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Carmen Rita Wong, author, host, and financial expert

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 5 d ago

Carmen Rita Wong, author, host, and financial expert

"Hey everyone. The show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the skin is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today we are very excited. Carmen reader Wong joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Malakand productions. She's also an author and the former host and Co creator of on the money on CNBC she spent years as a personal finance expert for NBC CBS. And CNN and she's written for publications including Glamour. Latina essence and good housekeeping, and in a very big full circle moment she was also carly's boss. At one point Carmen, we are very excited to talk to you. Welcome your skin from the couch, also good to be with you guys. This is very full circle for me. My very first job right out of college was as a production assistant at CNBC for new show called on the money, and I was there for about two weeks when I think somebody jobs one day, somebody came to me in. They're like you actually your job titles changing. Carmen's personal assistant. Good luck. To check. Back and like go theater sheets, anything for lunch very quickly currently under her wing, and it's amazing that we are still in touch today. I'm so excited to have you here. I'm so excited to be here. Those were the days right. Oh my gosh of you sitting just off the camera when we're on the set. general. I still high. You take all your your hamburger, your water your coffee. I got down hot and it's. Certainly was not divis- at all because it was one of those things where I was working as we'll talk. I'm like jumping ahead like twenty. Our date I mean nonstop seven days a week so carleen literally keeping me alive. We're GONNA get into all of this, but I will say you are one of the hardest working people I have ever known so I. Am very excited to share your story, so we're going to start with the question. We like to ask everybody. Which is Skim your resume? Gone how about this I don't have a resume. Here really I mean not that I don't think I have one. State, but like you've had one at different times you. Working for myself fifteen year whatever many years it was, so I haven't had to pull one together in more than a decade. You become a bio Danielle you did. You did a great introduction in so many things I've been a magazine editor, a TV host and writer and producer and a faculty professor author I'm Working Fifth Book. I'm an investor in women led companies, and I am a board member for some big nonprofits, which I love that work to so all of it. What something that isn't in the bio and we can't Google about you that people should know oh girl. You think I'm GonNa tell you that. Google. Wade Carly anything you know you did not read I think one thing that people like maybe John. Know about us like you're I, mean. Maybe they're hearing now, but you are very funny like you're very good sense of humor, and you're very good under pressure. Thank you yeah I'm freaking rock under pressure, but that doesn't mean I mean. You may not see what's happening inside, but yeah, I'm a goofball can't google at I mean there's some pretty funny pictures of me. Still shots that people take if you google made them. That's the one thing that going forward. It'd be nice to show people more, but as people who do know me like. Carly knows me off camera. Yeah, I'm a goofball. You are all right. We're GONNA get into this. This which if we talk about people's Childhood in? Toss how you grew up, but I think you are very. Guests were like your childhood is really really important to get into and kind of the family dynamic. You grew up with and how that folded over time and you're somebody who learned a lot about your family. As you got older, so I want to let you can share your story. I will just start off by saying you were born in New, York and then West. Those uptown Manhattan. I was I, actually did a story on the moth. Right, which is on the podcast as well a bit about what you alluded to there about finding out only last year that I have no idea who my father is, so that's a whole thing, but I grew up with two fathers. Up with the father named after hoppy Wong, and then I grew up with my stepfather, had a very very strong mother Dominican mother, who emigrated when she was fifteen, and we lived in Uptown Manhattan, and my brother, and my older brother, and I were the walls, but she eventually divorced, and we moved to New Hampshire. And that was a real shock for us a very big culture shock

Founder And Ceo Carmen Google Wade Carly Cnbc Wong CNN Manhattan Malakand Productions NBC Production Assistant York New Hampshire Personal Assistant Danielle CBS Editor John Writer
Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

Vicki McKenna

00:15 sec | Last week

Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

"Tina fey revealing that the blackface episodes in thirty rock have been pulled from air NBC for the total of four episodes of the sitcom from streaming and syndication at the request of co creators Faye and Robert Carlock they issuing a statement apologizing for any pain the episodes have

Tina Fey NBC Faye Robert Carlock
Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

Mark Mason

00:15 sec | Last week

Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

"Tina fey revealing that the blackface episodes and thirty rock have been pulled from air NBC for the total of four episodes of the sitcom from streaming and syndication at the request of co creators Faye and Robert Carlock they issuing a statement apologizing for any pain the episodes have

Tina Fey NBC Faye Robert Carlock
"co creator" Discussed on Bad On Paper

Bad On Paper

05:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"co creator" Discussed on Bad On Paper

"I don't know I mean if someone came to us and wanted to turn around combine season into a book for money. We would definitely figure it out but I love audio storytelling. That's really in terms of creating it. That's really where my interest lies I do. WanNa write a book I have always wanted to write. Write a book and it feels like such a big scary goal that for some reason I, think one having a partner in doing this made it feel more manageable so I wasn't ended alone, but then also it's kind of lower stakes because we set out that we were going to do this. In five months, it was going to be eighty pages versus. Versus, three hundred pages, and so I feel like there is more room to like and figure it out where I can almost kind of see it being a journey where it's like okay, we're going to do like five series five seasons of from compiled somebody end of that, I'm going to be so much better at telling a story, but if I just sat. Sat in my office and tried to brute force my way through writing a book kind of introduction introduction on the kind of like I've tried I. don't even want to say try. I have thought about writing a book seriously. Twice I've two documents on my computer I would not even say gave it a college try I gave it a middle school try. And it just felt like such a daunting thing, so I feel like this just was like rip the BANDAID. Let's do it and I've learned so much. Even in the first season about just how to plot a story and just flexed my writing muscle in terms of writing something medium long form to figure out okay I. feel less scared by the prospect of writing a book at some point in the future. Now I have no time to write a book, but. I feel more confident than I could do it. Yeah, question for both of you. What are your top three rom? coms besides chalet, girl or include Shelley girl? This is so hard, Rachel. You don't think girl. I don't think it would make it into my top three, because I also like just a special thing that will watch it when I introduced someone else to, but otherwise I just watch it with Becca. and. It's like my favorite evening. Let's get catch up from vicks around Christmas. Time and watch shelley girl, that's a perfect December evening, and obviously a bottle of red, and but I think my top three Rom coms of all time. If I was pushed which I am, that's what this is a okay while. You were sleeping with Sandra Bullock and bill, pullman. Oh, my God. Bill pullman in ninety two, or whatever that was Yes, please. It's around the same era as when he was the president for Independence Day to give you an idea. I feel about present day. Bill pullman. Still do it for you. Of course. I was just wondering. Now, he's held up pretty well. It's really about his sandy voice kind of. Thing I loved him in What was that Series Jessica? Biel is in Oh i. don't know maybe I need to I. Don't know either. That's the only thing I can manage. Just bill was in seventh heaven you. Know she he was in. It the sinner. that. Oh, I, did it all right Oh yeah into shot. Second is forget Paris. It is with Billy Crystal during the era of when Harry met Sally and I love when Harry met Sally, but forget Harris's better and nobody knows about it. It's so much smarter and Funnier and a little darker I absolutely love it and I think I think it holds up I mean I've loved it for twenty years, or however long it's been since it came out, but I one hundred percent think it holds up. Do yourself a favor if you haven't seen it because no one has finally obviously last holiday with Queen Latifah obviously. So he did a powerpoint presentation or a powerpoint party at the beginning of quarantine, and I can't remember the specific title Rachel Do. Do you know it off the top of your head of your presentation it I think it was just the greatest Christmas movie of all time. Now it was better than that. It was something about like Queen. Latifah's friendship with Ll Cool J. in the movie. The last holiday like I feel like it was ultra specific, or we had bears bromance. Okay, that wasn't about L.. O.! Cool J., that was about the CHEF CHEF DE A. Chef okay, yeah okay. How about you? Becca I'm okay so I think my number one is the wedding date with Debra Messing. So. Good God I love that movie with Dermot Mulroney as a male escort so good. Have you ever seen a crazy I've seen it. Oh, you agree. We have different tastes in a lot. You have to go after this, too. I WanNa hear what your Shit I didn't prepare anything better. Start Thinking. My second one would be friends with kids. which I feel is a very underrated movie across the board. Yeah where Adam Scott Stan. Adam, Scott San, where Jennifer West fell in Adam Scott are best friends decide to have a kid together, and it has such a great star cast and then my last one. Oh, this is so hard real. What would my last one be? Who American President? Now I locked up. It's not my top. Charlotte girl. It could be, shall I. This is only I'm only saying this because of recency, but I watched sleeping with other people this weekend. It.

Bill pullman Rachel Do Queen Latifah CHEF CHEF DE A. Chef Becca partner Sandra Bullock Dermot Mulroney Biel Adam Scott Stan Shelley pullman Adam President Billy Crystal Adam Scott Charlotte Becca. Paris
'Friends' co-creator Marta Kauffman says she hasn't done enough for diversity

The KFBK Morning News

00:11 sec | 3 weeks ago

'Friends' co-creator Marta Kauffman says she hasn't done enough for diversity

"The co creator of friends marta Kauffman got emotional she says she regrets the lack of diversity in the show quote I wish I knew then what I know today sixty three years old Kaufman said that during an

Kaufman Marta Kauffman
"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

07:26 min | Last month

"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Yeah? Actually like we've been talking about the things that are sort of the first thing through the wall sort of just too far ahead of culture for culture to catch up in the in the near term but it's GonNa Happen. I don't think it's going to be affordable in our lifetimes but eventually it will. It was one of the reasons why I I got in with impossible foods because I knew that there was going to be a protein shortage in twenty fifty or something like that and meet. Is You know we did? A whole series on this Or episode on this in ugly delicious I think meet is going to become incredibly scarce and very very expensive and people better understand that and we want that to happen unfortunately because we need to come up with turn it And if that means your Burger and McDonald's is a quarter blend of grains instead of all meet then. That's what we're going to need to do but this sort of goes and ties into what we've been talking about what. I also think we talked about with Jane's and what I see in your show lot is pain right. Like what are you willing to suffer for? And then celebrate over and I think we've lost the meaning of what it is to eat meat to monetize. It's too readily available. And I always joke with Chris. If three of us were you know trying to get meat for our families thirty thousand years ago trying to kill a woolly mammoth. We have twenty nine days of hell. We'd hate every fucking moment of it and a faulk. This sucks. I'm so hungry. And then you come back like dude. You'll never guess what I just did. I kill this fucking woolly. Mammoth and we're going to eat and we're going to feed our families. We're the best fucking dinner we've ever had in our lives that night. And then once we preserve everything and Blah Blah the. There's no more willy. Mammoth we'RE GONNA go back to holy fucking Shit. I hate six assists in so much. But that's why I think like we need that. We need to know that pain. We didn't know that suffering in order to really appreciate the goodness and I feel like with meat consumption. We have lost that identity completely and people don't even want to know where it comes from. They don't WanNa know that. It died in a plastic wrap. Keep it sanitized as much as possible and. I think that's going to come back in some way I actually. I don't know why optimistic but I think for environmental reasons. We're going to have a lot less meat. And then people are going to celebrate it in meaningful ways all over again but when we have the ability to buy affordable blab grown meat. I'm all in yet me to the experience on the far for strong get was a dairy farm but in New Zealand is a little different And you have these mobile butchers. So they're coming know America. It's all regulated. Different Way. You go the animal. The slaughterhouse and our our part part of the fact that we step so firmly as a society away from wanting to know we society. We became industrial society. We became a service society. We're so far removed from the farm these days. No one has any idea and I try to make a point to my kids. You know cooking for kids. There always wonder over. Be Like you know pork. Is they know pig right. This was a pair. Be Aware of what you're eating. Be Aware of the of the of your place. In the grand scheme of things museum they would have the dairy farm. Every you know every once or twice a month you have old an animal. You'd call an animal as heard was eight hundred head Operation is working there. Have the butcher would come out. I swear to God in a white coat park his truck and he'd have a little a little twenty two and he dammed because the animals are smart so they figured out what the guy in the white coat means so he would hide behind the barn and and and the farmer would bring lead one animal back and walk it down the path and like a bad mob movie. The butcher would step out from behind the barn. Raise the weapon animal's head and shoot you watch you watch this enough I think everyone should be. It's Kinda horrifying at first sight. Tragicomic insane horrifying thing. You know. I think everyone who's who wants to meat should be willing to understand where that where the food camera I came up. You could easily come the experience. Vegetarian run accent. I came out of it Totally re committed to you meet but feeling like I understood now where it came from and and Mike Place in the grand scheme of things And also being excited for the moment when we could we could start producing it efficient. Because you know it doesn't you can't feed seven and a half billion people animals it you know at a certain point that's gonNA run out of see we. We've been talking for some time. I know we had schedule you for an hour. I WanNa talk to you all day. I gotta when we're done. I have to teach my kids at frankly. My kids are my kids are smart enough. Anyway that I'm starting to feel like I got a China slow down a little bit. Kinda keep. Keep them now this is. This is an absolute pleasure. Can I just ask you one more question than on on that subject before we let you go You know I was thinking Dave and chefs and food nerds like myself are are pretty fanatical about the way we feed our kids. We want them to like certain things and we're just generally pretty overbearing about like what they're putting in their mouths D- You feel that you and your wife are the same way when it comes to books and TV and movies and like what you want your kids ultimately to consume and like are you gonNa try to shape their tastes in that way. Oh Shit that's a question very distressing one because I could have given you a different answer. Pre pandemic yellow know you one hundred percent. We had this curated list of like. We're GONNA do this that near you. Try to show your kids the first thing and they just their eyes glaze over and they don't give it. My kids are amazing. And they have an almost like preternatural or scary. My daughter has a frightening understanding at this point. I mean I don't know I didn't question for you as to whether or not you want your kids to follow a David you just did you guys have a baby. He's fourteen months. Yep He's the Batman Hugo amazing so I we have a daughter and a son six three and our daughter. You know I mean look you know again. Look I like what we do. But I don't think I would necessarily immediately pick The film business for my kids to work in it's heartbreaking. It's like a restaurant busy. The margins are very low The risk is very high. It can break your heart over and over and over again. That said you know with with their parents being writers. It seems like they're basically fucked this point. They're they're faded faded took so we caught my daughter. We walk in at one point. You know so you just wind up showing them his mind ideas about the kinds of movies books you to share your kids and then of course you know you're on a plane and they watched some fucking terrible movie. That becomes their favorite.

McDonald Jane Chris faulk America New Zealand Mike Place Dave China David
"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

08:05 min | Last month

"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Potentially do not in your lifetime right now and only have to do is say like look at the FRY station. This guy's just doing this every two minutes. Four minutes eight minutes. That's going to be gone especially post corona virus. Whenever that's going to happen you're going to for people to get better. Healthcare for people to get hazard pay all these things. Jobs are going to get reduced. There's just no way and you're GonNa have bathroom attendants that's GonNa be a robot. I know this I've talked to some some. Ai Do you're GonNa have you know certain positions in the kitchen not all the positions but certain positions in the kitchen. That are going to be automated. So yeah it scares me but I have to wrestle with the moral dilemma. Would I do? I save two hundred fifty thousand dollars a year by buying two hundred fifty thousand dollar machine and what are the societal impacts that that has and I don't have the answers it makes me feel gross simultaneously on fascinated by it. And I'll just give you one example like our Buddy Reneberg's EPI when they opened a restaurant in Mexico a pop up there like they open the jungle but they had eighteen dishwashers there. Eighteen cooks because there's no running water right and if you go to noma now. There's like one dishwasher or two dishwashers. Because it's it's automated. Guess what you're going to lose that dishwasher now and it's just I can just only understand for my industry particularly for food and I don't have answers. It gives me a lot of pause but I think one way that restaurants are going to be able to recover from this over a five ten period. You're going to see just the very rudimentary aspects of it is automation in Kitchens. And that scares me. You'll read piano vonnegut book player piano. I only slaughterhouse. Five is the only one Vanek Book I've ever read. I will read it though. If you're gonna read one that's the one to read player. Piano is also terrific. It was it was a reason for us. Why we use to play. Piano is kind of a an icon in Westworld. We're looking for something that sorta suggested the irony of the of the original Western robot But TURPIN has a terrific book and it ended about this community in which you have you know you have the beginnings of automation starting to tear society apart. We have a whole group of people who are just. The jobs are. The jobs are going. The factories totally automating. And it's in the sixties contemplating what happens when manufacturing gets completely haunted by automation. What's fascinating is operatives. Didn't see coming with none of covering was automation. Wasn't this Oregon replace that much? Those people replaced by workers in China and Southeast Asia. Are The all of those jobs? We're GONNA just literally disappear right so you know the the. The Revolution never quite plays out the way that you think that the book is is terrific and dark. I think the truth is you know at any given moment. You know these these innovations for the most part. We attacked right You know the the people who are doing the work that was in on the whole automation industry went and talked to the In the beginning thirteen because actually wanted to get real robots instead of using a computer graphics. Turn out to be not to be practical And tell the robots come Robot companies that we talking to someone got wise and was like wait. That's the show about robots to kill everyone we don't WanNA product. We don't want our products featured med show but we went and talked to him and this loss be of the three Ds right dull dirtier dangerous that those are the jobs that are GonNa get automated and that you know maybe at the end of the its it's especially as a business owner as an employer is very tricky. Those entry level jobs are how you find talent. It's how you find people and give them a shot and give them a chance. It's how I would imagine. All of us got our start. Being Stars is the same thing as being a PA right. That's how you learn the lowest level on the Totem Pole and you get shit on basically but Yup. That's how you learn is literally should on my first job. I was at one of my responsibilities. Pa and and it was explained to me that was basically anything that one of the Already very heavily unionized. Ride on any given set ninety percent of the people who are they are union members. S A terrific thing. It's guaranteed Crazy in crazy industry guarantees people a certain level of of livelihood allows us to do these things and I'm a proud member of I think. Three three unions as a PA. You are not a union and so your job is all of the things that the unions forbid their employees doing so picking up picking up Dog Shit. Were shooting at a house in a In Glendale and the owners had rented the House of Production. They haven't picked up any of their sizable dogs dog. Shit in the backyard day to job one was going. GonNa pick up the dog shit and everyone turns looks at you. You go okay so dull dirty. Dangerous is a great way journey. Business and Hollywood is not unlike the restaurant business in that it. It's a journeyman business right. You learn it by doing it. You can go to school at a net Beckham events or you can learn at on the on the. I didn't go to school for this. I showed up. I started doing the dull dirty or dangerous jobs for long enough to figure out how to do the other jobs and by the time I was directing I knew how to I knew I knew what pretty much everyone's job was on the set. I could do a half ass version of their job right which allows me to be able to talk to them about their job and understand when I'm asking for something. They can't do. A lot of that. Knowledge will go away as we automate those jobs and you know the idea is that it allows it means. No one has to wash dishes. No one has to pick up dog shit read but you do wonder on. Some level will create a better society but when he had his were fascinated with in westworld Looking into it. A part of world is this idea of having a an underclass in society right. The hosts are an underclass at any idea for us in a somewhat Post Scarcity Society of the future where you know you have less need of underclass because there are fewer of these dull dirty or dangerous jobs that you need to build one. You need to manufacturing underclass because the UNDERCLASS Things that beyond altered your dangerous or maybe they fit within that category. Are things like prostitution? You know crime avarice vice right That you would have to that. There's a certain amount of the that we've you know we've evolved in some ways but not enough. There's still human appetite for violence. We still have a an appetite for sexual transgression and that. We have to build it on the class to do that. So we spent a lot of time thinking about the idea of an underclass. The idea of the way society is structured. One of the most disturbing things was was doing research driving Harare's citizens book and it's borne out for the most part. They're never there has never been a human society without an underclass on any scale. Maybe contacted people's in groups of like one hundred or last but I but probably even within societies. There's one guy it's like preserve the dog shit. Everyone looks at a roller that that person. So you know the promise of technology is maybe somewhere in the distant future. No-one has to do dull dirty or dangerous jobs. But I suspect we will still be assigning people than underclass regardless. Because you have. We haven't yet come up with a society that doesn't require it. Can I tell you how much scares me because I feel if you edit out all the pain and the shit literally? You're just going to be a plastic person with no real values and.

Westworld Pa FRY station Southeast Asia Vanek business owner China Mexico Oregon prostitution Beckham Hollywood Glendale
"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

08:13 min | Last month

"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Would go out dutifully and track down the place the tiny little place Worry about how many of those. How many of those prices are going to be laughed? How many of them are left now? left a couple of months. There is a giant cultural cover. Mother dare that's GonNa that's GonNa Vanish. It's it's a little crazy and these are the exact kind of restaurants that need to be before even my own restaurant group right. I I really believe that we need to Save Them. Because we don't them we're going to lose like so much knowledge for the future generations. My kids your kids. They're not going to have the ability to have the vibrant ECLECTIC Diet that you had today but we're also talking about being able to express yourself and opening a restaurant that's not a Taco bell right because right now. Those are the restaurants that are going to just crush and their thriving right if you drive pass any sort of dry through in La there. There's a line all day long and they're just better equipped in one of the biggest issues is when if there is a vaccine and all of these things like in the meantime we were working in a restaurant as you said you worked in. It barely worked to begin with so this is an opportunity optimistically to be like okay. Let's reset this. How do we do this better? And that's going to be hard because right now. There's a lot of people you know Chris. I talked to him a lot in our industry that just want to get back to February twenty twenty and that's never coming back. No no I mean. We're looking at in our business now. Trying to figure out you know how you any kind of illness in our business is is calamitous. This is this is a job where I'm over the first few years trying to as at work on my brother and asking like what happens if you get sick you know. I was working in production. I started in this town twenty years ago as a PA ONSET PA and if you shop five minutes later fire. Your job is to be there an hour early. Were sixteen hours a day and I asked him what point like what happens by Waco. What if I get the flu like you show up you shop? You don't give anyone show do there. There are no sick days in the movie business. Because you're burning two hundred fifty thousand dollars. A day at your. That's your that your burn right at. It's mainly trucks and people got four hundred people and trucks so illness in that simultaneously. You're not allowed to be sick and a serious illness in that we've had situations where people you got. What would be considered minor illnesses? And it's millions of dollars if you if you can't shoot with an actor for a week. That's that's a two million dollar insurance claim. That's a two hundred dollar hit. It's devastating so the the the concert will struggle with our business. Right now is figuring out the way we liked to make movies and not. Everyone doesn't like this but the way we like to do. It is on location photography. Sure you could do it in a stage with green screen right and you know. People are starting to figure out how you can make that viable but we like to show up with four hundred people in trucks and descend on a cool You know State Park in Utah or a bank in Los Angeles or lasts less than we went to Singapore Italy. You know no figured out that we were shooting on. Hbo figured out the All of our locations last year. We're all food. Cities in Greenwich editor like Girona Barcelona Valencia Singapore. But we like to shop with all these folks transport hundred people out there shoot on the street. An illness in that situation is devastating. So I think at our business people were only really just beginning to grapple with how on Earth we go back to February twenty twenty favorite January twenty twenty. My wife was in New Orleans shooting with the crew there on her debut film. I was in Los Angeles route on. Pick up work on westfall shooting downtown. Either of those things I. I don't know how it's GonNa take. It's GonNa take a long time for us to get back to any sense of normalcy. We're just starting we're starting the TV filming business because we were shooting all this stuff for Hulu. And I don't know how we're ever going to start filming again anytime soon. A No one does and the answer is on. Some of the answer's going to be you just. Do you come up with best practices talking to friends who saying that in South Korea. They've continued. Shoot right I mean if we had done contact tracing if we try not to cast blame around but if frankly we've done a better job of managing this crisis for the beginning we would be feeling Leslie impacts now and we. We'd have a much clearer path to how we resume normal so you can look at countries where they were. They haven't stopped shoot. I would imagine they'll go back to shooting in New Zealand fairly fairly soon. Because that's what's GonNa Happen. Studios are just going to set up shop in New Zealand. Northern Canada Korea. Just to get stuff done. That feels intuitive on some level. Then the challenge becomes. How do you get your actors and talent because if you know not everyone who's working your crew in New Zealand is going to be from New Zealand? But you're actors are you gonNA put him into a lot of these countries have two week. Quarantine South Korea right now to quarantine fourteen days. If you don't own a home a pride at home in Korea you are in a dormitory for fourteen days and you know so so certain point studios through the over and under on. How much does it cost us to put Tom? Cruise in a dormitory in Greenburgh New Zealand countries are going simultaneously have vibrant film and Television businesses but are also reluctant to have frankly. It's and it's crazy to be in this moment. They don't want Americans coming out. Right is interesting moment for for. Americans have certain generation to be thing. We're like now we don't want you dirty Americans in our country but that's that's the moment we're in. Can I ask actually so one thing that David? I talk about a lot in regards to the future of restaurants and what we're going to have to do to make possible in America for people to get together again is one of the things is to look towards Asia for these models that worked you know having the pandemics that they've thought through survive and adapted to their in a lot of ways. It's the future of restaurants is already happening in Asia and I know you shot season three of Westworld in Asia to sort of evoke a futuristic. La So I was wondering like what do you see when you when you're shooting in Asia or scouting locations in Asia? That feels like it's the future like it's America in the future for me as I started in England as augmenting under the nineteen eighties. Boil Brussel sprouts And even as a kid felt like Loving tonight a Lotta family. There are my mom's still part time we go back and forth but it felt like a country. That was kind of Senescence right. It was like okay. We're we're we're in a quasi retirement. As a nation in a very strange way there are a law prolonged economic downturn. They had shifted out of being the central imperial power at the beginning of the century and by the nineteen eighties were so I grew up there. We would spend our summers in Florida. My Grandmother was down Gulf Coast and for me the Summer America. All felt like the future right. It always felt like this optimistic outward-looking country right so when I moved to the states time when I was eleven years old At first pissed off about it because chain schools all that kind of stuff But but I knew that I prefer to America because it felt more optimistic and more forward thinking and it was a land of Cheeseburgers Inc England of the nineteen eighties. Now weirdly now is an old man is actually sounds pretty good into of the nineteen eighties if you ordered a cheeseburger call you. They call a beef burger and the eggs. They put a an egg on the top right. Which sounds good now but then it was like you guys are doing this wrong. Getting off our you get it off by cheeseburger band so moving to America. Felt like I've moved into the future right and then through the nineteen eighties nineties. Two thousands. I I started traveling to Asia. Where my best friends from.

Asia New Zealand America South Korea Los Angeles flu La New Orleans Hbo Greenburgh New Zealand Gulf Coast Greenwich PA Chris Canada Korea Waco Korea Girona Barcelona Valencia Sing westfall
"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

08:01 min | Last month

"co creator" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"We have one of probably my most. I don't know if it's nerve. Wracking is the right word. But I was so excited for this guest. We have Jonathan Nolan. The Creator director with his wife Lisa Joy of Westworld screenwriter of Dark Knight Series the Best Batman Series and interstellar. You know I didn't even realize that. He wrote Memento when he was like twenty two years old. His brother directed Chris Nolan. And I'm a huge fan of westworld because I don't know of any show that actually makes me think as much about stuff that I learned in college whether it's artificial intelligence and Kirk Turtles incompleteness their consciousness and Julian. Jane's you name it. This is a show that is like very catnip for me. I love it so much. Because they're just so many references and when we got an email that we could get Jona. I was just completely floored and and then Chris and I were nervous this the most nervous I've ever been. I mean you you said. It was nerve wracking man. I was like on the edge of my seat. I was like more than talking to some. You know front of the camera person. I was like so nervous to talk to this guy because I knew because of the show because of what I'd read about him like this dude is so smart. Yeah so intimidating. I didn't I and I wanted to just like he's got stuff to do. He had to teach his kids. I think we could've talked for three hours. You have to be a parent. I have to be apparent so went on about almost like ninety minutes a little short of ninety minutes. I'm just going to. Hopefully he's listening to this. Please come back on. I'd love to pick your brain more and more because I was like fuck. I didn't even get to ask any of the questions. It was just absorbing. The wisdom of Joe Nolan was but we have you saw our faces just like Eyes Wide Open. Just like on almost one hundred twenty podcasts. And telling you the truth. I try to page out bill. Simmons who really just goes by memory and it's amazing and I never really have anything prepared because I can just remember it. I'll write some notes the day before but I try not to have notes in front of me because I want to have like a normal conversation with someone. This is the second time I've ever prepared because I was like fuck. There's so many things I wanNA talk about. I don't WanNa come across his immediate. That's the funny thing of those he did. I'm sure Jodi did not have notes but he was able to just like bounce ever anyway it was. It was amazing. I mean I don't know how he's able to and Lisa's able to put so many disparate topics into something. That's pretty seamless. Which again I I love and I was so excited because Westworld is a show that for the most part. Some of the episodes are just some of the best. Tv season. Two episode. Eight with the Indian I think is one of the best episodes of TV I've ever watched and the season I thought was great. Because it's got some Kubrick elements. It's got a little fincher. It's Scott basically the end of the world. That's happening right now. It seems and I had this professor called Howard along and he was student of Julian. Jane's and Princeton. Besides my thesis adviser is the best professor I ever had and I took almost every class and it was philosophy. Religion philosophy evolution took advanced logic with them so like all the classes that I actually studied. There are the only classes. I actually try to study this series. Really encapsulates all of these things that interested me in college too because nothing else really did. And whether it's the idea of consciousness that was sort of born out of pain and it's something that you should watch westworld because I think it does a remarkable job taking something incredibly dense and synthesizing it into you know the first season And I think it's an important question. Consciousness is important for free will and choice and that awareness that we need to be better versions of ourselves to do good and I look at what this is as a show I do i. It does some reflection of my life and I was really excited to talk to them into here. I know this fucking guys smartest. Fuck I bet you. His wife is like doubly doubly. It's always the case to always the case. It's funny because I saw your your eyes light up a few times. When he would reference the books and philosophers that had inspired him the that resonated. With you in like. There's a few times as we were talking to him and we should just let them. We should get into it but this walking advertisement for the importance of reading. It's like yeah if you want to be fucking cool and make cool shit. You should read more books. Don't think dumb reading gets a tagline reading I can't remember the word that his daughter used as an example stories. Incredible story so good but I. I've never used that word in my vocabulary. Everyone yeah you gotta you gotTA listen to all the way to the cutest cutest. Stir a six year old ever but again let me repeat I. It was honored to have him on. And hopefully we can get him on again. And Hopefully Lisa Joy I love westworld with all my heart and I can't believe it's going to probably take a couple of years and the cast is amazing pretty much some of the best actors in the business. Yeah so here. Is Chris trying to have a conversation with the guy? That's much smarter than I'm in my forties. I don't have any bad habits anymore except for eat it. This is the only thing you get what you got two young kids four days this is the get to have is is is food. And I'M A and I grew up in England in the nineteen eighties. So you can imagine how would I prize flavor you know? I grew up off the first ten years of my life without flavor. So discovering flavor was a big a big moment for me And that was interesting. I to unpack why food England in the eighties was so bad right at. I think it had a lot to do with the the rationing in the war in England went on for ten. You Know I. It's only because my my family. It went on for ten more years beyond the end of the war itself. Like my dad didn't grow up with any spices or you know. He used to hoard chocolate around the house and I was like. Why does he hide random drawer and find half Chaka because he grew up as a kid? You did not get chocolate. You did not get these things were were. Were rationed very carefully during the war itself and then for years after you generation. That forgot how to cook with spices. How to Cook with Labor everything? I really my grandmother Aid Cook when I was a kid was buoyed you you know you can make stuff taste good where you boil it but you have to add flavor to boil. It was just like brushing browse in a pot boiled down. Muslim. Grey Brussel sprouts. That's what it tastes like. So for me the concept that you're GONNA lose thousands of small you and one of the pleasures for me of living in Los Angeles for twenty years is you. Have you know it easier now with social media but you had used have to work to find these amazing restaurants in l. a? And for for years my wife and I were driving considerable distance to Jonathan. Gold spent the last ten years of his career just talking about restaurants in East L. A. And we.

Chris Nolan Lisa Joy Westworld Jane England Julian Jonathan Nolan Memento Wracking Joe Nolan professor Dark Knight Series Grey Brussel director Los Angeles Kirk Chaka Simmons
How Ear Hustle Went From Winning a Contest to Becoming One of the Most Successful Podcasts of All-Time

Inside Podcasting

02:34 min | Last month

How Ear Hustle Went From Winning a Contest to Becoming One of the Most Successful Podcasts of All-Time

"Hello and welcome to incite podcasting. The show in which creators discussed their craft. I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. You just heard the voices of visual artists. Nigel poor and former prison inmate Alan Woods. They are co host and Co creators of Ear Hustle which tells stories about daily life inside San Quentin prison. The show which came to life after winning a podcast competition was an immediate hit when it launched in two thousand fifteen the show got a ton of press won awards. It seemed to be the podcast that everyone I knew was talking about and then in two thousand eighteen. Something pretty incredible happened then. California Governor Jerry Brown Commuted Orleans prison sentence Brown credited Orleans work on the podcast as a significant factor in his decision after twenty one years earlier on walked out of San Quentin a free man since then early on and Nigel and the rest of the ear hustle team have continued to tell stories about life on the inside but they've also reinvented elements of the show's format and explored new narratives on the outside. I'm going play you a clip from season. Four of the show in it. You'll hear Nigel. An airline speaking with curtis a newly released inmate about something that's been on his mind ever since he got out of prison. So here's the million dollar question man. Are you still a virgin killing me? Why she turned away was GonNa Take Care of yes. I'm still a virgin. Sadly how many days have you been a probably close to seventy okay? So what I know. That guys insider very preoccupied. About how quickly guys are going to have sex when they get out. I am on the side of. What is the rush rush is at many of us like myself have been on the inside for twenty four years with out sex so now we come out. We think that we're going to run right into the arms of some beautiful woman was just happening. So you WANNA have sex. You could just have sex but are you looking for sex or relationship so to ask her problem. Tell us about that clip from a season. Four episode called. I want the fairytale which is about dating after prison. It's one of the many fascinating episode ear. Hustle has reported on from the

San Quentin Prison Nigel Poor Hustle San Quentin Jerry Brown Sky Pillsbury Commuted Orleans Alan Woods California Curtis Orleans
Be Inspired By Paula Peralta

Mindfulness Mode

09:28 min | Last month

Be Inspired By Paula Peralta

"Hey Mindful tribe. We have energy in house. We're following the energy. I've got an awesome guest today. I'm so excited I've got Paulo. Peralta and Paula is just filled. She's brimming with energy and positivity and great vibes and all of that stuff. Hey Paula are you in mindfulness mode? Today I think so my goodness what an introduction. Thank you so. I'm so happy to be here Bruce. Nothing while I'm happy to have you on the show. Paula Peralta is a celebrity hair stylist. Now how cool is that? She's a business and empowerment coach. Well and according to some standards. Though I get this she has done everything wrong to achieve success. Isn't that something different? Well but Paula exudes joy and she's experiencing more success now than ever before in her entire life. She loves to share. How taking a back step from living life? On everyone else's terms was the best move she ever made. And I'm going to repeat that sentence because I didn't say quite right. Paula loves to share. How taking a step back from living life on everyone else's terms was the best move she ever made. Paula helps her clients. Visualize how they can create a new life even with a blank slate. She believes it's possible to make a career change at almost every stage in life and well. We're in COVID. Nineteen right now and we're in a pandemic and a lot of us are locked down. Many of us have lost our jobs and things can be looking pretty bleak. But we've got this amazing woman on the show who understands that you can make a career change if you need to and it doesn't matter what stage of life you're at so. I'm excited to talk to you about all of this stuff paula. But first of all. What does mindfulness mean to you? So for me. It's really about getting to who you are and really understanding that you actually are the most valuable product like. What if you being? You is actually the gift this required change the world and when you take time to strip away all of the other narratives in all of the projections expectations judgments rejections that we often face in this world are a lot of the things that we have projected us from even a very young age When once you start to strip away bats where you are. That's like the beautiful pony that you are and it's like for not space you can literally create anything and from space you can ask the question with total is what else is possible here that. I haven't even considered a not so you can actually start to create a life that you don't need a vacation from an all of that is for me. What really about being super present or what you call mindfulness mode like that's being present and being like the creative director of your own life. Looks like for me cool. So what is it about you that makes it so that you can help someone veer in a totally different direction in their life and career? How what what talents and abilities do you have? That can help people do that. Well one I made a lot of mistakes in my own life. Okay like I did everything wrong and follow purposes. I definitely am. I think by this reality standards but failure I dropped out of college just because it wasn't for me. I started at career and got laid off five years in. I completely started over with by business twice my salon business. And you know now when we're in you know we're obviously the times of Covid nineteen and I'm again looking at like stepping away from certain aspects. Business that no longer work for me. So it's like it's been kinda failure after failure after change after change. That's the first thing. And then also I'm a certified facilitated access consciousness Which is really focused on empowering people to know that they know so you know what's true for you and you know it's going to work for feel and you have unawareness and so when you're actually following your knowing when actually the greatest possibilities can show up in the universe in have your back so those are. Kinda two things but just a lot of trial and error just really using tools to to get to a space where I trust myself. I trust my awareness that I really can follow the universe. So what do you spend most of your time? Doing Paula. Well it depends on the date so I spent a lot of my time facilitating Either one on one with my clients or I will explode classes as well. A lot of my classes are focused on being you a joint business. A lot of business than money classes but the more energetic cited the more. What's true for you like if you weren't necessarily following the latest Forbes or whatever the public the business publications Is Great Information in the form? But it's also whipped. You you know like what do you know about business and if you are truly creating your own reality what would that look like and so. I spend a lot of time. This'll take not and then I also I obviously like I said I own a salon in Los Angeles California and I work behind the chairs. The hairdresser and I spend a lot of time not only do my guest hair but facilitating them on the traditional issues. That people have in life whether it's relationship or money or business or kids or you know families always a big wind or their bodies So that actually is got started as an harm coach is. I was working with so many hairdresser earth sorry while hairdressers as well while I was working with so many clients. Who are coming into bogs down by by you know all of the projections of of this reality and I started to look at what like. What can I actually choose here? That would contribute not only to them having beautiful hair when they walked out but having not pep in their step and feeling empowered to go out into the world and be them so. That's kind of how we how we got started so now for mindful tribe for some of our listeners. Who Don't know this. Can you explain what is access consciousness Sherry? So it's a set of tools again like I said. I'm conscious of the set of tools that empowers you to know that you now. So every every projection or expectation that we often gay thrown upon us whether it's because our gender or race or our economic status or like where we're at in the family or what are familiar roles are so all of those things they are. There often is a certain narrative projected and so access conscious. Actually has is a set of tools. That help you get to you if that can be part of you but if you weren't defined by all of those things like where are you and if you were functioning as you choosing for you including the reality that you know as possible which is often reality beyond this reality. That other people aren't talking about like what what would actually be possible like what could show. What could you create? What could you choose like? Who would you be and not? That's what I actually really love that. Because it's empowering you to know that you know so what's your story. How did you first become connected to access consciousness? Yes so I I read a book Dr Hair here. Who's one of the CO creators boxes? Consciousness he wrote a book called being a change in the world and there are some really pragmatic tool than it and I read the book. I've toyed with the and he was doing a like a taster kind of short evening. Kinda MEET-AND-GREET AIR I went over to it actually lived in San Francisco from L. A. So I worked two fold in the salon. I hop on a plane was like tire screeching by Uber to get to the hotel in time out to to see his presentation but it just it was. There was such a kindness. Gentleness But this strength in this empowerment behind everything that he said that was like such a It was such a gift and one of the things I love. The most to access consciousness is it's not it's not about like trusting the it is a set of tools but but Dane and Gary Gay Douglas. He's also the CO founder co creator of access consciousness. He says don't trust me. Trust you like what do you know what they you know. So it's it's such a cool different conversation of like always getting to more you. What do you know what do you know? What tools can you use? What's your awareness? If you were truly being you hear like what would you choose and for me? That's such A. It's such a different invitation in a world. That's often projecting it like how to be who to be what to be where to be. When do we so and it's changed. It's completely changed my reality so you know it's changed my relationship with my body exchange. You do business. And it's just my life just continues to get greater so

Paula Peralta Paulo Bruce Covid Los Angeles California Sherry Forbes Director Dr Hair Co Founder San Francisco Dane Gary Gay Douglas
‘Parks and Recreation’ cast to reunite for scripted special to aid coronavirus response fund

Donna and Steve

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

‘Parks and Recreation’ cast to reunite for scripted special to aid coronavirus response fund

"NBC has announced that the cast of parks and recreation is set to reunite for a half hour scripted special airing on April thirtieth in aid of covert nineteen almost all of the original cast members including Amy Poehler Rashida Jones Aziz Ansari Nick Offerman Aubrey plaza Chris Pratt Adam Scott and rob Lowe jimo here and read I will be back in character for the special the special spear headed by co creator Michael Schur will help raise money for feeding America's covert nineteen response fund very run down on an ounce and I but the people who love parks and rec love parks and rec that's that's really cool and I'm sure some weird at home Skype you sue me kind of a version of it but it'll be great some new anything new now is just so

NBC Adam Scott Michael Schur America Skype Amy Poehler Rashida Jones Aziz Ansari Nick Offerman Chris Pratt Rob Lowe
Female-centered 'Star Wars' series in the works from 'Russian Doll' co-creator

Lights Camera Barstool

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

Female-centered 'Star Wars' series in the works from 'Russian Doll' co-creator

"Wars and other New Star Wars series in development From Russian doll creator. Leslie Headline She He's been making some according to variety that I will be a female centric star worship for Disney plus. There's sort of like martial arts type thing going on there She's writing the script. Serving as showrunner is with screener and says lottery reporting on this. But it's GONNA be set in a different era

Leslie Disney Showrunner
"co creator" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

11:46 min | 3 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"You have said the growing up. You wanted to save your family. Y Did you think that they needed saving own tango. You're asking some I wanted to know about you. I won't be mark interviews so that when you're an even bigger star who will come back to and like all right here. I'm like listen. We always talk about group low income. I grew up with You know parents have always been hard working but you know when we first had our first home. I remember you know. We didn't have any money. We didn't have anything we got by with family supporting each other like we were all low income. We're all struggling and I remember my grandmother. Getting food stamps. And the you know the government cheese all low income kids joke about the government cheese and for me and my mom putting water into the milk into the shampoo and conditioner to make last like few weeks more month more because we couldn't afford to get more or you know the age old joke of like. Oh beans again is like every day every day. It's like it's when you grow up low income so much around you reminds you that you are and like specifically for me was just like not having one. Alpha two outfits a year for school like that that we got that was new and like maybe every two years or every year new pair of sneakers and not like a nice pair of sneakers like the stuff that like people would make fun of always dreaming about it had some Nikes like that will be dove Using the kids of Nikes was always really cool. And say you know we were low income in like a little bit of a mixed income community so there were kids kids in my school. Who did have those things that a lot but there was some kids who did having that and see. My parents struggle financially. They always made it work. They always worked hard and made it work. But you know that strain of the financial strain is always with you from a very early age because you you feel it you see it. You see how you have less than I think for a lot of kids who grow up low-income especially if you're a child of immigrants like you grow with the of well. It's so hard for us. We're here for the American dream on a bus button. I'M GONNA GET THAT. Dream I'M GONNA save everybody like we're all getting out of this together. I'm GonNa make so much money that I'm going to get a mansion and we're all going to live in the mansion and I remember my daddy's to drive us to Beverly Hills and He would point to the different houses and he was telling me high. That's where you're gonNA live Mu Ho. That's where you're gonna live like he was always. Kinda like putting into our heads like both. My parents like this. This is where you belong. You can be there and I want you to dream for that. They had that attitude even sitting at dinner tables and telling us you're going to go to college like that was enough for me to say okay. I'm going to go to college. Well not only that. You had a mother who was telling you. I think you're going to be a writer like girl you really. You read everything God yes he did. That's rare yeah now. I remember when I was little. I was like the little adult who was like so when I grow up and be a lawyer and I'm GonNa make lots of money and my mom and my dad were like me. You're really I think there'd be a writer because I would write poetry short stories and like little books and I was little I read like I devoured books like devoured when I say like I was a bookworm like girl. I wasn't the libraries of the street from here the public one. I just lived there like every week was like what's the new topic that I'm obsessed with and it was everything from hamsters to ice hockey like I wanted to learn everything And I would read a lot of buzz of fiction you know like Narnia like all the things all the things And so I would write a lot because I love stories and I love storytelling and and to me never seemed like a career though. That's something I do for fun and I love moving people whether like I used to love writing poems. That would make people cry. I just loved it. I just love that. It could write something that moves someone like and it was usually like my parents or my siblings or my aunt and uncle or my aunts and my grandma but There was something that I felt within me. Felt so good and so right to be able to move someone with my work but I didn't know that could make a career out of it so you know my parents being like I think you're going to be a writer to me was like first of all. Y'All are broke for a reason. No you can't make money being a writer like that kid who was like what you're crazy like we. This is a saying in Spanish. Almost almost. It's like well I'm GONNA go get. I'm going to be a lawyer. I'M GONNA make money but the minute I went to college. I mean the first year was really tough. But then I took this class with Harry Elam at Stanford who introduced an issue in Moraga. Who's GonNa Right? Who was the feminism? Played a huge role in the Chicano rights movement with her work and she The first thing I wrote of hers was giving up the Ghost dinner. Remember Thinking Oh. I saw her writing about her community. Far More community and of course like our communities are very similar. Obviously like even my family who've done farm work and all that I it was my people essentially and I was like wait a second. Hold up you can write it by your people and like make a career. Well first of all you can read about your people because everything i Read. Read of until that point for the most part was white people secondly you can make money doing that like it all just like for me was like this moment of like. It was just a big moment to be like. Wow I can do that. I remember the first time I read. This bridge called my back and I was like. Oh I. I grew up in Latino community and it didn't it almost didn't occur to me that it was a minority experience. And I remember reading that and be like Oh this is a radical land like this is like I saw in my own little world of not realizing how radical it was to tell your story into own your story for those women. Yeah it's so radical. It's crazy and this is again. Goes back to like give. You can't see it. You can't be it right like that. If Cherie had an ex pursued her passion in her love and I'm sure there's the people who inspired her to do the same. I wouldn't be here a needed her work. I needed her to do her work. So that I could exist in the way that existing now that is like a full circle wild moment for me. Because that's what started my journey. You know like seeing something like what the Hell I can do this like. It's so vital and so important in one of the big reasons why never gave up on this show. It was a hard road. It was a very very hard road To make this in one of the things that really brought me to show up to it fully was knowing knowing that it was gonna make a huge difference to so many people and would create more craters than we need them. You know we need these. These folks to show up every day to create their art and And Yeah so ungrateful to my parents. Who taught me as a writer in a grateful to? Cherie for allowing me to fully Taken with I know now very very viscerally know. Now that it's my calling to do those early early moments of writing poetry tongues stories and storytelling all that that was just you know the university. Yeah this is who you are. This is what you're going to do. This is your life but it took these moments to really embrace that and say no no. This really is your calling now own it and step into and empower yourself to push through so much of the ethos of the show is about what you are willing to sacrifice in order to survive What have you sacrificed in order to get to this point? Have I sacrificing to this point? Move heavy deep Mobile I think for me like a big sacrifice has been. I don't have a traditional life that every Mexican daughter would have which is like to have a husband and kids and when I say kids usually a bunch and to be able to be available for every weekend like family barbecue and every like get together and every birthday party which has Latinos as we know like. That's the thing like we all everybody's shows up to every week. Every week in his fifty parties for so-and-so's kids for kids can sing at the baptism the distance that and that's what I grew up with. It grew up with a very tight. Knit like you always show up for each other. Which is such a such a part of the series ray very much. A lot of stuff is based on me but like how do you sacrifice that part to go after your dream for me? It was definitely like Sacrificing that part of it and also sacrificing that traditional time line of marriage and children. There's do you want it or not right and that for me. The struggle for a long time because I have a full blown career that demands a lot for me to be able to show up to this dream every day meant that I had to invest in me in and make this time for me because I most of the time during this process like I barely keep myself together. I can't even imagine like children are a family or husband or whatever may be. I know you're doing which is crazy like every prison. Amy Who is doing anyone who's at my level in terms of a creative or EPA. Moe's like Gloria like for example. Gloria they don't kill it. Who is the crater one time as a mentor version? A friend and I every time with her and I see her all the time and like how you doing honeydew. Tell me all your secrets. Like how are you raising? Children have a husband all the things. She's she's dancer like her. Show me her calendar but still like oh I think he just has to happen to figure it out but I felt like I had a sacrifice that to make this happen in a way that will keep me still saying because I am a huge advocate for mental health and I am a huge. You know I've dealt with a lot of mental health issues and over the years and I'm very aware of what I can handle what I cannot and in this time to keep myself healthy and strong it was like this is what I can handle an truthfully. This is more important to me. More than anything in my dream So that was. I think that was a sacrifice that was always like difficult to Process but you know Jassem. Sacrifices ARE WORTH A. Yeah and also that there's also that but you know when you hear again being that the clock starts ticking for your family when you're like twenty four doesn't like twenty one of the kids like whereas marriage what's happening like like that clock is taken from the get-go so it's a very real pressure that's still shows up for us consistently in so you know we're finding against that to being able to tell people like listen first of all. I want a secondly like wait like I have to do this. I and I don't think that's a traditional thing in our communities. What what do you WANNA do next? Do Nex oh goodness well I mean I work. I'm TV by also had have work the feature space so actually have a few really exciting big projects that will hopefully be coming out getting made in the next year so But beyond that I wanNA direct so that feature that. I talked about earlier that it was about. My grandmother is a feature that have in the Sundance momentum fellowship right now and they're helping me that fellowship is really for mid level folks in like at this point in their careers who need more support to keep launching but what asked of them was to support me in making this feature film directing it so for me. What's next is trying to direct that film. Thank you for your extreme patients with us. Thank you for all your amazing incredible questions. I get very deep..

writer Cherie Beverly Hills Mu Ho Amy Who Moraga Gloria Jassem Harry Elam so-and-so Stanford Moe EPA
When Gentefied Co-Creator Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Was A Writer

Latina to Latina

07:12 min | 3 months ago

When Gentefied Co-Creator Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Was A Writer

"You have said the growing up. You wanted to save your family. Y Did you think that they needed saving own tango. You're asking some I wanted to know about you. I won't be mark interviews so that when you're an even bigger star who will come back to and like all right here. I'm like listen. We always talk about group low income. I grew up with You know parents have always been hard working but you know when we first had our first home. I remember you know. We didn't have any money. We didn't have anything we got by with family supporting each other like we were all low income. We're all struggling and I remember my grandmother. Getting food stamps. And the you know the government cheese all low income kids joke about the government cheese and for me and my mom putting water into the milk into the shampoo and conditioner to make last like few weeks more month more because we couldn't afford to get more or you know the age old joke of like. Oh beans again is like every day every day. It's like it's when you grow up low income so much around you reminds you that you are and like specifically for me was just like not having one. Alpha two outfits a year for school like that that we got that was new and like maybe every two years or every year new pair of sneakers and not like a nice pair of sneakers like the stuff that like people would make fun of always dreaming about it had some Nikes like that will be dove Using the kids of Nikes was always really cool. And say you know we were low income in like a little bit of a mixed income community so there were kids kids in my school. Who did have those things that a lot but there was some kids who did having that and see. My parents struggle financially. They always made it work. They always worked hard and made it work. But you know that strain of the financial strain is always with you from a very early age because you you feel it you see it. You see how you have less than I think for a lot of kids who grow up low-income especially if you're a child of immigrants like you grow with the of well. It's so hard for us. We're here for the American dream on a bus button. I'M GONNA GET THAT. Dream I'M GONNA save everybody like we're all getting out of this together. I'm GonNa make so much money that I'm going to get a mansion and we're all going to live in the mansion and I remember my daddy's to drive us to Beverly Hills and He would point to the different houses and he was telling me high. That's where you're gonNA live Mu Ho. That's where you're gonna live like he was always. Kinda like putting into our heads like both. My parents like this. This is where you belong. You can be there and I want you to dream for that. They had that attitude even sitting at dinner tables and telling us you're going to go to college like that was enough for me to say okay. I'm going to go to college. Well not only that. You had a mother who was telling you. I think you're going to be a writer like girl you really. You read everything God yes he did. That's rare yeah now. I remember when I was little. I was like the little adult who was like so when I grow up and be a lawyer and I'm GonNa make lots of money and my mom and my dad were like me. You're really I think there'd be a writer because I would write poetry short stories and like little books and I was little I read like I devoured books like devoured when I say like I was a bookworm like girl. I wasn't the libraries of the street from here the public one. I just lived there like every week was like what's the new topic that I'm obsessed with and it was everything from hamsters to ice hockey like I wanted to learn everything And I would read a lot of buzz of fiction you know like Narnia like all the things all the things And so I would write a lot because I love stories and I love storytelling and and to me never seemed like a career though. That's something I do for fun and I love moving people whether like I used to love writing poems. That would make people cry. I just loved it. I just love that. It could write something that moves someone like and it was usually like my parents or my siblings or my aunt and uncle or my aunts and my grandma but There was something that I felt within me. Felt so good and so right to be able to move someone with my work but I didn't know that could make a career out of it so you know my parents being like I think you're going to be a writer to me was like first of all. Y'All are broke for a reason. No you can't make money being a writer like that kid who was like what you're crazy like we. This is a saying in Spanish. Almost almost. It's like well I'm GONNA go get. I'm going to be a lawyer. I'M GONNA make money but the minute I went to college. I mean the first year was really tough. But then I took this class with Harry Elam at Stanford who introduced an issue in Moraga. Who's GonNa Right? Who was the feminism? Played a huge role in the Chicano rights movement with her work and she The first thing I wrote of hers was giving up the Ghost dinner. Remember Thinking Oh. I saw her writing about her community. Far More community and of course like our communities are very similar. Obviously like even my family who've done farm work and all that I it was my people essentially and I was like wait a second. Hold up you can write it by your people and like make a career. Well first of all you can read about your people because everything i Read. Read of until that point for the most part was white people secondly you can make money doing that like it all just like for me was like this moment of like. It was just a big moment to be like. Wow I can do that. I remember the first time I read. This bridge called my back and I was like. Oh I. I grew up in Latino community and it didn't it almost didn't occur to me that it was a minority experience. And I remember reading that and be like Oh this is a radical land like this is like I saw in my own little world of not realizing how radical it was to tell your story into own your story for those women. Yeah it's so radical. It's crazy and this is again. Goes back to like give. You can't see it. You can't be it right like that. If Cherie had an ex pursued her passion in her love and I'm sure there's the people who inspired her to do the same. I wouldn't be here a needed her work. I needed her to do her work. So that I could exist in the way that existing now that is like a full circle wild moment for me. Because that's what started my journey. You know like seeing something like what the Hell I can do this like. It's so vital and so important in one of the big reasons why never gave up on this show. It was a hard road. It was a very very hard road To make this in one of the things that really brought me to show up to it fully was knowing knowing that it was gonna make a huge difference to so many people and would create more craters than we need them. You know we need these. These folks to show up every day to create their art and And Yeah so ungrateful to my parents. Who taught me as a writer in a grateful to? Cherie for allowing me to fully Taken with I know now very very viscerally know. Now that it's my calling to

Writer Cherie Beverly Hills Mu Ho Moraga Harry Elam Stanford
When Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Couldn't Quit

Latina to Latina

02:30 min | 3 months ago

When Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Couldn't Quit

"I think our insecurities that have come from many traumas at work through therapy in the thing with this particular moment for me by said this. Is it like you have to dedicate yourself to the thing that you want to do? Which is writing. It's now or never you can't give up on this industry because the reality is you haven't really tried in the one area you know you want it and they you know you could do it so. I said if I can't make this happen within a couple of years then that's it then you can. You can move on with your life and say did everything I could and it just didn't work out for me but you gotta give it everything. Linda is a toy. So you gotta give you gotTa leave this feeling like I gave it everything I could and I'm at peace because I always ask myself. How will you feel at the end of your life? If you didn't do that so I gave it my. I give it everything and within a few months ago. Hint defied and right away within those two year is we were pitching or TV. Show and and I had put out around that time My family and I were very cute or a very cute little immigrant family Mexican family but we would do these dream meetings where we would talk about our dreams and like what we wanted to to achieve him and we would you know manifest there talk about things we wanted and my sister kept saying she wants to be a mother and I kept saying I I WANNA BE I WANNA create my own TV. Show and I didn't know how it was going to happen. Because any OS and going through it the traditional way in television and knew there was a traditional way I had so much experience. Managing my skill level was not at a staff writer level. Like I knew that I my writing that I could do way more than that and I didn't WanNa come into television at that level because so much experience in different areas and skill sets that transferred so I was like God. I don't know how you're going to do it. This is what I WANNA do. And within two years I had sold me and Marmon had sold the show to net flix and now about a year later year and a half later we just released it and give it my all. I can't sit you know. A cancer really proved to me that like the truth is when you feel a calling your men to do it and it's just a really the only thing between you and that calling is will you choose to give it like if you choose to go after it because there was countless obstacles but at the end of the day you'll get there if that's that's truly what you want.

Linda Marmon Staff Writer
"co creator" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

08:47 min | 3 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"Linda Chavez was hustling hard creating digital content and deeply secretly wanting to write for television and film which is funny because she went to film school she was ready to give up on that dream which was offered the chance to co write a digital series that show hint the fide. Got So much buzz. That she and her co-creator Marvin Lima's reworked for TV and sold it to. Netflix focuses on three cousins. Who Work together to keep their grandfather's boyle heights Taco shop afloat. It is heartbreaking and hilarious and like Linda so smart engaging that you'll want to watch it all in one sitting Linda this is our first interview during a pandemic. So thank you for being willing to do this remotely. This is a little strange for us so I appreciate you being willing to give it a whirl absolutely I mean like you know we have to keep going even in the midst of this. I've definitely done multiple interviews. During this Megan's it's been a very been really interesting to hop on. You know the first question everyone wants to ask is like hey you doing okay are you doing holding of. Yeah I am. I think those first few weeks where a little tough rally for all of us to kind of comprehend and wrap our head around what's happening it's A. It's a new normal that we're all adjusting to how about you. How are you doing I? I'm isolated with kids which is like a whole different thing and it gave me time to watch had defied which I loved a truly loved. Let's start at the beginning of defied. Marvin the show's creator pitches the idea to macro just this big production company. They like it. They tell him he needs to find someone to Co. Write it he finds you through the film independent where you had just finished a fellowship when the head the fellowship approached you with the opportunity. What was your reaction was a first time like pitch that he brought them. He had a small deck that he had presented to them and they were like awesome. Like your background's more in directing. Can you bring someone onto to co write with you and develop this and essentially created with you and I you know when he brought it to me? My first reaction was I. Yeah please I have been trying to tell the stories for so long enough finding a place for those stories that have been wanting to do it so desperately and I was ready to do something more meaningful on deep burns something that was true storytelling and I liked his vision for like what he wanted to be was like listen. I I want you here because the voice thing that I read the sample I had sent him like. That's the voice. I won't for this project. I wanted to feel like that. I wanted to work together to bring what we both have to this. Whatever I have whatever throw that out like we need to tell the best story possible and let's be artists and I hadn't had the freedom to be just an artist in years because I had been chasing numbers on the digital platforms. I was working with and also just like you know the gender vacation hit the vacation of it. All from me was like so true. My life in that moment like being a young professional having all my friends all of us are our children of immigrants. We all are first Gen. All a lot of our parents came here. Undocumented like we had grown up with that American dream being seated in a so strongly and so we were coming into the upward mobility but then finding ourselves wondering as we moved into neighborhoods where we felt most comfortable. I felt like home like I lived like in. West Adams is community in La That's predominantly Central American and Caribbean. And it was. It's pupil color and I felt comfortable there when I was going to Grad School. This is where I want to live. But How am I contributing to the vacation? Even though I'm a person of color does it. Does that include me? Am I also part of the problem and other questions those asking myself when he brought that to me so when he brought it? I was like ready to get into all of that. You and he did a lot of what you call trauma bonding what did that. Yeah Trauma Bond. Always say that a lot. He always says he's like I don't like to work so at the beginning of every session it was like let's do some cheese for like twenty minutes and I you know I will force myself to where like let's do some cheese like all right like because ultimately. I don't really want to work like I WANNA get into it so we would you know we do our cheese and a Lotta Times. I was therapy sessions for both of us. We're both very willing to be vulnerable. And I have a long history of doing therapy so I was very ready to do it. And talk and talk about our lives and in that process we got to the core of a lot of the themes and issues we want to explore with the series digital series that we then carried into the into the TV series when we created that but those court Dana started in that first coffee shop on first street in Boyle Heights coping with us. That's not there anymore. Because of gentrification it's all came from a lot of the things that we were experiencing a lot of the the issues that we had been confronting us I mean kids as like and professionals of children of immigrants everything that we were experiencing. We felt we want to the page and also just relationships like our relationships with our fathers or mothers or siblings. The way that love is it happens in our communities the way that that our mothers who work in factories are portrayed like all those things were things that we had never really seen the way that we've really experienced them and so we were so adamant about putting that complexity onto the page complexity. That I think a lot of people like about the series in drawn to that you laugh and then you get hit with this like Oh shit this is reality and this real and for us that that tone is is our lives and the lives of our communities like we're we're always faced with a lot of difficult structural institutional `ISMs right that are always obstacles. That were up against but at the end of the day. We got survive. We gotta laugh like this pandemic Raina like we're we're very well equipped for it because we grew up with like trauma after trauma after trauma and like learning how to cope with it and learning how to roll with the punches in a lot of times that included comedy. You know cracking jokes and Marvin always says isn't it? Grew with it like you know. We both work around like a ton of Comedians with the findings people. We know our own families like our own Mazar on cousins siblings. Who LIKE CRACK JOKES? Like you're just stop roasting me. You know all of that. It's coping mechanisms in anything. That was the tone that we were trying to capture the series as well where it's like yes. Life is hard but are we're not all these like really sad sepia toned like you know sad. Immigrants Rolling through the dirt roads in a desert in Mexico. Like where there's a complexity to who we are and that's why we try to achieve with the series at the point at which you to partnered up and this opportunity came your way you. It seems we're at a crossroads where you're sort of getting towards the end of your rope in terms of pursuing this specific dream. Yeah Dan you do your research on the Google's Um my history is long before that I went to film school went to USC for Grad School. I had been writing for many years and trying to tell these stories for a long time and I felt like every time I try to find a way to tell these types of stories. Things didn't really pan out there. Though with it. I had wanted to take me back one. Step the what happened between graduating from film school and like why not go directly into film. What led you into then pursuing all of these digital opportunities while the the steps gets his actually many years of work. I worked in different areas. I worked I dish short films as a director. I worked on documentary. I worked for these Emmy Award winning documentary filmmakers with them Got US on Rub. Who taught me so much about producing Inspiration for about that. He's Be that he's his character comes from the film called made in La which was about garment workers in Los Angeles. I'll be honest. Like writing is what I knew I wanted to do. I inform us in. It's the one thing that kept avoiding because I kept doing all the other in this is something I tell people like. If you find yourself in industry doing all the jobs around the job you really WanNa do like check in on that because that means something. It means like you're avoiding. There's some sort of fear around you not doing nothing you really WanNa do. What was the year for me? Not being good enough now being able to achieve The dream of nothing that I was good enough writer that I could do a revision. That could get it done that. It could deliver like all these.

Linda Chavez Marvin Lima Boyle Heights La That Grad School Netflix Los Angeles co-creator Megan Taco shop Emmy Award Co West Adams writer Mazar Mexico Dana Google director
Farewell to ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ a delightful show ending at the most unfortunate time

Morning Edition

03:06 min | 3 months ago

Farewell to ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ a delightful show ending at the most unfortunate time

"This sitcom Schitt's creek ended last night after six seasons now most good TV shows have fans but shit's creek fans are on another level here's Glen Weldon of NPR's pop culture happy hour podcast look no spoilers shit's creek airs on pop TV here in the states but it didn't become the phenomenon it has until people found it early seasons on Netflix the sixth and final season that concluded last night hasn't hit Netflix yet so we'll be careful here because this shows fans are hard core they dress up as their favorite characters they make YouTube super cuts of their catch phrases I don't think that you'll feel you feel devalued last year they feel four thousand seat theaters just to watch it stars sit and talk about it in a live show the toward the states she plays my best friend Stevie bottom it might seem odd that people get so rapidly excited about a show that some small so gentle so Canadian but it's a that gentleness the way allows its characters to grow into slightly better versions of themselves the people follow up with certainly the show's set up wasn't unique your basic fish out of water story a rich family loses everything and is forced to move to the only remaining assets you bought a small town in nineteen ninety one Johnny yes I bought that is a joke for my son we actually purchased that town they want up living in a run down motel David the brutal condescending son played by co creator Dan levy began his new life in church creek by snapping at Stevie the motel clerk I have asked you thrice now for a towel so that I only wash this town off my body but then gradually something happened David met and fell in love with the local Patrick a sweet closeted businessman their relationship was depicted matter of factly because shit's creek was set in a world without homophobia in a behind the scenes special airing after last night's finale levy said he set out to depict a quick relationship on marked by tragedy or struggle when someone who has opposing beliefs sits down in front of their TV and watches we're not teaching them a lesson we're showing them what life could be like the David Patrick collision chip is one reason the show has been so embraced by the queer community but it's not the only one ladies and gentleman Catherine o'hara in the lease of the picturesque ridge lies a small unpretentious winery one that pampers its fruit like its own babies Hey I'm my referrals yes family matriarch more row faded celebrity fruit wine spokesperson wearer of wings as hats gay icon with a universal appeal I know we said no spoilers but the show's creators have made no secret about the fact that shit's creek concludes with a wedding and some tearful departures for six seasons it was a series of manager show its main character staying true to who they were even as they developed new layers of empathy and maintain their sense of self awareness the kept things from getting too syrupy like the time David and Stevie that motel clerk he yelled at an episode one but then grew close to as the series progressed confessed that neither of them had a best friend before this would be a really sweet moment if what we had just admitted to each other wasn't so sad actually it's both sweet and sad like the legacy that shit's creek leaves

Schitt
"co creator" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

11:27 min | 3 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Just like a real broad group of people from the place where you live and they're all pretty committed and hard-working incompetent and you're like this is a great place. I live in people have much more complicated feelings. Like there's this. There is a pretty simple story that you can say we're telling a story about government and how the people there are decent and certainly there are people who hate government and you had you know Ron Swanson on the show who who hated government. Despite working in aren't because he he worked in it because he hated it was the at least the original India but people have much more complicated feelings about officers And I wonder if that was something that you were thinking about right from the start or whether it was something that you sort of realized in the in the course of making the show. It's something we really realized in the course of making the show I think the black lives matter movement Obviously these problems have been around forever but the sort of national prominence and and place in the headlines really started around our season three or four two or three and so. It wasn't really a thing that we were thinking about. I mean we were thinking about aspects of the police and the way in which they deal with the public and we wanted to make we never wanted to glorify police violence in any way or make them bad. Cops was really important to us that they were good. Cops was important to us that they followed the rules. But we're smart and some of that was also Andy's really dufy and so we wanted to make sure we thought he was only believable as a cop if we made him a good cop if he's like bad as a cop and also a total do feel like there's no reality to this and in some ways of the show you know you're as much in dialogue with a history of police television shows as you are in dialogue with actual police officers right as as the show presented itself it at the very beginning right right and then so the other thing that happened was I think from the very beginning unintentionally we kind of created a group that models and also halt so halt as the dad was a tough kind of dad and he wanted he wanted them to be the best precinct in history because this was his shot so right away the directive from the top was. I want the best cops. They're want the best precinct ever and the director from the bottom from from Jake was I want to be the best cop effort so you know and their and their conflict was over method but never about an illegal methods and you know I actually ended up being one of the things I think people really like about the show because ultimately obviously it meant that everyone became what was on the same page but as writers. It was very difficult because very quickly. What's the conflict between person who wants their squad to be great and a squad that wants to be great and then you have to find sort of interpersonal conflicts and or circumstantial conflicts to to help Create stories so. We were really modeling. I think in some ways unintentionally. What good cops should be like. But then always showing. In our first seasons we often had them deal with bad cops or dirty cops and have to make moral decisions. I think our second episode was called the Tagger and in it and a deputy commissioner is asking for special privilege special favors for his son. Who IS Spray Painting penises on police cars and hold stands up to him and says we were not going to do the wrong thing. So it's a thing we were aware of on some level and we're we're trying to navigate on some level and then once it really came to prominence and was something we were reading about and carrying about a lot we really became committed to doing an episode that dealt with it head on and it just took us a while to figure out how to do that episode how to do that episode in a way that was meaningful but also still funny still felt like Brooklyn nine nine and then ultimately that led to the episode where Terry is racially profiled. Terry while wearing civilian clothing is racially profiled by NYPD. Officer were. You scared to do something like did you have ever have the The feeling like I don't want to do after school. Tell A- like after school or just like the. Let's just make this a world where only goofy things happen? Yeah Yeah but we begin to feel like it's going to seem like our heads are in the sand and one could certainly look at the fact that we don hundred forty three episodes and there are plenty of episodes where only goofy things happen. So maybe maybe our heads are partially in the sand still but it was a story we really wanted to tell and we felt like we couldn't avoid telling it we had to figure out how and once we figured it out. We were really happy with the outcome. How do you Check in that when you are writing storylines about such a diverse group of characters and You yourself are like a classic caricature of a guy who would be the boss of a Sitcom In a straight a straight white guy who went to Harvard and like got a job of college with his Improv Buddy. Yeah I thought you were going to say Stunningly handsome. Oh yeah most. Most television writers are known for their good luck. First and foremost I live in a bubble. How do you check in that when you have for example you know? Stephanie? Beatrice his character. coming out is by and she herself has. Bhai or Andre Brower. A big part of his character from the beginning has been His husband and the you know around the edges of his experience as a police officer and in wanting to be a good police officer has always been because he was the victim of discrimination within the Police Department for both race and orientation reasons how do you keep that ship on track in a way. That is both kind of like sees people for who they are and is not patronizing. I think the there are several things I think one Really striving towards having a lot of diversity on the staff in the crew is very helpful and being open to everyone's opinions and ideas and viewpoint and then to Really being in communication with the actors themselves so for Rosa Coming Out. I mean Stephanie. Herself was so integral to helping US break that story and talking about what she felt was really important for that character to say she wanted the character to say. I'm bisexual and to use those words because that's the thing that a character a main character on TV show who gets to live has almost never said before and she knew that and it was important to her that those words were said and similarly when we broke the story about Terry being racially profiled. We spend a lot of time talking to Terry about his own experiences with that. And then the thing that actually broke. That story open was a conversation with Andre. He said every time we've portrayed Captain Holt having to deal with racism or homophobia. He's taken it and he's taken it for a reason and the reason he's taken it is that he believes he will be more effective if he can make systemic change the way for him to make systemic change is to is to climb up the ranks and then eventually be commissioner makes his stomach change so we had this argument. And it's an argument. It's a legitimate argument on both sides and we have this. Argument between Holt and Terry is the only time we've really ever done this in an episode there sitting in two chairs opposite of each other having an argument over the course of entire act. Terry basically says I hear you but I think it's es. I'm going to hand in the complaint Consequences be damned and then at the end. Because I think the thing that we've really learned when we do. These episodes is not to sugarcoat. Anything at the end terriers made the report. The guy has been demoted but Terry was up for a promotion of his own and he doesn't get it and he says to halt. Do you think it's because I handed in that complaint and hold says I don't know maybe probably but I'm proud you did it and you see that the world isn't it's not all roses and UNICORNS and Candy Canes and I that there are consequences crappy consequences sometimes but they have each other's back. Well Dan. I'm so grateful you took this time to talk about Your Life in Brooklyn nine nine. I love the show so much like that. Show happy really really. Do Watch every episode. I'm really grateful you came in. I'm so flattered that you asked me and thank you so much I love your show. And this has been a blast. Dan Gore Brooklyn nine nine airs. Thursday nights on NBC. You can stream all seven seasons including the new episodes right now on Hulu. That's the end of another episode of Bullseye. Bullseye is currently produced out of the homes of me and the staff of maximum fund in and around Los Angeles California. Now normally we would give you an update on what's happening outside our office in Macarthur Park but instead Here at my house. My wife overheard this exchange between my six year old son and eight year old daughter after my daughter noticed that there was some whipped cream in the fridge. She said to him. Hey I noticed. We have a little something. That goes on top of hot cocoa in a blue spray bottle in the fridge. Son Oscar said Gatorade shows produced by speaking into microphones. Our producer is Kevin Ferguson. Hey Soussan Brosio is our associate producer. We get help from Casey O'Brien production fellows Jordan. Cowling are interstitial. Music is by Dan. Wally also known as Dj w our theme song is by the go team. Thanks TO THEM AND THEIR LABEL MEMPHIS industries for letting US use it and we have decades of interviews in the can if your home and board or doing important work and WanNa less important distraction. Check out our back catalog like if you like Brooklyn nine nine. We had on Stephanie Batteries. Who Plays Rosa di as she was absolutely wonderful. She's a actress and I really cool funny lady who actually was the inspiration for her character being by because she herself is Bisexual and we also had terry crews perhaps the most magnetic human being on earth Certainly one of the top ten most defined sets of pectoral muscles on earth. He talked about all kinds of things including but not limited to his love of mini vans. Frying those on our website the Bullseye page at maximum fund dot Org. We're also on facebook twitter and Youtube search for Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn you can keep up with the show there and I think that's about it. Just remember all great. Radio hosts have signature. Sign off Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn is a production of maximum fun dot org and distributed by NPR..

Terry Brooklyn Dan Gore Officer Rosa di US Jesse Thorn Andre Brower India Ron Swanson Bullseye Stephanie Police Department deputy commissioner Captain Holt Stephanie Batteries officer NYPD Andy
Flavor Flav calls out Bernie Sanders for using Public Enemy name for campaign rally

WGN Nightside

03:12 min | 4 months ago

Flavor Flav calls out Bernie Sanders for using Public Enemy name for campaign rally

"Night look enemy is going to play at a Bernie Sanders rally on Sunday in LA the rally of course proceed super Tuesday Dick Van **** is going to be there so it's it's it's weird Sarah Silverman makes more sense she's a Bernie Sanders supporter has been and the band Public Enemy number is all psyched up to be like wow that's what a move to have such a popular mainstream hip hop group a very political one one that you know the song fight the power the not to mention the fact that they're aligned with Spike Lee in do the right thing that's what that song was from Chuck D. course a very politically minded socially conscious rapper it's a big win for Bernie Sanders to have public enemy to help maybe woo the black vote some of the black vote that he hasn't yet moved so you like this gonna be great can't believe I got a mail I'm gonna see Chuck D. possibly a terminator X. I don't know about a professor Griff still in the band I don't doubt it of course flavor Flav yeah well turns out in this come out today tonight that's flavor Flav A. K. William Drayton is accusing the Vermont senator Bernie Sanders of misappropriating his likeness and promoting a quote false narrative that the group has endorsed his campaign for the democratic presidential nomination only that what could go wrong in that situation get pick public enemy but then the the storyline becomes no you're lying is that good very that's like the worst possible thing that's even worse and I'm not showing up there should be like scheduling conflict but for one of the band mates the most popular band mates come out and say the false narrative that the group has endorsed the campaign his lawyer plays got a lawyer says we've become aware the flavors bandmate and Public Enemy co creator Chuck D. has endorsed Bernie Sanders candidacy and he performed he plans to perform an upcoming Sanders rally what Chuck is certainly free to express political views as he sees fit his voice alone does not speak for Public Enemy the plant performance will only be Chuck D. of Public Enemy will not be a performance by Public Enemy those who truly know what Public Enemy stands for knows what time it is there's no public enemy without flavor Flav wow this is not good for Bernie for any just like what a coup I got Public Enemy to play all my problems are solved the question of whether or not truly is Public Enemy of

LA Sarah Silverman Spike Lee Bernie Sanders Chuck D. Professor Griff A. K. William Drayton Dick Van Vermont Senator
‘American Horror Story’: Macaulay Culkin Among Season 10 Cast Of FX Series

Colleen and Bradley

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

‘American Horror Story’: Macaulay Culkin Among Season 10 Cast Of FX Series

"The call can has an acting job he's officially joined the cast of American horror story for its tenth season Ryan Murphy the co creator of HHS is the kids like to call it announced the casting news in two Instagram videos this morning McCauley will be joining returning cast member Sarah Paulson and Evan Peters were not part of the ninth season of the

Ryan Murphy HHS Mccauley Sarah Paulson Evan Peters Instagram
RT launches The Nobody Zone in five languages

podnews

02:45 min | 4 months ago

RT launches The Nobody Zone in five languages

"The latest from our newsletter at Poured News Dot net. What out of the blue. I just said now tell me about all the other murders in Kelly. Some crimes are never seen which one you talk about. The nobody's own anu six Parsh- true crime podcast from Archie and third year. That's a true crime stories set on the streets of London. But it's interesting because it a first artie. They're making it available in five languages English Danish Spanish German and Irish. Nobody's own is a cupboard action third ear productions in Denmark spotify. His redesigned is podcast. Show pages show trailers and are given a prominent position at the top of the episode list. And it also has category browsing buttons as well. It's rolling out on. Irs We don't see it on Android yes staples built some new stores called staples connect in the state of Massachusetts Lucky Massachusetts. Each of these new stores have podcast studios as well and spreaker has very proud to offer discounts for all staples connects. Podcast studios uses listening to podcasts. Conference has confirmed its headline speaker. It's Sarah Caning the host and Co Creator Of Award. Winning podcast. Cereal not unique detailing the conference. He's on June the twenty fifth in downtown Los Angeles in California. Yes it's in the biltmore again. Why every hotel room is still nine hundred. Seventy Five Nick. Kwara ways in the podcast. He likes it. The horse radio network is celebrating posting over ten thousand episodes. The podcast network has been in operation since two thousand and eight and includes daily morning. Show horses in the morning which is now at two thousand. Four hundred episodes. Nee No yes. I just isn't to this. Podcast is a weekly podcast recommendation. Newsletter for women. You'll find it links from our episode notes and I'm used today also linked a free podcast conference yesterday in Providence Rhode Island called W. F. E. S. lineup features Andy Mills and acted Mayo and speakers from stitcher and w. n. y. c. and thanks to our latest supporter called the podcast news. No idea what they did and it cost us the first live podcast on Broadway. Of course it has to be true crime. True crime obsessed takes to the stage on June. The first daily podcast covering video game news has launched gaming right home is new from the makers of the tech me right. Home and bad on paper is a weekly podcast bringing you. The people products and books you need to know about it already has one hundred and twenty five thousand monthly downloads and facebook community with ever four thousand members

Artie Massachusetts Kelly Denmark English Danish Spanish German Facebook Archie Los Angeles Spotify Providence Rhode Island London IRS NEE California W. N. Y. C. Mayo Andy Mills W. F. E.
Lights, camera, Oscars: Meet the creators decolonizing Hollywood

Unreserved

08:55 min | 5 months ago

Lights, camera, Oscars: Meet the creators decolonizing Hollywood

"I'm Rosanna the dear child. Talking all about rewriting Hollywood's image of indigenous people from the inside and five indigenous. Writers Comics are doing just us that working on a brand new Sitcom for NBC. Called Rutherford falls unreserved producers. Tenant met up with them on the paramount studio lots in La just outside the writer's room where things can get a little silly job Tassell fulltime job. My name is Janisch meeting. I'M MITOCHONDRIA LAKOTA. And I'm a staff writer rather vol's my name's bobby. Wilson I'm secede secede Awan Awan Dakota and I think a little bit of White House staff writer Donahue. My name is Tania as Chavez. I am a citizen. If the Bishop how you tribe molly member one tribe relations are I am Navajo Pie in San Carlo Patchy achieve and I am the story editor on the jets. My name is Tyler Claire. I am Mohawk and mic-mac from from going to walk in Quebec and a staff writer on the show it's pretty great. AFC or analysis Hanish land nearby Cheektowaga Additionally my name is Sierra Teller Analysis I'm member of the Navajo Nation. I'm born of edgewater people in for the Mexican people and I'm also The Cook Creator of Rutherford Falls. I created the show with Ed Helms and Mike sure who both worked on the office in my created partner in Brooklyn I nine and the good place and so we've been working on this developing this idea for about a year and a half now. The show runner is really sort of like the boss. But they're also a conduit between in the producers and the other CO creators and the studio and the network and then also the writers so there's kind of jack-of-all-trades sort of shortstop position. I'm going to say that. This is the first native show runner in America and I would say this is the first TV show that has this many stuff writers and writers that Arnie if I could be wrong but I won't back down. Toss it would be my hype woman. The most basic question to start with what is referred falls. What is it about we such a hard time explaining what the show is? But it's awesome so like definitely spy side in there. I'm not it's all about the town of other falls which is this tiny town in upstate. New York that is adjacent to a native reservation and the town is sort of turned upside down own when there's talk of moving statue that commemorates the founder of the town. This Guy Lawrence Weatherford. And the last Rutherford to live in the town is this Guy Nathan in played by Ed Helms Nathan Rutherford and he just loses his mind over it. And because you sort of can't let go. It causes all these other dust ups in the town including his friendship. unshipped with Scroll Regan. Who is native American one of the things? I think that I love about Mike. Sure shows is that he sets out to really try to say something big in a super funny super assessable way talking about the bureaucracy of government with parks and REC or talking about like. What does it mean to be a good person with a good place and I were two picture shows? People be like what the hell are you talking new out but he has a way of sort of condensing and making it funny and making accessible way that I really enjoy and so I think we're talking a lot about like what are first stories. What does the American narrative? How does that American narrative affect all of us? And I think we've found a way to sort of make funny interesting version of that so for people who can't see where we are. Could you describe have a where we are. We're in a fort on an ancient Hollywood burial ground. There's a couple of Indians in there. I think Joey Ramone Well look at his heir where paramount pictures studio. So it actually is one of the oldest Hollywood studios you on point Bobby. This is the old blue studios which is on bay. Does your Anez and Lucille Ball. It's unoccupied territory and its content. It is one thousand percent haunted. We're surrounded by a lot of videos and so you get to walk past them on your way the office and like look in and see people making TV and movies. It's pretty wild everyday that I come here. I'm like holy. I can't believe this is my life. That's what I say. Every day we'll settle into the office very quickly very very quickly. Bobby put up artwork mark. We got rugs pillows. They got native real quick. Colonial settlers. We settled settled. It's actually one of the nicest writers rooms we've I've ever worked in. They usually look like these like really Friday sad dorms. It's preach ikya plants Manson furniture and blankets. It's nice so many gods so much I was a kid and I would go to my white friends houses they all have pantries ebbs and like French necks and lunch ables caprice and I didn't have that and so this kitchen I feel like is amazing. We are the rich kids now day one we were so like. Yeah if we'd have water beat the great shirts. Gosh I'd love to chat with you about how you work together. What is a day of work? Look like are you making each other laugh Just watched the movie black cloud. It's like that daddy issues. A lot of fights. There's one wall that we we can all punch his. I'm getting a lot of straight answers from the corner here. And it's a pretty traditional writer's room we blue sky and then we just go through and sit on a couch together and talk about the things that have happened in our lives. And that's what's look great but having so many native writers as I feel like being the only native right on a show and ask you a question you have to represent then everybody and what's so great here. I don't have the answer. There's a good chance one of the other writers we'll have it other native writers and that's so it's just so nice. There's such a weight off your shoulders. I was really amazed by how collaborative has been like. I thought we were going to be like Austin delegating. Some like random small space windowless room place. But we're actually like working together on couches is all day making jokes. It's phenomenal so what was the first day working together. Like I can't answer that because I feel like I have a moment. He's he's just a moment because this is the first time that I've had native colleagues in any workplace and it's so cool to come to work especially in TV and be around other native writers. When I had my first meeting with Sierra at Homs was in the room and her and I were just like talking points like she remembered he was there and she was like? Do you have anything that you say. And he was like no. He's this is amazing. And what's amazing is like we get to cut out Indian one on one and we just get to get on on with the humor and the stories and it's super cool. That's the most exciting thing for me that I know on the first day is that it was also the first time I think we've been the majority in any space. It like influences the vibe and the culture of the room for sure and it's just it feels really familial and it also also is I think influencing the storytelling quite a bit. It's it's pretty magical. And what about putting the writing team together were you part of that Sierra. So could you. Could you tell me about how you put a writing team together for this show. Sure I mean it's really just been like I sound like a Pollyanna but like a dream come true in a sense of like. I figured there'd be like one native writer later and have to fight for it and Mike was like. Oh no there should be like half. The room should be native but to two hundred between woman a white guy should be half and half and he just has such incredible influence so the three of us at Mike and I met with a bunch of different writers from all different backgrounds. And it was so cool that you're told all the time well there there aren't out there so it's GonNa be really hard and it really wasn't and it was just a really cool idea of like who are the funny native people that I know or discovering and then we put them all together with a bunch of other funny writers from different backgrounds and friends runs that I'd worked with before. It's a really exciting time because I feel like we're all getting to do something that is like genuinely funny genuinely interesting but also very much from a native have perspective and kind of juxtaposed that with a traditional white American perspective. I think we're going to have multiple native characters. There's like two main native characters on the show who have very the different views of just everything and I think there's something interesting about their scenes where native people are talking to people about whatever and not necessarily about housing native but sometimes and I think the exciting about getting to to write those

Mike Writer Bobby Staff Writer Nathan Rutherford Hollywood Ed Helms Rutherford Falls NBC White House LA Janisch Awan Awan Dakota Joey Ramone Guy Lawrence Weatherford Lucille Ball Tassell Tania New York Wilson
Gene Reynolds, Co-Creator Of ‘MASH’, Dies At 96

Donna and Steve

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Gene Reynolds, Co-Creator Of ‘MASH’, Dies At 96

"Learned from their long time television producer director and co creator of mash gene Reynolds has died a family member confirms to reports he was ninety six years old Reynolds died of heart failure Monday at Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank California his knees eve Reynolds said brown's co create the TV series mash with Larry Gilbert the won multiple awards for his work on the iconic series including multiple primetime Emmy awards and directors guild of America awards great show I mean come on one of the best on it series finales ever very moving I watched in my English class wow teacher brought in you know the TV from the AV department we watch that and one of the best on TV theme songs ever things too so grab so we absolutely large iconic

Director Reynolds Providence Saint Joseph Medica Burbank California Brown Larry Gilbert Producer Gene Reynolds Eve Reynolds Emmy Guild Of America
Gene Reynolds, Co-Creator of ‘MASH,’ Dies at 96

Steve and Ted

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Gene Reynolds, Co-Creator of ‘MASH,’ Dies at 96

"Reynolds co creator of mash and former president of the directors guild of America fast weight the age of ninety six six time Emmy Award winner best known for writing directing producing tons of TV shows a lot of them from the nineteen seventies he was involved with directing episodes of leave it to beaver Andy Griffith show my three sons F. troop Hogan's heroes wow course two huge shows in the seventies he was involved with he produced one hundred twenty episodes of mash which he co created with Larry Gelbart in the U. also produced several episodes of Lou grant was heavily involved with that show as well nominated for twenty four Emmy awards he won six time and later in life was elected president of the directors guild of America in the nineteen

President Trump Andy Griffith Larry Gelbart Lou Grant Directors Guild Of America Emmy Award F. Troop Hogan
Gene Reynolds, Co-Creator of ‘MASH,’ Dies at 96

Joel Riley

00:15 sec | 5 months ago

Gene Reynolds, Co-Creator of ‘MASH,’ Dies at 96

"Co creator of the television series mash is dead gene Reynolds was ninety six he died of heart failure at a hospital in Burbank California Monday Reynolds was nominated for twenty four Emmy awards he won six of them including for outstanding series for mash and twice for the series Lou

California LOU Gene Reynolds Burbank Emmy
"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

02:41 min | 5 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

"You have to choose the feelings. You want to experience Vince and recognize that. What you take ownership of is your choice. I have this practice these days anytime before. I sleep leap. I closed my eyes and feel my body now just by closing race and feeling your body you get rid of all visual experience. The only knowledge you have of your body then the sensations and the healthier you are the furor sensations. You'll feel you just see. Feel nothing with a few islands and and of sensation. That's existence for you right now with your eyes close existences sensations period and the fear of fewer. You have the more close. You're getting in touch with your body as a place of perfect harmony. Perfect peace and perfect order so order and disorder go together. Ask US have do. I see my own uniqueness. You might have the same awareness and as being but you have your your own unique experiences and how you have interpreted them just like nobody else has the same fingerprint or the same. I prayed or the same tone of voice or the same exact facial expression or the face although we could see archetypal bygones and faces. Your soul is totally unique. There's no one else in the entire universe that's been exactly like you in the entire history of the universe this. There's no one else like you are now and there will be doing else like you are forever. So ask yourself. How do I really feel am identifying. Define these transient ephemeral. EVANESCENT ungraceful uncatchable experience. That come and go in the twinkling double and I or am I in touch with the source of all experience. It's not what you know. It's not what the expense it's what is the source of knowing an experience. That's where we WANNA go in this book of secrets and find the Oscars of am I seeing. Would I really want to see. And if not why not gonNA choose to see. Something has now now. We can take this further and we'll do it in our next. I stalled bent of the book of favorites. Join me tomorrow for Friday Meditation..

US Vince
"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

"Welcome to today's daily breath as we continue our journey to the book of secrets. The book of secrets as APP said his nothing but higher own truce Assaf beyond the ego beyond the mind beyond the secret passages in the dark alleys and the ghost attics of your mind. It is something very mysterious. and that is you orchestrating and go creating the universe so start to you begin to see yourself as a co creator in everything that happens to you now. Of course this takes time in prayer in the course the miracles. I don't know how many of you familiar with the course Americans but this is one of my favorite press that I used to read to my children when they were going growing up and it goes somewhat like this. I'm responsible for what I see. I choose the feelings I experience and everything that seems to happen to me. I ask for and receive as I have ost now. Some people get very enraged when they hear this prayer. I am responsible award. I see I choose the feelings experience but he has the third part everything that seems to happen to me. I ask for and receive as hi of US did is for cancer. Did us as I must ask for this disease and once again the key here is everything anything that seems to happen to me. Not Everything that happens to me seems to happen to me is a very important part of that praise. I am responsible for what I see. We already said we construct visual expense. I choose the feelings feelings. I experienced right now. Think of someone you love and see what you feel now think of someone who irritates you and see how you feel choosing feelings right now in our choose to have. Resentment chose to have grievances. Choose to be grateful. Choose to love. Choose to have compassion so we choose the feelings and everything that seems to happen to me because nothing happens to awareness. Awareness can never suffer. Awareness is not personal only experiences Bush and experience becomes personnel will be take ownership of the experience but in the deeper reality. Don't own anything you don't own your body. Your body's recycle items originally star stuff tough but recycling with everything on this planet your breath the air your circulation. The rivers and waters stardust. Stardust is the items in your body. What do you call it. Your body is just recycled stuff. Your thoughts how many regional tossed you have. Every thought is recycling through these days through twitter through facebook through instagram through media And so on in fact. The only what's that. Our original are totally disruptive like the theory of relativity or quantum mechanics of Beethoven's fifth original novel because they're disruptive most of your thoughts are recycled. Everybody else's thoughts your body's recycled everybody. Dell's his body. It's not a thing. It's a process in you today. Let's go a little deeper. Are you seeing order or are are you seeing disorder in the world. Some people see chaos but remember niches said if you have chaos within new you'll give birth to a dancing dancing star people who don't see disorder also don't see creativity or order the two go together. Do I see my own uniqueness. You're the same awareness. Everyone else in the world because awareness cannot be divided on multiplied the same awareness. This exists in you as in a tree as an appliance as in any sentient being but the experience is different. The mind is different sprint. The perception is different but they weren't necessarily awareness cannot suffer..

"co creator" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

11:10 min | 8 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Unchained

"Keep crypto clean back to my conversation with Christian Castellini so actually before we talk a little bit more about this in bank tissue. I was curious to hear how CA- libra and facebook will make money from your efforts. Here yes so. There's a number of dimensions were something like Labor is a compliment to facebook Existing business model. So what's interesting. Is that when you think about you know. Our remittances are happening today. People may be going to a kiosk or in store and essentially pay for a remittance. Take a picture of the receipt and and send it over a messaging APP somewhere across the globe so you Ronnie those transactions are already happening facilitated through the platform Did this challenge being that people pay very heavy fees on that leg I on the little trip of data across the globe and so you can see facilitating that as being one more way that users users can be engaged on the platform can be actively using the from for different needs. There's a large number of small businesses. I believe it's about ninety ninety million at least That are active on facebook's different properties and payments and the ability to really move move value could be quite important Especially because many of these Even if they're if they're trying to pay for ADS or if they're trying to sell some goods no payments are a friction and payments payments may be costly in their current framework so again. That's another that's another important dimension and more broadly I think this relates also to to. I think some of the pushback on privacy with collaborators really strong effort in showing that the company can innovate around different types of business models and a different different type of Long term view about other product to shape over time one of the things that was Near and dear to my heart when I was probing David and INDE- initial meeting about okay. We want to design this right For example what about privacy and I think from the very beginning there was an understanding that people bowl You know at least in the US in many other Western countries do not want their social and financial data to be commingled That's something that many feel strongly about and so if you look at some of the commitments that have been made For a libra. The idea is really to explorer New Types of business models in the long run and new types of innovation Asian and obligations That do not involve that link and so that was something that was really important to me and to many other people on the team and so oh I think you know when you're part of a platform in any system likely BRA first of all. You're pushing the company to be on the frontier of important wave of innovation but second there's there's strong complementarities with things that are already happening on the platform. And you know going back to the cash example There's there's people in different regions and this. This is a small relatively smaller use case but they're trying to buy ads and Kent because they don't really have a payment solution so there's also very practical reasons for why this could be good for for deco system okay so it sounds like from facebook's perspective it's a way to diversify revenue to bring in a stream that is isn't necessarily dependent on advertising or selling data but maybe then within the APP itself the way you guys are making money is by charging fees. I wasn't clear on that. Actually because I I've seen like for instance in the white paper it's a low to no cost and then I saw Kevin Say An in a in an article on the verge that there might be a small fee just to cover fraud and chargebacks but not a feed us the payment itself so can can you just define you know or or. Maybe you haven't figured it out yet. I don't know do. Do you know what the fee structure will look like to use a libra. Yes so on caliber again. A lot of this is still working progress. This but did the goal is certainly to go as closely to zero as possible right because again going back to the seven percent charged for remittances on average globally. Probably the Word Bank Sustainable Development Goals as a goal of three percent and so this is an that can push much lower than three percent. I and you know again close to possible I think we're fees may may be More more reasonable is action. The merchant side so and this reflects reflects I think some of the current business models where consumers don't pay for some of these fees and then there's no fees for merchant services Merchants need all the additional features and functionality. chargebacks fraud and everything else but again this is this is an area that we will have to see in a males vary by region depending what the integrations look like. The objective is over over the short-term and medium-term To really bring this available at almost zero-cost But then again once you start thinking about aml. KYC There are additional. Structural costs. That of course you can subsidize For for for a long term and so I think it'd be important for Awad Khalil to understand what is the best way to to cover does fees and ensure that the platform is secure but also respond to the kind of functionality functionality. People have come to expect Africa Digital Payments Service. You know if you're locked out of your wallet or if you you will it gets taken over. Those are all additional futures that I think protect consumers and so those are features that that caliber was support and and of course they will come at a cost. Okay and so yeah. Yeah that was my other question about the chargebacks so it's not literally that you're like reversing the lever transaction. It sounds like that's not possible. You're charging the fees so that way you can can make people whole if anything goes wrong. Is that correct. Yes and again. If transaction is between a merchant that's using a Calabro or user that's using CA Libra Abra in that case. It's even simpler because it could be reconstructed in the system. If it's between two wallets that business relationship. We did within each other because maybe they transact dolphin weeded shudder There could also be an operational there if it's on the Public Shane. Yes I couldn't be reversed but of course the agreement with the end user. I would covered up. Oh now I got it okay. Okay so basically. You're sort of like a coin base. Where if the payment is happening all within the caliber ecosystem ecosystem than you guys can just update your records? But if it's you know between a caliber user and somebody not in the clipper system but it's still using the libra currency Consi than not obviously probably can't be reversed but you can make them whole. Is that okay. I think you will really depend on. What triggered the reversal? So Oh but my sense is that it will reflect a lot of what people have come to expect from existing platform so it won't be different than that okay so now let's talk about the radiators again I trying to figure out you know what what signals are you looking for from. US regulators to decide whether or not you should go forward or not go forward. Can you break it down maybe by the particular agencies like do you need some signed from the SEC. That this isn't a the security or are you waiting for something from Congress or like obviously than here. We've got the G seven saying you guys should not go ahead until you've proven that it's safe and secure or so. Just you have kind of like a checklist of the things that you need before you can say like. We're okay so you know I think a lot of these regulators. I've already you've given us some homework in terms of like what are kind of questions that they want more detailed answers and so I would look for you. Know further announcement by the Association in in the coming months about many different dimensions. That people care about I already mentioned for example Y C That's a dimension that many regulators off for example Treasury story and others are focused on But but again I think like we like we said before we want to launch this once we have kind of a green light and we feel like the older stakeholders are kind of happy to design. And so you know in the US. Of course in Switzerland that relevant one Is FINRA and I think what's is being a great about Switzerland as a home for this. Is that FEMA and the regulatory framework as you know in Switzerland as being a fairly advanced when it comes to cryptocurrencies. He's blockchain stable coins on some issues So you know you may have seen the Finn MAC guidelines on payment networks Those are things that we're looking closely at To really ensure that this network can not only integrate but also operate across different regions. And that's really the challenge here. There's no global framework for anything like this. Yes and so we're kind of the first ones to explore dot and dub requires additional work and obviously. I'm sure you're aware that the scenario that potentially Lubar Association could go forward without facebook has come up a few different times would need to happen for facebook to say okay. You know what this is. The way that this will go forward is facebook will leave and will no longer be a part of the Libor Association again. I think you know we've seen facebook's FACEBOOK's commitment to this Over a long period of time all same phase of a very high pressure is not a project that as gained facebook book. I think any any favors of friends. But if you roll back to Domitian I think. FACEBOOK is in a good position to really delivering on Global Financial Inclusion Having platforms firms like WHATSAPP MESSENGER reach an end connect people and allow them to move value again. I think you'll see tremendous pressure on all of the members as as we go through. And and that's that's really important for the project to I think the ultimate test is not yes association and this goes back to the economic design and and why blockchain auction is so important. You don't the moment you have like one single entity that is a single point of failure for the project is is not really designed right or hasn't reached the stage where it's designed right So I think in the future. It shouldn't matter whatever entity leaves or joins the would be outstanding and and be able to support itself often evolved So that that you can think of that as an important test of of the association itself and one thing I was curious about was that in one of the initial white papers. You stated needed that. One of the goals of the association would be to minimize the association's role as a manager of the Lieber Reserve and instead fully automated reserve management. I didn't know what fully automated mean. Does that mean like using some kind of algorithm to were to manage it or like obviously here in blockchain world. We've got you know things like Dow's and where people can vote with their token so I didn't know what what does that mean like. Do you have a vision for that or again. You know many of these all right but because in our projecting into to the future But you know when we looked at all the designs and there's many designs in the crypto space which I think are really clever but from an economic perspective my main my main concern about many of them is that at their core. They're always based on expectations..

"co creator" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

05:29 min | 10 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"I was like I'm going to go to bed. I guess I'm not GonNa know what's going on. Fifteen minutes later I got an email that said Texas ed Bob said Yes wow and then we coordinated this and he liked the page to the pitch. They were such a great. There's no way to keep anything secret so then we did a big and it was. It's really fun. The tough thing is for the network. It's like we're a first year. Show you know each other. Oh Oh totally goodbye that just like excitement wise doing fine. We're like we're doing episode one hundred and twenty cents so it's just a nice way to go into a new network it guys. I think we have this great great so you got the word on like a Friday or the and then you so you had to fly to New York then I flew to New York. That's it's really exciting thing was again. This is like very insider and probably unrelatable but like when you take a show to the up fronts normally normally it's a new show. They don't usually go your first year. Maybe your second year otherwise you're just sort of on the air not they don't put you in front of the media and the cast just doesn't know each other right so it's like it's fun but you're and you're on the red carpet and you're having fun but you don't really know each other right this to be sixty show that had gone through this massive drama. Emma and then to go it was so fine great chemistry such a big celebration. It was just it was like you know that moment where you you got hired before you actually have to start the job. It's like the best part of a job right. Oh my God yeah and then he started on Conan when I got hired and there was like a two month wow and it was the best I was that I think we decided. I think I needed to do something he in the first few within just had to try it out. I had to see how I did on torts few lectures and and some property classes some pre civil procedure I but I think it's just weird to start the week before the tenth. Anniversary Serie just started as a separate thing together but it was great. I mean that was like the best case scenario. Yeah I know you do that. You're going to be employed. Then you are jet stream job. I saw when I saw LASCO thing was I had given myself a year. I ended up quitting last call. I applied applied weeks before sweeney notoriously took a long time to read applications and make decisions about them notorious. Let us tell you how long they've been reading packets for another you. If you applied to Conan in let's say two thousand fourteen and you haven't heard anything because they were give up anyone who's applied in the last thirty years move on. Don't do anything Dan. It's called due diligence. I'm sorry but I really want to give everyone there. It takes a long time to read a trillion look. It's the hardest everything so different. I don't know how you did it. I really don't you know Nice. Turn on a dime. They're not not I'm not even. It's like for what we read. Our SPEC script write scripts okay. I wish I respect. I actually think that would be more informed. I heard a rumor at that might be coming back but back okay. I'm in your wedding gang so when people apply to get a Sitcom yes in the olden days they were told to write what's called a SPEC script of an existing show what they would do is they would write an episode of friends. Yeah cheers right that obviously hadn't existed listed otherwise they would just be copying done an episode pretty idea yeah but then you would read they would usually have that and maybe what's called. An original pilot is obviously an idea that they came up with on their own so the advantages as show runner who's reading one of these scripts is the job of a writer on a show is to adapt their voice and bring something of their own to the show to assisting resistant character and world and in a way but as I show you that they can write your just hairdresser world now it's become just original stuff and the reason I think is partly because we live in a world where there shows no because we have a billion shows so you could write a pilot that your reps could sell so it's like why waste your time writing something that won't sell also also there are billions shows so what showed you choose to write a SPEC of but the problem is the hardest episode of any television showed is the pilot yes in the skill of writing. A pilot is not the skill of being a staff writer at all right one hundred percent different. You have to lay all this pipe over episode setup setup all the characters so I find it completely useless nearly I mean we really be like if somebody was applying to Conan and they were like they the packet involve all of them coming up with a new late night show for for a host of their choice who's not Conan. What's the point of doing host character mm-hmm. Let's talk about the holidays I know I know. It's crazy early but if you don't have all of your gift spot and wrapped you're completely fleet screwed but that's not what we're here to talk about..

Conan New York Texas ed Bob writer staff writer Emma sweeney one hundred percent Fifteen minutes thirty years two month
"co creator" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

14:24 min | 10 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"Bacteria high it lasts us. Let's we're back. It's early morning at yet. We're full of them big. It never been so stooped do appalled coast. He'll CAIN. Has it worn. My name is Mike Sweeney Jesse GASCOYNE. We're still riders on Conan show and we are here to talk about inside cody. Ah Yes yes yes. All we do is talk and think and counted. My wife loves it enhanced our relationship CONAN footy pajamas bed. I don't want to forget what I do for a living for one second. You can never forget Oliver. Vacations being canceled the not. All the stations are great. She gets a vacation for you and it's Nice. That's that's the bigger ones in the works. Of course she what I'm doing a horrible way to find the good though I you know it's it's good to keep her on her. Toes me on my toes. Yeah not her on her toes keeps things fresh now. She's she's with us. Oh why are we having a third in the room. I was taking a stab at small talk so the people really get to flush out our personalities We've got a fantastic guests at least a good old friend and very very always happy when I see him. It's Dan Gore Gore. Welcome to inside code. You guys so much for having me so huge fan of the the Dan of course one of his hallmarks is saying flattery season and then you you have to probe a lot of times. It's true he's got. He's got the facts back things up so it's beyond facts. Yes lived experience and in your blood. Dan Gore as if every single listener doesn't know dangles a writer in late night in the offs for for five years five years there you go oh and then he went on you. WanNa career parks and REC had been enough and you've created a hit show Brooklyn nine nine. Have you heard of it. I'm sure you have creative fluttering. Make sure we didn't I mean yes technically. We don't have to mention literally we will. It just felt like I I we will edit at Jessore. Dan Goure on his own creative Brooklyn. Either I myself included why why not lovingly created with one of my absolute best friend absolutely integral to the right. I was just cut that out. Cut that out point at point so we're with from nine sole creator. Danone can't say that now okay so anyway. It's great to see you again. It's to be here and we have so much to talk to yeah you want to know. Why don't we start talking about late night where you worked for well actually my experience with. Mike Sweeney starts prior to late. Oh Hey hey mimi is almost babysitter. He's my babysitter and he told me on French kiss chat with a teddy bear. I just WanNa tell you watching not because I mike so I was I had been at the daily show for a few years three years right John John Stewart all right not kill for commute writing partner at the time we started with Craig kilborn than we were there with John. Stewart right that survived the transition then I left the daily show and I was like I'm never leaving New York. There weren't a lot of jobs in New York for television television right. There are a lot of jobs millions of humming economist bus driver so I was working for a show called last call with Carson Daly Right. I didn't realize until recently was still on. Just got just ended just ended my mind. There's a new a woman host of that timeslot right right and has she. We started. Her show started writing for sight. Yes sounds like Jesse's jumping ship so so so carson we should explain. It was a half hour show same opponent show. Yes and it came on one thirty at night. It came out at one thirty at night. Prize time slot and it was really finding itself at first they thought it was going to be a comedy show and then it was just gonna be bands and I wasn't sure that I wanted to I wasn't I it was a sort of a career impasse for me right and I had a friend Allison Silverman yes who was a writer on the daily show and then moved over to Conan Conan right and so I said it to her on thinking of applying to law school right and she said Oh you're at that much of an impact I took the my took the all sides I should say not. I'm thinking of the plane I I had gotten into law school and she might as well Brag back to good. Las Dos and she said why. Don't you talk to Mike Sweeney. He was a lawyer. He'll tell you if it's a good idea. That's my scarlet letter. He'll talk you off the ledge almost exactly what she said you take the elevator up to doors open to Conan happen to be there right in the bank. I was waiting for you. I stand in the hallway answer questions about loss like I say like a Yogi course but she explained the situation. I won't repeat it said it and you looked at me for a second and you said you should go to law school right. Oh my God it was not a bit bruce. Got An absolute show and then maybe it was a joke but go to go into trade school which is lost. You should become a plumber of course at that moment. I didn't even know you. I feel I know where you're like. We talked to go to law school. Then Smiley came up and he's like I need you and he took out so I had no idea it was a bit births. Jeter you could reverse the course of history we might not have nine nine hundred you reverse the course of history weeks later. You hired me. When nicest comeback there were so many comics who are lawyers during the day and they're like I don't know what to do and I'm like for God's sake could stop being a lawyer like anyone successful lawyers if I meet them for God's sake. What are you doing this. It's I mean it's the worst job ever I would never ever. I just WANNA be clear. I would never ever tell anyone. I wish I should go to las myself in time and time. I know you didn't go to law school so I listen to you. What do you mean you travel for real harrowing few weeks what you think it was the harrow which which forced me to realize I didn't want him to decide. Oh yeah the Harrow put me on the street. Whatever well okay now I can admit I I it was purposely. It was all part of my plan Tom. We've all been victim of one of Sweeney's that you're just very good at delivering things deadpan and then if you don't know you then you don't realize that Joe Heroin Narrow Conan's still say does some. It's it's tailed off I thought he had just come up with that time that I saw him. Do it and it turns out. It's it's on a sign on on a I found out years later. It's it's on a sign of a Chinese restaurant in Boston. Area at Brooklyn nine nine comes into say lunches here. I I say Paul Revere say less is more unless moon bears no one moonves. I always think think of less I want to have a character named. Less is more. Let's say you want to. I probably have the power to do that. Ah Yeah you're right. We're expecting yeah well. We'll be. I'd probably unmentioned character. Okay you want that in the show but you don't want people to know that they say less is more more as sole creator. The show should be able to just throw that in this was such an awkward way to start. It was my fault. I know as a joke and then see for you. When you take the L sats. How long like can you do. Would you have to take them again. If you decide to go to break. We looked into that okay. After after I like the first year Conan I know I wasn't sure how I was doing. I looked into it probably five years years afterwards and I think they're only good for what I really did. Look into it so you but that's an interesting thing to talk about. L. Set is no no no. Let's do some game when you were to Conan when you started. That's scary feeling of Elim. I is going to work out 'cause aw you I feel like sometimes some places lower the boom and you don't see it coming. Oh yeah it was really it was very intimidating to start first of all. I just felt like again. I think you guys are GonNa be flattery but it felt like like joining the what's the murderers row of of the Yankees Yankees. It was such a good group of writers and it was unbelievable it was I'm sure it continues to be continues to be. I am a man would be serious. It's all like I'm still litters. Testaments all the people who who you hire for them to think hiring is so incredibly hard to hire. Everyone says you know and also so writing. I'm sure I know you guys have gotten into this before but writing on a show like Conan was different is different than a lot of late night shows because the writers also direct in purdue right at Cetera there bits. I don't think we can emphasize that enough so integral. It's such a such a learning experience and and I had I think the other nice thing was that a lot of the writers were mentors immediately so if you pitch something I you know the first time I've got something on actually code something with Demetri Martin Demetri Martin and I started on the same day is that true and we did a bit which was like a audience ask Conan sometime and the audience ascona Trivia questions and then it turned out to be stripped. Trivia bit was only Conan had to take uh-huh and I remember we both to meet you and I had no idea how to produce it right. I think Gordo I think blitz actually sort of put under his wing wing right. You're anti blast Iran writer Andy Blitz who don't go home and it was great. It was it was you you work with all of the different departments comments. It really gave me an appreciation I use it. I use what I learned. Conan all the time at Brooklyn because I really learned that all of these departments are are so good at what they do and they are such creative partners so you would you would have an idea and then you would hand it off to Deb Shah in in wardrobe wardrobe who was generally in a bad mood dropping a bowling ball. She had the she had the office underneath the writer's room jokingly throw a bowling ball around. It wasn't a joke. It was like Russia above her head. He took it as a hostile act. I don't get or the props department. Those are still with unbelievable and they would always make things even better so right. My philosophy is always when I'm dealing with the departments at Brooklyn nine. Nine is always to give them as much leeway to make them true creative partners because they're just geniuses. That's a great great approach and I mean the props here are so fun and so funny Yeah No. He's still it is fun when when something you ask for in house and it's it's like you're more than new nightmare come to life which we we had a character and it was bulimic Trojan Horse Trojan horse but it could bring it was about two feet long and eighteen inches tall and could bring its hoof to its mouth and the mouth would open and then they would pull out you could pull out a bunch of choice holds true Trojan. No the youngest weight was against war the Trojans the Trojans Gore because they went into troy. They invaded. Try Boy Misnomer Fuck Tuck. You really screwed that up. homers. Dick homers a Dick but yeah that was a great it work. It made it worse yeah. It was great didn't they. Famously some some bit called for a dog skeleton and I drove sheep sheep scholarships. Go tell stories tall drove to the story I had and he drove to a farm in upstate New York to a farmer said you have go. Oh Yeah we recently buried and they in the dead of night. Dug it up. Yes he boiled the bones bleach them and then and glued them back to back together like Madman Madman and there was some missing bones because it had dogs already picked over the have you guys had him on the show you have no they were saving were scared because he also when we want to the story of cutting the he accidentally..

Conan Conan Brooklyn Mike Sweeney Dan Gore Gore Mike Sweeney Jesse GASCOYNE writer Danone Dan Goure Oliver Carson Daly John John Stewart New York Paul Revere Allison Silverman bowling Demetri Martin Demetri Martin Boston Craig kilborn
"co creator" Discussed on What If World

What If World

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on What If World

"O'Keefe my co-creator Greg Martinson for our theme song grammy-winning Musical Artists Secret Agent twenty-three Skidoo for coming on our show and all you kids at home who try to have full active days so you can get a good night's sleep and maybe some adventurous dreams secret agent twenty-three Skidoo gave us permission to play you out his song broken dreams. I hope you enjoy it until we meet again. Keep wondering <music> so we stopped it can seem much disappeared if you find bring them back here but and when I saw that commercial we specialize in Green Repairman nightmare reversal okay a copy down to address. Maybe my sadness I had but then vanished leaving an empty campus. I walked to do this out. They said Columbus Avenue Status was painted blue smelled like maybe open dreams like the next to me as going strong being forty three and more than a crocodile. It happened nightmares. Every night must be worse. Trust me underwear with my class for them. They call my number twenty three. I got eh talked on the.

Skidoo Greg Martinson co-creator O'Keefe
"co creator" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on 790 KABC

"True comic. Book fans are mourning the loss of marvel universe. Co-creator Stanley Phil Hewlett has more on that. The ninety five year old legend died today after being rushed to cedars Sinai Medical Center from his Hollywood hills home Lee who had suffered from several illnesses over the past year was the mastermind behind comic book. Superheroes. Like Spiderman iron man and Black Panther more than two million of his comic books were published in seventy five countries and twenty five languages and his characters have been featured in twenty four animated TV shows and a long line of box office. Blockbusters fans are leaving flowers and tributes lease star on the Hollywood walk of fame. Phil Hulett KABC news, Southern California Edison is being investigated by state regulators for its possible role in the Wolsey fire or to the CPU see the substation circuit near the Wolsey, fire origin, relayed or sense the disturbance on a circuit, just two minutes. Before Cal fire said that the fire began SC says, it's personnel. Have not been able to access the area where the fire reportedly began to investigate it further. The CPU see is also investigating PG for its possible role in the campfire in northern California. Phil Hulett KABC news. The investigation is continuing into the mass shooting that took place at the borderline bar and grill in Thousand Oaks investigators are returning to the scene where a gunman shot and killed twelve people before turning the gun on himself officials say they're still working on a possible motive and the.

Phil Hulett Stanley Phil Hewlett cedars Sinai Medical Center California Thousand Oaks Co-creator SC Lee ninety five year two minutes
"co creator" Discussed on Final Games

Final Games

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on Final Games

"So before I get arrested and convicted full eighty three different life sentences, and then try and then Sean space all into my own realm of choosing and they closed my magical final games book on. So I can never I can never be released onto the world of specifically the video game industry just know of industry, just this one. We can roll right into a new game that late is going to be taking with now. Although I live in Japan. I always confused this title because I used to live in a place called tomato. I used to live near a place called tomorrow. So the have been times on the show when this game has come up that I've called it come Tamada democracy instead of cut Tamari democracy, which is the next game on his list, which is game developed by Namco who announ them co night therapist by the wonderful Takahashi keta. It's a game that released back in two thousand and four for the PlayStation two and has now been announced to be released as to my democracy re-rule for the Nintendo switch which I totally got to play last week at the Tokyo game show as fun as always. Yeah. It's it's still fun. Still has some of the games quirks. And we'll explain nice with the job cons. But the next game that Layton is going to be taken with is cut Ahmadi, democracy Leysen. Why's it going with you? Well, I think you know, if I'm somehow trapped on this magical star valley island, I think another. Stipulation should be that my really bad motion sickness is cured. But we can fix that. Yeah. Great. That's a good trade off because I can't play this game any more because I get horribly motion sick, and that sucks because it's one of my favorites over and build a role things. Again, the music is amazing. I will totally toss it onto the background while I'm farming crops are crying or something. And I love the art direction. It's really solid in. It's just like the most satisfying. It's like AMR the game. Yes. I can. I can think that that's true. So you know, it could be like one of those jukebox titles. You know, while you staring at your cabin wall is having on in the background. Yeah. It's lovely. Yeah. I the convention that I actually met my writing partner injury. He's co-creator Vernon Shaw. I met him at manifest awhile ago. Forget what you're, but the first thing that I went to during that convention was panel with the composers in like the I think maybe the craters of the game. And at the end, everyone in the audience got to sing the theme song together in ball like small child. It was beautiful. It's incredible. How this got started? I don't know if you know. No. So basically, there's a guy called Tony Tony who was the head of our code the time. And he's he basically stated that cut Tamari resulted from keta Takahashi's school project for like this game laboratory that was sponsored by go. So he like Tashi case was like making like his final theses or something. And like that idea was came out of it. And they were like, hey, that sounds cool. So they through like a million dollars at it, which is like, you know, super low budget for video game and then in like two years or so they just developed this game that made way more money than it was made full and kind of solidified caterers like this ridicule game does basically just because he was doing a school project. Well, that's really great. That makes me very happy for them. So now he's like doing what's his game? What Tom I forget. I forget if that's the correct name. But he's making new cold what Tom now and he lives over in LA. Really? So you might see him about at some point..

keta Takahashi Vernon Shaw Tony Tony Tamari Takahashi keta Japan Tom Nintendo Namco Tamada Layton Tokyo partner co-creator LA Tashi million dollars two years
"co creator" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on The Watch

"All right. Now we're gonna talk to damper all Dan Luganda Antonia send a the shore owners of American vandal season. Two is out on Friday and it's well worth your time. Let's check out this conversation with those guys. If you guys could just for the sake of the listeners because we've got four people here to say your names and what you do on the show, and we'll take it from there on twentieth Santa co-creator, and I direct all the episodes. I'm Dan Peralta another co-creator and Dan Lagaan on the Showrunner. I finished season two last night at it's again, completely delightful, and it is a testament to how much I like this show that I'm not a big shit. Joke guy like it's like acceptable, but like you guys definitely like start out without a safety net and the first episode and I even be my wife were sitting there watching just like, man. This is like, what's the is going to be about one hundred? How many times we're gonna have to see this like exact moment in the broom or whatever you guys decided what the inciting incident of season two is going to be. Was there any heat check moment where you really or we could do this, like, or what was this thing was about pushing it beyond dick drawings or. Was it about what was the idea behind the actual event that incites this whole season will that that visceral reaction you have when you're watching it with your wife is probably not too dissimilar to a visceral reaction. You have watching certain true crime documentaries where you see these brutal murders and blood all over the place in these like completely destroyed body's used to destroy by this. This really gives you like that and like to us, the funniest version of that fascinating, horrific scene is high school hallways covered in poop. Yeah, so made us laugh, but that wasn't lost on us that people might like want to look away right green and there was something deeply hilarious about that to me and we didn't hold back in production. Like if anything we we had to pull back in post because we had shit like almost like there's like a waterfall against the wall of shit coming down. And there were so many should gags that would take up minutes of time in the deleted scenes sort of thing on the DVD which will probably never happen, but there was there was we, we pulled back a bit and even so it's still getting this reaction from people which is great. And also all the people that asked if we were going to go vaginas in season two decks, we threw them a curve ball. That's right. That's right. But that's the thing that's so funny about the like, what you guys pull off with this show is that it's this incredibly heartfelt incredibly humanistic show. That's essentially about this disastrous prank that involves into actually like a felony. You know what I mean? By the end of it, you can tell it's that we will have to get to specific and despoilers. I don't wanna do who did what on it, but I wanna talk a little bit about how you guys balance scowl humor, usual highschool, bullshit humor. And then also like having this incredibly warm center of the show, dislike heart to it. Think it's fun in the writer's room, talking about our high school experiences and different people, we know, and, oh, you had that person your high school. I had that same exact person in my high school and that being a lot of the conversations in the room that always like helps bring levity and make it. I think personal to two high schools. And then the second part of the equation is just being a student on all of these documentaries. And that's a medium that's I think, really involving like ten years ago, twenty years ago, documentaries where really niche thing where it was kind of pretentious. Now it's like everybody in the country is going home with the wife, and we're just gonna watch a documentary on Netflix is such a common broad thing and because of that documentaries or evolving getting really, really good..

co-creator Dan Luganda Antonia Dan Peralta Dan Lagaan Netflix Santa Showrunner writer twenty years ten years