35 Burst results for "co founder"

Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

Outcomes Rocket

05:12 min | 2 d ago

Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry It's you know everyone makes decisions or everyone strives to make decisions in a data driven way the acquisition of data to make those decisions, your go to market or even your your product strategy is still not democratized Jesus, sometimes available and very regularly available in. Thanks. It's not available at all on companies like care. Where we're trying to do. At least off the for. Right now, we're trying to do is we're trying to democratize access to this information whether it's you know information about who's doing, what types of services takes a physicians practicing the type of and your are devices best for or on that you're pharmaceutical product is best stations for it. I think a lot of like data's available, but traditionally, it's only been available to the wealthiest layers market and so our goal is to democratize access to that. So even startups that may not have the backing of the largest feet from on me, not how hundred million dollars in the bay and can't get access to it and really execute a great girl market.

Anatoly Ambra Chief Architect REC Sal Marquez Ceo And Co Ambra Health Lead Engineer Founder Writer Bloomberg Developer
Co-Founder Divya Gugnani on What's Next for Wander Beauty

Mom Brain

01:40 min | 2 d ago

Co-Founder Divya Gugnani on What's Next for Wander Beauty

"Divvy at what is next for wonder, beauty a lot is next for wander beauty. I think that we are. Looking at this year as very interesting time to be in business. We will definitely be launching some newness which I'm very excited about extending into the skincare category further and deeper. As we're seeing a lot of traction there people are really getting more into self care. They really look at us for minimum effort maximum result formulations, which is what we're doing in skin on will also be growing the category in and color and hair. I'm really thinking a lot more about sustainability that's been at the forefront of what we're learning and growing from really thinking through our packaging trying to be find ways to have less. Less of a footprint on the environment. So that's on our horizon up things to do. We're starting off cycle all of our components where people can actually send them in. We can upcycle them for them and then more growth for global brands. Now were distributed all through, southeast? Asia Australia. We're going to launch a new markets we're going to be penetrating in the EU in a deeper way when travel comes back, we're going to do a lot more travel retail. We just started to dip our toe into hotels in cruise ships but I think. More. Of that because that's the perfect place for the wonder woman who's on the go and traveling on when she's allowed to go back to traveling, she will be finding, many more touch points. So she really wants to go back to traveling. She's excited. All. She's really really wanting that right now. She just wants to be able to leave my house but. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with

EU Asia Australia
Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:10 min | 4 d ago

Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

"So Camilla you're from Brazilian from Rio, tell us about what life was like growing up there. I had a very happy childhood. Brazil is a very special place for me my sister and I grew up very her suction at Hanley. We Love fancying we love eating. So an obstacle up the beach. So it was a very outdoorsy place to to grow up in and just a lot of energy and happiness beauty for you in Brazil how is that different and who were some of your beauty icons growing up? Oh, Gosh. The beauty icon for me growing up I mean obviously started my mom and my grandma there just seeing them and their approach to beauty what was their approach to beauty? It's this concept of always be ready Brazil's have a word they word. In particular is actually considered a good thing. Versus be overly produced Brazilians of spend a lot of time making sure that they're always ready. You know taking care of it. It's like a daily control versus you have a party and he spent three hours getting ready. It's about what you do every single day is there a diy Brazilian beauty secret that everyone does but that might surprise our listeners in north? America like about bridges are very big into going to the So that aren't many betrayal to there's one thing that resilience love and they do this either at whom or on the beach, and it's lightning the hair on your arms or your I on your belly. Always do at home or on the beach. What do you do? It's diy you have a mixture at home and you Li-. You know like the says share or a lot of. Women think that. Brazilian, remove. Hair. Body about his not true. A lot of women will keep the here on the side and the belly to that's something that that they'll do at home depot lighten dot that Peach Fuzz just getting rid of it. Yeah. Right now we're out of stock of our original product of it and will be to bring it back but we have a product I got which one of the products launched with what's that called it hold Golden Body Veil we'll get that back in. Stock Soon yes. So it's like a cream that bleaches the hair is that right? Yeah and even I read that Brazilian women are obsessed with taking care of their feet. Is that true or is that a myth? Now? It is true. It is very, very true. We have fetish obviously a lot of this is because of the weather, right? It's a very, very hot humid tropical country and we were sounded almost all the time I mean why are resilient and it's basically everyone. Parachute, to every household has. Vienna's so yeah, we show them off and you know president going back to this concept of always being ready. You always keep your feet soft mood touchable and I'm I am personally obsessed with my feet is my favorite body part.

Brazil Camilla Vienna America President Trump
The New Tech Driven Home Healthcare with Rachel Munsie

Outcomes Rocket

05:54 min | 5 d ago

The New Tech Driven Home Healthcare with Rachel Munsie

"More. Welcome back to the outcomes. Rockets saw Marquez's here and today I have the privilege of hosting. Rachel Muncie she's on the founding team of tomorrow health, a technology driven home healthcare company changing the way individuals and families manage their care. She leads business development focusing on partnerships and sales strategic marketing initiatives, and new market expansion. She was formerly in healthcare investing, just working to unpack the US healthcare system and understand how we can treat. Treat better incentives through innovation policy and Advocacy Rachel received her bachelor's degree from Georgetown University and attended Mit for her MBA. Before leaving to build tomorrow health, you know the M E, durable medical equipment field definitely is a need for innovation and the work that Rachel and the team at Tamar Health doing is super unique and I'm excited to be covering that with you Rachel today and then. So I wanna give you a warm. Welcome. Welcome thanks for joining us. Thank you so much solve. Really appreciate it, and thanks for having me absolutely. So before we dive into tomorrow health and you know what makes you guys so unique and different in that space I love to hear more about you Rachel and what inspires your work in healthcare. Absolutely. So I am most inspired about solving the problems of healthcare and really the ones that we've all faced. So we spend more. More on healthcare in the US than any other country in the world. But our outcomes are worse and everyone understands what this means on level. I personally once racked up a bill equal to my rent payment during one doctor's appointment because even though I knew I'd have a high deductible plan and even though I knew I'd hardly spent anything against it. I, mean, I work in healthcare I throughout all of practical knowledge because I. I was anxious and nervous, and in a vulnerable situation. I think when you're sitting in a doctor's office or hospital, you rarely compare prices or shop smartly and most people don't even know that you can do that. So most of the time we do things because we're scared or rethink what choice do I really have my health is at stake and I think sometimes the prices in our system take advantage of that. So took me. Me a while to internalize I. Think most people don't realize is that we all pay the price for our broken health care system whether we know it or not. So either through lower take home wages or higher premiums or higher deductibles or even higher taxes and I actually still have those outrageous bills sitting on my kitchen table as reminder to myself that these costs aren't normal and i. think we deserve better and so since digging. Digging into this industry I as an investor, and now as an operator, I'm just constantly floored by the unnecessary complexity that I found in every corner of the go system and no one understands any of it. I. Think People Inside the industry barely do ominous the result of some wacky incentives that run. Ima- and not always a bad intentions. But this is exactly how that knowledge between industries, stakeholders and patience and the broader general public. Public just become so massive, and so when it came to my decision to help found tomorrow hull, it's not an exhaustive solution by one clear trend with pasta impact on all of these stakeholders is the shifting of more care to the home, which is higher quality, and as we know much lower cost of care setting. Yeah. You know you call out a lot of issues that were faced with I think every one of us. You're listening to this podcast today. You're thinking Yup I've been screwed with a big medical bill or and if you haven't which I'm sure you have if the very small chance that you haven't I'm sure somebody in your family are a close friend has dealt with it and I think it's great that you keep that bill on your kitchen counter Rachel, just as a reminder, right of the why behind why we're doing what we do and? Yeah. Care in the home is becoming that much more important with Kobe among us. So reimagining that healthcare is critical as you guys like to coin it. So talk to us about the work at tomorrow health and what exactly you guys are doing to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yeah. So at tomorrow health, we are a technology driven home healthcare company, and we are a full stack provider of healthcare, and we're a trusted partner that you can depend on to coordinate and deliver specifically home medical equipment supplies and support all in the. The comfort of your own home, which as you mentioned, all in covid world is extremely important and our big focus envision is on restoring home as the focal point for healthcare delivery and the Genesis of tomorrow health was personal for us, our Co founder and CEO Bj Qatar was working at Oscar. So He's well-versed in the complexity of healthcare and his mom was diagnosed with stage, three cancer, and she needed about a year of intensive home healthcare. Luckily, she's now doing much better, but he was responsible for coordinating. So much of that. That he and his family had to work with over a dozen, different providers would coming out of her home to get what she needed, and after about a month when she was discharged from the hospital, she ended up having to go back three times in her first one pound because of delays or equipment failures relating to her oxygen therapy, and so for patients, and also their families who are usually playing the role of caregivers edition be this hard, and then from a systems perspective whilst does the whole matter and you know by. By dramatically reducing our dependence on hospitals on ers on post acute care sites were able to get high quality care at home and also bend the cost curve in healthcare system. So by working with tomorrow health, we think it makes it easier to shift that care to the home because one of the legs of the stool for homebase healthcare are these hall medical equipment supplies and support

Rachel Muncie United States Tamar Health Rockets Marquez Georgetown University IMA MIT Kobe Partner Bj Qatar Oscar Co Founder CEO
Open Source NLU - Alan Nichol, Rasa

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:18 min | 5 d ago

Open Source NLU - Alan Nichol, Rasa

"I mean what we're trying to build with Raza is the standard infrastructure for conversationally I. So the same way that you have these. have no brainer technology choices, right? If you're adding. Search to your stack, you're gonNA use elastic search. If you're working with containers used docker similarly, if you're building conversationally, I use Raza. That's where we're headed. That's what we're aiming for, and of course, if you want to be that level of standard, you'd better be open source, right? So that's in a nutshell, the way it started was that my co founder, Alex and I. Were, building a few assistance ourselves. We had the first couple on the slack platform. We had some people bang for them. And just realize that the developer tools were lacking in. So many different ways, right. So we were using the tools that everyone was the time with a I was big than dial. was called API. Time the review others. And? While we kind of came with his controversial statement, right? So two thousand, Sixteen Fiscal Messenger Platform was opening up. And there's all this high. You know such an Adela, saying the new APPS and I go all this kind of. Rhetoric. And the day before that announcement from facebook, we wrote a posting. We don't know how to build conversationally I yet. Right? Like nobody knows the tools aren't there and this isn't GonNa go very well. And I think that has sort of played out kind of as we predicted, which was that the push came from people wanting to users through messenger APPs right because APP downloads or difficult to get. Wasn't because all of a sudden. We'd stumbled into a great new piece of technology and we're like, wow, look at all the new things we can build. Right. It was very much coming from people wanting to talk to people in Messaging APPs. And so we said, well, look, let's start for principals and think what tools do. We actually need to build great compensation I and what developers need. And we were working with some of these cod products realize that they're great for getting started quickly, but you very quickly also pain yourself into a corner, right? And the other thing as a developer, right? If you're. If, you're building an ailing startup. You're doing something right and every single message that goes in to your application has to go through a third party to get interpreted. It's pretty precarious situation to be as a developer right, and so we built a few things and we decided to hack together own. System, and then we were running this meet up in Berlin chat bots, balls, Berlin meet up. And everyone was saying Oh we're going to do. We're GONNA. Do our own NLP. You know. We don't have time now, but maybe next month something like that. Right, and always you know what he did, and so we said, well, why don't we just open source hours? And then everybody can contribute rather than rebuilding. Thanks. Very. Innocent insight by this was sort of six or eight months after message from opened up and everyone who is still seriously in the space have the same thought which was. I'm really dependent on the service which might shutdown might so being freedom is charging for it. It's not a great position to be in as a developer, and so when we said look, here's an open source drop in replacement for the clouds will the using. Now, it was just kind of the right product at the right time and instantly got a big community farming around it. So that's was kind of where we started, but we'd been working already for. Six months on a better way to build dialogue, and that wasn't ready for Primetime yet, but we'd already been working on that problem which was okay. It's nice to have this system right and you bring in message and you get back and intended some entities. bought. What do you do with that information and you just layer more if statements on one another all the time that be we're going to get anywhere, and so we've been thinking about that problem very hard and. because. Of the success of Razzano you which was the name of the library, I punched it. We decided to go all in on open sourced look. Everything has to be open source. And that kind of set us down that path burn interesting. Very interesting. So came from chat bots that came from a real need in the developed community using these cloud services I, you had wall stability tools, yourself, you open them up, and the rest is history of the community call onset communities been a real real key to success. Right? Right. From the very beginning, the community has built this company with you

Developer Raza Berlin Facebook Co Founder Alex Adela Razzano
The Why and How of Self Care by Randi Kay of Naturally Randi Kay

Optimal Living Daily

04:35 min | Last week

The Why and How of Self Care by Randi Kay of Naturally Randi Kay

"The why and how of Self Care Iran decay of Naturally Randy K. dot com. As you can gather, I think a lot about taking care of yourself and I care a lot about it. I WANNA shout about it from the rooftops I wanna hug you and bless you with self care blessings. I WanNa grab your shoulders, shake you while I yell how important it is in your face. But. I shall take a more humble right in a blog route at the moment and a little deeper into why it's important and some simple ways to get started. Talk to yourself. Our bodies are constantly communicating the different body systems working together the body language we exude or verbal conversations, but one of the most important conversations that we tend to neglect his consciously checking in with ourselves. I wrote a few posts ago about negative self-talk and start gently changing that conversation with ourselves. But along with that, there is the honest feedback conversation because something like this hey body mind or soul how're you doing today? What do you need? How can I help this whole day after? And then taking the time to listen for me some of those answers tend to be something like this Mo-. Hey, girl thanks for checking in. May I'm doing pretty good but my name and upper back heard a little I think he slept Kinda funny. You should do those and neck and shoulder stretches that I like Owen though he totally loved those cupcakes from Nicole's last night. My Tummy hurts meet a little lighter today Okay Mogi cool and by the way you are the bees. It may seem silly and he may feel like you've got a little goal homes Megan Combo going but it's K- keep going with it and you will come to cherish that daily inner dialogue I have come to not being able to function without it. Movement does your body good. This may seem like an obvious one but your body needs to move and yes, it moves all the time but we need that time of intentional movement, the benefits of exercise and stretching are endless and yes, we all know them. But seriously folks if we don't stretch and move and tend to our aches and pains, it can lead to incredibly negative and serious consequences. A favorite quote of mine that is known in the Yoga therapy world is quote if you listen to your body whisper, then you don't have to hear it scream and quote. And that touches on my first daily Combo point as well. Those first twinges and whispers of body discomfort is our bodies way of warning us saying, Hey, let's do something about this or else is going to get worse and lead to a torn rotator cuff or knee injury or heart attack or who knows what else. One of my favorite quotes is by core fusion co founder Fred veto quote. Embrace movement as an essential part of being alive and quote. We were created, sit at desks and stare at screens for eight plus hours a day. I'll save the soapbox for another time. But Self Care is how he counter that ever increasing way of life. And if you are up and moving for most of your day, self cares how we create some stillness and more therapeutic movement inhabits. Fill your own cup I save something to pour. In Our culture, there is glorification of busy. There's a glorification of sacrifice and struggle while I think being busy and sacrificing and struggling or important parts of life in their own ways is gonNA balance of heard almost every excuse in the book as to why people can't do self care is so hard with kids they need me I never get a moment to myself. I don't have time at work. So tired by the end of the day, my dog ate my homework. Okay. Not that last one but they all. Sound, like silly excuses to me what people don't understand, and this is usually the self care point that makes me wanNA shake people yell in a loving way. Of course, is that by taking time for yourself every day even if it's just five minutes of debriefing and grounding will make you a better partner parent friend employer employee everything you need to fill your own cup. If you really want to be the person you want to be in the world, you must take those sacred moments to yourself to take good care. And not only will you be able to serve others better you'll have valuable coping tools like healthy body, healthy breathing habits, self love, and confidence etc to deal with stresses in Traumas that will happen in life. In Summary To put it all onto a sweet-smelling glossy package check in with yourself daily to receive guidance on how to move and stretch and care to yourself. So you can be that kick angle force in the world.

Owen Randy K. Rotator Cuff Megan Combo Traumas Partner Fred Veto Co Founder Nicole
Here's what we know about Trump suggesting the idea of delaying the November election

Morning Edition

03:56 min | Last week

Here's what we know about Trump suggesting the idea of delaying the November election

"Do. But the mere suggestion by President Trump about changing the election date is causing extreme concern. He tweeted quote, delay the election until people can properly securely and safely vote, followed by three question marks. Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed the idea in an interview with W N k y 40 never in the history of the country through wars, depressions. And the Civil war, and we ever not had a federally scheduled election on time, and we'll find a way to do that again this November 3rd, we're going to talk about Republican reaction to the president's suggestion with Sarah Longwell, She's the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Morning, Sarah. Thanks for being back in the show. Thank you for having me. I'm going to read the president's entire tweet and then ask you about it, he says, quote with Universal mail in voting parentheses, not absentee voting, which is good. 2020 will be the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history on then he goes on to suggest that delay that we talked about you have said everything in his tweet is a lie. Walk us through that. Well, first of all, like you, said Trump cannot change the date of the election. The date of the election is constitutionally mandated and ultimately under the purview of Congress. But the you know the bigger issue is is honestly the vote by mail on the fraud. I mean, I really think there's two things going on here in terms of why, Trump said this tweet. The first is that the president is trying to change the subject away from Yesterday's historically bad GDP numbers, which came out, you know, just shortly, and coincidentally before his tweet on, there are plenty of other stories that he wants to distract from the moment whether it's the Russian bounties or his bad polling, etcetera, the president always had kind of Ah, low cunning. When it comes to understanding how to control narratives, So this looks like a classic case of calculated misdirection. But the bigger goal I think is about generally sowing distrust in the outcome of the election and laying the potential groundwork toe either dispute the results or claim it was rigged. So that he could be perpetually aggrieved. If he loses. We saw the president do this in 2016 on do you know he really only has a few plays in his playbook, and he tends to run them over and over again. But I think that it's you know, everybody sort of reacted to the idea that Hay was talking about delaying the election. But I think what's most concerning is just this general tryingto undermine confidence in the upcoming election because that is that's scary at a time when the election is going to look different to people because we're in the midst of a pandemic because there'd be so many mail in ballots. Well, let me ask you about Republican response. When we played that McConnell clip. We also heard Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas say, Hey, this is just the president troll in the press. But yesterday, the co founder of the Federalist Society, Steven Calabresi, wrote this op ed in The New York Times, saying that this is grounds for immediate impeachment and Calabresi as someone who has supported Trump a lot in the past. Yeah, you know, While there were no profiles in courage from the Senate Republicans who should have issued clear, thorough repudiation Sze of his comment. The one real bright spot was that the founder of the Federalist Society came out and just in no uncertain terms condemned this called it Fascist, said that the president It would be warranted for him to be impeached again. That is strong language, and I think that sends a really strong message to the conservative legal community that nobody should be defending this kind of behavior and that the highest levels of sort of conservative Legal ethics would not agree with anybody defending this.

President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Senate Sarah Federalist Society Steven Calabresi Senator John Cornyn Executive Director Co Founder Fraud Congress SZE HAY Texas The New York Times
Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

Judaism Unbound

04:58 min | Last week

Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

"Reo is the CO founder and executive director of a mood. She's a Jewish educator performer and perpetual student who is a former Fulbright research fellow and has taught at the national hoverer institute door to door tutoring and was the two thousand nine. Hundred thousand feature teacher at the Jewish singing retreat. Let my people sing Mirror Rivera is a board member of a mood where she also serves as resident rabbi. She has rabbinic ordination from the Jewish, theological seminary and services a rabbi at New York's Roman Nu- She has also board certified Chaplain Mirror. Rivera is also co chair of the Rabbinical Council of Jews for racial and economic justice. Jay. Fridge. And the CO founder with Rene L. Hill of Harlem. Have Ruta a brave space for Jews of Color Allies and co-conspirators in partnership with the Community of Saint Mary's Episcopal Church a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company before rabbinical school she taught hundreds of New York City Public School children through the National Dance Institute Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera, welcome to Judaism unbounded. So great to have you. Here, thank you. We're really excited to talk about a mood. It's such an interesting and important project. I'll give a little bias in that. I'm really interested in this in particular because I've been on the board of Sfar for many years, which is the issue of the Torah Academy, the Talmud Academy for lgbtq folks are that comes out of the Experience Lgbtq Q. Folks. It's probably a better way to say it and. When I first heard about a mood I was so excited to hear that there was something that seemed similar from edge use of color perspective. So it's something that I've really wanted to explore for a long time that both of us have and and we're really thrilled to finally have this opportunity. So Mirror I was wondering if we could start with a little bit of the origin story of a mood. In, two, thousand, eighteen, I was invited to be in the Selah Cohort fifteen of bend the arc four juice of color by Jews of color and there I met Ya McCoy will meet her the year previously. And part of that training. Was a study that we that she called. J O C. Tour Academy. And it was several afternoons where we would look text from an anti oppression lands, and at the end of that hurt I was sitting with you who the webster was hard the cohurt. We looked at each other and I said, why does this have to be only part of this training? We need this to be real, and so we started talking with start talking about that. So that was may of two, thousand eighteen. By June or July. Are Corman had come back from Israel at, pass it to you. I did a fulbright year in Israel I live in. Jerusalem and when it came back, I became involved in. J. Fridge which is to cherish on economic justice. And Colored. Caucus. Part of my involvement. J.. Fridge I was connected to Huda Webster An. I approached you Huta saying that I wanted to teach a small class on the politics of Hebrew pronunciation and I wanted to teach it for Jews of color of an Alexi that you're smiling because acid is immensely nerdy deeply nerdy. Added belts deeply important but you huda one up to me and he said what if instead of just having your class, we actually create a container for this kind of learning to happen more often. and. So that really launched the idea of. Jesus, Colored Tour Academy, which became a mood colored tour academy and we started out by a every other week having a person in the community, a Jewish person of color in a community teach whatever they wanted and we we started her first Beta run I'm really got to see what what kinds of topics were interesting. How did the groups of people showed up for different topics differ in and we basically got to conduct all this research We launched our first full year after the high holidays. This past fall in two thousand nineteen. And we just completed our first full year of classes. We got here because for as long as there have been Jewish. People color navigating predominantly white Jewish space the roots have been growing and deepening. People like you. Huda. Myself were able to found something like this because of all that work that had been happening. JESSOP. Color entering wet Jewish is being Jewish spaces and also getting to know one another.

Mirror Rivera Co Founder Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera Colored Tour Academy Israel Rabbinical Council Of Jews Ya Mccoy Huda Webster J O C. Tour Academy National Hoverer Institute Research Fellow Alexi REO New York Huta Martha Graham Dance Company Harlem Torah Academy Jerusalem JAY
How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

How I Built This

18:03 min | Last week

How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

"Hey, everyone and welcome to how I built. This resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're thinking creatively during such a disruptive time and today we're GonNa hear from Ta the CO founder of Good Wall Good Wall is a social network that connects high school and college graduates with jobs and scholarships. Today Good Wall has raised over sixteen million dollars with more than a million users on the platform I. Spoke with Taha, from his company headquarters in Switzerland where he gave me a rundown of goodwill's mission for people who've never heard of goodwill just tell us how how does it work? It's essentially a mobile platform that's designed for the next generation. We started off with high school students helping them build up their first profile showcase themselves in a way that I'm accentuates their extracurricular activities in particular, connect them to opportunities mostly scholarships in colleges and all. This happens within a positive and supportive community. Over time, we've grown with our members into the college and young professional space. Our whole goal is to level the playing field, maximize the potential of as many people as possible. So it's been compared to linked in is that a fair comparison I? Think there are similarities however, we're really focused on on our part, which is this next generation starting as early as sixty and guiding them through almost Sherpa in. Them through the future of earning learning and those opportunities. There are various features that we have that they don't, and we're really focus from a user experience perspective, and then from a community perspective, it's it's very different posts don't work here. You wouldn't find students talking about being on the chess team being on the robotics team being on etc etc on goodwill mean if you are, let's say eighteen years old and you're interested in applying to college. What does it look like you go to? While you create a profile for yourself and and then what you're going to goodwill, you help yourself our initial early adopters were mostly international school students who maybe didn't have as much guidance as others or since the US who maybe didn't have as much guidance from their parents from college counselors it come on. Here's he would other people are doing they'd be matched with colleges and universities and. Also. With scholarships based on their data on their profiles and then they'd be able to connect with like minded youth. So we had this girl based out of Jordan who was really into robotics science and unfortunately no one really around her who had that those similar interests and she was able to find others like her in the US connected Internet. NASA did incredible things afterwards actually many of our students have gone bound exclusive opportunities at. Like Oxford and others that we've partnered with an. Super fulfilling perspective. Yeah. It's really caused US checking it out last night and it's it's a little bit like if you didn't have a mentor or a guidance counselor like here you go. Yeah definitely I think a lot of early adopters were privileged in the sense that they had a lot of ambition and maybe they went to good schools. But over time we've especially with last year we've really. Put a lot of effort and a lot of energy towards helping youth who are maybe a little under privileged that privilege is actually not necessarily one hundred percent linked to financial situation but it can be for example, we're doing now with UNICEF death and other organizations in Africa for example, is running programs they are and were really helping you bring out their ideas, build up their confidence show who they. are in connect opportunities and it's been really really fulfilling and we expect to do more underrepresented communities in the US. For example, we're doing more and more there. That's where the biggest room impact is. At the end of the day, we are a social enterprise and it's very fulfilling to help youth who go to elite schools and connect them to lead universities and colleges, but it's even more fulfilling. Even more important for us to step in where the impact Delta's the biggest for, for example, youth in Africa who insert African countries that just don't have any exposure don't have opportunity. Don't have the guidance but do have access to a phone and can has result go through. So we're really trying to do more there in particular and are you started this company in two thousand fourteen with your brother? Where did the idea come from? So my it was my brothers idea both of us were born in Switzerland we lived in Iran the US came back to Switzerland. Our parents used to work in the humanitarian sector. My father worked for or Serb refugees around thirty years, and we experienced a lot growing up. We was like quite a contradiction going skiing on the weekend in in a very affluent privileged, no bubble in Switzerland whereas at the same time, we'd go in summer vacation and give candy out to refugee kids who are age your ten eleven and that that really did shake US quite a bit in throughout our upbringing we realized that we are. We are I'm here not because I'm smart but because I was lucky osborne that could have been born two doors down in that, my life would have been very different and I'm confident because of the experiences I had rather than because I'm innately able to do so and that's really what pushed us to say we were lucky in this sense what would happen if we were able to give those opportunities in terms of particularly experiences. So education is one thing traditional education is one thing but particularly experiences to millions of youth around the world what would happen how can we change things and that's where we thought it has to be mobile first it has. To be a digital solution and it has to be able to tackle millions and we wanted to go a step further. We said it's good to maximize one's potential but hopefully, we can do that in a win. We're very idealistic in that sense in a way that it maximizes or improved society as well or impacts society positively, which is our mission statement that if we have enough people that are exposed to not only improving themselves but as so often it's a form of education knowing what's out there if I hadn't gone to refugee camps or if I didn't have the background where my parents are Richard from Sri Lanka, would I really be so inclined to How this positive impact who knows I did have that chance I view that as an opportunity to give those opportunities in showcase through volunteering through being aware through connecting to people from different backgrounds. Hopefully, we can move the world forward I. Think it's needed now more than ever, right? Yeah. For Sure Tyler, the business for a second I think you've got around fifty employees the world you've got offices in Switzerland, the US Germany Serbia the Philippines mean you're growing you've got presumably some cash runway but these are tough economic times. I mean Lincoln just laid off a thousand people, their record numbers of people in the US for unemployment. So first of all. How is your revenue been in your business been impacted by the global economic slowdown? Yeah. I mean when it happens I think the first week where we started notice he was getting really serious I. Remember it. The first thing we did was we we had a board meeting and we talked about, okay what's our cash situation and let's make sure we get through this are along a be while maintaining the team for two reasons. One is like you don't want. Downward debt spiral. But also because we have the opportunity to have real impacting this time if we make the changes in adapt effectively, but we won't be able to do so if we don't have the team to do it so we've actually hired over the past few months and we've actually grown over the past few months and we've adapted to do. So the first week was really about scenario planning getting through that after that, we assume the worst but we. Ourselves decided. Well, there's definitely GONNA be less demand for recruitment is definitely less hires which hurts us which hurts our users or are members and we said, okay how can we can we help because if they come on in the no jobs? Well, it's a very bad experience, but it's also it's hurting us. So what we did was we put we put together this program better together and other challenges where youth can develop work experience at the end of it. They get certificates that show that they've accomplished these different challenges participated in it, and at the end, it can be used as work experience towards all of our partner companies. So it's actually giving them something to do some hope, and at the same time, this is generating revenue for us as one example of revenue for us. Another example is just before the crisis a part of our model is we work with large partners and a couple of these large partnership so. Leading recruitment than leading education routes, stunts or came to a halt. And then I don't know if this is despite coverted or because of covid other opportunities came about we've now partnered over the course of Kobe with market leaders in markets that we are not present in or were very marginally presents and he's actually allowing us to take up extra market share and grow in more significant way to timber onwards. Let. Let me ask you about the demographic that you target. Right I mean and I'm Gonna I'M GONNA use this term Gen Z.. Always cringe when I say because I remember like when I was in my twenties and people talked about Gen-x and their slackers and I would just cringe and you're older people talk about Gen xers and I was like, what are you talking about but just just to make this kind of simple we'll we'll just say Gen Z.. So if you're Gen Z. I'm sorry it's annoying I know. This is a really challenging economic moment if you are in high school now and you're going into college or if you're in college, there's a pretty good chance. You'RE GONNA GRADUATE INTO A world with very few jobs. You know a world that we haven't seen certainly since two, thousand, eight, nine and ten but maybe far far more challenging than that. What's your sense I mean? What do you think I mean do do you think that's that's actually true that that is likely to be the case for the next three, four, five years or more. Yeah, I think whether or not we go through a deep recession with mass unemployment particularly for the Youth USA next three four five years very probable that US at least in the short run or to suffer they're normally the last to be hired the first to be fired and that's justified for various reasons including ethical. Oh, they have less commitments than, for example, someone with kids, but it is incredibly difficult and the mental toil of, let's say an eighteen year old doesn't know what's coming up next we need to be able to be resilient and we need to be able to learn how to learn and adapt because we just don't know what's going to happen. So they could be a second. Downturn there could be a third downturn. It could be sustained downturns and US like across society but in particular for the youth they we have an opportunity they have an opportunity to take this and say, okay, it doesn't kill me. It might make me stronger and I can learn from this develop that resilience that five, six, ten years from now I'm able to deal with the next crisis in a more in a stronger way because I'm going to have to do that and some of the skills that need to be developed in my in my opinion or entrepreneurial thinking that ability to be flexible and resilient we we need to do more though the on just the the these massive stimulus packages and. Is trying to do whatever they can for sure this generation needs the government needs to intervene to be able to organizations needs to be able to intervene to support them to the best of their abilities in terms of developing skills and able to resilient. When we come back in just a moment, I'll talk with Taha about college graduates who will probably face a shrinking job market over the next few years stay with us. I'm Guy Roz and you're listening to how I built this resilience edition from NPR. For this podcast and the following message come from the American Jewish World Service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at age aws dot org. Hey welcome back to how I built this resilience edition despite the economic slowdown tie and his company good wall have been able to grow their team and stay afloat. But as jobs are drying up across the globe. Many college graduates are looking for opportunities and can't find any if you're like in your early twenties now and you're looking for an opportunity and you can't find one. What would you recommend a young person? Do Who's who's graduating college is just entering the workforce and is kind of trying out different potential career pass. Is it a good time to just steer clear of the workforce for a while and get some more education which in the US means more debts? What do you think? Yeah, I think. Definitely, trying is important, but this might just be an opportunity to start your own thing. You know a lot of great companies came out of the last crisis because they just couldn't find jobs or that opportunity just wasn't there for your. So maybe start one's own thing. It's never been easier to start a business. It's never been easier to try something new. So if even. If it doesn't work. That's incredible work experience. You know when we talk to HR owes of some of the leading companies in the world, what are they looking for or what were they looking for before the crisis indefinitely after is that ability to be entrepreneurial even if you're working for fortune five hundred, so it can't hurt best case scenario you build something. Amazing. Worst case scenario. Fail and you take those skills and you leverage those skills and you keep your mind active. It's so important from a mental health perspective, keep your mind active and then apply them when the market comes back, which will at one point another opportunity. If if maybe starting yourself isn't it join some friends or join or reach out to small startups definitely volunteer is an opportunity. There are a lot of NGOs are nonprofits that need help or need support right now, build up your work experience gained some experience concrete tangible work experience that differentiates further rather than just having eight twelve months in your resume which are empty. Unfortunately, it might not help financial side and that's where that's where one has to be creative and it's it's just really tough and that's What does the government intervention on that front need to be because there's some that just can't afford to do what I just said, which is volunteer or build your own company because they don't have that safety net that don't have that opportunity in and unfortunately there in we're almost out of ideas because he go back to college, you just talked about extra debt but for some unfortunately are going to have to do it, and that leads to more a more philosophical discussion on what is there so much debt attached to a college education where you know in Switzerland, for example, I paid for my undergraduate I paid around a thousand dollars a year it's a leading edge I mean it's like A. Top universities and so that's a that's another discussion. Yeah. I agree with you I think that this is a moment to be entrepreneurial and it's challenging because you're you're right. I mean not everybody can do that from an employer's perspective you mentioned human resource officers, and by the way you're right I mean a human resource officer is very attracted to an applicant who started a business or try to start up in it failed. Because as you say, that's incredible life and work experience. What are some of the characteristics and sort of ways that quote Unquote Jersey works that might be different from previous generations maybe what their expectations for example? Yeah. It's something that comes up quite often the expectations are are huge I think even if we look at the generation before part of it is there needs to be in there. Always has been this need for grits for determination. I think post Covid, we're going to have very likely incredibly resilient and determined generation I. Think it's it's really great for I mean it's it's very tough. Love going to suffer and I hope I hope it will be as as few as possible but coming out of this generally on the whole, there's good reason to believe that this generation. is going to be really conscious a bit like after World War Two really conscious of financials very conscious sauce how lucky they are how privileged quickly things can change how precarious the society within which we live is actually it's a disease that, yes, it's it's it's it's serious, but it could have been a lot worse. It could have been worse could be one hundred exists and it's brought. Our global economy to its knees and you know we feel like we're often the masters of the universe and that's not just Jeb across demographics and we clearly aren't on I. think a little bit of humidity goes a long way. I love the energy of younger people coming in because their ideas are just so radically different from the way people in my business have have seen their profession What is your advice for employers looking to harness the intellectual power of Gen Z.? Yeah. No, it's a really good question. There basics of management that have been the same for every demographic every every niche within that demographic. It's look at maximizing the potential of the particular individual to different people react differently to different forms of management. Within this can talk about trends, but the ability to give them that chance to express themselves. The need for trust is always been there now definitely, so I mean even more so because they know what they're capable, but then also must not forget they are still with very few years of experience and being able to be there to give feedback to to tell them what they're doing. Right. Tell them what they're doing. Wrong. Both sides is critical. So just leaving someone out there in the world is not going to necessarily need to great results either but giving that safe-space giving that trust and creating an environment of being game your to maximize your potential and the. Direct, order may have worked. They may have been able to get away with it in the past, but some people might be okay with it but generally speaking that's that's especially for for you a lot of potential that's just not conducive for maximizing the potential where do you see your your business and what you're doing in five years from now what do you want it to look like I think for us it's always been about really helping as many youth as possible be as inclusive as we. And so we're ready serving youth in one hundred, fifty countries would like to go deeper in certain areas through our partnerships or load serve more youth in a more significant way. Provide more opportunities just re the best experience. That's probably what's most important. I think that's where we can have where we can make our contribution towards society. That's what we're good at, and now it's just about going to the next level. Yes. It's a challenging period, but we're going to be okay. WE'RE GONNA get out of this, and then it's about really taking this opportunity and doing the best we can because we are in a privileged situation if we were if we were unlucky which is the case for many other start ups I, friends who had term sheets for massive rounds of financing evaporates we hear the stories and then know they're just unlucky. So we're in this lucky position to be able to operate and to be able to do what we're doing. Let's. Make, the most out of it and I think that's our that's kind of our duty and I think that's yeah. TOBBACO

United States Switzerland Africa Good Wall Good Wall Taha Nasa TA American Jewish World Service Co Founder Oxford Youth Usa Jordan Osborne Richard Partner NPR Lincoln Officer
The Joy of Photo Contests!

This Week in Photo

06:10 min | Last week

The Joy of Photo Contests!

"Welcome back to another episode of this week in photo him. Your Hose Frederick Johnson Today on the show. I got my friend Mr. Ori- guten. He's the Co. founder over a company called view book. They specialize in photography contests or has agreed to come on. Let me pepper him with questions about the state of the photo contest industry where view bug is has been where it is now and where it's going Ori-. Welcome to the show man how you doing in great. Something to see you here. You as well as long time to time agreed on. In person good to see you over the camera, I. Know I know I think what was the last time we hung out was? Was it over drinks and San, Francisco? That's right. Yeah, no, that was great. To, see you again. Good to see that you're you're you're happy and healthy? Your sort of withstanding or weathering? This whole pandemic thing is everything. Same Kelty where Downing San Diego. Everybody's working remotely but. no-one would everybody's doing well. Yeah, no, that's awesome. That's awesome. Okay, let's dive in. It's Friday. Respectful of your time here, so let's dive in so view Bug Dot com view bug dot. com is the name of the site that you co-founded. What's the origin of that? Why why a photography contest sort of software as a service engine? Restarted View Book Further Kabbah a little bit over ten years ago when My Co founder Jimmy being enthusiasts, photographers were getting friends Amoeba family. Saying Hey, you. You have a really cool photo. You should to this contest or to that contest, and they would send links via email, or like a heard about these other contests, and then, when looking at those pages or sites. Some of them look Dina. IFFY or Scammy I wasn't sure if I wanted to send. My image didn't know what was going to happen with the copyright etcetera so. Start talking about it. Where we thought that it would be wise to build a community where the contests would be the backbone of the community and make sure there's a place where photographer feel safe and comfortable joining contests while giving it an interesting twist were contest used to be only Samira photo and see if you will not. The way we do it, this moral forgets contest, but there's a whole community around it. So that was the initial thought. We need to solve that problem of not knowing the contents was legit or not. Let's make it a safe environment and build a community around. I love that I. Love that because you hit it right on the head, one of the one of the reasons I. See this a lot in own in the twit pro community. One of the hesitant. Or the factors that lead to hesitance to submitting the photos is because of that terms and service that go along with some of these more shady contests. You know there's like yeah. We have the the possibility of winning all these great prizes, but we own your photo and we can sell it, and you know in perpetuity for three thousand years. You, know all this for for for the chance of winning something that you're probably not GonNa Win Anyway Talk. About how view bug is different from that. We break it where we go completely the opposite. They're photographers. Always keep the right to their images. We cannot sell. The images sat at all and again. We're photographers ourselves. A wilder stunned where we stand on giving the rights of your images, and you mentioned it try. Contest you participate, and you have a very low chance of winning, so it's not only up about being top top winner and the contest we have a different type of disease of the image, and then it's really cool. We give you a lot of analytics behind your submission. The other images you can get inspired by seeing the galleries of the participants and there's boarding blind voting, so we can share with you where you're doing ranking our comparing university others enjoying your images like are they cannon arts or It's. So we make it fun interesting and as part of an educational process rather than the participation nor gone this process so. It's very different. Feel look and feel when you participate in our contests. I like that I. Like that that that like you, said the exact opposite of give us all your photos and we'll do whatever we want with them, and you're probably not going to win anyway. which kind of praise on the uninformed in the week you know those kind of contests. That's interesting. Talk, talk a little bit about the community side of it, so is it. Is it just as giant group of photographers in every now and then contests spouts up that they can compete in, but otherwise they're talking amongst themselves, or is there another sort of modality to it? So there's another one. Right now. Over three million strong members. So. Every day it's so inspiring to see that type of photographers are joining the community, and it's all types of photographers from board threats to landscape to architecture. It's unbelievable. Finally Photographers and We know there's different type of photographers and there's different experts at the friend John Russo. When you join view book, there's always between thirty to fifty. Different contests not are open for submissions, so you can really explore your great DVD's. We see a little for the referees that are experts for example at architecture, and they see our context, and they reach out to us, and they say you know. I never thought that I could. Join contest out four drinks, but I saw that contest and I got inspired. I try order now I'm getting a lot of people. Congratulating me on my portrait, so we tried to have many different types of contests with different themes and subjects,

Mr. Ori- Guten CO. Frederick Johnson Founder John Russo Co Founder Iffy San Diego Samira SAN Francisco Jimmy
Stephanie Fleming on organization, life hacks, and how she built 'The Happy Planner' and 'Me & My Big Ideas'

The Here for Her Podcast

51:55 min | Last week

Stephanie Fleming on organization, life hacks, and how she built 'The Happy Planner' and 'Me & My Big Ideas'

"Are so excited to. To introduce incredible Stephanie Fleming. She is a creative entrepreneurs speaker of and wellness seeker. Most notably, she is the CO founder of me and my big ideas creator of the happy planner, and what began twenty years ago as a tiny garage business is now an industry leading lifestyle brand and offers a wide variety of products that inspire customers to live creatively and plan a happy life. Please welcome Stephanie to the show. Okay, we'll Stephanie. We are so excited to have you on the here for her podcast. Thank you so much for joining us. And we are so curious about everything that you've created and your and so I think. Our audience is going to be very very interested in the business aspect of. Everything that we're about to talk about some super excited cool. I'm so excited to be talking to you. Guys for those who don't know. Tell us a little bit about your health. I'm Stephanie. Fleming and I'm a creative entrepreneur. I actually call myself like an accidental entrepreneur. I started my business me and my big ideas with my mom twenty actually over twenty years ago started in my garage with an idea of just one idea for making stickers for the scrapbooking industry at that time and. And really just kind of wanted to do it too. I needed a creative outlet. Yes, but I needed to pay the bills like I. was you know a young mom and struggling to make ends meet, and just really wanting to like. Go out there and I would do anything because I you know I wanted a better life for myself, and for my kids and and so I was definitely you're. You're? The definition of a hustler like I was like I have no money, but I will put in the sweat equity so. We been hustling with me and my big ideas for. Over twenty years now, and we've created everything from paper stickers and now planner, so planners is our latest the happy planners, our latest product line and It's just been such a a wonderful thing for us to get into because we get to share a love for creativity for positively, and that's been kind of where I have fallen in the last probably five or six years which. Not only being an entrepreneur in a business person, but also being able to be the spokesperson for our product and our brand, and that's something that I've been totally passionate about. It's amazing. I'm curious. So, what did you do before you started your business? Were you a stay at home? Mom? Did you have have a job, so I was? I was pregnant when I was eighteen. Not Married had had a baby, and when immediately from high school to I need to find some way to take care of my son and I did in home daycare for eight years, and was daycare provider for six kids usually at one time and it was you know it's honest work? It's hard work. It's eleven hour days for you know for eight years and you know all I to do is be a good mom, and and so I didn't have a college education. I grew up in the craft industry though my. My parents had a manufacturing and distributing business so I grew up from picking orders in the warehouse. To you know watching my parents who are entrepreneurs basically navigate the craft industry and come along with them to trade shows and things like that so I always had that creative bug, and and even as an entrepreneur as a kid I was making little catalog, so you can buy these cards here, my designs and so, but then life hits, and then you have to go out, and you know and do the best you can and and so at the time. In one, thousand, nine, hundred eight. My mom and my mom had sold that business, she and my stepdad divorced and they sold their business, and so she was kind of at this place in her life where she was like okay. I'm ready to start over, I need. She was probably my age now, and it was like thinking I need to start over and figure out what life looks like for me. Now and I was saying I just I want to start something something I want to do anything and so my mom had some seed money and. Like I said I would do. You know so. I stayed up all night trying to find just hustling to find hair. Competitors are advertising in this trade magazine. So that's a potential a mailing list for so anything possible. I was willing to do so. Yeah so it was not like I had this pedigree of an MBA, and I'm going. Go start a business, and that's why I say I'm definitely. An accidental entrepreneur, but I've I've loved it. We'll story. It is very very cool. It seems like you had it in your blood like raped in the beginning. Though like it was something that you're meant to do. I, think so. I think without knowing that that's what it was like. I was just cleaning out. One of the things we've done in quarantine is cleaning out our garage and so all my memorabilia. That's where I found my card. Catalogue of here are the things you combine I'm like I always was. Experiencing entrepreneurship right in front of my is growing up but I never really knew it. In fact, my mom was in charge of all of the creative side of the business, and was the one in charge of new products, and out there trying to find out what creative women were doing next, and so when my mom would go on an rnd shopping trip and take all of us with her. We didn't realize what we were doing was watching her shopping trends and seeing what was out in fashion, and how we can bring that into the craft and creative industries, so when it just seemed like something natural, and now I'm trying to identify people go. Where do you find your trend Mic-? Just Watch I. Just look and so yeah. We were Kinda groomed without knowing that that's what was happening. So cool and so. You had your first business you? You began doing that twenty years ago. And then you landed to the happy planner, which has been a huge success and It's a it's a beautiful book. It's something that you want to. Hold in your hand, and just like carry with you all the time. It's so cute and fashionable. Where did that idea come from? And how? How did you of get to that point? Where like I want to be in this market of making planners? Happy like honestly we've had a lot of great products that of sold weller mckellen's pretty cool, but the happy planner is like it's so me. It's totally me so the the way we came up with. It was pretty much the same process that we did it with anything. As we and my sister is heavily involved in product about men in our company as well, but we watch in decide okay. scrapbooking was huge for a while, and so we were able to kind of ride that. That wave and we've kept coming out with products and line extensions and and then you kind of see that it was kind of starting to taper off. It was not as popular and the products weren't as weren't selling and going doing the having the sell through that they did before, so we're like okay. We need to know what creative women are doing next. which is what my mom did, so we would always be looking for what. What what do i WanNa do what is something that's interesting for me. and and then also kind of searching pinterest looking around water, creative women doing so for some reason on pinterest people were taking just regular planners from staples, or whatever and they were putting our scrapbooking products, stickers and things and making them cute but the scrapbooking don't really fit like they don't fit size-wise. They didn't fit if you're you know the stickers we were. Were to commemorate memories and things, and that's not necessarily the things that you need for planning so I kind of just you know, and they were boring to staples like office supply things. They have black brown different color bays. You know really great. You know what I think. Someone would would think the businessmen would like. And then there was like three designs that were like purple. Paisley or some ugly grandma color. You know I'm a woman, I. I don't want that, so we thought definitely we could do better in design. We could get them more affordable. We could create accessories that would go specifically for them, and then you could put in those accessories like things that are positive so that every single day when you're planning when you're having fun putting stickers out ever, there's this creative positive message that makes you happy that keeps you going, and so it was just a kind of another. Offshoot into what we normally do. What are creative women doing? And at this point? It was like people are busy, and they want to be creative, but they need that little bit of licensed to say it's okay when you're planning your schedule. You can kind of put a sticker downer. Says you can do it or just. Those little positive affirmations make a make a big difference. I love that so much were all about positive affirmations and There's something that I still love about having a planner in front of me like an organizational planner. Where where I. Can you know touch the pages and I can mark things off. It's so different than a calendar on Google you know and I've always I've i. still have a planner, so I love that, but I'm curious because you have built such a successful brand and obviously. You've separated yourself in so many ways by having something very unique You offer as something that's very I would say year to the millennial woman. But how how have you separated yourself with your branding? I'm just so curious about like where your sales come from utilizing social media, you have a huge social media following. So, how what kind of what was your? What was the method to your madness at that point when you started thinking ahead? Yeah, so at that point. We had we had a very successful company in the craft industry and up? Until that point, we had what I figured successful products. We didn't really have necessarily like brand. Following social media was just coming up, but you know there was something about the happy, and I think my own personal passion for the product helped in planning it. No Pun intended. because. I feel like we got to this place or like this product line. I just feel like we need to be able to have a brand. There's gotta be a message behind because the message of the product is so powerful and so really. What happened I mean there wasn't? A Master Plan I love this product so much. That I just started talking about it and sharing on social media back in the periscope days. You remember, periscope yeah. Remember. About it and I just said you know what I would anytime we would come up with something, or we had something new exciting happening in office. I'd like I'm just GONNA share. It's just going to be I wanted to our product and the brand to feel like like we were just friends sharing like. If I was you know to call you up and say Oh, my Gosh I'm so excited. We just got this prototype in, and here's what it looks like. Here's how I'm going to use it and every. Every new products came in. We previewed it on periscope did live Q. and A. is, and and that's before people really doing that and we were sharing the process and the product, and sharing my excitement, geeking out over stickers and a paper planner you know, so. It became I thought there was really no plan other than to share authentically, and that was really before, but you know everything authenticity be authentic was just such a overused catchphrase, but that's what it was because I didn't actually want to be the spokesperson. For our company, and because it's such a team effort, and so I'm not. I'm not maybe maybe I wouldn't had the idea for. Let's let's look into to paper planners, but I didn't create designs, and I not the artist, and I'm not the one who source the product and sold it in such a team so but. In order I felt so passionately that. Don't have relationships with companies. They don't have relationships with products, but they have relationships with people and brands, and if I could be that conduit. To Give A. Personality to our land our company then. I'm like all right. I'm willing to do because I was the one before it was like no, I don't really want to know I'm just I'm fine to not do it, but when I was sharing something, I was so passionate about the following just came. We did not say hey. We want to get to I. Think we're over six hundred thousand on instagram. We didn't have a plan for that. I mean eventually to grow. It takes you get to a certain point. It's like okay now. You have to plan, but we grew our numbers very very organically, and by just engaging with them. You know true engagement and it's. It's not even just the number in the plan, but it's like. Are you engaged? Do you care about your followers? Do you care about your customers and deal you know? Are you engaging that way? Are you doing it for the rise near following? Are you doing it for the sale? Are you doing? Are you doing it because this? Just feel so right to you know. Yeah while you're on that topic, too. Because so cool that you grew organically because. I mean it's such an easily marketable product, but also like how how do you stand out amongst your competitors are? There's other planner companies out there. So what's your differentiating factor with your product? So at the beginning? We were the only ones pretty much doing what we did, so we stood out really quick, and it's almost like I. Always say like it was like. Like when I had my first when I said WHO's very well behaved typical. I am such a good mom. And then my daughter came a second, and she is like great, but she's you know totally like wild spirit and I'm like oh my gosh. I need to to work at this little more. So when we did when all of a sudden you're like It's growing and you're thinking. Oh, my gosh is great. People are just listening, and then all of a sudden when you're onto something, people and other brands and other companies go. They're onto something I. Think I'm going to try that, too. And then what you were doing so authentically is being duplicated right so. So what we have always done I think and even back in the scrapbooking and paper. Crafting days was just advice. My mom gave me is just really don't worry too much about what other people are doing. Find out what you uniquely do. What is it that your company or your brand do what do you? How do you stand out and for US There's a lot of people who have high end stationary and people. People that are saying a professional and I want it to look like this or I. Don't like this about your as well. This is who we are. We are colorful and fun and were affordable. We have a disc bound system where you can change things in and out, and those are some things honestly and with the brand that will turn people off when you really claim like who you are. Some people are going to say. Well, I. Don't know but I. don't like that well, but this is who we are when you can really find that those are the things that just kind of narrowed down, and you nail it down so much that these are the things that make us unique, and so for us. We embraced all of that. That is who we are fun and colorful, positive and an interchangeable, and all these things about the product and about our messaging. That's what we focused on, and I think even especially going forward when it becomes harder and you. Maybe at this point, we're going like you see a slowing in not just gaining followers as fast when you get up high. And there's more people in the space so for us it's how can we find? What, we, what is it that we offer? That's unique whether it's the message product. And, you kind of have those pillars of our being authentic. Is it something that's different or are we just white noise in the space? Should we be making a change? We be pivoting. Right now do. Is there something we need to be doing to be more aware of the surroundings of the economy of this of society so You're constantly looking for you have to just be aware. Of who you are where you're going and not being paying too much attention to. The competitors and the people aside. It's really hard though it's hard to do because you find yourself looking. They're doing so good over there. Maybe I should change and go that way so knowing who you are is a huge part of that success for us. And, I love how you really made an emphasis on. Being okay with not being a good fit for everyone, and you know we talk about this even on social media. How you know people always give us questions on. You know my Gosh I I lost if I don't post for three days. I'll lose one hundred followers well if those people want on, follow you because you haven't posted three days. They're not your people. Like they were never people anyway, so I love that you have you have a focus and you understand your branch so well. The you know who you're catering to, and also you mentioned pivoting when you need to because. You know I think that people get so focused on the end goal, and if it's not if it doesn't turn out exactly how they anticipated that it would be, they give up right, so I think that's I. Love that so much and it kind of brings me to my next question on. The hardships entrepreneurship because I think that when people look from the outside, they see this beautiful brand that you've built a successful mom who's who's doing it all, but it takes so much work and behind the scenes that the people don't see. Can you walk us through some of those hardships that you faced in how you've kind of gotten through them? Oh yeah and I think. I'm so glad you brought that up because you especially on social media, people will see their, so they'll say. Where were you because I'm pretty active on my own, and then also I with the happy planner, but it like where were you? We Miss John there. I'm like you guys like if I would have shown. What I was doing for the past seven days, it was get up in the morning. Go to work. Stay there till seven o'clock have like meetings altay come home barely figure how I'm going to get the door dash before I wanna fall asleep, and then you know over it over and over again and I'm like it's not glamorous. It's hard There's a lot that goes into it. You know and you have to love it if you are somebody who has your own business or your own brand? You have to love it because it is not I mean I would say. Ninety, eight percent of it's not glamorous, but it's rewarding. You know it's something that you love, but you're GONNA have failures. You can't be afraid to work hard and fail. Because, you're GONNA. Do both of those all the time? And you know and learning from your from your failures for me. It's like you know we've had products that the ones that you've mentioned like happy planner that quadrupled the size of our business in the matter of two years But in the in between, and we had already had like a pretty successful company, and we were like well, but what you don't see, are all of the things where you come out with the product and you're like that's a dog. You Know Kate next. What do we? Can we learn from that? You know that's what you can't. You can't shy away from it, but nobody wants to see that nobody, but those are the lessons. Are you know what you're seeing? When when you see the happy planner is our success of you know Gosh over twenty we did that. It was fifteen years. I think into the our business before we hit that like Grand Slam, we'd had several. You know that was. This product was a triple. This one was a strikeout. This one was a base hit. And then you know, we never know we not. Even we're not even. Promise that we were going to have that big of a success that we just kept going and every time we did we learned something like Oh we didn't do. The packaging wasn't right or you know. Maybe we rent to too early into that trend, or maybe we didn't research it enough or maybe we learned something every time but I mean we've had. We've had product failures. We've had really difficult times in the economy I've been around here through September eleventh through the two thousand eight crash where the business was doing great, and then all of a sudden we've had were having to like have layoffs and figure out how to make the hard decisions. To keep your business healthy and around and surviving, and that's really hard. I mean that's something that right now we're going through. You know we have. Luckily we've got a great basin. We've had a very successful business, but this is a gut punch, and for a healthy business like ours. This has been really difficult and I can only imagine if you're struggling before this, but you just have to figure out you. It's almost like a business as almost like being a parent. You've got to make those tough decisions. Decisions you know that not everyone's going to understand. That's going to be hard. It's going to keep you up at night. and those those you don't see those on social media. No one's sharing like we had to really hard today and or have been meetings all day, and if they are, they're showing you the picture of themselves looking really cute, and you know here I am with my thing and it's. It's just not always like that victims hardly ever like that, so I think it's sometimes i. I've shared lots more real version especially on my own personal social media on instagram. Especially because I, think we do a disservice to. Everybody but to women's in general specifically where it's like if you're trying to be an inspiration and trying to share with other women, this is what if I can, we can all be here for each other. You, know in business, and this is how we can succeed. We are doing a disservice if we are just showing what our lives really never looked like And how how then do those? How'd you push through? How do you push through at the worst times for people that are listening that are entrepreneurs have launched their business or not seeing success right away. Like what have you learned to cut has kept you going. I think i. mean this sounds like something that my husband would go. No, if you can't measure it, you can't manage it because he's. My husband was our CFO CEO and. But for me, I, it's so much into an instinct. And then pushed through because I believe in my instinct very strongly. There's a thing like I feel like you know for us. We were very fortunate that the business that we started stayed healthy, and was viable forever, however I. Kind of look at our product launches in our product releases and different product types almost like many businesses, because there comes a time when you know this isn't working, you know there comes a time when you're like. We just need to let this keep going. We need to work at market. We need and you just you kind of. If you're really being honest with yourself, you know when it's like am I pushing too hard for something. That's not really making. Any headway or do I just need to keep working harder and I feel like You know if we ask ourselves how we done everything. HAVE WE EXHAUSTED EVERY OPTION? That's what I think. We need to kind of listeners, though because I just feel like if you are sitting here like. With a struggling business, let's say whether it's from the economy or just like I'm just not going anywhere It's hard because some people will say just keep going. Just keep going all the time. I don't think you should do that all the time. Sometimes you want maybe need to move onto. Something different doesn't mean you're not going to be. In business or start your own company, or but maybe this, isn't it? Maybe it is? Maybe you're just sitting there going. You know what this is going to be tough times, but I believe in this business i. know we have and we're going to keep going, so you kind of have to listen to that. You know you're got to say. Where are you? Are you? You know? Do I need to keep pushing through this, or is there something else that I need to be? Doing are exploring. It's such a weird time to because with everything going on I. Mean People are obviously doing less news less really to plan but I think there's still an opportunity and it's great that the product isn't just a manner planning out your daily activities that can also be used for intentional set goal setting in just writing down thoughts that you have journaling so I love that it's it's I town that regard Have you guys thought of ways to during this tough time? Kind of still sell your product in different ways or maybe thinking about different product lunches. Were you know what kind of has been brewing in the last few weeks, so it's like a perfect example of. Of evolving and pivoting right so like. Yes, when you're when we're looking at people that are planning your days just filled. My days were just like I couldn't even have the whole damn thinking. How tiny can I right because there's so much going on, but you know one of the other things we have in our product, minus positively journaling and guided journals, and then when you you know for us, it would be so tone deaf to be talking. Talking about we know you're busy. Let's just talk about busy busy busy schedule Hustle. Let's go because this is not the time for that, so we had to look at. What do we have in? You know in our offering. And what do we have What do we think is important or is there something else we can offer so for us? you know slowing down journaling 'cause for me. It's all about putting the pen to paper. I Love I love my. Technology and I. On my computer as well, but there's something to me about writing stuff down whether it's my schedule and prioritizing key efficient or whether it's like you know just journaling what I'm grateful for writing that down I did a whole like wellness like year in two thousand eighteen, where every single day for the entire year I journal. Like what am I feeling I thought it was going to be like more. Of a fitness thinks I like. My cholesterol is high, and I needed to lose weight, and I was going to do all these things I'm going to travel the stuff and what it became was. Oh my gosh, I'm realizing that I'm tagging my emotions now like when I would write things down the journaling became the biggest part for me is what I was feeling like I was really I felt very marginalized that meeting today, and I came home, and I think like I was going into hibernation. You know and I was angry and I was, but I was identifying my feelings. Why was I instead of just going like writing down my food log? You know it's like it wasn't helpful for me. I. Know How to eat healthy. But to realize that when I feel angry, I don't know what to do with those feelings and to eat them you know, or and I'm like an eye stuff them and I. Try and do anything in Canton. and that was like a realization for me, so we're kind of leaning into that and saying hey, right now when you're stressed or you're afraid or whatever it is that you're going through. What can you lean into? And how can you get in touch with your feelings whether it's do journaling or if you really do maybe you're a mom who is trying to work fulltime at home and also. Also home school your kids to the distance learning the. Maybe you need to be really efficient, so you need to you know. What is it that you need and listening to that? Do you need to be productive? Do you need to be kind of moving a little more inward, and then just writing it down and really getting out of your head and onto paper, so you can help process it. Yeah I need to start journaling. That is something that. I know he's for the whole year. Did you notice that it had a huge impact on? It changed the way I thought it totally and I'm the same way because I'm like I'm so famous for starting a journal. And then it's really good for like a couple weeks, and then it's empty, and I keep it and all these like you know journals that have a little bit done in the beginning, and then like I wish I could combine them all. And are they now? It's like so I just said I have never made like a year long commitment to myself I. Will I mean I will do anything for my kids. My husband, my family, my, you know the team of me me and my big ideas, but for me. It'd be like I'm always the first one to get shoved off the list and so I, said I need I was stressed because just like what you were saying. Our business was. Wildly successful that year, and the year before that but I was so stressed out. Because when you quadruple the size of your company, and you're trying to do the same things that you did before scaling it and learning how to do that so quickly is really stressful for a for a creative person who likes to do things like. As I'm inspired. And so. So dealing with that was huge, so all of these things that I saw which were gaining weight having high cholesterol, not sleeping at night, having hiring Zaidi I was thinking, it was because I'm out of shape or this and I didn't really realize accepted the journaling. which that's not what I started to do. That it was more than just that and so this journaling process just gave me. Such clarity and insight into my own feelings that I had no idea and I don't think if I if I just tried to do that at the very beginning for just a little bit I, don't think I would have. Gotten as deep because like doing it every single year someday the destroy today sucked. He knows the worst day ever and I didn't know how to see it through, but then as I got used to journaling just as an exercise every day. I learned to go. You know to just kind of. I guess like look a little deeper. Really. Shed light on stuff that I had no idea I was looking for. I feel like now. I'M GONNA. Go buy one of your journals because I'm so inspired by that by just what you said and I think that I'm someone that just keeps everything in my head and I talked to myself all day every day just. All the things that have to do all the things that should you know that are behind me? That I should have done yesterday it's that's great. I love that with you. You know you don't realize that when you're not like kind of emptying out. It's like for me I was not able to. I was not able to like think of I was kind of creatively blocked, and then I was like even motion. Lee blocked and they just didn't realize because I'm the same. I am an over thinker. I like I process everything and I just I kinda hold onto it and I get very wrapped up in my own head, and so it was just almost like an emptying of it and helps me sleep. Helped me do all that stuff, so my guys. I think you'll love it. Okay. I'm sold. journaling. Borsch, now let's talk a little bit about living intentionally, which is very much related to what we're talking about now, bite. What does it mean for you to live intentionally? And how can people cultivate a more meaningful life? Because obviously you found your passion, you work really hard at you. Know keeping your mind rate, and it seems like you're a very self, reflective person, but how how have you gotten there? I think. I've always been somebody who really likes. Growing looking inside I ask a Lotta questions of myself and. Other people like I. Try and tell my husband like I'm not really trying to psychoanalyze you. Even I would love to just get into everybody's head, but I think that there's so much we can learn. And one of the things that I have learned just by trying to grow as a person and being teachable. Has Been You. Know there's nobody in the world that is going to take charge of my life, my happiness, the things that I want that me. Matt what happens around me it doesn't you know we can all we can all be complaining about what's happening in the world with your job with your relationship, but when it really comes down to it, you're the one that's responsible for what it is. You want in your life and how happy you are. And so for me, it started with number one. I needed to. Learn how to love myself because I didn't love and accept yourself believe you're worthy of all those things, and then once you believe that those things started kind of coming into my life and a realize it's like you know. That was something that I had to really focus on. I had to work on with myself I am. We're a project, so if you go out there, and you really want a job, or you really want to start a business, or you want a relationship. You have to almost I think. Go for the life that you want with that same passion and I mean for me. It's just been about really starting to identify. What is it that you want? What is it that makes you happy? And how do you need to get that? I think that's why I'm a planner at heart, because living intentionally as really planning, you're trying to like you have to identify something first and then figure out how you're going to get it right, so it's like for me. Identifying. What makes me happy? What the name of our podcast plan? Happy Life at the Tagline for our company. Or for the for the happy planner, because really feel like you know if if for me, I need to identify what it is, that makes me happy right, and so I'm not somebody who is an Adrenalin Junkie I'm not someone who needs a lot of activity in my life, I need I need serenity a need. Calm I need a place to be creative I want to go travel I want to be with my family so when I. Start to really identify Granular Li, like what it is, that makes me happy and what I want I can easily say you know okay well. Then I am intentionally going to make the choices that get me closer to those things that I want and. It's really a responsibility. You know it's really taking responsibility for For the actions that we take and you know and I think it's empowering I actually feel like instead of going like Oh. My Gosh I'm responsible for all of these things in my life and no one's going to do about me that makes me. I think it just gives it gives me the power back to say you know. Stuff can happen all around me. Crap can just be going on like everywhere and internally I can live intentionally with what makes me happy, which what? And I can be. Responsible for especially this stuff that's going on in my head. You know so setting intentions of you know whether it's daily whether it's setting an intention for a year or whenever you're feeling like you need a little more clarity into. What am I working for I think it's a really powerful thing to do and I know sometimes when things get more popularity. They gained that whole like people in Oh. Yeah, okay. Setting intentions are doing all this, and it sounds a little Wu, and all that and I'm like it, but it really really makes a difference in how we live our lives, and the decisions that we make yeah, and it's all it all goes back to taking accountability, right and totally nine I. always talk about this on the podcast where a lot of people struggle with that I. Think they kind of have this. Poor me, mentality or you know I could never accomplish that I'm not ex- enough. I'm not educated. Enough I'm not. You know fast enough smart enough pretty enough whatever it is, and I just do I. Hope that if pe- when people listen to this episode, they really if they take anything from it. I really hope that they listen to what you just said. Because it's so powerful, that's such a like. I can't I've had a lot of things. People will ask me like well. Of course, it's easy for you to be happy because where you are today, you know and I said, but but here's what you don't understand is that? The reason I'm happy is not because I have all the things that I have the reason I have all the things that I have is because a happy positive person who believes that I have. that. What happens in my life is a result of you know of the way that I go about it and what I believe I deserve and how and then I can have those things I'm happy. And I'm positive period. Doesn't necessarily. Happy happy I just mean like I'm going to be content and positive and optimistic in my life. No matter what is going on and I have lived through a lot of things I've had like I said I shared with you. Guys had some traumatic things in my childhood that have happened I was had a child eighteen I had a lot of money issues. I'm growing up. I was in an abusive relationship with physically and mentally, and there's a have been drug abuse them I mean lots of things that I've had to deal with and. I could very easily any of those instances been. Why did this happen to me? I could never start a business because I don't have a college education and they don't have any money, and they don't have this and you know. What will people think of me and you know a? Growing and believing that you can do something, no matter what like having that resilience and having that. Like I'm just going to figure it out like I said I. It pretty much anything now I'm probably going to be more of a of a jack-of-all-trades master of none but that's okay. That's who I am, and that's really has gotten me where I'm at, but yeah. I just I think if anything I totally agree with you. If I share anything, it would be that no matter what your circumstances are in life. I think optimism and. And believing that no matter what happens to you, you will get through this, and you make something of yourself, and you can get the things that you want in life If you know if you're working, you work hard. You have to be willing to work hard. You have to be teachable if to learn to be confident, but all those things are things you can control. And it doesn't really matter what your circumstances are. So that would be something I mean. Yes. I love the product. Yes, I love our brand. Yes, I love all these other things, but that's just something that I think everyone can take with them throughout their lives. Such great life advice, and it's so true I feel like there's been looking back and reflecting on my own experiences to and the hardships that you know everyone has different forms of adversity, but how you respond and react to that is I think all the difference and I think it was a murray furlough that said everything is figure out. That just. When you said that because it's true like if you have that drive and that hustle enough to do what it is that you WanNa, do you can figure that all out and I think Alex also reiterated several times. There's this concept of just start now. Figure everything else out along the way as you go. Otherwise, you're never gonNA start. You're never going to achieve those goals but in terms of goal, setting and just organizational tips. I mean I feel like the ideal buyer of the happy planner is a very organized individual, or maybe they're aspiring to be more organized. So what are some good organizational tips just in general that people can start practicing and then apply to the happy planner. And I am not a naturally organized person. At like what you see back there on this video that we're recording over is not what it normally looks like I'm a creative person so I'm very like. Just kind of scattered and I will follow an idea like if I have an idea, I'm like I'm down that rabbit hole and. There's a chaos and mastic usually follows so being organized and using happy planner and using organizational tools is actually been essential for me to be like a productive society member of society or running a business, so one of my favorite tools and I think we kind of alluded to this a little earlier was getting things out of your head in getting him down I use a master What I call him Master Action Item List, so it doesn't matter if like you are thinking of I've gotTa. GotTa do cupcakes the Kids School I've got empty. The dishwasher I have a huge project that I'm working on. That's do every little thing. Take space up in your head and It doesn't really you know you're not really. They all have the same weight, so you're thinking constantly of the Dishwasher, the cupcakes and all of these things and you don't have the space to really think about Give yourself like. Hey, now. I'm really focusing on the project because there's so much stuff spinning in your head. And, so I think David Allen I think is his name he said you're. You're headed for having ideas, not storing them so like for me. It's like Oh, my gosh, that is so perfect so I take and had this one massive list actually I have to, but it's ones home in one's work, but usually for most people one will do and. If everything that comes out of my head is something that I have to do if it's an action item. I put it on my list and then I work from that list. Would plan my weeks when I plan my days, so I look at Monday and I think okay. I've got five meetings not lot. Stuff's going to be coming off that to do list, but on Tuesday I have one meeting in the morning and I had the whole day that I. have so I'll go off of my master list and then start working from there. I'M NOT GONNA forget my tasks that way. It's not going to be like oh shoot cupcake sting it. You have your your things that have due dates and everything so when I'm working from it I don't have fifteen sticky notes everywhere and a piece of paper that I wrote over there. That I got lost cause. I left it in my car and you're constantly then figuring out. How do I remember where it was that thing so keeping everything kind of in one place has been a big tip for me. the second organizational tip that I use I plan every Sunday I plan my week out every Sunday so or whatever the day before the start of week.' In for me. Mondays the start, so I sit down I. Take a look at what are all of the to the must do's appointments. The the deadlines that have to happen that week and get all those things in there and I. I plan everything out from date night with my husband every week. we're putting that in their first wins the time that I need one of my GonNa. Go exercise. When am I going to those put in appointments, and then I start to fill in again with things from that master to do. If I don't do that, then you know, there's things that come up and they're just time. Thief's and they come in to take in all of a sudden. You look and you've spent. Monday and you're thinking I've done nothing you know. It could be a week and you're going like shoot. There's nothing off my list. conversely you can take a look at that, and if you've been really productive, there've been times. I had no idea I could get that much done. So those are two tips for me to stay on and just to contend me. Being organized means being productive, because if I'm not productive, my stuff's all over the place. I get very easily overwhelmed, and that is not a good place for me to be. I was GONNA ask as well with with your master. Master list you add everything from like emptying the dishwasher doing laundry like every task so usually I have like if those are ongoing I will have just started doing this, which helped a lot, but all I kind of assign like if something that occurs every week for me I have a list. That's basically recurring tasks, so if you're if it's a cleaning thing, it's like an you know you've got changes sheets. You know the bathrooms or whatever I've got empty Roomba. because. Just, all those little things that are like take the trash out. Those are of things that I put off to the side which are more recurring tasks. And then when I sit down. Unday, I think you know empty room by the today's the in the evenings and do my meal planning here and those things happen all the time. The the Master List for me is you know the things that are their projects or their like like for me for my work one. It's like every time like I need to talk to him about this Call up this person and make sure I return this thing and check out on. All of the let's marketing meetings scheduled out. Make sure to reach out and so then I can cross them off. On Cross them off. And then when they're done, they're done, and of course you know once it gets to about halfway marked off at create a new list because it's prettier. And I like doing that, but yeah, the reoccurred things I keep separately. Of It, so we're GONNA. Get this all in. Your home about really what you're saying is it comes down to time management skills right, and yes, you know like you said there are some days ago by and I'm like. How did I just spent two hours scrolling through instagram? Checking emails bearing bearing myself in emails that really don't I don't need to get back to these people right away and you self reflect and go like that I see I'm busy, but to hours of that time was wasted. Time management is huge, and that was another thing that I uncovered in my memorabilia box that said think I was in like fourth grade and the teacher says like Stephanie needs to learn time management. Because it is true, because I do the same thing and I feel like there's so many times when people say I just don't have enough time and I'm thinking i. just spent four hours binge-watching. Whatever I. We. Do have the time and that's okay. If you're going, you know what I'm going to. It's going to be a binge party like I am going to be watching and It's fine but I think we need to be aware like you don't WanNa miss out on the things that you either want to be doing our need to be doing because you're not managing your time well and like I said it's a constant struggle. This is going to be something that I'm GonNa be. Be doing for my whole life. Because you know because I'm just not naturally inclined to be that way even, but it's a habit you know, and it's easier for me now, but managing your time well and scheduling it out is is a habit that we form you know, and it's just like it just becomes easier and then yeah, you find him. There's nothing to me like when I look at a list I'm like. Oh, my gosh look! How productive I was this week! That is such a good feeling when you even when you finish the day, and you're like man I was on point today like I knocked this off the list and I. Did this and you just feel good? There's just this feeling it brings. There's something about they say like an actual like I don't know what gets release, dopamine, or whatever that when you cross things off your list. That, yes, go. It is what? What are some other resources that you? You've enjoyed yourself or that? You would recommend to listeners in terms of time, management or building, good habits, organizational tools and practices. I think that like to meet. Okay decluttering. Making sure that you like you don't have because again. The more clutter at the worst and I know they say you know a messy desk or whatever they say, but the MESSI dozen. Beans or whatever and it is, but it's probably one who's just driving themselves crazy 'cause they can't find anything so developing somewhat of. Of A protocol for how you're GONNA. Plan your weeks and then also. One of the things I don't know if it's not really a resource, but it's something that I learned that. I kind of tend to first thing in the morning. I want to like answer all like you're saying I. Want to answer all my emails, and then of course I go down. Somebody's asking you know unsubscribe to all these things now and then I started subscribing, and then I go down, and so somebody told me to block off your days and at the beginning. Do the most important thing for you that you need to. To get done in the morning or whenever it is that you work I work best in the morning and freshest van, and then about three o'clock, I'm looking for anything else. I'm looking for something to snack on or any distraction and it, but some people are not also if you're like going, this is when I do my best work. Then make sure you can identify those times because you're gonNA. Find that you have. You're going to get more done. You'RE GONNA feel more efficient more. More productive and I think that's going to help I. Definitely, figure think that if you can figure out how technology and productivity work for you. I am kind of a hybrid between outlook and all of the technology that we can't. We have that really does keep us I've got when I have meetings. All my stuff is stored. I, don't WanNa. Right down the zoom. Call Identification Number and the password, and all these things you know, that's all stored in my outlook and I have a really good relationship between paper planning and my tech, you know. And then but I have a process every time I have like a nice system. I think I think that works I've been I've used a lot of productivity tools into honest with you. Nothing's really kept me more productive than just keeping it simple and planning things out and getting stuff done I mean it. It starts off great, but then it's just something else for me to. Keep track of so having something just right in my face whether it's my outlook, calendar or or my paper planner I just like I, said I've tried I've tried them all I've tried. And I know they were really well for some people, but for me it's just all about keeping it really simple and just getting stuff done. Yeah, and you know what I love the realness because we get questions, sometimes of like. How do you have a business and you work fulltime in your mind like? How do you do all the things? And I always kind of self reflect in its and I always think you know. You make time for what's important to you. That's the bottom line. We all have twenty four hours a day. I think that that hustle mentality isn't always helpful and isn't always positive, but at the same time if you have something that you want to accomplish. You just have to do it. You have to figure it out and do it. That's the bottom line. So Yeah? I love what you said on that. You know what I'd like to ask you Stephanie. If there's some sort of book or podcast or resource that you'd recommend for our followers, I don't know if you have any in mind that something that is is really impacted you in some way. Yes, so two different two different things so a book that basically just changed my life completely were was the gifts of imperfection by Bernard Brown. And it was one of those things where I just realized I don't have to be perfect I'm worthy of just the way I am, and that just really kind of just her whole. I love her so much that book. When I started to believe those things about myself, things change. They think changed in my life. They changed in my business That's why I think that no matter what you're looking at doing that. Inner work is I. Don't don't try and like. Get the promotion or getting the relationship, because you think that's GonNa make you more successful or happier, or whatever, because if you're not okay with that first step I it's all going to be empty. You know you're going to get the promotion, but it's not gonNA. Feel as great as you thought it was. Because you're. There's there's that whole in there that you're trying to fill so. That personally was amazing for me and then I love how I built this by Cairo's and. The podcast and for business. That's something that I listened to and I just. If, you're ever wanting to start a business and you think well I don't fit the typical either entrepreneur or business owner, or whatever I don't fit that mold listen to those stories there from every walk of life and every kind of story. It's so empowering to listen to them, but it's also really interesting to see how some of those people dealt with you know the setbacks, and how they how they innovated, and how they funded their businesses, and it's really interesting, and so, and they've covered just about like every aspect of business so I love those, too. Such third-rate episode actually heard how I built. This I've never listened to it, but I've heard it is great good, so that'll be one that'll that'll be added to my podcast list. podcasts our life right now in quarantine. Basically do anything and just have headphones on and listen to podcasts. For sure so good. Well this has been great. We are so happy that we have had the chance to chat with you and an answer all of our questions. Where can people find you on on social media? And where can they purchase happy planner? So they can find a me personally and INSTAGRAM's. Where is my John? That's what I love the most. People over it Instagram, so you can find me at Stephanie Score, Fleming. And then you can find the happy planner, which on Instagram, as the underscore happy, underscore planner or the happy planet Dot Com. I also have a podcast called planet. Happy Life that host with my daughter, sharing tips about how you can choose to be happier and planned to be happier and. And we love that, so that is planned a happy life. You can find that. At Planet Happy Life Dot Com so and then the happy planner you can buy at craft stores all over Michael's Joanne. Hobby Lobby Walmart and that'd be planner DOT COM, so we're all over. Love it. It's awesome. That is so great. We will link everything in the show notes, and it has been such a pleasure Stephanie you offer so much wisdom. As it relates to not only business but life so thank you for sitting down with us today. Thank you appreciate it. It's been fun talking to you.

Stephanie Fleming Co Founder Married Google Pinterest Bernard Brown Wanna Weller Mckellen Dopamine Paisley David Allen Kate Cfo Ceo Kids School OH Canton. Zaidi
Interview With Ben Shapiro, Author Of How to Destroy America in Three Easy Steps

America's First News

13:54 min | Last week

Interview With Ben Shapiro, Author Of How to Destroy America in Three Easy Steps

"With US co founder Of the daily wire. Ah, host of the Ben Shapiro Show number one New York Times bestseller. His latest book is How to Destroy American Three Easy Steps. Ben. He wrote this book. And we're in the middle of this. We seem to be dead Set on destroying America. Did you give everyone a blueprints or something? I am glad that I cannot take responsibility for it. I did not give them will bring. But I won't say that. When I wrote the book in the summer January, I figured out the relevant I didn't think you'd be quite literally been quite this quickly, like all the all the syndrome that I was talking about taking the country broke out into the open at once. So, you know, forget about the gun violence. What? You talked about the civil unrest in Philadelphia in Oakland in Portland in Seattle in New York City in Austin in Albuquerque. And And in Kansas City. What's going on here? I mean, what we're watching right now is a variety of movements, all pretending, t be about civil rights and moving the country better and then all immediately about making the country worse, But they're really about Castigating America as uniquely horrible castigating America systems as repositories of privilege and evil and saying that those systems need to be torn down. Whether you're talking about black lives matter. Rioters in Los Angeles or New York or Washington, DC, or the top men and rioters in Portland or in Seattle. We're watching in the end is sort of a lion's that says that the United States is bad. It's just that the bleeding spear of an ideology That that claims that the United States of systems are unworthy of continuing and need to be tor now out at the root, and there's a reason that Nicole Hannah Jones is very proud, she said. This on Twitter that did it that count 16 19 project and tackle editor of The New York Times. At this point, she said, on Twitter that she was happy. The people were suggesting that what happened in New York and L. A in Washington, D, C and all over the country that was 16 19 riots, meaning that her perspective on the United States namely that it was rooted in evil. And it's inseparable from that evil. That perspective had taken such hold. Now let me ask you Does that come up in the interview? Hi. How you doing? Tell me about your background. You seem to be a good writer and your view of America. It's terrible needs to be disassembled. And what based on slavery? I think you're the perfect person. We have a column. Feed it right. And we have a news division for you to lead so to prove bench appeal. You're right. I'm looking at, uh Ted Lin Seth. He is somebody who is A, uh, African American activist. He said Oregon is white is hell. Uh, he said that He warned that the black guys, Ah matter movement in the city is being co opted by quote privileged white people with their own agenda. It is not our agenda and double a C P is saying the same thing. Why are you telling us what we need again? If it is a white black thing? Why we, depending why are white people taking the lead is not the ultimate insult, telling black people What they need for justice. Late is pretty incredible. But even it goes back to this view of racism that is actually pushed by people like you bring Candy and Robert Angelo and Kenny, Of course, the author of how to Be a racist and from the Beginning and Financial of the author of My Fragility, their View of the United States that the United States is on only racist, But the racism is embedded in all of its systems. And so the way to you identify raising them. Is not how we used to identify racism used to be. You could pretty easily tell who's the racist who ever thought that there was inferiority or superiority based on racial race, right? That was the definition of racist well, Now they changed the definition. They say Any system that create any sort of racial inequality or results in any sort of racial inequality is a racist system. And if you don't want to tear down the system You are racist. Not only that, if you're a white person, you bear all responsibility for this so nobly bears responsibility for the success of white privilege to have lived under and propagated this particular system. What That doesn't mean that white people are still in charge. And the white people are the are the people who have you know, in the sort of old Runyon Kipling phrase that the white man burden to fix the entire system. And so what That means that the views of people of color actually don't matter. The only ones that actually matter are the views of people like Robin D'Angelo was going to cure the country of Whiteness and hat and take on the past in of the United States, So that's why you see these bizarre videos of these white protesters lecture and black ops about what America needs on racism. But I also find her standing, too, is the place they're just overrun with gun violence. And that, of course, is Chicago with great Rahm Emanuel rained and left with his tail between his legs but came out with his chest high with his with his chin in the air in his chest pumped out as if he was a great victor. So because the president did states actually did what he said he was going to use his Listen. I'm gonna send some federal help in there. To not to handle protesters on the Christopher Columbus statue. No, but to find out about these guys. Gangs there were running rampant and the sub gangs that are killing each other. They're shooting each other at funerals at funerals. And here's the mayor. Who blames it on who blames this whole thing on the president's and his willingness to cab federal help cut seven I've drawn a very hardline will not allow federal troops in our city. We will not tolerate unnamed agents, taking people off the street, violating their rights and holding them in custody. That's not happening here in Chicago, so I've drawn a very, very bright line. I've made that very clear to every federal authority that I have spoken with. And they understand that if they cross that line We will not hesitate to use every tool at our disposal to stop troops and unwanted agents in our city. So this woman who should be begging for help with 117,000 gang members, 55 known gangs 747 factions, and they say there are 2500 subsets of those major gangs. You think this won't be begging for help? Instead, she's drawing the line and went through. When push comes to shove, she'll take down Columbus a statue. What planet are we on, Ben? We're on a planet where one of the one of the tactics But that's being used by mayors across the country who are on the left is something that unauthorized infront Eagle, who would the counter of City Institute hey called the riot ideology. The basic idea here back in the 19 sixties, and that was the riots or sometimes useful because politicians will use them as a way to club the citizenry into essentially giving the rioters what they want. So Marion Barry technically did this in Washington, DC He wouldn't work with people outside the governments who are protesting, but actually, we're in Aged in violence, and then he would basically say that the taxpayer to do all these people will stop here to the five things you need to do this something John Lindsay in New York City during the 19 sixties. He basically said the way that we can help alleviate the underlying problems here and do all the things we want you to do. Well, if you're a leftist politicians, you have two possible sort of solutions here. One is that you surrender to the protesters simply because You are afraid that they are more work than you are. And that you're going to be castigated is insufficiently weapons. And at the same time you can go to the citizenry consideration. We can alleviate all these problems. All you have to do these things. I want you to know you're starting to see hints of this nationally. By the way, you're starting to see writers say things like, you know, it's awful. This is Trump resign tonight. You're saying that part out loud, Which is it? This whole thing is about you wanting what you want, and you're only going to stop this democratic elected So essentially, you're threatening the law abiding citizens of the United States. You're going to continue violating law and wrecking major cities and shutting down major cities in six PM and curfews unless you get what you want. Well, that's never believe him. Ocracy is operated and no democracy can operate under those conditions. So, Ben, do you get the sense in looking at your book? There are reasonable people in the middle that understand when a mayor Lightfoot says things the way they do way, understand that these liberal mayor's saying, this is going to be the summer of love in Portland and then see the ransacking of a city like we're seeing, and now we see it re re igniting in Seattle. So when do you get the sense that there's a majority of Americans who who don't care about the politics but a logical enough to see the problem? So I think that most Americans, definitely the problem. I think the biggest problem right now is that the media is such an incredible job of making intimate. Everybody's focusing on President Trump that they've ignored the real problems that are played in the country right now, and they're downplaying it purposefully in order to convince Americans that none of this is happening, how you get that, during that quote, where, he says there's no such thing as in chief of violence. And the only way that you could do that number one of your delusional but number two. If you really think that you could get away with that, and the media decided point again, which they have been playing, So do I think that the vast majority of Americans are happy to go along with us. No, I think the best majority Americans know that this is nonsense. But I think that the polarization around the election is so effective and so effective around President Trump. This is the media have basically been able to make this a referendum on Trump as opposed to a referendum on violence. And this is why it's very important to President Trump be incredibly focused last 100 days of this campaign he really needs Prevent the media from using distraction in order to avoid the logical conclusion here, which is that if you actually want this stuff to stop and not paid to rioters and looters and protesters, then what you actually need is somebody who is going to affect you wait longer. The president needs to make that message inescapable until you can offer the sort of distraction that maybe sometimes I wonder if you know one thing I have to say he's been pretty discipline. I thought he had a very good week last week. He definitely saw the change in messaging, and I do think 99 days in this In this world we're in is a lifetime. I agree. I agree. I think last week was much much better, and we just need to see that we just need to see them and we don't want this to become you know that that image from the Simpson nations work actually read that back to zero. Instead. What we just want is consistent level of solidity coming from the White House looking people have been, I think, begging for this from the beginning because President Trump's policies are actually quite popular. And when President Trump 16 script that he is quite popular, the problem is that he hasn't so if he can actually being here's the discouraging part. He's down in the polls. The encouragement He performed about badly de cluttering will have three months and just not not in terms of policy. But in terms of stuff he's been saying would mean that this is a low water mark, and you're going to see him rise in the polls are gonna start to see things tighten up a little bit at the very least before the election, and if he's disciplined, and if he can point to this he really has to do is point you say well, what Democrats are supporting worst. Joe Biden condemning these riots. Worthy. He's hiding in the basement. Where is it? You want to do an interview? Chris Wallace, it Trump can do that and be consistent about it. Then I think this election's been tied up with her. But I just think that we're not looking at Barack Obama had 5 48 years old with his his eloquent speech and promises that he couldn't fulfill. But you say Well, pretty talented guy, Bill Clinton. He had all his personal problems. But man, can he speak, and he certainly was comfortable on a myriad of issues. No one doubted his intellect. But when you look at Joe Biden, he's the worst candidate that I have seen in my lifetime. And if President Trump can close the gap and force him to actually campaign That would actually be an exponential gain for him. I mean, no question. I mean, Joe Biden is an extraordinarily we candidate who's being benefited by two particular circumstances. One Kobe has made it so he doesn't have to go out and campaign is actually benefiting him tremendously. He just gets to stay home and talk to friendly's basically was really nice for him. He doesn't have to demonstrate any level of potential energy. It all on number two is the fact that he's campaigning. As I said before, essentially the dead person. He's basically what you're saying. I am. A tree stump. And you don't like trump to vote for the tree stump. And so that makes it really a referendum on Trump, which means that this is very much about hands from shift the burden of proof back to buy as opposed to letting it sit on his own shoulders. So then, Lastly, you write the book how to destroy America in three easy steps. I felt as though I am well the book by just reading the news. Unfortunately, if the word destroyed does work, and it is getting, I think it's beginning TTO unnerve our allies. What's happening in our country right now. What is the element that we could see around the bend that would make you believe that we are on that path that we have not discussed yet? I think that the one thing that they would allow us to recover here is a renewed sense of what America's history is all about What the book really does juxtaposed to stations in the country. One is what I thought it's not really left right. So much of it is unions versus disintegration is Do we even want to be a country anymore? If we do we have to have a shared philosophy rooted in the declaration of Independence have assured culture rooted Masonic institutions like churches. And school that values entrepreneurship adventure that values taking care of neighbor. And then if we and we all have a shared history, we have to have a belief that the United States actually an incredibly glorious place. That glorious place ought to be of help. If we don't have those things were gonna fall apart. I think that can be re invoke ated. You've seen Antifa. I mean, they don't. They don't seem to like you. They seem to show up with some of your speeches. Are you seeing their imprint on, especially over in Oregon in Seattle? Hundreds. I mean, you can see all the hall marks mean There's certain things you just look for visually raising both flags. You see the You see the red flags You see people who are dressed, own blast at the bicycle helmet and the goggles. You know this is it's perfectly obvious to everybody that he was deeply involved in very active in Portland for years reporter and you know, it has pointed out another action in Seattle as well. Look at what you're going to see right now. And this is the most predictable effect is a mass, a mass evacuation of major setting two years to see everybody who can afford to leave these nature city. But his major said, because who wants to live there? I want to pay inordinate taxes in order. Get shut down in 68 every night watcher business burnout. It doesn't come in a party today. I think figure I never sent right as a broadcast from New York City virtually alone. There is nobody here, Uh, Bank. Congratulations on the book. How to destroy American. Three Easy steps, continue to get the word out and continue not to take a step backwards. Thanks. Appreciate it.

United States President Trump America New York City Seattle Donald Trump Portland Joe Biden Oregon The New York Times BEN Twitter Kansas City Washington Chicago Philadelphia Co Founder Cluttering
My Secret Hack To Increase Your Webinar Conversion Rates

Marketing Secrets

04:33 min | Last week

My Secret Hack To Increase Your Webinar Conversion Rates

"Right. The webinar fuel Webinar the Anthony. More so than I did really recently. In fact, we tonight for the time you're listening, but recording this day could be week or so. By the time you listen to this this episode, but basically happened. We came in here and we did the web and so. It was a little ready firing. Things was like we planned this to be in a month now a whole month launched and we said No. Let's get it done quick. We gave ourselves like three days. So that meant is like number one which was Monday creator registration page and promoted it right ID number two, then I created the slides because I could which were perfect, but they were Kinda. Good. Day three finish slides, and then we went live, and it was just chaos because we had over ten thousand people registered. We have I think. Thirty five, hundred live cutting, it was chaos so a lot of fun, though and we did the Webinar and overall, the Webinar was awesome. Crushed it sells converted really well like everything was was awesome with it, but the right three or four spots that I could tell them work right right that we miss something. Looking back at the questions that people smit afterwards like they're missing this gap, and the urgency of the scarcity wasn't right in the bud. Things were busy. In fact, it's kind of fun todd. You know I co Co founder and partner Todd. He watched it, and then he messaged me he's like Russell you've messed up. You've heard about this and this and this and I was like house taught. Teach me webinars now, but it was actually really good. It was some of the most of the key things that we didn't click funnels to increase conversions and our webinars and I forgot about it. I was rushing to build these slides out, and so basically was was. was there there was no. There's no urgency in scarcity couple things. If you've ever gone through any my my deep webinar training. Talk about how in the offer stack you want to introduce constraints so later in the stack you can. You can amok was restraints right so what I saw what the thought was instead of saying hey. webinars unlimited everything was coming and saying. Hey, you get a you know. There's going to be limited at twenty twenty webinars. You could build hundred thousand things like that, and so those constraints people nobody constraints with okay, because still pretty good, and then at the end of it like the bonus. These people now say hey, those who get started today while we're live. We're going to release these constraints. Instead of having twenty dollars. You get one hundred or unlimited so this you're going. Get this you can. kind of break things out and so it was cool out of that is. He told them I was like. Oh, my Gosh, she's right and right now were Brandon Fisher on our team. Is that rendering the Webinar and getting it ready? All sorts of stuff like that and say wait before you render the final version I needed record. Some clips ran back to the office. You know it's nighttime now we're. It was the morning or during the day when you. Turn Lights look as close to possible deal before and came back and I redid three sections of the slides to introduce constraints, and then and then only. Restraints by making unlimited offer in. Record those three things quarter part one part two part three brands going through editing it in and then anthea for weight increase with three bonus record right now and then. Brandon said that in taking this presentation, they did really really well, and it's like what are the Holsworthy gap? So could you better and recordings weaving in, and it's really it's really powerful if You badgen light. River. This is probably a horrible example, but it's taught by. Hand is probably tired now, so but on on Seinfeld where it's the time where George's with his buddies and they're. They're They're making fun of him. They keep ripping on him and and he has come back way to stores, comebacks and just work, and so finally he up with the perfect comeback. He's so excited in the comeback with something like. The jerk store called, they're out of you and everyone's like trying to give me a horrible comeback. You'd better come back in. And then he put himself the situations where he can use his comeback. He's been waiting for. It's like this is the perfect comeback. It's GonNa. Crush everybody, destroy him, and and he kept setting finally came back and someone said you know the thing is like the jerk store. They're out of you. You and kind of bombed, but it was funny because he knew all this was lying. If I had this line that would work perfectly and think for for us like the reminder. It's been a while since I've done something like this, but it's like wepener. Overall was given a couple of parts like if I just was said this just had this piece. It would have been perfect I forgot about it and so. This gives me the billy and Tony, this news well have the recording. That's like it's done. It's good, but now I know where to go back and recording him and trying to record it with the same energy level trying to record it same situation close like an so our video editors can weave it into the presentation, and hopefully people notice they do notice. It's such a small thing that's not going to stop them, but it adds in these things that change

Brandon Fisher Russell Todd Co Founder Billy Hand George Partner Tony
Fleetwood Mac co-founder Peter Green dies at age 73

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:17 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fleetwood Mac co-founder Peter Green dies at age 73

"Mac co founder Peter Green has died at the age of 73. He hasn't been with the band since 1970 but he did write nearly all the band's early classics like this one. Green, one of the eight Fleetwood Mac members inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame back in 1998.

Peter Green Co Founder
Fleetwood Mac co-founder Peter Green dies at 73

830 WCCO 24 Hour News

00:07 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fleetwood Mac co-founder Peter Green dies at 73

"British musician, Peter Green has died. He was an original member of the famed rock band Fleetwood Mac

Peter Green
Peter Green, Fleetwood Mac co-founder, has died at 73

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Peter Green, Fleetwood Mac co-founder, has died at 73

"Another legend is lost This legend in the music Peter Green Blues guitarists in the first incarnation of Fleetwood Mac until 1971 has died. A law firm representing his family says he died peacefully in his sleep this weekend. Green to some listeners was the best of the British blues guitarist of the 19 sixties, BB King once said. Green has the sweetest tone he's ever heard his career shortened by drugs and mental illness. Green also made a mark as a composer, writing songs like Black Magic Woman. Green was 73 years

Peter Green Bb King Green
Make a will for free with Freewill

Talking Tech

04:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Make a will for free with Freewill

"A lot of US never get around to creating a will to make it easier. The APP free will would like to invite you to use their free online tools. co-founder Jenny Chia sprawling is here to tell us about it hi Jenny. So free will is a website that anyone can make a free state plan on, so that includes a will help care directive and a power of attorney. It's really easy process. You just go to www dot, free dot com, and you answer a series of questions very similar to when attorney might ask you in person, and our software takes those answers and populates a form a legal document that you can then print inside with witnesses and your gotten so on average it takes users about twenty minutes to get a completely free estate plan set up. Already your called free will so this is a totally one hundred percent free will. That's right. It's only possible through the support of nonprofits, so we get one hundred percent of revenue from nonprofits that WanNa make it easy for people to not only set up their estate plans, but also potentially, but you're not required to leave money for charities. Okay because I know people spend a lot of money to lawyers to get will's made. That's right and we think it should be very different access to lies a huge problem in the United States today instead, so we see that you know underrepresented communities have half the rate of will writing than majority communities, and that ends up being a huge barrier to wealth transfer from generation to generation. Some people just never get around to it, aretha. Franklin died without a will. Acting, right and princess well. Wow crazy. So, how long has the been out? It's been out for about three years, and we're actually experiencing a huge spike in demand right now since Kovic started booth, because people are actually able to or think about mortality for the first time, and having really important conversations with their family about what their hopes and dreams are if they were to pass away. How long does it take to create a will on the APP? On average less than twenty minutes. Okay what what motivated to start the at. I the big motivation. Is that you know we talked to a lot of people about their charitable giving and realized a lot of people don't have the ability to gave large amounts of money while. They're saving for their mortgage. Their kids educations things like that, but when they pass away, they might own a home and be willing to share a kind of five or ten percent of that with charity, and it turns out. This kind of charitable giving is actually the largest type of giving. On average in a person's life, so we started free well with the promise of making Book Estate Planning on charitable, giving in not really easy, and we've now raised over one point five billion dollars in commitments attorneys. Host on the charities that have gotten money from you guys. United way of heart. Association's Saint Jude's. People donate to all sorts of causes whether it's the universities that they went to the hospital. They had their children ought. It's just astounding the generosity during this time of course I'm talking to you on video. Video Window here on skype and you look really really young so you in your twenty s. I actually just turned thirty last week, congratulations. You seem very young to be concerned. About will's. Yes, so. You know it's important to write a will even early in life, a lot of people don't realize that one of the biggest purposes of putting a will place is to set up a guardian for your children. To setup protection for your pets and caretakers. If you have those to pass on your digital assets, such as your facebook or instagram account, so this isn't just something that baby boomers who had a house. They want to give away. should be concerned about, but really all people including people. My Age should have advice Jenny. Spalding from free will go to free will dot com. Go to the APP store, I assume the the IRS Google APP stores to download the APP. Just when www dot, free dot com,

Jenny Chia Attorney United States Co-Founder Facebook Spalding Kovic Franklin Google Skype IRS Instagram
Netflix is Hollywood

Land of the Giants

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Netflix is Hollywood

"Where are we? We are in Los Angeles. We're about to turn onto sunset. Boulevard Hollywood maybe in Hollywood. Okay, so we're. We're approaching. Hollywood hills. Really Tall Palm Trees. So should we explain why we're? We're driving through sunset radio. There's a bunch of billboards here, right? That's what we're. Getting at. Less Ronnie our producers, etc piled, a newborn, took a drive down Hollywood's main drag. It's a traffic jam packed with billboards promoting new TV shows and movies. I've been covering the business of media for a long time, so I served as tour guide for this trip, but Ronnie is a data reporter who mainly writes about tech companies. She doesn't typically pay a lot of attention to what's going on in Hollywood. Here, we have a a the crown net flicks up on the right. Have you watched any of the crown yet? I have not. On the left we have marriage story billboard. This is a Scarlett Johansson. I don't think I want to watch that. You may not be the right person for streaming roddy in a row. We got the Irishman. That's Scorsese's film and then DOLEMITE is my name. Reading that right. Alfie, these are both movies. They're both movies. You can see on Netflix Sega. Any of these this is this is a worthwhile trip for learning. What's on Netflix? You could just actually go to your browser. Are these like already outer. These are like I don't know. Someone like hermetically sealed raising. A drive down, sunset isn't just a chance for Ronnie to see what's coming on. TV, it's a way to watch Hollywood talking to itself, these billboards are messages which are very much directed at Hollywood except now. netflix's doing most of the talking. Stranger things net flix. The politician. Net flicks, one billboard tuna flexible work three Netflix. Netflix well years ago when Netflix was first getting into its own programming. Executive there told me that because they were tech company. They didn't have to do things that traditional media companies do like renting billboards, so it could show big-name talented netflix serious about Hollywood. That guy turns out was wrong. Netflix has decided loves billboards so much that it went out and bought some for itself, and now the company owns many of the signs on the Strip. This, you still look like before streaming. That's one of the main ideas we keep running across as we're working on the series, it's almost impossible to imagine what the world like before Netflix. Even though that time was just a few years ago. If you didn't know any better, you'd think. Netflix's has always been a huge part of Hollywood. Syphilis can be fatal to your baby free. Check that out not flick show. UNCLEAR UNCLEAR? Welcome the land of the giants. The NETFLIX's effect. I'm Peter Coffee. Today. We're talking about how NETFLIX's. Would outsider that no one took seriously took over the town and change the lives of the people in it. Are the CO founder and CEO of Net flicks. I'm going to conduct this interview netflix style. I'M GONNA. Have like five questions you're GonNa love and five thousand. You've never heard. Today. It's given it. NETFLIX's remade. The media. World to companies becomes so omnipresent in our lives that CEO Reed. Hastings even counts as a sort of celebrity. He's a big enough deal for a guest spot Stephen Colbert. You're like one of the big one of those big new media disruptors. Why did the entertainment industry need to be disrupted? Just for the fun of it. On this happened really quickly. We talked to Kim Masters veteran show business journalist at the Hollywood reporter who said that a decade ago Netflix's was an afterthought for big media companies newcomers from Silicon Valley or anywhere else did not strike fear in the hearts of moguls. There's a thing that happens in Hollywood. Which is the outsiders come in, and they think boy. There's a lot of stupid rules in Hollywood and people sure do dumb stuff, but we're going to be much smarter than these idiots, and then they get kilt. It turns out that Netflix was the exception to the rule. It didn't get killed at one. And NETFLIX's did it with Hollywood's help. You can trace all this back to two thousand eight, which is when Netflix's really broken into streaming by getting his hands on a bunch of blockbuster movies for a bargain, Ben, price, it had made a deal with stars premium cable channel. Let netflix's stream always rate movies from Sony and Disney so stars had created the service called Vong which nobody listening to this podcast is GonNa Remember, but there was a service before Netflix's. That was streaming. Streaming movies called. Longo Van Gogh was losing seventy million dollars a year. Rich Greenfield is an analyst with light shed partners. He's been following digital media closely for years, and in walks, Reed Hastings in Ted Sandoz and says hey will take that streaming content. You could sub-licensed to us and we'll pay you. Tens of millions of dollars Netflix's use it as the base to build their streaming service, versus what was historically just a DVD service. And the rest is they say is history.

Netflix Hollywood Ronnie Reed Hastings Los Angeles Scarlett Johansson Reporter CEO Longo Van Gogh Stephen Colbert Peter Coffee Scorsese Roddy Alfie Rich Greenfield
"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

04:02 min | Last month

"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

"Something, on Rwanda at least I want to walk into a memory that you have of Rwanda because I have never been in Rwanda. And I think a lot of people here so many. Amazing stories of the business ecosystem in wonder. Maybe. If you could. As a closing closing closing I don't know what to call it closing experience four for people listening to you. How! How's your day to day in? Wonder? What is the most? The most amazing either place or thing about wonder that you can share. That has also made your your life as a CO founder. Much more easier or much more enjoyable because you are stationed in in Rwanda maybe something that you can share with us on on what's wonder is like.

Rwanda CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

06:16 min | Last month

"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"A holiday that marks the end of slavery in America which is why it's been referred to as the true independence. Day I hope all of you were able to honor the day in your own way and reflect on what it represents. I'm so glad you're tuning in because today's episode is incredibly special I know I say that every week, but this week really is. It's with Powell of alleged a pastry chef based in Washington DC and the CO founder of Baker's against racism. The initiative started as simple call to unite bakers in the fight against the unjust treatment of black people in the United States, Paula and her co founders were hoping eighty or so people would join in their bake sale and stead. They sparked a global movement bakers against racism, his ignited solidarity on five continents and seventeen countries, and in forty one states until corona virus devastated the restaurant Industry Paulo was the pastry chef at the critically acclaimed afro-caribbean restaurant, kith and kin, she has creative, charismatic, honest and force to be reckoned with the industry is lucky to have Paula in it, I'm honored to bring you this conversation. So Palo. We're GONNA start at the beginning. I'm telling me where you spent your childhood. So I grew up in the Bronx. In New, York City and every summer for three four months depending on. How my mom felt I would go to the Dominican Republic and lived there. She thought it was really important to make sure that I. Slit my difference Salah I knew my heritage, but also you know experienced the American way of life. And did you stay with family members in the Dominican Republic? Yeah, before everything happened like with my grandmother. Passing away my grandfather fascinating way, we would just stay our family home in the what we call is uncomfortable, and it just means the well. It means camp literally translated, but it just means like the countryside that's where I kind of like learned how to appreciate food, and how to grow my own veg and herbs and appreciate like fresh fruits. You see a lot of that in my desserts. Now I'm so sorry lost your grandparents winter. They pass away. I was young. I was fairly young. You know maybe ten all the so hard. Yeah, it was it was difficult. You know, but my grandmother really with the time that we did have she. impacted my life. Changed. Everything that I thought about you know where before I might have not appreciated food, because when you think about American culture, you think about fast. She kinda like helped me like slow down at a very young age, and really look and see in what the earth against us, and how the world nourishes us from a very very young age I understood the complexities of food, and how we hold our heritage through it. Can you tell us some of the things that she both cooked and grew, she would cook a big meal which consists of rice beans, chickens that we would grow not grow. Her is very traumatic first because they were my pets and then I realized very quickly. The food system was like Oh. You know she would make this huge meal and she would invite everybody in the neighborhood. Everyone that was able to come. If you it didn't matter if you're rich poor, it didn't matter if you're young or old, and we all kind of sit in the front yard in the backyard and eat from my grandmother's food and she had that meal in Cup of Coffee Ready. Ready in the middle of the day for everybody always matter what was going on and our lives. She had that ready, and that's something that we as a family now when we go to the Dominican Republic, we continue as a tradition, so everybody knows our family to be hosts, so it's very fitting that now I work in the hospitality industry. Did Your Grandmother Specialty. Yes, so she would make coconut rice with peace so much Guan Lula cocoa and it was cooked in the woodfire. We had like a house that was open open air that they had bricks that you put your woodfire in, and that's how she would cook. Everything was cooked, by Soviet, Elena, which means over fire while all of my experience in the Dominican Republic I didn't know what stove was in the Dominican Republic. My my brain never made that connection that you could have. A gas stove. 'cause we always use what fire so. How about some of the things that that she would grow you mentioned fruits. You mentioned herbs. What were some of the things in her garden? Her. Garden consisted of this plot of land in front of our house, and behind our house, and we call it in cal-, and cal means the Cacao trees, and it was just rows and rows and rows, and rows of of wild ca cal that would naturally in our backyard laced in between were mango trees, tamarind avocado plantations right next to our house in our well of rain water was guava and passion fruit, which I always like to say whatever fruits like. Like to grow together will always taste good together. We had herbs in the back in the shaded area. Where is anything that you can think of shot? They CILANTRO or no Kulan. Throw and more we had for me. We had lemongrass growing by the side of the House and I would drink that tea, and it would be a natural mosquito repellent so pretty nice, you know. Oh, my Gosh! I'm starting to get the impression that it's no surprise. You became a chef. I I think so? I mean it was a good fit i. feel like I was the only one in my family. That kind of took that same sentiment of food, and being connected with nature like that like my grandmother did and turned it into a way to give back to the community, so I've always been using food. As a way to connect with other people because I'm very shy I don't make like a great first impression is very awkward at first I'm like. Oh, I'm sorry you had to go through that with me. You know, but with food I can show you who I am without.

Dominican Republic Paula CO founder Palo United States Industry Paulo America Washington Powell Salah Guan Lula Baker York City Elena
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

07:46 min | 2 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Take your personal experience in in arbitrage of personal experience. Okay go ahead Eric. If you wrote this today besides the every quicker would it be meaningfully? Different not really. I think I think some of the things have been sped up. Because you know you you. Can Incorporate online stripe is there? No Code is there. I'd probably advised not and and online services much more right because you can get pretty far that I might also say that you know and this is the third model. At which is you might serve the community. So there's idea there's executioners community right so you know nowadays on I've got a following on my twitter removes or what have you and the interaction of them is sort of like you know person community Fit Right. And then that community you can withdraw. A protocol can withdraw a product and so forth. And that's something. I was just less thinking about back in twenty thirteen today but that might be third angle on things you know to take a community. I approach and how about the Kobe requests for startups or anti replacement startups. This shea. Talking about I. What is this graph? This is the Telegraph of thousand days in the life of Thanksgiving Turkey. Life improves improves improves. And then a ridiculous sudden reversal. Okay and we're seeing Thanksgiving Day charts across the economy and where the rubber is orange. Okay and look at that ridiculous Thanksgiving giving day drop and breach by the way has risen dramatically right so uber is now essentially just breeds their second. Business has become their first. That's literally their business. Okay now the thing about this is a reversal business. Plan for you know like fortunately for over it. At least the corporation they can. Disengage drivers when demand plummets. Like those but But that's like a you know ridiculous. Drop right like seventy percent drop revenue. However here's the thing. Notice how we dropped but not breeds one of things. I was short on Uber. Benatti reads is pretty good. It's pretty specific prediction in terms of what to be long insured on. And frankly you know. I never talk about trades online because that's investing Advice River Bellizzi. That if you had reallocated full you listen to me around the time you would have done pretty well right so like for example. X Rays drones antivirals. Cat Scans Autonomy Diagnostics. Facemasks remote were Tele presence bioinformatics at that holds up. One of those were in drones. Me Put an asterisk on simply because there's such supply chain disruption demand me there have been not not the supply we'll have to see. You can make VR headsets in the US but everything else is clearly going especially like Mike. Remote workshops zoom and stuff and then on the short side of things. I think that holds up pretty well as well traveled tender grinder hotels AIRBNB airlines in person. You know blue cities come back it up. Real estate is crashing commercial real estate and blue cities restaurants conferences digital nomads. In the sense of moving around the world. You can't do that anymore. Remember Berates so I think that holds a pretty darn well right and I think that's like let's call it a part of the comp investing thesis if you remember this concept of the digital divide this is the thing in the late Ninety S O. Some people have access to Internet others. Don't right so April seventh. This concept which I think is one mental model. The fiscal divide bright digital is now cheap with billions of smartphones around the world. It's a physical. That's expensive case for last two years. We've made the cost of putting a bunch of transistors on a chip that that's now cheap but putting a bunch of people in rooms now expensive okay so the measure of a competent society is one that can actually hold a rally if you can do that you are. You're confident in the people. There are confident of the steam and the diagnostics. And so on that you know you can have this huge crowd that it's being tested to them into their life and they all come and congregate there right. I from incompetence state and for citizenry. That is not cooperatives. The Commons are attracting. And you can't basically there's a field state in between your house in the next person's House. You have to wear masks you you know you basically house a like like a place where you can't show your face you know. Maybe it's pollution meets infection. It's not the comments aren't actually traversable. So I think this is a powerful mental model for the next several years at least that physical is expensive and one thing that means by the way is digital now cheap physicals now expensive so everybody is GonNa want offer substitute for things because you know Sadler tweet. By the way that I was really surprised. People wild doubt about the I one more question for you which is a CO founders. Are we sort of in the picking co-founder similar to sort of dating before that you're limited to the people that you went to college with or worked with or is that for Co founder? Is that actually good? She's should you stick to that pool. How do you think what's your framework for picking the Right Co founder? Yeah know so so like the way I kind of think about this is having and being like an investor and having seen like lots of these things and whatnot so you should pick somebody who who's is complementary to you okay and there should always be clear. Ceo that's like the most important component the thing about that is like the question of WHO's the CEO. That's like one of the very first conversations you need to have and ideally. It's something where that's obvious between between you but if it's not a for example at the beginning of joint base itself public knowledge but you know Brian and the Guy who helped found blocking didn't so they had a screaming. Send you know what they were outright and basically blocks company and Mrs Good Company. That type of stuff shouldn't be resolved. There's also an ideological dispute watching to be able to have a wallet where they couldn't have the password password reset four the road actually very substantive. It's two different visions of the future. Both of which trinite illegitimate visions of Crypto? Right true product. Difference on on simple thing pastor reset so so that's that's like a good example of a few things. I who's the leader Second Woods A LONG-TERM IDEOLOGICAL VISION THIRD OUR SKILLS COMPLIMENTARY? I do not do these. Co-founder dating sites or whatever. Kids these days you know like I don't know I don't know if that works. I feel some could work but it feels inorganic. Maybe you know I think the best thing to do is to actually work on a project with that person and find that there's an actual division of labor nothing substitutes for that because working with somebody is just very very different from talking to them on. It's like they have to cash the past when you throw it into it. What you meant not necessarily what you said. Lots and lots of little things like that have to tolerate your using 'cause nobody's ever heard strong and every dimension or some people are few and so I think actually doing and shipping project. Ideally one involves money and customer support with them like is is probably the best bet naked or something like that but try to push it all the way through such that book that you have legal liability together or or customers yelling you. That's real trial by fire. Balji thank you so much for coming on give a digital rotten for her volatility. If you're an early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you check us out. Village Global Davi seat..

Co founder Ceo twitter Eric Advice River Bellizzi US Kobe AIRBNB Benatti Mrs Good Company co-founder Sadler Co-founder
"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

The John Roa Show

02:45 min | 3 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

"This is one of the first major cancellations in America in a major shock to both attendees and the city of Austin, Texas. Canceling south by is more than just calling off a massive event or party. The festival was intertwined with the financial and personal livelihoods of ton of people global. South by two people got record deals where movies were picked up for distribution. Tons of money was raised for startups. Ideas were shared. It's even where twitter. South southbound was also a boon for hundreds and hundreds of Austin based businesses to sustain throughout the year to the tune of almost four hundred million dollars in revenue for the city. Canceling, the event is and will be devastating. To Austin The impacts everyone. The bars, restaurants hotels taxis the performers, free and everyone else in between. The CO founders of south by southwest music producer Roland Swenson writers makeup borrow and Lewis Black. Promoter Louis J Myers started the festival way back in nineteen, eighty, seven to promote and foster local talent. Now, the fate of south life hangs in the balance as does. The festival had to lay off a third of its staff after the cancellation. And fans rightfully called for refunds. South by didn't even have an insurance policy to cover the fallout. And then things went from bad to worse. More than one hundred and sixty thousand would be. Attendees aren't going to get a refund. Instead, it was announced that the badge purchasers for this season. Can. Defer their purchase to. The festival next you. Founder Louis Black, although he's not involved to day-to-day operation to the festival any longer. Says the news of the cancellation still devastated. He's weathered a Lotta stores. Pandemic something entirely different in south by not even the only project he's co-founded. That's taken a hit. Lewis is also the CO founder of the All weekly Austin Chronicle which has taken its fair share financial punches, but is still hanging in there. Somehow. Louis always manages to get back in the game. In two thousand fifteen, even start his own production company Lewis Black productions. Joins me on today's episode from an Airbnb in the small town of Lockhart Texas. To talk about south buys cancelation his retirement in the profound and often unpredictable ways. He helped to transform.

Austin Louis Black Promoter Louis J Myers America CO founder Lewis Black Austin Chronicle Texas twitter Lewis Roland Swenson Lockhart Texas Airbnb Founder producer
"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"To build a mailing envelope. No we're going to buy a gift greeting card and blow. Oh let's go find DVD. Oh I see these close enough And that is. The skill is finding a proxy. Which allows you to begin learning about the world and your ideas your ideas place in it. It does not need to be repeatable or scalable at first at this an organ specific example. If I have time you're really briefly. Yeah so women. Women came to me At at an idea she goes he cool if we could do peer to peer clothing. Rental were basically. I know I have always clothing in my closet and I think I would want to rent that and I could rent. There's and she goes I'm Anita Mesa money and how do I find a co-founder? How do I build my initial APP? And I go. Whoa WHOA. Whoa whoa let's begin seeing some. Let's collide this idea with reality. Go get a piece of paper get a sharpy right on the piece of paper. WanNa borrow my clothes. Knock and pasted on your door right and let's see what happens. Let's see first of all anyone knocks if they do. Let's see what happens when they're looking for your clothes. Is there a fit problem? Is there a taste problem? Let's see if they do bar. You're close. Let's see how you feel when they come back stained or dirty or what you have to do to get them repaired or how you feel about this. Let's begin learning by doing nothing more than writing on a piece of paper with a Sharpie. You can't run a business like this but that's not what you're doing now you're trying to understand. Is this idea real? And she did that and little by little by little. She accumulated evidence about this problem and ways to solve it and so yes six months later when she was going to raise money and someone said how do I know this ideas. A good one. She could talk your ear off about the evidence. She had what people would pay. How long the rentals were how much you'd have to do for cleaning. What percentage And Wow that's the person you WanNa follow you back in invest in. Yeah it sounds like Renaissance Wag. Actually sounds bad. Exact business model but Is that she ever yes. It's a smaller business. Because she's still in school but she is moving ahead and she's moving ahead based on finding a way to. I caught validation hacking away to validate or idea without actually a doing it. For Real Right. I only have like a single story. That is almost a little different. But a friend of OUR EX GIRLFRIEND OF MINE. Her Dad wanted to start a business where he sold a MO mobility scooters and all he did was get business cards printed. He had no had no shop. He had no product. He had nothing he had a little bit. You know he knew you. He used to sell them in the past for a bigger company. Just got business. Cards and went door to door does not under the door until he had enough business where he could take fifty percent deposit and go actually by the scooter. And then he would do all the The the repairs themselves until we hire somebody. It's just everything was just started with a business card. I love that story because it is another entrepreneur. I know he he had an idea. Use at a party is eleven o'clock at night raining and they ran out of beer and all began arguing about who is turn. It has gotten find the beer. The usual Millennial problem Yeah the idea is cutting while ago because basically my phone knows where I am at knows. My taste has my credit card database. Open liquor stores great idea but same thing as your friend rather than saying. I'm going to raise money. I'm GONNA find a technical co founder going to build an APP going to test this. He just had business cards printed up. That said need beer. Call me with a cell phone number eight stand outside apartments on weekends and.

Anita Mesa co-founder co founder
"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

Building A Unicorn

02:42 min | 3 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

"Your clients. Montana is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer of Quinoa an online platform that allows you to easily create the business documents you need and then send them to your client as individual websites including dynamic pricing information and the ability to sign and accept that proposal. Right there on the web. The core idea behind cua is that Files suck at the way that the documents work in this. This world is sort of based on this like nineteen eighties way of thinking about the documents atmosphere being largely kept in place by the glorious Microsoft Monopoly And so all queries is a way for anyone to create. They had documents especially sort of customer facing documents as Web Pages. And so if you can re imagine a document on the ground As you know what you can do in the web and not have to be in this four rectangle hyper. What can you do you know? Why can't you have analytics? Like buttons? Do things why can't you haven't lived in this world of of SAS in the cloud where it can push and pull data from different systems rather than just being a dominant ugly file. Mock grew up in Sydney and throughout his childhood was surrounded by entrepreneurs. His Dad ran his own architectural business which he grew to around sixty or seventy staff and his uncle also had a number of startups. Mock went to school at Sydney Grandma and low. He was a good student. He couldn't see himself for showing the same kinds of career opportunities that his friends were interested in he wanted to carve his own path. Although he wasn't quite sure what that path would actually be. There was no like plan. There was no like I said. Look back on it like some people have these amazing narrative ox of their their life and their career. And I'm deeply skeptical because I think that really life happens and you. I think people who are very good at adjusting knowing Knowing where on paternity lies and able to dive into it. Sort of an opportunistic in that side. I think I think that sort of rings true to me and certainly I remember being at the end of highschool being like I feel have plan and I kind of really didn't have at university mock studied subjects. He was interested in. He did history and philosophy and also became interested in student politics but he thought maybe he wanted to issue. I curry in business. But it wasn't quite sure what that actually meant so when he's caused finished any trying to work out what to do. He ended up getting some work with his uncle on an e book. Stop cold read how you want. But.

Mock Sydney Chief Operating Officer of Qui Montana Microsoft cua CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

02:12 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"Say was interesting. That's when we found the wizard the is Diana Ruth. He was a coo co-founder but she creates all the products. She has an amazing background hard. Candy Bliss. Cosmetics was William Fung for a long time but she is just a creative genius and she will never ever create anything that already exists. She's all about innovation stories. Great Components Ray so we we joined forces with her by then. I remember her first meeting with us. We're all around the table going because we had a lot of. I did get a lot of passion like Rosie. Jody and I kind of just sat there staring at the three. I was going. Oh my God. This is going to be so interesting. She managed to take all this. This energy these ideas these thoughts and make them into tangible products I really think the interesting part of the packaging that sort of push pop idea with clear sight milk. It's very it's a very modern fawn. Yeah exactly it's very transparent as we are as a brand and everything about it. I always lean into the idea. That's for utilitarian so we have sticks. We have dispenses with rolling balls. We have click pens. Everything is extremely easy to use on the go as well because we originally always had the milk goals get ready quick We have so many things going on. They creative ambitious very fast. Paced lives the girl and the guy and we wanted to create something align that they could use very quickly in the back of a cab changed their look five minutes down town and something that you know worked really hard but was kind of Felicita on kind of rewrite. All those. The things that were contradiction terms. We wanted to rewrite. Why can't you get ready? Quick but still have really great payoff. Why can't you have cool products? That are actually still clean. They can still be extremely low maintenance but yeah a high tech.

Candy Bliss Diana Ruth co-founder William Fung Jody coo Cosmetics
"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

13:29 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Of girl boss. And you're listening to girl boss radio. Everybody's you know game is on point these days and I know I'm not the only person who loves to see crazy now are on instagram. Whichever way you spin it. The nail game is a pretty big industry but if we go back a few decades time well no Polish used to just be nail Polish. It was bland. There was a thing you grabbed at the drugstore on a whim. Or maybe you got a fresh manicure. You weren't really paying for the brand on the bottle that all changed with a little company called. Opie I yes that OPIE I. It's the go-to Nail Polish for a lot of us in on today's show we're going to hear from the CO founder and Brandon Basseterre for opie. I her name is suzy. Weiss Fishman and. She's known as the First Lady of meals. She actually co-founded Opie I with her brother-in-law and it started out as a dental products..

Weiss Fishman Brandon Basseterre CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:58 min | 7 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"This CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD. AMERITRADE investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD Ameritrade our trade offers two different mobile APPs there's TD AMERITRADE mobile. Which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined? Simplicity or thinker. Swim Mobile. which gives you tools as you need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one? That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE AMERITRADE dot com slash APPs member SIPC bring in show musically. This is squawk Fahd the daily sleep podcast brought to you by the team behind squawk box. CNBC's essential morning chef worked every day. Get the best stories debate and analysis analysis from the biggest names in business and politics today on Squawk Todd. Joe Becky. Andrew are at the World Economic Forum with the planet's the most influential leaders in business and politics. We've got a huge lineup. This week. This is Are Super Bowl for the world of politics and business a roundup of the best sound bound from CNBC's interviews with the CEO's of Verizon Bank of America and steady plus the leaders of some of the best known and largest asset managers and hedge hedge funds in the world and an interview with author investor and Philanthropist David Rubenstein Co founder of one of the world's premier private equity woody firms. The Carlyle Group right. Now I don't see any prospect of a recession in two thousand twenty so pretty good the best of the World Economic Forum Day One plus some behind the sounds from Joe and Becky. We're double Switzerland. The Beautiful Alps beautiful behind us to bed. You guys can see it. I'M CNBC ABC producer. Cameron Kosta it's Tuesday. January twenty first twenty twenty squawk pod begins right now three one. Good morning everybody. Welcome to walk on. CNBC we are live from the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. I'm becky quick along with Joe. Kernan and Andrew Ross Sorkin the World Economic Forum is exactly that an Economic Forum Michael Corbett the CEO of city spoke to Joe Backing Andrew about the trajectory of the global economy. When you look at the growth prognostications coming up while we're here three point three percent global growth down from three point four four prediction but up from two point nine for the year right? So that's that's not horrible if you get some of these clouds to clear. I think they're still runway left here of course at a conference this size with this caliber of attendees there's a diversity of perspective and of advice. Ray dallaglio billionaire founder of bridgewater ladder at the world's largest hedge fund shared some of his firm's investment strategy issue is. You can't jump into cash. Cash is trash. Okay you have to have a well diversified portfolio and first of all you have to be global and you have to have ballots. Think that you have to have a certain amount of gold in your portfolio portfolio or you have to have something tarred another theme today and probably all week trade between the two biggest economies in the world the US and China Steve Schwarzman founder and CEO of Blackstone Group has a long history of business investments in China and was in the room for the phase one signing literally. He's he's competent. That fees to as at least a priority for both parties involved. It's in China's interest as well as the US interest to do a face to deal. Most of the tariffs were not rolled back in this phase. One so there's a lot of incentive if you will to get to face to and They're they're quite serious about that in China all your on Squawk box and certainly as long as we've been delivering use pod guests have been debating capitalism And that theme is no different at Davos. Twenty twenty on the broadcast this morning. Billionaire Hedge Fund manager Paul Tudor Jones. A legendary investor kept corporate responsibility. What's ability at the center of his conversation? We know what's happening right now. As causing millennials not to believe in the system. We know that there's a threat to free markets. I'd much rather see us. change the sharing agreements organically bottoms up where. CEO's put employees. I put with the planet in communities and customers on par with shareholders also calling for corporate. Responsibility was Brian Moynihan CEO Bank of America. He's he's also the chairman of the International Business Council an advisory body to the World Economic Forum itself but of all the companies apartment job is commit the carbon neutrality. That will help drive. I the demand for alternative energies at the power companies need to get them carbon neutral and the final theme today new tech the CEO of Verizon Hans. Berg says five G. is way closer on the horizon than some other things. What comes first? I get a five d phone where I fly on a seven thirty seven. Max We there without five G. You're getting the best of our Davos coverage right here on squawk pot coming up will be investor. Author journalist Philanthropist and Co founder of the Carlyle Group. David Rubenstein if I knew how to solve income inequality I'd be in Iowa. I do think she companies that worry about more than just shareholder return of probably the companies that are going to get more people buying their stocks in the end. And they're probably going to do better. Plus Katie. Kramer is onset in the Swiss Alps with the anchors. Ready by Beck apply Rubinstein's interview and in some behind the scenes of Davos.

CNBC CEO Joe Becky Davos Joe Backing Andrew Carlyle Group David Rubenstein Co China founder Joe founder and CEO Davos Switzerland US Switzerland Beautiful Alps Co founder Hedge Fund Swiss Alps Cameron Kosta
"co founder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:30 min | 9 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Kibble dot com like the dog food no similarity similarity there And of course we got to that point it was tough and in fact we had this list of ten finalists and they were weird. Names was like take two was replay. One was cinema center and then there was Netflix and quite frankly a lot a lot of people didn't like it because back in the late nineties The euphemism for a pornographic film was a skin flick so oh skin flicks. And then of course there was that big x at the end of net flicks. But you know desperation does strange things. And so that ended up being the best of a lot of choices and so even though it sounded a little corny net flicks. It was here mark step by for just a second because I want to just let it a caller here. Susanna is calling from Cape Elizabeth Maine. Susannah you're on ear. Hi there I just was calling comment that In nineteen ninety eight my. I'm sorry ninety. Nine my husband and the group from the bay area New Mexico onto the Navajo Indian reservation and where we live which was right in the reservation. There was a little eighteen video store but this election was dismal. It was basically really ancient movie either B. Movies and my husband had heard about that flicks and I feel like we're one of your first subscribers and I just wanted to say that it was a life changing for us for the three years. You're on the reservation. We'll thank you Susannah and thanks for your some small way helping. Put My kids through school so we both got something out of this relationship Susannah. Thank you for your call. Okay so back. Act To this big the big idea you had about putting people on subscription like Like Susanna they're a pretty quickly got a couple of hundred thousand subscribers But the company was I mean I mark. Forgive me like I'm just going to have to pull you away. From your standpoint of ruthless optimism and down into reality because net flicks clicks was still losing money even as you brought in a lot of subscribers and so talk to me about those Those months in years before the company went a public it was not smooth sailing. No we were as I describe it drowning in our own success and you heard in the commercial you played how she had a articulate. What was this crazy thing? No due dates no late fees subscription and. It was so complicated that the way way to get around that was to give our subscribers their first month free. But when you do that you take all the cost up front and then make it back a little a bit over many months which means when you have runaway success you have runaway expense and so customers were flooding in and on one hand that was going. This is awesome the other hand I was wringing my hands going. Oh my God. We're going to go broke and just to add insult to injury. This came to a head good in the fall of the year. Two thousand which was the very moment that the final bits of air were streaming out of that dot com balloon so so there was no money to be had and we were losing money hand over fist..

"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

13:12 min | 11 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Don't get caught up in this perfect thing the test everything try something and fail at it because the failure is learning moment ladies and gentlemen welcome back to short story long first and foremost it is live event time. I'm doing doing the next young reckless live event on October twelfth. Picture live all day live short story long podcast with all my favorite people that have ever been on the show and some who haven't doing keynotes. QNA's panels all of the above. If you want to come just go to events dot young and reckless dot com. Get your tickets also. I'll put the link in the description of the episode. come check us out. I think you'll really really like like I think we did one back in May it was incredible. five hundred people showed up it was sold out and everyone left really positive and there was a really cool energy not in the room of just people there to learn and share ideas and I was really proud of it so this is round two and I couldn't be more excited. Today's guest is Marc. Mark Randolph Mark Grand off is the CO founder and was the CEO of Net flicks and as you can imagine you has a lot of good stories we ran through how Netflix how he even got to the position of when he started Netflix and how Netflix was created and where he was with Reed Hastings the other CO founder when they came up with the idea and decided to go for it that as well as all the challenges of running a company of that size size and trying to scale it and trying to just completely disrupt the entire industry. You guys are GonNa. Absolutely love this episode. Mark has a new book coming out called that will never work with a lot of really good stuff in a lot of good information and a lot of the stories more on the stories that we talk about here on the podcast if you like it if you like any of these episodes share it tell your friends posted on instagram hit me up on Instagram at drama. Let me know you think semi. Dm Tag me in your stories. Literally anything works. I'm reposting and communicating with you guys all day long. Keep that coming. I can't thank you enough. That's it. Let's get into the episode Short Story Long. It could take your whole life develop clarity second patients patients probably whatever you think you don't have you have something else in his the short story mark welcome to the pod. Oh It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so excited. I'm excited because because you know I have a lot of entrepreneurs founders CEOS on this show and some from a lot of well known companies but I think the moment I I kind of saw your stuff and started reading your stuff and saw that you were a co founder and CEO for a little bit of net flicks. It was obviously Lisa like well. This is another level and it may not feel that way to you van to me it does and the way the reason I liked that is because I really like I really live in the world of kind of these. We started up a Lotta apparel businesses and online marketing and stuff like that but I just feel like the things I can learn from someone who has kicked off something on that level. are probably endless and I'm really excited to try to get as much out of you. That can hear well. I mean that's kind of what I mean. The book in many ways is about that untold story Ori because everyone thinks it started out as one hundred and fifty million subscriber screaming giant but for years we were just a DVD by mail company for years. We could could make it work. Yeah I mean I was telling you earlier. I came into the into the building here and like all of a sudden. I got that vibe like Oh my God. This is start feels like a startup and for many years that's what Netflix felt like and that's the part you love. You love that started up energy yeah you know. I sometimes say that. If you're really lucky you kind of figure out two things about yourself like what you're good at and what you like and if you're really lucky you actually get to do you both those things yeah and I kind of figured out. It's early stage companies and it's not just that I like it. I suck at the companies. Get Big. It's I don't know how people do that. How do you manage like thousand people. Just I totally different game. I'm so happy to hear you say that because like I was telling you before before we started recording. I have always just sort of instinctually avoided letting my business get to corporate. I love that startup feeling and even recently the past few years. I've really tried to make sure that you know I'm covering the right basis. Still the right infrastructure is in place and the right you know talent is where it needs to be but I just. I don't know there's something about it the. I've never felt like I wanted to to try to get it to that place. I've I walked into a lot of these massive clothing companies and it just doesn't look fun anymore so to hear you say that makes me feel really feels like I was right. You were so uh-huh on target in fact I'll give you the advice is don't ever start making things more efficient. That is what kills companies real. Temptations -tations are going to be there. I mean you're going to go. Wow you've had this nice stability. We're growing ninety. percent of my orders are coming in a certain way and you're going to start hiring people who are real experts at efficiency agency because we can help. You cut a few points of margin. We can help you ship a little fee. They're really good at that efficiency stuff but the people who are really good at efficiency Z are clueless when all of a sudden your world changes and your world's going to change everyone's world changes yeah and so what you WanNa do is build this culture in this environment fool of people who are really adaptable who are Jacksonville trades who are comfortable with making decisions based on incomplete incomplete information because then when your world's suddenly shifts those are the people who can then okay and they shift in on it again. Yeah that's funny. Would you say that the main reason we all know the story three of these big corporate companies that can't pivot or make a move. Would you say that's because they're built around efficiency of of what used to work unquestionably and if it's a combination of things six that's what gets him into trouble. Is They go wow this is nice for years and years were doing the same sort of thing growing nice and steadily we have this nice to stage age distribution resell to wholesalers celery and so they hire these sales people who are really good at that and the warehouse there are people who are really good at that and then all of a sudden someone comes along who says screw this multi-stage stuff. I'M GONNA sell straight to consumers so and they can't do it. That's part one is that they can't do it but the the worst part is. They're scared to do it yeah because they go. I can't sell direct because my distributors Poke Hilmi and right. Now distributors are ninety five percent of my business business. So you get stuck me it is. I do a lot of I told you before I did a lot. I do some you know speech a speech sometimes and usually by half half the clients. I'd say or big companies who are scared shitless what's happening and the executive see they see it coming and they're trying to rally the people. You've got to be flexible. We've got to be innovative and so I go in and try and rally the troops whatever you can do in an hour so there's that piece and then the rest of my time I am. I'm working with the early startups helping them take down these big companies so it's this form of job security yeah. That's true either way it goes. That's good good stuff with what's interesting. Though is the best way to learn is to be on both sides. I'm sure yeah I'm sure that's amazing because to me now and you had a history and clothing. We'll talk about that but I I see what's happening with you know macy's and Barney's and all of these retailers that were just staples like you never I thought they would ever go anywhere and people are closed indoors and go and bankrupt and do and it's just like at this point this late in the game because you know we've been talking about retail apocalypse for five for six years. I just sit there and I watch and I'm like how are you not doing anything. How are you not like you know what I mean like. How is your literally. Your ship is sinking and you're not ah you know but that makes perfect sense so deeply set up to act one way that it's so hard to pivot. Here's a classic one so take supermarkets okay I so free really frustrating business for a consumer long lines and all that crap and supermarkets have seen what's going on ECOMMERCE and they're going out. That's that is not a threat. No no way no one can replace selling fresh vegetables and having milk and doing what we do and they just and then someone looked at it and said this is crazy having this checkout. Why can't you just go take stuff off the shelves and walk out and was the innovator who came up with that. Safeway or a Kroger knows was Amazon. I mean the fact that they left that open open for twenty years on them. You know so let me ask you to like I mean I just got right into advice part but if you are one of those guys or you you are even a medium or small sized guy that just has your you know your thing figured out and you have a really good thing going. What do you do like do you have. Do you have a department in the back office. That's constantly only trying to figure out how to disrupt your own business or what. Do you do to avoid that happening so I mean I understand. You know large. Your audience is probably not these big companies but all dispense the big company advice right now. Lease problem is you can't do it. Internally people go I want set up skunkworks and all set up a few people in an office Jason and that might work temporarily but as soon as they try and bring that out into the open the immune system is triggered and the white blood cells come swarming and then every department department in this big company kills the start up the only way to do it is to have it happen separately and so the way you really should do it and this is my opinion is as you basically set up a seed fund big company you invest in las a small startups not so that you can own them in certainly not so you can make money but you have a seat at the table big ten to see what they're working on. You get to understand the future. Eventually you can participate and perhaps them. It's really really really really hard because here's what happens in my world I have you know essentially small business and game example of something that happened. We came up using athletes artists and all that stuff to promote our business all of a sudden this thing started happening that we're social media influencers and so we're like okay well. Let's send him a bunch of clothes and we'll I don't know let's just having where a close on Youtube and so we did that but one thing that happened I will admit out from under me that that I didn't spot was it became so easy to make t shirts and so easy to start a shop store and so easy to start a website that now you have I mean there are some youtubers I doing ten million dollars plus a year in Merch and all of that is my business going somewhere else and that's something I could have spotted and I could have had ten indifferent merch lines or these things or whatever and and I didn't spot it and that's a big one where it where it happened for me. You know what I mean but at least you're watching it and seeing it. You're not gonNA catch everything but you're but that was a pretty fast despise us and I can predict what's going to happen. Next of course is right now. The U you too and INSTA- and face we're going to go. Why is this schmuck making ten million bucks a year emerge on our platform and it's GonNa be taken away from them. What do they do about that though they stopped distributing things like how many likes you have. They stopped letting people know what your followership is. I mean they have it. It's a dance because you don't WanNa driveway the people who are building building your platform but absolutely instagram for example and that's what I'm speaking totally off the cuff here. I don't work in-store Server. you know of this is just not stable environment for a company to keep on saying. This is a great deal. We're we're letting leading the influence your make all the money so then it goes back to obviously they want people to spend money to advertise not get it for free so it'll go back to the companies that are advertising on the platform. We'll we'll get the absolutely right so you know you can wear the shorts on the on the on the youtube if you want but the person who's GonNa make the money is instagram advertising whatever they want on the platform good stuff or so. It looks anyway. It's not so much exactly work because quite frankly as I say in the book. Nobody knows anything and electric. He's going back to the very first thing we said is..

Netflix instagram Mark Randolph Youtube CEO CO founder QNA Marc WanNa Reed Hastings Ori macy Lisa Jacksonville Safeway Poke Hilmi INSTA co founder Amazon executive
"co founder" Discussed on OFF RCRD

OFF RCRD

11:28 min | 11 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on OFF RCRD

"Anyone anyone to find that talented student in your dorm you want to build something with you can just do that and so. I think looking where you don't need permission and building their first is going to make you far more attractive two mentors in the future great advice. I'd love to talk about the open door story and how you got connected to co-founders. How did you meet. How'd you get connected two or three or four CO founders? He has three other founders so I was rabbe. WHO's now a general partner at Khosla ventures former CEO of square one of the pay tall mafia keith and I met at a square party at Red Door Coffee Celebrating squares? I were at a million dollars in sales in the platform and if you look at what they're doing today it's almost it's pretty funny to think how small they were then maybe thirty forty people and we got into an argument during this party. I newly was from twitter at the time and we third arguing about fraud loss rates and I was just convinced that they were GonNa make the same mistakes. They made a pay pal where the cared too much about fraud in solving the problem at the expense of customer experience. I don't remember the exact position each of us had but at the end of it he tried to hire me to run the risk team which I thought was funny because I knew almost nothing about risks and certainly nothing about Credit Arctic cards. I just had a passion for the customer experience around it because I decided I was totally unqualified. I said no we ended up becoming good friends and arguing about startups for a few more years and a lot of that time was spent talking about real estate why real estate was broken and what could be done about it and through that he had this idea for a long time called home run where you would go to the site you enter your address and you'd say what you're willing to sell your own four and decided to say yes or no and I I didn't think that was a great idea but I thought had the nugget of a really good idea. Took Keith is telling people about this time eventually connected me and Eric are CEO he had started a company that sold Trulia. He had run a fifty to one hundred home portfolio okay since he was eighteen years old founder market sit with sort of off the charts so we really clicked. I respected how he thought about customers really respected how about customer development and the reason reasoning mentioned. Keep trying to hire me for this risk. Job Is Fourth Co founder Ian Wong who ends up taking that job is leading risk at square and we pulled him out of a out of another small start up to start this company together other so I'd like to ask. How did you buy your first home. How did you know there's demand for this product. was there anything that you did early on to kind of assess the demand for open door yeah. You know it's really funny. I don't think we've told the story publicly before. Selling a home is a really important in emotional moment. If you've never done it before we really did not want to mess it up before before we really launched or even raise any money and did anything we'd be created. This fake brand called simpler sell dot com mostly to figure out we actually do this. Could we offer fair market value on someone's home and would it be a great France for them. We we didn't want to cause any kind of trouble. We didn't WanNa make any mistakes. It worked. It worked really well. Our first customer Josh Brewer out in Phoenix took the plunge with us. You know went to a facebook ad clicked on it entered his home address than sold his Holmdale Sembler Sal I think probably ten people in the company at the time and we've all had this bottle of wine. We mixed blended together called a simpler cellar which I'm aging in my basement right. Now it's great and what do you wish you'd started doing more of much earlier. In your life like typically action with compelling tax I I think I massively underweight the importance of listening to other people and the importance of building relationships around disagreements disagreements instead of using them as a way to get to the truth. I think one of the things I did really poorly earlier in my career I've done. I've totally gotten a lot better at is when I had an opinion whether I was right or wrong too soon for the sake of the argument I was right. I viewed my job as taking someone from their position to mind as efficiently as possible that it doesn't work all that does maybe it does work to a certain extent but it's definitely not the best thing to do and much more effective way to do that as to deeply understand where someone is what what led them to their conclusions and then fill in context sort of draw the path from where you are to where they are and then you can both walk on it and that's a much better way to both get to the truth and also you to build much stronger relationship with that person which allows you to get harder questions in the future. Who would you say some of your mentors. Today is still very much. A mentor of Mine America's a mentor of mine. I Still Keep Joe Mentor of mine. I have a lot of internal mentors at the company. I have my spiritual mentor as my executive coach which I highly recommend to anyone anyone who has a a large team is to get an executive coach you find mentorship in so many places. I think twitter's a great way to get that one way mentorship you. Can you know look to the smartest people in the world feeding incite constantly who will often even engage with you if you just reach out to them that's amazing in a recommend biographies in which biographies you know what's funny about recommending books is that the needs to be at the right moment in someone's life for them to really hit books that have been really impactful for me or sometimes books looks set today would mean absolutely nothing or tomorrow might be the most insightful thing. I could possibly be handed so harshly to recommend any kind of book without knowing where someone is today but recently I've really enjoyed Benjamin Franklin biography by Walter Isaacson. I really enjoyed powerbroker Robert Caro. Yeah I could probably name ten ten or twelve others but against that point in time and when did you start with the executive coach and I'd love to dive deeper into that yeah. I started open-door when I was twenty three years old and I had maybe managed eater so people before I found myself within a larger team and a lot of pressure to go very quickly. I think one of my co founders Keith give a talk during wiessee startup school about operating a business and there's the company growth curve in your personal growth curve. I think whatever you can can do to accelerate your personal growth curve as founder in a company is incredibly important worth prioritizing in so I decided in heard before that an executive coach be a great way to accelerate your personal growth curve and that was worth the investment in when did you get that technical which was right at twenty three when he started the company or is it a year or two or three end. Yeah I think I I interviewed probably twenty or thirty coaches before I settled on the mccutcheon work with today. I believe we've been working together now for about two and a half years so probably about two two years in how big was hoping to our at the very beginning of that period tuneup years ago. Yeah I think probably around forty or so people eighty six people got what are some of the the biggest things that you've worked on with this coach and where you've grown with this coach yeah. I think it's a lot of it is interpersonal. Dynamics less so on like strategy I ah most of that mentorship from Mateen here hiring really great people you know what's interesting as you grow the company from one to ten one hundreds of people that you just have these different chapters when my favorite rules is this like the rule of threes every time the company triples everything breaks just like everything that worked really well is complete disarray in a disaster and set you learn learning by trial and error the first ten people everyone in that group of ten people is going to replicate themselves at least ten times if you're successful all of their strengths all their weaknesses houses and so it's critical that every single person that initial group is someone. You're ready to spend twenty four seven with because you're likely going to do that. The next stage is like this a call like the the band of brothers and sisters stage. It's like that first thirty forty people and they really shaped the culture so I think a lot of founders of the states are hiring for culture fit but you really should be looking. I'm for cultural contribution. It's really crucial that you develop an open dialogue with everyone in that group about what's working. What's not working and what the company can do about it? You want every single person that band of brothers other sisters to be like a missionary for the company in the mission. You want part of their identity. The reason get a coach at the next stages because you hit this. It's all changing stage from fifty to one hundred fifty. People were a lot of companies falter because you're growing so fast and everything is absolutely on fire and there's not enough structure yet. You don't really have necessarily you know a leadership leadership team built out and so at the stage earlier employees who previously were generalists who owned a large swath of the company they feel disengaged because it's no longer that band of brothers and sisters. They don't know everyone anymore but you can turn that into empowerment. You can sit them down when I wanted to say. You're a flagbearer for the company. You are flagbearer for over north culture in everyone who is joining today is going to look to you for how to behave and how to contribute and it's on you to teach them what it means to be a member of the team here because if you don't they're going to change it and I I recommend at that point also sort of reaching out to every one of these missionaries in your company gathering their opinions about what the company's values are and using that bottoms up process where everyone contributes needs to write down and establish a set of like what are your company's values and make sure everyone knows you mentioned that executive coaching is something that you do to accelerate your own personal growth curve. What are some things that you've done to tolerate that growth good question done or doing. I think the biggest thing for accelerating growth curve is just understanding that people draw US incest surrounding yourself by great. People is a single best way to grow yourself. I think the the adages you know your average of the five people you spend your time with your you probably the average of the thirty to forty people you spend your time with probably in proportion to the amount of time you spend with them so be really rigorous but who you're spending your time with and thoughtful who you want to be eh that helps a lot in being able to grow in the ways you. WanNa grow. Let's talk about Keith little. He's been on the show before great episode. What are some of the things that you've learned from him. You know it's funny about Keith is that he's basically a state machine for the right answer but he hasn't always necessarily know why he knows what's right by working with. Keith you sort of this this this cheat code to the answer and then you get to work backwards to why he's right. That's helpful in frustrating. That itself is a huge accelerate. What are some non obvious things that you've done as a founder. Let's make open door successful. I think it's really important once you have a team of probably thirty or so people to do a great job with orientation when when someone joins everyone remembers their first day and being present for that and making sure.

keith founder executive twitter CEO fraud Khosla ventures facebook Red Door general partner Robert Caro Co founder Joe Mentor underweight Mine America Trulia Phoenix Benjamin Franklin Josh Brewer
"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"It's our last episode of summer while it feels like summer is ending. You know people hate it. When people say that i've seen the back to school adds its own. No no no no no no. No don't bring that here. Oh not sure what we're getting here schooled today today yeah we are and we have an amazing founder who i am obsessed with and that is none other than alley web yes and she is the co founder of dry bar so that's the original chain of blow dry bars launched in twenty ten and she cofounded dry bar with her brother michael landau and her now ex husband cameron cameron webb. She's also just branched out into the small world because she created this brand called squeeze and it's really aiming to do the same thing that she did with dry a bar which is to standardize that whole experience of getting a blow out. She's doing the same with this this concept yeah. I think what you're talking about. Is that level love consistency. You know back in the day you would go and get a blow dry and you have one idea in your head and you'd say to the person okay i want it to be voluminous but not shoe voluminous at the route then you'd walk out with something that you didn't really want but you ended up paying for or instagram yeah and you so you didn't have a picture to show and i think just coming up with that. Menu was so genius at that time like here's six different blow dries we get it. These are all the different like mini iterations that that make a difference to people yeah that was completely revolutionary at the time and now with squeezed. She's aiming to do the same thing so you got the customizing the spa music it's all cashless you don't have to feel awkward about the tip at the end and the level of pressure at all that stuff that some times practitioners remembered ass and sometimes they don't that's all kind mm-hmm systematize saved in a profile so you basically don't even have to talk to anybody going squeeze so there's only one location of of this concept right now. It's in california but it's hopefully you're gonna roll out <hes> tomorrow place as soon can't wait to try. I know i need that and let's not forget. That alley is a fellow podcasters. She's the co host of raising raising the bar podcast which she host with her brother michael on our network dear media. She's had people like anina being. She's that famous fashion entrepreneur from from los angeles. She's had <hes> emily schulman from cupcakes in kashmir. She's had jamie schmidt on her show who we've had on our show and get into the nitty gritty of entrepreneurship so if if you need career tips that is a great one to check out i noticed you had tony coe from next cosmetics recently so i wanna be listening to that. I like i want tony on our shows. As a whole badly you beat us to it allie putting her on the vision board foreshore alley is also set to launch a reality makeover show which allie will will give us the full scoop on in today's episode. She's got so many things on the go first. We're going to get to the origin story behind dry bar because it really is completely jean s. and next year the brand celebrates its tenth anniversary dr are actually launched in the middle of the recession and despite that fact managed to have if such a huge success today there ninety two locations and they do over one hundred and twenty thousand blowouts a month now in canada dry bar. We don't actually have the locations. There's one in the nordstrom in vancouver which i frequent every time i go to randy. Vancouver definitely need a blow dry but when you and i went to l._a. Last year first first place be hit was literally the west hollywood drive our because who wants to do their hair getting off a flight. No i know and then our hair was good for four days. We went to sephora. Yes we were instagram. Graham ready our hair looked so crisp the entire time and we actually hit up the drive bar.

co founder cameron cameron webb alley michael landau jamie schmidt tony coe allie california los angeles founder nordstrom vancouver sephora hollywood Graham jean s. canada randy four days
"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Their businesses from being, you know, hundred thousand dollar businesses to being hundred million dollar businesses. Plus and to give them the real tactical trae. Meaning that they need to move from the beginning to the next step. I could not agree with you more. And the reason I have the conversation at all here is because I want to talk about solutions and approaches that have been successful in. You clearly have found the way to be successful in spite of and I for me, it's really it is a it is a balancing act in my own mind about whether we go there, we don't I don't want to ignore a problem that exists. But I also don't want to talk about it without having solutions on the table. Yeah. I've been thinking a lot about what are proactive things that can be done to equalize. The opportunities for women, and let's just speak about the world of entrepreneurship because that's the world. I know the most. The terms the legal terms that women are given early on in their business. I think are much worse on average than the legal terms that men are given. So for instance, we've been hearing in the media right now about this entire situation with Uber where Travis has kind of shares that are worth ten x the voting power of a single share. And we know that Travis has this and Mark Zuckerberg has this and many other male founders Evan Spiegel at Snapchat has these shares. I've never heard of a single woman having shares that are worth ten x her voting power. You don't have that. I had to I had to work to actually have a vote on my board. If you look at my first term sheets of rent the runway, my co-founder, and I while we were on the board our votes affectively didn't count. And my preferred shareholders held all of the control and sway as to what the future of the business was so we were starting not even from a, you know. Point zero. We were starting from like negative fifty and over the years. Thank God rent the runway took off from the very beginning. And we've been able to negotiate in every subsequent round of funding more rights for ourselves. But all we've wanted was fair rights to what we would be offered as a male CEO or a male co founding team. So what I would love to see is. I'd love to see women, and I'm happy to be the first to do this publicize put online their first seed round term sheets and compare that with the seed round term sheets that men get the and the reason why I say seed round just because at the seed round there's no evidence that any business is going to be successful. You're taking a bet on the founder itself, you're taking a bet on a person..

Travis founder Evan Spiegel CEO co-founder Mark Zuckerberg Snapchat hundred thousand dollar hundred million dollar
"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Janklow had ridiculous name, but it was a very innovative idea at the time, and it was related to another startup called yawn to back in the day and a recruiter from the start up beyond two decided to contact me through this and yawn to actually turned out to be Ari tros company, my co-founder and business partner in X Y O U is one of the only crazy people at the time in two thousand eight actually. Starting a company in two thousand eight when everyone was going through turmoil and running for the hills. Well, yeah. So so you and Ari how did that relationship happened was he the first person that had took a chance on you just like you just said like nobody was saying. Yes, you wanted to get somebody to say, yes. And then how did that relationship build up? That is exactly right. Yeah. He is the first person that said, well, this kid is smart. He's also very humble as well. Yeah. Yeah. You know? You know, he he he saw how passionate I was. And how driven I was. And I think what is kind of the metric and the thing that we care about the most at X Y O. And like what I look for an employees and new employees now is like how much do you care, and you could tell that I cared about what I was doing. I was passionate about technology, and I had zero experience. Right. He didn't even know what the heck he was going to hire me for. But he was like, you know, what I need higher this kid and take a chance, and he is the only one that took a chance on me. And so basically, I have spent especially with the amazing story that X Y O has turned into. I've spent a lot of my time re repaying him and basically making him feel great about taking a chance on me. So he was the first person to say, yes, what was the company about? What was he trying to do? And how did you fit in? Yeah. At the time. This is when the concept or idea of Facebook, apps didn't exist. So it was a brand new concept. He first off he credited technology for my space that allowed you to turn off those annoying layouts and all the color schemes on my space man when you picked your page. Yes. Okay. It was called sanity switch. So you head switch on your page and every single other person's page that you visited it would turn off their annoying glittery layouts home. I he he's a savior. I didn't know he was a say yes now here is what he discovered in doing that he discovered just how big the personalization space is. So he decided to do the exact opposite thing for Facebook. He created the first ever it was called the onto layers the first ever technology that allowed you to add layouts and personalization layers to your Facebook profile, and it caught on like crazy. Well, so I joined him in that technology company, and it was just a wild and amazing ride. So yeah. So what did you do there? What did you learn what did you? Discover about yourself because from starting out as somebody taking a chance on you to be in co founder of a black Shane company now valued at twenty million dollars spot. Number two, fifty I'm Queen market cap. And you're just having amazing party for your.

Ari tros company Facebook Ari Shane company Janklow co-founder co founder partner twenty million dollars
"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

Tech Reports by Larry Magid

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

"If you're just joining us Microsoft co-founder, Paul Allen has died this afternoon. He was sixty five Allen had said earlier this month that he was being treated for non Hodgkin lymphoma. Larry, you have been covering Allen and Microsoft. Since the early days, how would you describe his role in the tech world incredibly important. You know he'd not nearly as well known if Bill gate is or Steve Jobs, wealth, but certainly important pioneer. He and gates co-founded Microsoft back in nineteen seventy five that's year before the apple two came out and he helped he engaged together. We're responsible for Microsoft basic, which was probably the most important of the early early personal computer software languages. And then he remained Microsoft for number of year. I think until eighty two, when he was first diagnosed with Hodgkin non-hodgkin's lymphoma, this is not the first bout that he's had from Canterbury. He been diagnosed back then with three diagnosed and to come to a today, but he's been around he and he engaged from schoolmates. They were fourteen and twelve. They were playing around with computers way back guess what lie in the seventy s and you know, symphony wouldn't invested in sporting teams. You can't go to Seattle without seeing it, influence your mutual impact on the city. So you know an important person. What kind of a relationship did Paul Allen and Bill Gates having in more recent years? You know, I don't know. I, I assume they were in touch because they were both. You know, they're both very active in philanthropy and both in terms of international and and also Seattle. But I really don't know gates course haven't been at Microsoft. I think he's still on the board and it's been many years since Paul Allen resigned from Microsoft board. I think he resigned in two thousand though. I'm sure that they were in touch, but I don't know how closely we're and once he left Microsoft, did he try his hand and another tech business or, oh, yeah. He was involved in a number of interval technologies years ago with doing some very interesting. I can't remember what if any more because it's been so long. But he's been a certainly an investor in a number of tech companies, as well as a number of social entrepreneurs. He's given a lot of money to brain research, but yes, and by the way he wrote a book called idea, man, and that's sort of how fancied himself as you know, gates with the business guy and and Allen thought of himself at the the idea person pretty remarkable career all the way around. Absolutely. And the thing that not one, but two of them Bill Gates and Paul Allen both went on to do so much philanthropy. That's right. And you know, very big contribution again, not as well known if gates, but certainly a person with a huge amount of influence very early on and continuing. I think up until his death..

Bill Gates Paul Allen Steve Jobs Microsoft Hodgkin lymphoma Seattle co-founder Larry apple Canterbury
"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

"The president and co founder of the city blockchain summit got paulson and began with me today thank you so much for being on the shy polls appreciate your time it's gonna be right to have a chat love to be here i'm very happy to engage with you rank end i'm looking for i was looking for this and talking to you look this this the so much going on the spice at the moment it's such an exciting time and you're right there in the thick of it before we get into the actual city blockchain son at what you guys are doing who you're speaking to and i throw about a million questions that you what had liked to if you wouldn't mind poulsen just gives it a little bit of a background on yourself why you're in blockchain what you doing how you come to hear and what your objectives are absolutely greg i'm so i've been into a in the business from at least twenty years now twenty five years actually and republican complication computer user and what we've seen is you know do the today show everybody is afraid to jump on the computers and livable computers all afraid afraid afraid so we put of location he's the pain and and dispose the intimation in a very forced to fifth grade level of writing so it helped them a consumers just understand the technology and be part of the other than being afraid on it so become voted a lot of people into the computer age and then of course we had the big boom of the internet and i see the same cycle happening again in this base blockchain is very robust technology i'd have been around for a while but now that the only other stuff that's going on in the innovation that's happening in the in the industry is more than the full front now some of the big names all the fortune one hundred companies are already in it big time and i feel that again the consumers are left out of the dock and i'll go this to engage the consumers in another way not republication but throwing events in smaller cities and engaging them with the innovation that's happening in in the blockchain space so you've been there through the.

president co founder paulson poulsen twenty five years twenty years