, you know, what I need higher this kid and take a chance, and he is the only one that took a chance on me. And so basically, I have spent especially with the amazing story that X Y O has turned into. I've spent a lot of my time re repaying him and basically making him feel great about taking a chance on me. So he was the first person to say, yes, what was the company about? What was he trying to do? And how did you fit in? Yeah. At the time. This is when the concept or idea of Facebook, apps didn't exist. So it was a brand new concept. He first off he credited technology for my space that allowed you to turn off those annoying layouts and all the color schemes on my space man when you picked your page. Yes. Okay. It was called sanity switch. So you head switch on your page and every single other person's page that you visited it would turn off their annoying glittery layouts home. I he he's a savior. I didn't know he was a say yes now here is what he discovered in doing that he discovered just how big the personalization space is. So he decided to do the exact opposite thing for Facebook. He created the first ever it was called the onto layers the first ever technology that allowed you to add layouts and personalization layers to your Facebook profile, and it caught on like crazy. Well, so I joined him in that technology company, and it was just a wild and amazing ride. So yeah. So what did you do there? What did you learn what did you? Discover about yourself because from starting out as somebody taking a chance on you to be in co founder of a black Shane company now valued at twenty million dollars spot. Number two, fifty I'm Queen market cap. And you're just having amazing party for your.

Ari tros company Facebook Ari Shane company Janklow co-founder co founder partner twenty million dollars
"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

Tech Reports by Larry Magid

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

"If you're just joining us Microsoft co-founder, Paul Allen has died this afternoon. He was sixty five Allen had said earlier this month that he was being treated for non Hodgkin lymphoma. Larry, you have been covering Allen and Microsoft. Since the early days, how would you describe his role in the tech world incredibly important. You know he'd not nearly as well known if Bill gate is or Steve Jobs, wealth, but certainly important pioneer. He and gates co-founded Microsoft back in nineteen seventy five that's year before the apple two came out and he helped he engaged together. We're responsible for Microsoft basic, which was probably the most important of the early early personal computer software languages. And then he remained Microsoft for number of year. I think until eighty two, when he was first diagnosed with Hodgkin non-hodgkin's lymphoma, this is not the first bout that he's had from Canterbury. He been diagnosed back then with three diagnosed and to come to a today, but he's been around he and he engaged from schoolmates. They were fourteen and twelve. They were playing around with computers way back guess what lie in the seventy s and you know, symphony wouldn't invested in sporting teams. You can't go to Seattle without seeing it, influence your mutual impact on the city. So you know an important person. What kind of a relationship did Paul Allen and Bill Gates having in more recent years? You know, I don't know. I, I assume they were in touch because they were both. You know, they're both very active in philanthropy and both in terms of international and and also Seattle. But I really don't know gates course haven't been at Microsoft. I think he's still on the board and it's been many years since Paul Allen resigned from Microsoft board. I think he resigned in two thousand though. I'm sure that they were in touch, but I don't know how closely we're and once he left Microsoft, did he try his hand and another tech business or, oh, yeah. He was involved in a number of interval technologies years ago with doing some very interesting. I can't remember what if any more because it's been so long. But he's been a certainly an investor in a number of tech companies, as well as a number of social entrepreneurs. He's given a lot of money to brain research, but yes, and by the way he wrote a book called idea, man, and that's sort of how fancied himself as you know, gates with the business guy and and Allen thought of himself at the the idea person pretty remarkable career all the way around. Absolutely. And the thing that not one, but two of them Bill Gates and Paul Allen both went on to do so much philanthropy. That's right. And you know, very big contribution again, not as well known if gates, but certainly a person with a huge amount of influence very early on and continuing. I think up until his death..

Bill Gates Paul Allen Steve Jobs Microsoft Hodgkin lymphoma Seattle co-founder Larry apple Canterbury
"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

"The president and co founder of the city blockchain summit got paulson and began with me today thank you so much for being on the shy polls appreciate your time it's gonna be right to have a chat love to be here i'm very happy to engage with you rank end i'm looking for i was looking for this and talking to you look this this the so much going on the spice at the moment it's such an exciting time and you're right there in the thick of it before we get into the actual city blockchain son at what you guys are doing who you're speaking to and i throw about a million questions that you what had liked to if you wouldn't mind poulsen just gives it a little bit of a background on yourself why you're in blockchain what you doing how you come to hear and what your objectives are absolutely greg i'm so i've been into a in the business from at least twenty years now twenty five years actually and republican complication computer user and what we've seen is you know do the today show everybody is afraid to jump on the computers and livable computers all afraid afraid afraid so we put of location he's the pain and and dispose the intimation in a very forced to fifth grade level of writing so it helped them a consumers just understand the technology and be part of the other than being afraid on it so become voted a lot of people into the computer age and then of course we had the big boom of the internet and i see the same cycle happening again in this base blockchain is very robust technology i'd have been around for a while but now that the only other stuff that's going on in the innovation that's happening in the in the industry is more than the full front now some of the big names all the fortune one hundred companies are already in it big time and i feel that again the consumers are left out of the dock and i'll go this to engage the consumers in another way not republication but throwing events in smaller cities and engaging them with the innovation that's happening in in the blockchain space so you've been there through the.

president co founder paulson poulsen twenty five years twenty years