35 Burst results for "co founder"

Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles opens campaign against police unions

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:17 min | 2 d ago

Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles opens campaign against police unions

"Police unions are the latest targets of black lives matter L A. The goal of the end Police Association's campaign is to get rid of the unions representing LAPD officers and L, A county sheriff's deputies. And it's part of a larger effort to fund services, not police. BLM L. A co founder Molina Abdullah says she thinks both unions should be kicked out of the L. A County Federation of Labor. Neither the Los Angeles Police Protective League or a leads represents the interests of working class people. L M L A for years held weekly protests demanding the ouster of then ta Jackie Lacey. Now the group plans to hold weekly demonstrations across the street from the protective leagues office were prepared for a long fight. If anybody looks at black lives matter and what we've done over the last 7.5 years, one word should emerge that we are relentless. League President Craig Lolly describes the campaign as another dangerous idea from anti public safety fringes. We have the largest increase in shootings and murders in the last 10 years. We should be working together for solutions They want to defund and abolish law enforcement. That's their ultimate goal account, he said. Spokesperson tells the L A times the organization believes every worker in every field should have the right to collectively bargain. Claudia Pests. Utah KNX 10 70 news radio. Nursing

End Police Association Blm L. A Co Molina Abdullah County Federation Of Labor Los Angeles Police Protective Jackie Lacey Lapd Craig Lolly Claudia Pests Utah
Crafting a Conversion Series So You Can Sell with Email

The DigitalMarketer Podcast

05:45 min | 3 d ago

Crafting a Conversion Series So You Can Sell with Email

"Lot of the time in digital marketer. The things that we do aren't because we're incredibly intentional. They're out of necessity or we have a strategy that we can't fulfill on because of technology because of some other barriers. So we have to do something else and we do something else. And everyone gives us the benefit of the doubt and the credit that we had this brilliant epiphany from go and we're so put together but it's always fun at least for me to look back at how we have an asset or a process. Now that was created out of oops ryan and perry forgot to write and send emails one day probably about eight years ago. So that's why we're we're looking these templates now and that's why we were able to temple ties them and use them for all of our businesses and and what. I hope you'll to do is walk. You guys through some of the core templates and the conversion series That you can use to deploy in your business and truly built an automated follow up campaign for your business so back to the agenda. We're gonna move onto crafting your conversion series so a couple of wrap up points here. Remember the conversion series for new subscribers is going to be triggered simultaneously with the indoctrination series brand new people when they've opted in. They're going to get their your indoctrination series. But they're also going to go into conversion campaign right because going back to the question that ryan asked in the very beginning of this workshop or or at least the question that he posed in the very beginning of this workshop. You have a subscriber now. What what are you gonna do with the subscriber once you have them going back to the five phases of the follow up machine living here in the conversion phase and green is good red is bad and yellow. Is hoping that we're back on track. So we're right here. New subscriber or old subscriber news going to get the indoctrination campaign and the conversion campaign. Old is not going to get this. They are going to go into a conversion campaign because looking at this and thinking of this As it pertains to the customer value journey once someone subscribed the next most important thing for us to do is to get them convert to convert right. Something magical happens when you when you take someone from being just a subscriber just a prospect to a customer pain customer win when money or time exchanges hands when they give you money or they'll give you their time. They they change in the way that they look at you. They listen to you differently. And when you have a successful transaction they're willing to ascend so going back and thinking in here. After conversion we're focused on ascension that first conversion isn't necessary because we need to move them along from a us a low dollar or a entry point offer to a higher priced. it allows them to trust us with a successful transaction so making sure that our email campaigns and email series are are moving people efficiently through those processes. It's kind of what we're gonna be talking about here again to answer the question that ryan posed in the very beginning of this workshop. The the answers to move them quickly through the convert face as seamlessly as possible by deploying a conversion series. So let's talk just a little bit about conversion series so a conversion series is an interest based triggered campaign sent following a specific action or requests. Remember ryan talked about two types of email sends there's triggered and broadcast definitely the conversion campaign. At least an automated sense because we're building automated follow up campaign is triggered so in someone's requested a specific resource whether it's a lead magnet or whether they've subscribed for awebber opt in for a webinar. That's an interest based triggered campaign that sent immediately. Alright the job of the conversion series is to turn subscribers in the converts twice called the conversion series emails and a conversion series should referenced the previous positive reaction. This is big right. Think about if you just met someone and that personnel ryan talked about a lot about the from like your from information right the first email you send. You should not expect them to recognize you. Even if an amazing job at personal branding or branding your company they are not gonna see that email and remember who the heck you are. You haven't earned that yet. You haven't become important to them especially if they're new subscriber so if you're not tying back to that positive that previous positive action that they took they have no idea why you're emailing them and what the heck you're talking about and we are all really really busy. I bet you. I opted in for five things yesterday that i have. I don't even remember doing right. And i bet you that three of them tomorrow will email me. And i'll unsubscribe from them. Because i won't know what the heck they're talking about. I give everyone the benefit of the doubt that i opt into a lot of things. I don't believe they're spamming me. But i do believe really terrible job at reminding me why in the world they have the right to email me and why should care the way that you overcome that is referenced. The previous positive action and then prescribe the next logical. Step i if we know thinking back to the previous slide if it's interest based we know what they're interested in at least right now that may not be the only thing they're interested in but it is the thing that they were interested enough in to give you their contact information. So that's what they're interested in and you've said something on a page that talk them into giving you their contact information so you now know what they're interested in now remind them the last thing that they did your last interaction and then tell them what they need to do. Next so successful. Conversion emails will overcome or inoculate against known objections and common

Ryan Perry
A Small Molecule Cancer Drug That Promotes an Adaptive Immune Response

The Bio Report

04:15 min | 3 d ago

A Small Molecule Cancer Drug That Promotes an Adaptive Immune Response

"Matt. Thanks for joining us. It's a pleasure nice to meet you. Danny i'm glad to be here. We're going to talk about fos flatten. Its lead therapy. Which has multiple mechanisms of action and how it works to enlist the immune system to kill cancer cells. Let's start with your lead therapeutic. Pt on twelve. Which is a first class. Harrow phosphate platinum conjugate. Break that down in simple terms. What is it thank you. That's a good question. I think maybe i'll just briefly tell you a little bit about the company and how we got to where we are with this molecule. Pt one to foss platin- therapeutics was founded by myself. And our ceo robert fallon my fellow co founder in two thousand ten and we really built the the company around this family of compounds that we in license at the discovery. Stage which comprise these Family of these first in class pi-rre phosphate platinum conjugates and based in new york. Although these days that that means something different than it used to We have a nice Small office here in midtown with our management team. Of course now are all working remotely and we worked our way through preclinical and early clinical development by running collaborations around the world. We've actually had worked ongoing in fifteen countries Since we started and These are academe amick. A- collaborations contract research organizations clinical sites but also industry collaborators We we have a an existing collaboration with pfizer and their co-development partner. Md serono or merck darmstadt on one of the combination programs that were running and we're still private company in early phase two development with pt. One too so to your question about pt to is a small molecule and actually to our knowledge. It's the first anti cancer agent containing a pirate phosphate and This has implications on its safety. Its pharmacokinetics to mechanism of action. And even on its. It's targeting where it's delivery within the body and i'm sure we can get into that further as we go. I generally think of conjugated therapies is linking targeting mechanism to a- warhead. I take it the way. Pt one to works is a bit different. What exactly conjugated in pt. One two and what to each those components do it's a great question i think we. We certainly are not an antibody drug conjugate. I don't want to give that impression. I think we're thinking of conjugation. As a medicinal chemistry term that goes back to certainly before the advent of of adc's in cancer care Our inventor of the late refunder bose was actually the first researcher able to successfully link or conjugate a pyro phosphate to platinum core molecule. And of course Platinum molecules with platinum in their core have been a mainstay of of cancer. Care for some time now. He was really seeking through his work in medicinal chemistry To find a new paradigm for a platinum containing agents he did so by congregating power phosphate. And what that does is because the para phosphate is so strongly linked. It remains intact for the most part in the body theory differently from cytotoxic agents and certainly from other platinum containing agents Pyro phosphate also benign in the body Native to healthy cells so you'll the respiration so we're not adding something that's in and of itself toxic

Foss Platin Robert Fallon Md Serono Cancer Merck Darmstadt Harrow Danny Matt Pfizer New York
OA466: Opening Arguments Blocked in Australia?!

At Liberty

05:54 min | 3 d ago

OA466: Opening Arguments Blocked in Australia?!

"As the people of georgia helped deliver both the presidency and the senate to the democrats. This past election cycle defying the perception that the state was a republican stronghold after stacey. Abrams is contentious loss. In the two thousand eighteen race for governor the effort to stop voter suppression in the state and mobilize black voters ramped up as a result. Black georgians showed up to the polls in droves this past election cycle and turned the state blew one of the activists responsible for this term is latasha brown a political strategist. Who's been working at the intersection of social justice and political empowerment for decades. Latasha is the co founder of the black voters matter fund and bv 'em capacity building institute a movement to expand voter access and build power for black americans particularly in the south. She joins us today to discuss the impact of expanding the right to vote and building a more diverse and inclusive future for the south latasha. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me molly. I'm happy to be here. Between mobilizing i. For the presidential election and then for a hugely consequential senate runoff election all in the middle of a global pandemic. I feel like is it safe to say that you had a very busy twenty twenty. How are you have. You had a chance to relax a little bit. what are you saying. It's twenty twenty. It's just been a continuum. It seems like it's been a continual. It is different so i will say i do think that we got a little breathing room and it's not as intense. I think we're starting to fine or at least i am starting to find at least somewhat of a rhythm of how to operate in these circumstances how to give it but we're still in the midst of a global pandemic. We are certainly a different kind of i think political landscape but the fight isn't over matter of fact in some ways it has intensified. You know that whenever there has been progress in this country politically. There's always been backlash and so what we're seeing right now. All across the south and particularly in places like georgia. We're seeing the state. Legislators take up these bills to actually prevent black voters disenfranchised black voters and make it difficult for voters to participate in the process. Given what we were able to accomplish. And so when i think about twenty twenty i will say yes. Twenty twenty in some ways is over but there is a continuum of work that we're doing related to that take a break. I don't know if i've been able to take a fall. Rake i will say i dig into take a breather rights i was able to take a breather and was able to take a week off and really be able to do some kind of i'm not gonna say calming down because i had to sneak in work time to but nevertheless we are in a different phase of the work and i'm really happy and proud of the work that we were able to do in twenty twenty and i tell people i don't know if we're going to remember what happened in twenty fourteen or twenty eighteen twenty. Nineteen what i know for sure. War is that all of the history books will make reference to twenty twenty so was a very significant year. But i also think that twenty twenty one is showing itself that it will also be significant year as well particularly as we're talking about what governance means. Could you tell us a little bit about how you and your organization played a role in twenty twenty. How did you play a part in the history. Books will hopefully report back so part of our organization. When i'm really proud of is while we saw a lot of the work manifest in twenty twenty. This has been a work in progress. I've worked in the region in the south around power building for the last twenty seven years of my life. I long cliff all right. Who's the other co founder of black voters matter and so there's is so interested over two and a half decades. There are different strategies that we've used and worked to try to perfect or really to help support our organizing work and so two thousand sixteen. We both felt it was the opportunity to come together and really create an organization that we could bring some of those best practices together round power building and that ultimately if we were going to break up this kind of structural racism this backwards. What we felt was the precursor for fascism in this country. That fundamentally you could not do that without literally recognizing the role that many of the legislators and the power base in the south play in protecting facilitating trump's power and some of the destruction that we see and some of the structural racism that we see in legislation so we created an organization two thousand and sixteen with the idea that we would build power and the way that we would do that is a couple of ways one that we would certainly address the issue that the south is not. I say this all the time in the south is not read is just been under invested. You know. I think we have shown we have the receipts to show that when you are able to make an investment over time when you able to build out the ecosystem and help tap into the capacity that exists. We can make a difference and so one of our first races before even georgia. That people know us is that we were one of the groups that worked in the two thousand seventeen specially us senate race which was in many ways. People thought it was just an impossible. Long and in some ways it was because in the state of alabama. That's a deeply deeply deeply conservative reactionary right state and so to be able to tap into the opportunity that existed in that year. We want it. We were able to. Our strategy and our strategy was how to connect role communities and rule organizations with urban work.

Latasha Brown Latasha Black Voters Matter Fund And B South Latasha Senate Georgia Abrams Stacey Molly Donald Trump Alabama
Nintendo Direct And Latinx In Gaming

LAN Parties: A Video Gaming and Esports Podcast

05:46 min | 4 d ago

Nintendo Direct And Latinx In Gaming

"And welcome the land parties episode fifty eight from the las vegas review journal. I am your host ryan smith and with me always my host and good friend lucas egging. Lucas how are you my friend. I am dealing. Well had a pretty good weekend. Started going back into final fantasy seven remake with my girlfriend. So she's going through it some having fun kind of watching her go through that ready for a nice long game and the the other thing i did this week going as i finally got a new phone so my phone from like five years ago is has been replaced and my goodness when you wait that long. It's ridiculous how much faster it is. Some blindly untreated even one of those people that like i use it till it breaks and finally i can't anymore i just can't was your weekend. I can relate to that. do good. I chill out. We we actually got. We had this like home garden Thing that we had gotten a while ago so we went ahead and planted that this week and And then i just. I just did. Some destiny went did that. Secret mission That was recently released. That was really good super atmospheric. I i i absolutely loved it. Got a solid gun from it and then played some more spiderman. Got the sinister six reveals. So we're grinding away. I'm moving along with that Those fantastic enough about us. Oh please introduce our guests. We are excited to welcome two very special guests today. You know them from the group. Latin x and gaming. You may have seen them honored at the game awards in december as global gaming citizens. We are excited to be joined. By the founder of nexen engaging cristina amaya and co founder and developer relations head. Elaine gomez thank you both to For join us today. How you guys then thank you. Thanks for asking. Yeah thank you so much for having absolutely thank you so much for taking the time and and i'm excited to talk about Talk about the Next and gaming and everything that you guys have done so far sorry. I didn't mean to cut you off there go ahead. You're fine. i was just gonna say we're excited. This is an amazing group. We talk to fernando last year. A little bit about the group. But we're we're super pump to take a deep dive into it but before we get to that. We just wanted to touch on a couple subjects and ryan last wednesday right before the nintendo direct rocked. I was so excited. Because i was almost one hundred percent. Sure that we were gonna get breath of the wild or pokemon or metro news. And we got them. We struck out. We struck out if you haven't you happen to be me on twitter. You saw like like the realization that like none of that was happening. And i look. I'll start by saying this. There were a couple of games. That intrigued me. I'm actually looking forward to the new. Mario golf game of the project triangle. Game looks interesting. I love that art style. But i don't know ryan. I was just disappointed. What about you. yeah. Yeah it was definitely. I felt like it was pretty underwhelming As far as what we thought we were gonna get versus what we actually got So i mean again. There were some some nice Games that they presented and whatnot. But i just thought that especially with it being a thirty five year anniversary of zelda. I thought we would get some some big news as far as with that again. What they said they were gonna port a port over night. Work soared scar. Yeah and i never. I never played that one. So i am excited to have the opportunity to actually go through and run that Zelda but i mean again it's it's been it's been a good amount of years since Breadth of wild came out. They've already we already know that breath a while to is is in the works. I thought for sure going to drop it like it's hot and give us some heat there but you know we. We did not get that so it'll be interesting. I mean again. This could be something that maybe in the second half of the year that they looked to drop then as well again. We know that anytime. People are are rushing games They seem to to very much have a negative impact on their releases. So you know again you guys. They know what they're doing They they always had. I feel like they have a solid plan as far as marketing and getting games out and stuff like that so i still think we'll get it this year Yes i thought it was going to happen then but the years not over is still early. My friend deshaun. Hopefully you're right. I just the joy was getting sucked out of me. The longer let direct went on in the close to the end that we got. That's okay though. That's a good. You're right the year is young christina a u and nintendo fan at all. Did you catch the direct. Yes i did not get to watch the direct because it winds carrying my meetings. But i will say that as a very large fan since childhood i straight up do not understand word sword. I'm just gonna put it out there. I would much rather buffalo wild to or just a teaser trailer. Something anything five seconds. Give me a carina time. At least you know what. I mean like i. Yeah i yeah. I don't even know what that is a series. What was that four. Like thirty something. I

Las Vegas Review Journal Nexen Cristina Amaya Elaine Gomez Ryan Smith Lucas Ryan Fernando Nintendo Zelda Twitter Deshaun Golf Christina Buffalo
Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

podnews

02:57 min | 4 d ago

Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

"Browns bean spreaker and captivate all subjects to eight to nile attack. The same attackers appear to have been involved. We were wondering why they targeted podcast hosts so we talked to them. You'll find that full report in our show notes and our newsletter today. A company called. Happy scribe is publishing automated transcripts of podcasters without the parent's consent of many of the publishers. We learned today. Cumulus media owner of westwood. One has its achieved more than one billion downloads. In two thousand twenty podcasting revenue grew forty percent last year to they say. They've made their bet on partnership arrangements with talent as opposed to going out and spending a lot of money on it or infrastructure the company uses spotify owned megaphone backtracks has launched a tool that monitors your head gesture movements. The tool requires the listener to be using airpods pro headphones investor. Andrew wilkinson says in a tweet. He's removing podcasts. From his phone because podcastone mostly people repeating ideas. You already agree with or talking about things that trigger anxiety. He's co founder of tiny capital which invests in ios podcast app castro podcast membership platform super fast and podcast producer. Righto media try and digital has released the latest podcast ranker's for the us and latin. America they're incomplete ranker's containing participating publishers only notably the ranker's don't include. I heart radio podcasts. Triton digital is being bought by the company echoing the open independent nature of podcasting and writing in the financial times fulmer spotify chief economist will page notes that major labels released one point two million songs in two thousand and twenty but diy artists released nine point five million songs the music industry. He says he's making more money but has more mouths to feed. Iv is a new podcast app. That offers a way to follow. Topics tags hosts or podcasts. Catholic part is also a new podcast for android with a great name. Mavi star homa smart speaker in spain from canada now incorporates. I've is podcast catalog. And i will be speaking at the rain. Podcast business summit with npr's. Brian moffatt tickets are free and available now from link in our show notes and our newsletter. Today and in paul cost us the journal has an interview with dominion voting systems. Ceo john pelos today. His company has filed three defamation lawsuits against tv networks. Saying his excellently. One hundred percent accurate and very handsome. Voting machines are perfect. Which of course they absolutely are and nassar's curious universe is the first podcast recorded on another planet if features raw recorded sounds from the mars perseverance rover

Andrew Wilkinson Tiny Capital Spotify Triton Digital Browns Westwood Cumulus America Brian Moffatt Dominion Voting Systems Ceo John Pelos NPR Spain Canada The Journal Nassar Paul
WeWork Co-Founder Adam Neumann Nears Settlement With SoftBank

WSJ What's News

01:16 min | 5 d ago

WeWork Co-Founder Adam Neumann Nears Settlement With SoftBank

"As we first reported exclusively we work. Owner softbank is in advanced talks to settle with the company's former ceo and co founder. Adam newman softbank took a majority stake in the shared office space company after we works attempted. Ipo collapsed in two thousand nineteen. A deal could clear the way for we work. Second attempt at a public listing the journalists. Maureen farrell has more. Adam newman some early employees and shareholders have been fighting with softbank about roughly three billion dollars. That softbank was gonna spend to buy their shares as of monday. It looks like softbank. adam newman. We work special. Committee is all very close to a deal. There are all close to settling their respective lawsuits with each other. So that litigations out of the way it could clear a path for we work to move forward potentially with the spec deal. We've heard that they've been negotiating. People familiar with the matter. Said there is no guarantee that an agreement will be produced but if there is one it could be finalized in the coming days. Newman had stepped down as investors balked at buying the money losing companies shares as well as conflicts of interest and erotic behavior

Softbank Adam Newman Maureen Farrell Newman
Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

Museum Archipelago

05:10 min | 6 d ago

Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

"For the past six and a half years more or less weekly museum. People gather on twitter for something called museum our together. These people form a peer to peer community supporting discussion and debate between those who work in enjoy and challenge museums society. That's the beauty of museum. Our is entirely independent. It is not an organization is just about holding a space so other people can talk with each other. This is dr to meena car who co-founded museum our back in october. Twenty fourteen gosper also founded the curatorial research center. Hello my name is to mean a costco. And i am the director and curator of the curatorial research center and that's an organization. I started back in two thousand eighteen very much to support fellow curator's from around the world and also to make progress in modernizing curatorial practice this month gosper officially steps back from her role in museum. Our i wanted this to serve as both exit interview and a chance to highlight other projects that she has founded based on her curatorial. Philosophies museum i started can october two thousand fourteen sophie balancer. Who was the co founder with me got together over twitter. We've never met in real life. Goodness knows whether we ever will. Sophie was based up in the north of england. I'm based in the far west of cornwall. That we both decided we'd give the idea of the discussion based hours that were kind of finding their feet on twitter at that time so we decided to give it a go and it's grown and grown and grown and changed a lot since then of course twitches also changed hugely in terms of who participates. Who feels confident about speaking out. Who likes in the background. There is a lot of polarization on the platform. Now and so we've changed adapted museum iowa to all of those trends that we've seen happen including it's growing politicize ation as well. If i'm being honest i've kind of treated the whole thing. Even six and a half years own as an ongoing experiment in trying to understand how it is people like to communicate with each other and how it is that you can provide some kind of support for this peer to pay contact is what we're really after on museum archipelago. We look at museums as a medium and twitter is also a medium one that has changed since museum. Our started six and a half years ago since then. Twitter has shifted from a simple subscriber model. One we you see all the tweets from the people you follow the order that they tweeted to a system that uses algorithms that optimize for other factors such as engagement with the tweets. This can make a global conversation about museums. Difficult with the change in. How twitter is managed. And how the concept of driving engagement and algorithms are dictating. What we see on our timelines. There has absolutely been an impact on museum our because of that. We've got to work much harder to try and get ideas for topics for example people's ideas out to as broad an interested audience participation group that we can and that has proven very difficult in fact particularly of late because people's timelines also manipulated by twitter's algorithms and because they're so much more noise on twitter than there was so. I'm kind of glad that museum. Our has managed to hold its own. It retains a light structure. It does support those intimate conversations as well as supporting bigger thoughts and opinions and even ones that people disagree about in one space. I've participated in even hosted a few museum hours. And the thing that reminds me of the most is a museum conference or at least the conversations that you might have at museum conference which is yet another medium but interestingly docker says that museum our has never been about recreating that experience. That certainly isn't the kind of experience you usually get unless you Fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to very expensive. Large international museum conferences. For example like the newseum association conference in the uk or any of items conferences but we've never really perceived if museum hours to fill that kind of gap with still kind of exploring what it is that we think we're doing and that's just by way of being very honest about no having an agenda and letting sort of the emergent process of museum our happened

Curatorial Research Center Gosper Twitter Sophie Balancer Meena Costco Sophie Cornwall Archipelago England Iowa Large International Museum Docker Newseum Association UK
Philadelphia's Warrington Residents Get Account Credits For Contaminated Water

KYW 24 Hour News

01:08 min | Last week

Philadelphia's Warrington Residents Get Account Credits For Contaminated Water

"Township Township Township Township residents residents residents residents are are going going to to are are be be going going getting getting to to be be getting getting some some some some payback payback payback payback for for additional additional for for additional additional fees fees fees fees they they they they had had had had to to pay pay to to pay pay in in connection connection in in connection connection with with with with a a contaminated contaminated a a contaminated contaminated water water crisis. crisis. Ky. Ky. Nobody's Nobody's Paul Paul Kurtz Kurtz reports. reports. I think I this think is this just is excellent just excellent news news for for all all of the Washington of the Washington residents residents Marksman Marksman Coalition Coalition for Safe for Safe Water Water Co Co founder founder Joanne Joanne Stanton Stanton says says the the announcement announcement the the announcement announcement that that state state that that state state grant grant grant grant money money money money would would provide provide would would provide provide credits credits credits credits to to customers customers to to customers customers of of the the former former of of the the former former Warrington Warrington Warrington Warrington Township Township Township Township water water water water system system system system should should should should go go a a go go long long a a long long way way way way toward toward toward toward easing easing easing easing a a lot lot a a lot lot of of frustration. frustration. of of frustration. frustration. They They were were They They stocked stocked were were stocked stocked with with higher higher with with higher higher bills bills bills bills after after Warrington Warrington sold sold the system the system to North to North Wales Wales Township, Township, killing killing sure sure the delivery the delivery of clean of clean water water to residents to residents homes. homes. They had They to had pay to pay an extra an extra fee fee for clean for clean water water delivery delivery because because there was there was actress actress alteration alteration systems systems and we were and purchasing we were purchasing water water to have to a have commence a commence to different. to different. Municipal Municipal township township representative representative Todd Todd Stevens Stevens was one was of one several of several state state lawmakers lawmakers who helped who helped secure secure the funding. the funding. The goal The goal is is to do to credit do credit each of each the customers of the customers for the for amount the amount that they've that expended. they've expended. Over the Over years, the years, the groundwater the groundwater in Warrington in Warrington and and neighboring neighboring townships townships was contaminated. was contaminated. Pee Pee fast fast chemicals chemicals from from firefighting firefighting foam, foam, Stephen Stephen says says there are there no are people no people us anymore, us anymore, and the and goal the goal moving moving forward forward is to is keep to keep the water the water clean clean could maintain could maintain that standard that standard cost cost money, money, and and that's that's one of one the things of the things that our that our son son can be can used be used for. for. I'm I'm

Township Township Township Tow Paul Paul Kurtz Kurtz Washington Of The Washington R Joanne Joanne Stanton Stanton KY Warrington Warrington Warringt Warrington Warrington Wales Township Municipal Municipal Township T Todd Todd Stevens Stevens North Wales Warrington Stephen Stephen
Bill Gates: Rich nations should shift entirely to synthetic beef

Glenn Beck

01:15 min | Last week

Bill Gates: Rich nations should shift entirely to synthetic beef

"On fake meat for the sake of the planet in a recent interview with M I T Tech REVIEW The Microsoft co founder slash philanthropist slash farmer as double down on his beef with beef, arguing that rich countries Should ditch the rib eye and fill their shopping carts with fake meat instead. While going to plant base isn't a viable option for the poorest 80 countries, Gates said. I do think all the rich countries should move to 100% synthetic beef. You'll get used to the taste. I love this How these people are just telling us what we're going to get used to, and we're going to like You'll get used to the taste difference, and the claim is they're going to make it taste even better over time. Oh, great. Eventually, green premium is modest enough that you can sort of change the behavior of people. Or use regulation to totally shift the demand. Oh,

Microsoft Gates
Johnny Pacheco, who popularized salsa music in the US, dies at 85

Night News

00:29 sec | Last week

Johnny Pacheco, who popularized salsa music in the US, dies at 85

"Salsa Music's funnier Records co founder Johnny Pacheco has died. Chaco was music director, composer, arranger and producer there at the label. Which tweeted out today. They're Pacheco was the man most responsible for the genre of salsa music. It was the band made in backer of salsa stars like Celia Cruz, Willie Cologne, Ruben Blades, Hector Lavoe, his wife said. He was admitted to the hospital a few days ago forward pneumonia and Pacheco died Monday at the age of

Salsa Music's Funnier Records Johnny Pacheco Chaco Pacheco Willie Cologne Ruben Blades Hector Lavoe Celia Cruz Pneumonia
Interview With Emma Grede

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | Last week

Interview With Emma Grede

"Emma thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. How i thank you so much for having way and mary excited to talk to you about everything that you've done but first let's jump into skimming your resume so my best job was when i was like twelve and i had to pay around and it gave me my best taste of cash. Which was just wonderful pitches stopped working since then. I went through the hosted in my life working in retail. And i had always weighty being about sasha i loved that world i come from place where you know. It was really devoid of any kind of fashion obama. So i found was really gravitating towards you. Know just the beauty and the supermodels and the brands you know. As i was growing up it was all about the saatchi and chanel and families that working in designer stores in and then my first proper job of coming out of college. I studied business at the london college of fashion and went straight into fashion. Show production avow myself in this really all. Its little niche because in london guests there. Was this amazing. You know london fashion week. Where all of these brilliant designers but nobody really had the money to put on this show. So i ended up in this strange donation of sponsorship and kind of creighton bronze collaborations with the great and the good of the british fashion industry. And that's weighty. Where taught my teeth. And i think that when i think about what it is today and where i've found my success it already started in those early days of being a production company and really learning how to bridge the gap between the creative businesses that fashion all and and more commercial bronze. And so. yeah. That was it for me. That's that was the beginning of it when something that people would be surprised to know about you. Oh i mean. I guess he will probably be surprised to know like how much about makeup i am. I guess maybe that's not something that you always associated with. Somebody who's an entrepreneur like my favorite thing to do is cooking and making things nice at the house. I'm an absolute festive fruit. Like the idea that. I get thanksgiving on top of christmas. Now i'm living in america could not be a need better. I'm not get to do that. Twice is at christmas participate so right now. That's all i think about is that. What is my thanksgiving menu table. Go look greg bat. That is my job. Elevate okay so. I love opening up our questions with entrepreneurs like yourself by talking about your childhood because our childhoods shape all of us and informs ultimately who we are in in how we make decisions. I want you to paint a picture for us about how you grew up in how you think that's shaped you. Yeah it's a great question on a great more. I failed so much of may an how i behave. How i treat people have chosen to comes from my childhood and you know i had a reedy great childhood. I grew up for e kind of a poll basically in east london very deprived area. And i say it so blatantly as that is because you know. It wasn't only devoid of glamour. It was completely devoid of opportunities. Everybody in that community had lived there their entire lives and you seemingly could get out of it. It was a huge jack of opportunity. A huge lacquers education and i saw for myself in my mother who really kind of broke through an managed to create something else for. She was a single mother with four children and my mom found herself. You know working in the stock exchange becoming a trader having a job for twenty plus years at morgan stanley. And that for me was you know it was just like a gateway sunday could see that you know you could create with with a lot of hard work and today and if you really did that you get rid of that to pay off then you could really really really change your outlook very very early on i. I really believe that the harder. I what the more likely would be to get myself out of. Why soares a pretty kind of dire situation but of course when you live and you grow up like that doing something you know. I could understand it if you're a doctor lawyer or going into banking fashion just didn't seem like a way out to me and so there are times in my life where i definitely thought. Oh am i on the wrong path which is ultimately why. I went and studied business at the london college fashion. Because i believe that. If i could set that foundation in business and have this specialism fashion that at least it would ground me that if all that fun bit didn't work out. I'd still have the basics of business. And i could go and run construction company. Also something

London London College Of Fashion Greg Bat Saatchi Sasha Emma Creighton Chanel Mary Barack Obama America Morgan Stanley London College
Lincoln Project co-founder resigns from board amid group's scandals

The Hidden Wealth Solution

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Lincoln Project co-founder resigns from board amid group's scandals

"The leadership shakeup continues within the anti Trump group known as The Lincoln Project. Co founder Steve Schmidt resigned from the board last night as the group faces increased scrutiny over Howard handled sexual harassment allegations against another co founder, Six former employees of the Lincoln Project are calling on the group to waive non disclosure agreements or India's writing in a letter to The New York Times, they have information quote that would aid the press. Public and our donors and answering questions relevant to the public interest. The Lincoln projects leaders have long been fiercely critical of former President Trump's India's. This comes fresh on the heels of the scandal surrounding John Weaver, a co founder who's been accused of sexually harassing young men. Boxes. Gillian

Trump Group Steve Schmidt Lincoln Howard India President Trump The New York Times John Weaver Gillian
Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

Science Friday

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

"We're talking about challenges for genetic research. 20 years after the first draft of the human genome was published with my guests, Dina Zelinsky, a bio infirm, a Titian with the Paris transplant group. And elite scientists for civil tech and crystal, soc and indigenous geneticist bioethicist with Vanderbilt University and the Native Bio Data Consortium Crystal I introduced you as a co founder of the Native Bio Data Consortium. Which gets to an issue we've talked about in different ways on this program in the past indigenous sovereignty over genetic data, please remind us how big an issue this is. Yeah. So when we talk about precision, medicine and health were always promising that the next advantages and innovations will be conferred to those individuals that contribute the genomic information. The pandemic has shown that preventive healthcare and structural barriers to access to health care probably highlighted more about health disparities than this UN pronounced supposed to future advantages of healthcare. Indigenous peoples have You know, willingly or unwillingly contributed their didna for the supposed betterment of humankind Need I remind everybody what happened after the completion of the Human Genome Project. We had the completion of large scale diversity projects such as the Human Genome Diversity Project and 1000 genomes project, which were denounced by over 600 plus indigenous nations worldwide that went to United Nations because they were concerned. About privatization and commercialization and exploitation of indigenous genomes and what has happened to those biomarkers collected from indigenous peoples from Central South America. Those bio markers are now freely and openly accessible to companies such as ancestry, Didna and 23 Me ancestry. Edna has hosted revenues over a billion dollars every holiday quarter since 2017 so we always have to ask yourselves. What exactly are the protections? Really? This data privacy and commercialization. The rate of technology outpaces our regulations, these new technologies and while we think that these protections are conferred by laws, which is the genetic Information nondiscrimination Act Last change. Companies are bought and sold. So we have to ask yourself what's the commercial value? The data that we're being asked to freely give away and how can we look to communities and empower communities to self directed decisions that are being made using their data? Dina, you contributed your data, and you gave it away freely. Do you not feel the same kind of threat here that exist? Not quite in the same way. No individuals of European ancestry make up the vast majority of genetic studies, and that's really problematic because they only make up 6% of the population. And I, I completely understand the threats to underrepresented populations. We should be sequencing these underrepresented populations, but we should be sequencing them with the idea of Making genomics research more equitable of giving back to these communities, not just taking from them. That being said, I can't even explain how useful data like that from the 1000 genomes project has been. I've used it in most of my projects. I have whole human genomes at the tip of my fingers. When I'm accessing this data, as well as other scientists, I think We generally have good intentions, so I currently use it in a study to better understand Parkinson's disease. That being said. I think in many cases, a lot of this data has restricted or limited access for researchers versus commercial entities. I agree here that we we really should limit what industry can or cannot do with with our data. Krystal. You mentioned preventive care and the pandemic. The human Genome Project. I remember promised to tell us everything about her genome. Doesn't this sort of tell people Hey, we know everything about you now and ignore the nurture part of the nature nurture debate. What I can tell you as a geneticist. My first skepticism and what I always tell tribal leaders is that genetic data is just the easiest type of data to collect. But genetic data does not. Predict as much about disease risk than we think. Other things such as access to care, cultural factors, colonial factors relating to help probably contribute more to the health differences and outcomes than actual genetics itself. Things like diet environment and lifestyle are things that we should be looking at. And definitely socioeconomic status by factors. But these are the hardest bits of data to collect. And so we really can't build truly robust models without looking at these other factors related to health. So looking at genetics and biological factors is sometimes a little bit of a cop out. You don't necessarily properly convey the limitations of genetics and biological research to the lay

Dina Zelinsky Native Bio Data Consortium Human Genome Diversity Project Central South America Vanderbilt University Human Genome Project Paris Edna UN Parkinson's Disease United Nations Dina Krystal
Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

Esports Network Podcast

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

"Any of these Sports networks other properties on this episode of the E Sports Network podcast for bringing back a gasp from about a year ago wage a little more bonetti. He's the co-founder and CEO of on zoo in a more. Welcome back to the Shelf. Hey meets great to be here tomorrow is on the show back in February of 2020 where we discussed the growth of in-game advertising age people who miss that show or too many of our new listeners since then on to his a platform that makes it easier for braids to get into video game worlds and for developers to open up more potential White spaces in their games for Grants Pass. I'll do is work with Publishers like Ubisoft at lide Castle to deliver Brayden moments for major. It's like Samsung Pepsi American Eagle and many more Esports. We've seen it gave ads take Auto larger role especially patiently League of Legends open up space in summoner's Rift and it was filled by MasterCard an Alienware among other partners and just this morning as a record this on Wednesday, February 10th, 2021 rocket League announced that Ford is going to take over there it gave Billboards for the upcoming which are major on zoo also had a big adults with this what the platform recently raised nine million dollars in additional capital in around Kool-Aid buyback Fetchers and hbse Ventures. There is participation by plenty more investors, of course, including Mark Merrill, one of the two founders of Riot games, this follows two other funny raises of three and five million. So in Mark Gratz of the race, first of all, what are the plans for this capital? Yeah, thank you Mitch. So as you said we raised 9 million dollars beatcraft is one of our previous investors are still leading gaming Esports v c. B c is a new VC which comes from the sport world and a lot of touchpoints around gaming and then other investors are wpp the biggest advertising group in the world, which is also like in the existing investor and Sony Innovation fund, you know, Sony is one of the biggest gaming groups in the world and the owner of PlayStation. So that's a privilege to have them on board Mark Romero the founder and chairman of road games on League of Legends. As you mentioned didn't call ins the founder and CEO of super awesome that recently got acquired by epic games and the Chicago Cubs. Yeah, the baseball team go Ventures and gainesville's and illumine Adventures. So a very crowded and exciting structure of invest investors to have on board. I'm a Cardinals fan so we'll let the dog So invested things slide, I guess but grats on all the different people who came together you mentioned before we started recording you were in the position that every founder kind of hopes. They find themselves in which is we have a few people. We have a different options for Capital so we can pick the people that make the most strategic sense for us going forward. What did you find from the mobile the different investors? What were you looking for? Especially as guiding parts of the company to push it Forward? Sure. So I mean, you know what this round was not about it was not about as fast as we could have fine as it like very very fast as what it was about bringing the best structure. Number one number two, it was about, you know to maximize shareholder value. We could raise almost double the amount but we didn't want to make sense. This is the amount of cash we need for next stage Rose and then in the future if it's a year from now or two years from now we can do another round off. For that makes sense. So we were not looking at at you know, these things it was more about we have a lot of confidence in him. Advertising is going to become a major business model for game divorce across all platforms, through PC Mobile and an important ads category four Brands media agencies and the ESPYs and and the question is how fast can that happen or more sneaking about big Brands big Publishers not easy companies to convince them to do something new. So when we meet partners that can help us to make this happen faster than wages. Are we get excited one form to partner is again investment one is a strategic partnership and they can elaborate more of some of the Partnerships we have in place and some of them is people who join our team. So that was what was guiding us and looking at the different, you know buckets of we are investors came from there is some you know, some like VCS and financial institutions. There is advertising and groups. There is game. Groups and there is a sports organizations that have a lot of touch point in going to become an important overlap in my opinion the next two years. And of course there is like with the values that we want to group represents and communicate us companies gauges as the leading investor for equal opportunity and Which choice for us an important to him and announcement to basically said if the world that was how we were looking at it that's a great place to be at

Bonetti Lide Castle Hbse Ventures Mark Merrill Mark Gratz Sony Innovation Mark Romero Road Games On League Of Legend Brayden Ubisoft Alienware WPP Mastercard Samsung Mitch Chicago Cubs Ford Gainesville
Chinese forced to grapple with a Lunar New Year COVID conundrum

Morning Edition

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Chinese forced to grapple with a Lunar New Year COVID conundrum

"New Year celebrations in the countries of Vietnam, South Korea, China and the U. S. So the ringing in of the year of the ox will be a largely virtual affair. But that means festivities hosted by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Freer and Sackler Galleries in Washington, D C may draw an even wider audience. will headline the virtual celebration. The first piece is nicknamed the writer That's a realist and Shanghai Quartet co founder Hyung Gong Li second piece is a set of Chinese folk songs. Arranged by off friend and my friend and old schoolmate of mine So long, we were looking for folk songs that we thought would be evocative of this kind of Lunar New Year and his folk songs are just beautiful, and that's the Shanghai quartets, cellist Nicolas Severus. Theo. Entire performance, which will debut on YouTube tomorrow evening was pre recorded at one of Juilliard's performance halls in China. A kaleidoscope of brief musical journeys that takes you from the nostalgic to the sorrowful to the upbeat If you're happy you want something happy? There are happy music, And sometimes they only last a minute or two minutes long, You know which cheer you up, bringing to music lovers worldwide a soundtrack for the start of a new year and maybe a chance to taste the promise of more hopeful times to come. Paying your debt to

Freer And Sackler Galleries Shanghai Quartet Co Hyung Gong Li Smithsonian American Art Museu Nicolas Severus South Korea China Vietnam Washington Theo Juilliard Shanghai Youtube
This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

Equity

03:07 min | 2 weeks ago

This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

"Is raising money. And i think this is a really cool company and i want you to tell us all about it. Athena raised money in june with two million round for anti harassment software that it would send to companies and companies basically. Install it for their employees. You'd get a nudge every month. Five minute training and it'd be kind of this idea of making a more flexible way of learning about how to deal with modern situations that might rise up better than the one hour lecture. This is a shift in its focus. Because before was doing kind of one thing and now it's doing a broader array of things when it raised in june was just doing anti harassment in zoom and slack world and now eight months later. It's another two million co led by the same firm. Gsp that let first round of it's and it's going into anything compliance related whether that's how to make sure you are not doing insider trading by mistake or or other bits like that and it's they leaned on big customers which was the impetus for this round including netflix's doom and send us and so for an early stage startup. Those are big names. They have twenty thousand active employees completing their monthly training which the co founder is a positive signal that it's at least getting engagement in some way. Are you currently caught up on your corporate training for verizon media group as managing editor one of my wonderful tasks at the company is to actually monitor our employees to make sure they follow all of the different trainings that they have to do. Because i am the one who gets. The e mails for a bunch of folks that says so and so is sixty days later on their annual compliance training. We will delete thirty male if they do not respond immediately. Did not know that was a state attorney question again dan. Natasha and i caught up on our vm. I think you're mostly caught up february's if you are not cut up would have been fired because most the recordings are due in december. So if you haven't done them you would be out nailed it tauscher. There's also some grows numbers and our notes here. Something like two hundred and fifty percent growth quarter over quarter. What is that metric tracking in the athena's since it was tracking basically the amount of people who are on the platform amount of learners. That are coming to athena. Obviously those big contracts and mentioned earlier help them be able to prove that like any startup. right now knock sharing revenue profitability et et cetera. They're just hoping to use this money to gain new customers and figure out that stuff. Later is spelled. E. t. h. e. n. a. Not of in ethene like it's like patina but it's not blockchain related. I usually ask founders for the story behind their name but recently i guess i have not been good enough to that curious enough about how that came together. I think the idea of little mini modules. Make sense. I mean some of the things i actually remember. From compliance training are like mini modules for instance detectors by verizon media and reisen media's owned by and say verizon because it has infrastructure works with government a lot and so in our corruption training which had to take. Oh yeah there's this great story of like you're working hard at work in the field and you have a city official with you. Can you offer them a bottle of water on a hot day. And i was like stir and there's like wrong committed bribery and corruption and a dig radiation to american society. You may not offer anything of value. Not even a penny. You can't offer free water bottle or kick cat.

Verizon Media Group Athena Netflix Tauscher Natasha DAN Verizon Media Reisen Media Verizon American Society
Interview With Evan Kuo

Bitcoin Radio

06:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Evan Kuo

"Welcome back to imagine twenty twenty. I'm yonaha coutts and today. I'm glad to join by co co founder of ampleforth ebonics of joining. The i'm glad to be here. And i see you're wearing a costume for this halloween themed interview necessary. I i know it's not a very scary costume but this is what had around the house so you'll have to forgive me right. It might be scary if you stand up. Exactly i'm gonna sit. I'm gonna sit camera token upward for those who haven't seen any your past interviews. Who might not know. You wanna give a background kind of who you are and how you got the blockchain. Yeah totally so On my background is in engineering. School at uc berkeley to study kind of mechanical engineering and also computer science got more and more pulled into that direction of robotics but then you know after graduating quickly went into the startup world and eventually kind of Teamed up with my co-founder brandon aisles. He's also kind of a computer scientist. Said he's more of a a google search engineer And the time of a twenty seventeen after therion was really taking off We started to kind of think. About what sorts of applications block chain. Technology might be interesting to explore We had both been introduced to bitcoin years prior. We both kind of didn't fully believe you know it would be as revolutionary as. It wasn't about an interesting and anyways we kind came to this mutual conclusion. That the most salient application of blockchain technology degree the be monies and then began a journey asking what sorts of new monies ought to be created are can be created with this new technology and in particular. We're interested in non. Collateralized currencies like bitcoin as opposed to redeemable collateralized currencies like tether anyways Ampleforth is a cryptocurrency like bitcoin. Except for the number of units in your wallet can increase or decrease does so each day based on price exchange rate so it accepts a price as an input as a proxy for demand. If there's more demand and supply than increase the total supply of ample directly to use our wallets and proportioning there's less A demand and supply than we decrease the quantity of units proportionately from user wallets and the design of this crypto currency was actually meant to address the limitation of fix supply commodity. Money's like gold and bitcoin and along the way We kind of we were. We were funded by a you know. Really kind of reputable leasees were also advised by two members of the hoover institute which is a political and economic thing at stamford in their independent capacities and anyways long story. Short upon further analysis We also realize that this new kind of incentive mechanism or protocol Might introduce a different movement patterns to the space and so that's really interesting because most of these cryptocurrencies very very tightly correlated And it makes it difficult to kind of make them useful. In baskets of collateral assets or to construct you know robust systems on top of it and so two things one we designed it to address the limitations in fix apply money and two we noticed that And hypothesized that it might have novel movement pattern. That could allow to decouple for mass. It's like bitcoin. Which makes it useful for. Diversification at basket of of crypto assets. So that's kind of ampleforth in a nutshell okay. Well it does seem like a like a great idea does addressing those problems. You mentioned You know obviously knipling. The price fight supply and demand. Classic out it's an economic officials. But how do you actually change the amount or the value in actual you can hold it in a in a special wallet. And what a flip on keeping my ample in foot. How does your network right. That's a really great question. Actually that's the kind of the one technical breakthrough here That we take advantage of its The the the ampleforth protocols able to increase or decrease apply across all wallets proportionately without a transaction between pierce and the way that happens is but we adjust this kind of global coefficient of expansion if you will And by adjusting that single variable once every day. It's actually not we do it. But the protocol does so once every day automatically You know the number of units in all wallets whether they're in cold storage or not an increase or decrease now if your wallet your ankles being held on an exchange in the exchange tends to pool these wallet addresses so the jane wallet Quantities will automatically increase in decrease according to the protocol But if somebody's custody in your assets in pulled it then it's the responsibility of the custodian to make sure that the accounting is up to date. Because if you're if you're are in exchange really what's being reflected near-balanced might be just some entry in the database not what's actually directly connected to a wallet because they pull wallet addresses and therefore the certain exchanges that integrated ample have essentially propagated that accounting Into into the wall balances or the balances that are displayed to users. But yeah kind of happens automatically. So that's kind of the novel thing would never in the past people to do that. Like increase or decrease the quantity of units in people's wallets without a transaction between pierce and. That's what allows us to happen in a scalable way with just a single transaction per day And so yeah it's cool. It's elastic and it's also. Non diluted mentioned this earlier like bitcoin.

Yonaha Coutts Uc Berkeley Brandon Aisles Co Co Hoover Institute Bitcoin Knipling Stamford Google Pierce
"co founder" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:02 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Today's Wednesday. September thirtieth. America's blood pressure is up Disney theme park jobs are down and we're focused on one of Silicon Valley's most controversial companies. Earlier today Pantene tear technologies went public on the New York Stock. Exchange. It did so via a direct listing rather than an IPO. But that's not even the interesting part except to finance nerds instead it's because Pailin tear has long been known as secretive and controversial and to be honest unique with within tech industry known for Copycat. ISM. Penalty was created in two thousand and three to apply information technology to anti-terrorism campaigns by a group of founders who included current CEO, alcs, carp current venture capitalist, Joe Lonsdale, and Peter Thiel, the well-known facebook director, and inform advisor to president trump. Also pledged to help secure people's data from their own governments kind of philosophy of we'll help them find you. But only if you've done something really bad. As Alex Kerr recently told axios on HBO. If the US government targets somebody with a drone strike chances are that talents your software was used somewhere along the way. Pound tears since. Moved into work with government entities like ice, which obviously doesn't make it to popular in large swath of liberal Silicon Valley. It also works with governments if foreign. And a growing number of businesses which represents around half of its revenue. Oh and speaking of revenue and balance sheets pound. Cheers unprofitable despite a massive valuation and a longtime in business. So we want to dig into what Palette here is and what it isn't with company CO founder Joe Lonsdale, who no longer works pound here but who continues to be paid a consulting fee and who holds a whole lot of Pailin tear stock that conversation in fifteen seconds. Bridge Bank knows the INS and outs of business ups and downs and remains dedicated to providing financial solutions to the risk takers, the game changers, and the disrupters those committed to leveraging innovation to make the world a better place bridge. Bank is a division of Western Alliance, Bank ridgeback be bold venture wisely. We're joined. Now by Joe Lonsdale a CO founder of technologies also, a venture capitalist who runs Eight v C.. So Joe, what was kind of the mission when you help found Pailin tear basic idea was to take a really competent technology culture that had gotten way ahead of Washington D. C. and to apply to solve the most important problems going on at the time, which was basically to help bring together data to solve. Problems and stop terrorism stock attacks while protecting civil liberties the protecting civil liberties you obviously well, no kind of some of the criticism of Pailin tear, which is this idea that has gone from as you say, kind of protecting US troops overseas to enabling whether it be ice or NSA to spy to a certain extent on Americans how do you respond to that because it seem to be kind of a fundamental mission creep? Well, if you look at what we're doing, we're helping augment the human mind to act on data and act on data they're allowed to act on and to me it's really ironic that is seen as problematic that way because the whole idea was, let's build in such a way that people are only allowed to see share they're allowed to see in share. So there's audit trails you can watch the watchers. It's a rather than like the show twenty four were Jack Bauer goes and just whatever he wants to get the bad guy let's have a system. That only lets them use the data legally only the way they're allowed to you, and that's the whole point is helter is a privacy engine that lets you only see what the rule say allowed to see. How does Powell to your protect that data from talent here basically set up there, and it's very clear how pounder works with whoever's in charge always see who's accessing what so I mean I suppose it is possible that if the people using it are doing. So in a way, it's it's hidden from pounds here in charge all the way up the top could be involved in. Something, they're not supposed to be doing that is the power they have. However, it's designed such way. It's very hard for any small bricks to get away with anything. They not supposed to do because people talk about full control and can't see what happened. What was access isn't that one of the concerns that when you've got a company that's collecting and analyzing and kind of merging so much data that even though whether it be ice or the NSA or some corporate customer doesn't have access, there is somebody who has access and it does open the possibility of there being a bad actor somewhere. Well it makes it a lot harder to have a bad actor. If you haven't information infrastructure that's tracking everything tracking exactly how it's used and the has pounds here itself doesn't have access to all the data that people are using pounds here to work on. So it's not like talent you're sitting in the middle is able to see everything. You're always when I read a story about that, it's referred to as the secretive silicon valley technology company I know this bothers me a lot and you know what it is. Helen chairs culture is really good at getting the most talented engineers technologists in the world and saw the really hard problems in these really cool missions they go on with their customers to work on penalty here does not have very sophisticated and built out PR group. In fact, the PR strategy seems to be to avoid talking to the press I. Guess that makes us secretive but it's funny because we go to their site they explain. How the technology works explain when it's it's really complicated. Building information infrastructure is not easy. It's not complicated most of us don't understand it so I think rather than secretive is that it's doing something that is just relatively Tarik most people, Alex Carpet Interview with my colleague Mike. Allen for our HBO show about a month or two ago, and he talked about how even within his own family certain things pound here has decided to do have been controversial for you. Are there things are their customers their clients at has taken on that? You think man if I was in charge, we wouldn't have done that. It's an interesting question. Actually I don't have full information on exactly how it's working western countries in the Middle East I tend to be very pro enforcing the laws in the US never they are working with our allies works with thirty to forty nine over five countries probably were forty point. I'm very allying with talents here. Don't China don't work with Russia Iran Etcetera. Obvious one son other allies in the Middle East I. Don't know exactly how they're using it. I. Always get a little bit of a queasy feeling myself. Exactly what people do in certain countries where my values are not aligned with their pounder has a strong set of principles internally but I've actually not privy conversation since I can't say for sure that I, agree with every. Choice. They've made their but in general I support with Algiers done number like trout and all these things they've done does that include ice and I guess I asked the question because the company originally was kind of founded at the time of the Iraq war and as you said, was kind of an anti-terrorism thing in part it seems correct me if I'm wrong about this. The part of its technology is being used by not to identify violent criminals, but to identify people whose sole crime is crossing a border but not violence. Well, in general, the company has to make a choice he's going to support US laws are not you know I was actually when I started we joke, maybe we shouldn't be helping the IRS depending on different people have. Different views morally of that, and of course, it does out the IRS while I think in general helping the government do what does better is right thing to do I personally am very against some art immigration laws that said minor standing as the Obama Administration worked with here with ice and they actually ended up stopping a lot of child traffickers and caught law child. Traffickers, thanks their works Joe Your Day job now is being venture capitalist, identifying new tech companies which to invest. Do you see baby palim tears coming up from behind it? Because from my perspective on the outside, I don't seem to see much you've got a lot of big data companies but not ones that are aiming at the same sorts of markets found series. That's A. Really good question and actually gets the heart wise special company. It's actually something very similar to what we did without a apart is we took a bunch of really talented people and we worked on a problem that take four or five seven years to really solve properties very, very hard problem to take these things that used to be services and to make into products there's. One hundred billion dollars year services everyone around the world does that nobody else has been able to turn as many of them into products such a hard technical problem. So ideal hope to have somebody else spent hundreds of billions of dollars with equity driven team of the very top talent to be able to pounce here does I have not seen people.

Joe Lonsdale US NSA Middle East Pailin CO founder Silicon Valley America Pantene HBO New York Stock Western Alliance IRS Jack Bauer Alex Kerr Algiers alcs better place bridge
"co founder" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

03:48 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"Was summarizing his email. But in essence he had a developer who did some work on it earlier and it didn't work out and basically feels like you know kind of wasted the money early on. So doesn't WanNa make that mistake twice this feels similar to the to the prior to questions where someone has done some validation. Saying I think his questions is a little different. He saying should I find a technical co founder right? Yeah. He's. He's definitely hasn't jumped to the conclusion that he must find a co which I. Actually it sounds like especially since he's already had enough sort of business acumen and skills. To. Developed any has a product that he can bring customers into. So even said, he's already secured thirty customers that want to transfer from the APP they currently use to mind. Awesome do that if you have customers and your APP is going to work for them, then than help them, do the transfer and make them get them starting to pay for it, and then you can start seeing. Okay. Now can I grow this are? There, more customers out there and the downside of course, the doing this, the risks that you're taking is that you you validated with these thirty customers, but that's where it stops. Now I a feeling thirty people who are interested in something is a lot more than a lot of companies start with before going out to actually grow. So that's pretty awesome I. Really think that you ought to try to run with US A. Little Bit, and if you had a developer company that help build the revised version of this APP and it's working, then stick with them like get your customers end, get those thirty customers and maybe try to add on thirty more sixty more one, hundred more or whatever, and then use the money from that to fund further development with this company for a little while longer, it doesn't seem like you need necessarily a technical. Co founder yet because you seem to have a pretty solid base of knowledge and you've already made some mistakes on your own..

co founder developer US
"co founder" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

04:27 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on The Playbook

"See is the CO founder and CEO Four Ocean and he is truly a capacity capitalism. He doesn't seem like he's old enough or experienced enough to have the wisdom that he does but welcome to the playbook my friend. Thank, you very much for having me David I appreciate it. I always say you're wise beyond your years because I as a capitalist myself, it took me like two lifetimes before I understood how I could make a major impact in society while still you know creating revenue and and having a business and being able to balance those two things and also inspire people by doing those two things for you. Obviously, surfing's probably been a major part of your life and to be able to utilize that in a manner. To not only have a business but the help so many people's extraordinary Tell me exactly how that journey started where you made the transition from. You know because there's millions of kids that serve from you know taking a surf trip to Bali wherever to know figuring hey, maybe I have a business and then taking it to the next that would call the empty Mile Hey not only can have a business but I think I can truly impact the world. Yeah I think that it all started when when I was younger as well as my business partner. Andrew we both have grown up around the ocean were both licensed captains we've grown up surfing fishing diving. I mean I grew up on a smaller on the west coast of Florida, and it's just the ocean has been my lifestyle literally growing up on the water spending all my free time there and and just growing up a both and I have both been very entrepreneurial. You know I I. was I used to have lemonade stands on the corner is young I was doing car washes I was doing I was cutting lawns I. was you know you name it? I was doing I could just always trying to you know be entrepreneurial and the same thing with Andrew and we went to fau here in. Boca Raton on the southeast coast of Florida and you know it was there that. We spent most of our time. You know when we're not class out on the ocean and realized that we always wanted to start a business around what we're passionate about, and that's the ocean.

CEO Four Ocean Andrew David Florida Boca Raton CO founder Bali partner fau
"co founder" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

04:49 min | 8 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on The Playbook

"Needs. How important are your sales skills? Not just in the situation of knowledge of what a sales person would need in this aspect of sending platform born, but moreover in building a business, this scaling of business, raising money all the different facets of of business that you've built. Yes I think in the early days me and my co founder brain were actually both sales background so we were it was. Easy for us to start counting pavement early on and called Colin Sibusiso Alien Getting our first fifty one hundred customers. That was like you know no brainer to us. Still I think that helped accelerate momentum in in that I. Think sometimes. If you're a product engineering founder you, don't it? You may be reluctant to go. Get a cold call get. In the door so for us. That was just like you know what we knew, so I think early on it helped build early. Momentum our customers. Another thing for me was. Building Company with got you know. In the mid two hundreds of employees now and so that's a lot of hiring a lot of recruiting at so I think recruiting is also my sales has helped me. Go and find amazing people to join me on this amazing journey, and so there's some selling their in terms of you know. Hey, you should leave your company that you're currently. Go join this company. And so I think from recruiting embiid heavily involved in that since day zero and my sales skills, there have been really helpful. And then even today I think. I meet with a ton of customers among this virtual customer roadshow right now where I've met with a few hundred customers literally in the past month, and my sales skills of also healthy a with very attitude. Get in front of customers. Talk about what they love about. Sibusiso, your customer stories get product incites. Versus. You know if I maybe wasn't as extroverted really customer facing. It might be easier for me to hide behind the company walls and..

Colin Sibusiso co founder founder
"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

04:02 min | 8 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Pioneers Around the World – Engineering Pioneers

"Something, on Rwanda at least I want to walk into a memory that you have of Rwanda because I have never been in Rwanda. And I think a lot of people here so many. Amazing stories of the business ecosystem in wonder. Maybe. If you could. As a closing closing closing I don't know what to call it closing experience four for people listening to you. How! How's your day to day in? Wonder? What is the most? The most amazing either place or thing about wonder that you can share. That has also made your your life as a CO founder. Much more easier or much more enjoyable because you are stationed in in Rwanda maybe something that you can share with us on on what's wonder is like.

Rwanda CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

06:16 min | 9 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"A holiday that marks the end of slavery in America which is why it's been referred to as the true independence. Day I hope all of you were able to honor the day in your own way and reflect on what it represents. I'm so glad you're tuning in because today's episode is incredibly special I know I say that every week, but this week really is. It's with Powell of alleged a pastry chef based in Washington DC and the CO founder of Baker's against racism. The initiative started as simple call to unite bakers in the fight against the unjust treatment of black people in the United States, Paula and her co founders were hoping eighty or so people would join in their bake sale and stead. They sparked a global movement bakers against racism, his ignited solidarity on five continents and seventeen countries, and in forty one states until corona virus devastated the restaurant Industry Paulo was the pastry chef at the critically acclaimed afro-caribbean restaurant, kith and kin, she has creative, charismatic, honest and force to be reckoned with the industry is lucky to have Paula in it, I'm honored to bring you this conversation. So Palo. We're GONNA start at the beginning. I'm telling me where you spent your childhood. So I grew up in the Bronx. In New, York City and every summer for three four months depending on. How my mom felt I would go to the Dominican Republic and lived there. She thought it was really important to make sure that I. Slit my difference Salah I knew my heritage, but also you know experienced the American way of life. And did you stay with family members in the Dominican Republic? Yeah, before everything happened like with my grandmother. Passing away my grandfather fascinating way, we would just stay our family home in the what we call is uncomfortable, and it just means the well. It means camp literally translated, but it just means like the countryside that's where I kind of like learned how to appreciate food, and how to grow my own veg and herbs and appreciate like fresh fruits. You see a lot of that in my desserts. Now I'm so sorry lost your grandparents winter. They pass away. I was young. I was fairly young. You know maybe ten all the so hard. Yeah, it was it was difficult. You know, but my grandmother really with the time that we did have she. impacted my life. Changed. Everything that I thought about you know where before I might have not appreciated food, because when you think about American culture, you think about fast. She kinda like helped me like slow down at a very young age, and really look and see in what the earth against us, and how the world nourishes us from a very very young age I understood the complexities of food, and how we hold our heritage through it. Can you tell us some of the things that she both cooked and grew, she would cook a big meal which consists of rice beans, chickens that we would grow not grow. Her is very traumatic first because they were my pets and then I realized very quickly. The food system was like Oh. You know she would make this huge meal and she would invite everybody in the neighborhood. Everyone that was able to come. If you it didn't matter if you're rich poor, it didn't matter if you're young or old, and we all kind of sit in the front yard in the backyard and eat from my grandmother's food and she had that meal in Cup of Coffee Ready. Ready in the middle of the day for everybody always matter what was going on and our lives. She had that ready, and that's something that we as a family now when we go to the Dominican Republic, we continue as a tradition, so everybody knows our family to be hosts, so it's very fitting that now I work in the hospitality industry. Did Your Grandmother Specialty. Yes, so she would make coconut rice with peace so much Guan Lula cocoa and it was cooked in the woodfire. We had like a house that was open open air that they had bricks that you put your woodfire in, and that's how she would cook. Everything was cooked, by Soviet, Elena, which means over fire while all of my experience in the Dominican Republic I didn't know what stove was in the Dominican Republic. My my brain never made that connection that you could have. A gas stove. 'cause we always use what fire so. How about some of the things that that she would grow you mentioned fruits. You mentioned herbs. What were some of the things in her garden? Her. Garden consisted of this plot of land in front of our house, and behind our house, and we call it in cal-, and cal means the Cacao trees, and it was just rows and rows and rows, and rows of of wild ca cal that would naturally in our backyard laced in between were mango trees, tamarind avocado plantations right next to our house in our well of rain water was guava and passion fruit, which I always like to say whatever fruits like. Like to grow together will always taste good together. We had herbs in the back in the shaded area. Where is anything that you can think of shot? They CILANTRO or no Kulan. Throw and more we had for me. We had lemongrass growing by the side of the House and I would drink that tea, and it would be a natural mosquito repellent so pretty nice, you know. Oh, my Gosh! I'm starting to get the impression that it's no surprise. You became a chef. I I think so? I mean it was a good fit i. feel like I was the only one in my family. That kind of took that same sentiment of food, and being connected with nature like that like my grandmother did and turned it into a way to give back to the community, so I've always been using food. As a way to connect with other people because I'm very shy I don't make like a great first impression is very awkward at first I'm like. Oh, I'm sorry you had to go through that with me. You know, but with food I can show you who I am without.

Dominican Republic Paula CO founder Palo United States Industry Paulo America Washington Powell Salah Guan Lula Baker York City Elena
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

07:46 min | 10 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Take your personal experience in in arbitrage of personal experience. Okay go ahead Eric. If you wrote this today besides the every quicker would it be meaningfully? Different not really. I think I think some of the things have been sped up. Because you know you you. Can Incorporate online stripe is there? No Code is there. I'd probably advised not and and online services much more right because you can get pretty far that I might also say that you know and this is the third model. At which is you might serve the community. So there's idea there's executioners community right so you know nowadays on I've got a following on my twitter removes or what have you and the interaction of them is sort of like you know person community Fit Right. And then that community you can withdraw. A protocol can withdraw a product and so forth. And that's something. I was just less thinking about back in twenty thirteen today but that might be third angle on things you know to take a community. I approach and how about the Kobe requests for startups or anti replacement startups. This shea. Talking about I. What is this graph? This is the Telegraph of thousand days in the life of Thanksgiving Turkey. Life improves improves improves. And then a ridiculous sudden reversal. Okay and we're seeing Thanksgiving Day charts across the economy and where the rubber is orange. Okay and look at that ridiculous Thanksgiving giving day drop and breach by the way has risen dramatically right so uber is now essentially just breeds their second. Business has become their first. That's literally their business. Okay now the thing about this is a reversal business. Plan for you know like fortunately for over it. At least the corporation they can. Disengage drivers when demand plummets. Like those but But that's like a you know ridiculous. Drop right like seventy percent drop revenue. However here's the thing. Notice how we dropped but not breeds one of things. I was short on Uber. Benatti reads is pretty good. It's pretty specific prediction in terms of what to be long insured on. And frankly you know. I never talk about trades online because that's investing Advice River Bellizzi. That if you had reallocated full you listen to me around the time you would have done pretty well right so like for example. X Rays drones antivirals. Cat Scans Autonomy Diagnostics. Facemasks remote were Tele presence bioinformatics at that holds up. One of those were in drones. Me Put an asterisk on simply because there's such supply chain disruption demand me there have been not not the supply we'll have to see. You can make VR headsets in the US but everything else is clearly going especially like Mike. Remote workshops zoom and stuff and then on the short side of things. I think that holds up pretty well as well traveled tender grinder hotels AIRBNB airlines in person. You know blue cities come back it up. Real estate is crashing commercial real estate and blue cities restaurants conferences digital nomads. In the sense of moving around the world. You can't do that anymore. Remember Berates so I think that holds a pretty darn well right and I think that's like let's call it a part of the comp investing thesis if you remember this concept of the digital divide this is the thing in the late Ninety S O. Some people have access to Internet others. Don't right so April seventh. This concept which I think is one mental model. The fiscal divide bright digital is now cheap with billions of smartphones around the world. It's a physical. That's expensive case for last two years. We've made the cost of putting a bunch of transistors on a chip that that's now cheap but putting a bunch of people in rooms now expensive okay so the measure of a competent society is one that can actually hold a rally if you can do that you are. You're confident in the people. There are confident of the steam and the diagnostics. And so on that you know you can have this huge crowd that it's being tested to them into their life and they all come and congregate there right. I from incompetence state and for citizenry. That is not cooperatives. The Commons are attracting. And you can't basically there's a field state in between your house in the next person's House. You have to wear masks you you know you basically house a like like a place where you can't show your face you know. Maybe it's pollution meets infection. It's not the comments aren't actually traversable. So I think this is a powerful mental model for the next several years at least that physical is expensive and one thing that means by the way is digital now cheap physicals now expensive so everybody is GonNa want offer substitute for things because you know Sadler tweet. By the way that I was really surprised. People wild doubt about the I one more question for you which is a CO founders. Are we sort of in the picking co-founder similar to sort of dating before that you're limited to the people that you went to college with or worked with or is that for Co founder? Is that actually good? She's should you stick to that pool. How do you think what's your framework for picking the Right Co founder? Yeah know so so like the way I kind of think about this is having and being like an investor and having seen like lots of these things and whatnot so you should pick somebody who who's is complementary to you okay and there should always be clear. Ceo that's like the most important component the thing about that is like the question of WHO's the CEO. That's like one of the very first conversations you need to have and ideally. It's something where that's obvious between between you but if it's not a for example at the beginning of joint base itself public knowledge but you know Brian and the Guy who helped found blocking didn't so they had a screaming. Send you know what they were outright and basically blocks company and Mrs Good Company. That type of stuff shouldn't be resolved. There's also an ideological dispute watching to be able to have a wallet where they couldn't have the password password reset four the road actually very substantive. It's two different visions of the future. Both of which trinite illegitimate visions of Crypto? Right true product. Difference on on simple thing pastor reset so so that's that's like a good example of a few things. I who's the leader Second Woods A LONG-TERM IDEOLOGICAL VISION THIRD OUR SKILLS COMPLIMENTARY? I do not do these. Co-founder dating sites or whatever. Kids these days you know like I don't know I don't know if that works. I feel some could work but it feels inorganic. Maybe you know I think the best thing to do is to actually work on a project with that person and find that there's an actual division of labor nothing substitutes for that because working with somebody is just very very different from talking to them on. It's like they have to cash the past when you throw it into it. What you meant not necessarily what you said. Lots and lots of little things like that have to tolerate your using 'cause nobody's ever heard strong and every dimension or some people are few and so I think actually doing and shipping project. Ideally one involves money and customer support with them like is is probably the best bet naked or something like that but try to push it all the way through such that book that you have legal liability together or or customers yelling you. That's real trial by fire. Balji thank you so much for coming on give a digital rotten for her volatility. If you're an early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you check us out. Village Global Davi seat..

Co founder Ceo twitter Eric Advice River Bellizzi US Kobe AIRBNB Benatti Mrs Good Company co-founder Sadler Co-founder
"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

The John Roa Show

02:45 min | 10 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on The John Roa Show

"This is one of the first major cancellations in America in a major shock to both attendees and the city of Austin, Texas. Canceling south by is more than just calling off a massive event or party. The festival was intertwined with the financial and personal livelihoods of ton of people global. South by two people got record deals where movies were picked up for distribution. Tons of money was raised for startups. Ideas were shared. It's even where twitter. South southbound was also a boon for hundreds and hundreds of Austin based businesses to sustain throughout the year to the tune of almost four hundred million dollars in revenue for the city. Canceling, the event is and will be devastating. To Austin The impacts everyone. The bars, restaurants hotels taxis the performers, free and everyone else in between. The CO founders of south by southwest music producer Roland Swenson writers makeup borrow and Lewis Black. Promoter Louis J Myers started the festival way back in nineteen, eighty, seven to promote and foster local talent. Now, the fate of south life hangs in the balance as does. The festival had to lay off a third of its staff after the cancellation. And fans rightfully called for refunds. South by didn't even have an insurance policy to cover the fallout. And then things went from bad to worse. More than one hundred and sixty thousand would be. Attendees aren't going to get a refund. Instead, it was announced that the badge purchasers for this season. Can. Defer their purchase to. The festival next you. Founder Louis Black, although he's not involved to day-to-day operation to the festival any longer. Says the news of the cancellation still devastated. He's weathered a Lotta stores. Pandemic something entirely different in south by not even the only project he's co-founded. That's taken a hit. Lewis is also the CO founder of the All weekly Austin Chronicle which has taken its fair share financial punches, but is still hanging in there. Somehow. Louis always manages to get back in the game. In two thousand fifteen, even start his own production company Lewis Black productions. Joins me on today's episode from an Airbnb in the small town of Lockhart Texas. To talk about south buys cancelation his retirement in the profound and often unpredictable ways. He helped to transform.

Austin Louis Black Promoter Louis J Myers America CO founder Lewis Black Austin Chronicle Texas twitter Lewis Roland Swenson Lockhart Texas Airbnb Founder producer
"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

04:00 min | 10 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"To build a mailing envelope. No we're going to buy a gift greeting card and blow. Oh let's go find DVD. Oh I see these close enough And that is. The skill is finding a proxy. Which allows you to begin learning about the world and your ideas your ideas place in it. It does not need to be repeatable or scalable at first at this an organ specific example. If I have time you're really briefly. Yeah so women. Women came to me At at an idea she goes he cool if we could do peer to peer clothing. Rental were basically. I know I have always clothing in my closet and I think I would want to rent that and I could rent. There's and she goes I'm Anita Mesa money and how do I find a co-founder? How do I build my initial APP? And I go. Whoa WHOA. Whoa whoa let's begin seeing some. Let's collide this idea with reality. Go get a piece of paper get a sharpy right on the piece of paper. WanNa borrow my clothes. Knock and pasted on your door right and let's see what happens. Let's see first of all anyone knocks if they do. Let's see what happens when they're looking for your clothes. Is there a fit problem? Is there a taste problem? Let's see if they do bar. You're close. Let's see how you feel when they come back stained or dirty or what you have to do to get them repaired or how you feel about this. Let's begin learning by doing nothing more than writing on a piece of paper with a Sharpie. You can't run a business like this but that's not what you're doing now you're trying to understand. Is this idea real? And she did that and little by little by little. She accumulated evidence about this problem and ways to solve it and so yes six months later when she was going to raise money and someone said how do I know this ideas. A good one. She could talk your ear off about the evidence. She had what people would pay. How long the rentals were how much you'd have to do for cleaning. What percentage And Wow that's the person you WanNa follow you back in invest in. Yeah it sounds like Renaissance Wag. Actually sounds bad. Exact business model but Is that she ever yes. It's a smaller business. Because she's still in school but she is moving ahead and she's moving ahead based on finding a way to. I caught validation hacking away to validate or idea without actually a doing it. For Real Right. I only have like a single story. That is almost a little different. But a friend of OUR EX GIRLFRIEND OF MINE. Her Dad wanted to start a business where he sold a MO mobility scooters and all he did was get business cards printed. He had no had no shop. He had no product. He had nothing he had a little bit. You know he knew you. He used to sell them in the past for a bigger company. Just got business. Cards and went door to door does not under the door until he had enough business where he could take fifty percent deposit and go actually by the scooter. And then he would do all the The the repairs themselves until we hire somebody. It's just everything was just started with a business card. I love that story because it is another entrepreneur. I know he he had an idea. Use at a party is eleven o'clock at night raining and they ran out of beer and all began arguing about who is turn. It has gotten find the beer. The usual Millennial problem Yeah the idea is cutting while ago because basically my phone knows where I am at knows. My taste has my credit card database. Open liquor stores great idea but same thing as your friend rather than saying. I'm going to raise money. I'm GONNA find a technical co founder going to build an APP going to test this. He just had business cards printed up. That said need beer. Call me with a cell phone number eight stand outside apartments on weekends and.

Anita Mesa co-founder co founder
"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

Building A Unicorn

02:42 min | 11 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

"Your clients. Montana is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer of Quinoa an online platform that allows you to easily create the business documents you need and then send them to your client as individual websites including dynamic pricing information and the ability to sign and accept that proposal. Right there on the web. The core idea behind cua is that Files suck at the way that the documents work in this. This world is sort of based on this like nineteen eighties way of thinking about the documents atmosphere being largely kept in place by the glorious Microsoft Monopoly And so all queries is a way for anyone to create. They had documents especially sort of customer facing documents as Web Pages. And so if you can re imagine a document on the ground As you know what you can do in the web and not have to be in this four rectangle hyper. What can you do you know? Why can't you have analytics? Like buttons? Do things why can't you haven't lived in this world of of SAS in the cloud where it can push and pull data from different systems rather than just being a dominant ugly file. Mock grew up in Sydney and throughout his childhood was surrounded by entrepreneurs. His Dad ran his own architectural business which he grew to around sixty or seventy staff and his uncle also had a number of startups. Mock went to school at Sydney Grandma and low. He was a good student. He couldn't see himself for showing the same kinds of career opportunities that his friends were interested in he wanted to carve his own path. Although he wasn't quite sure what that path would actually be. There was no like plan. There was no like I said. Look back on it like some people have these amazing narrative ox of their their life and their career. And I'm deeply skeptical because I think that really life happens and you. I think people who are very good at adjusting knowing Knowing where on paternity lies and able to dive into it. Sort of an opportunistic in that side. I think I think that sort of rings true to me and certainly I remember being at the end of highschool being like I feel have plan and I kind of really didn't have at university mock studied subjects. He was interested in. He did history and philosophy and also became interested in student politics but he thought maybe he wanted to issue. I curry in business. But it wasn't quite sure what that actually meant so when he's caused finished any trying to work out what to do. He ended up getting some work with his uncle on an e book. Stop cold read how you want. But.

Mock Sydney Chief Operating Officer of Qui Montana Microsoft cua CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"Say was interesting. That's when we found the wizard the is Diana Ruth. He was a coo co-founder but she creates all the products. She has an amazing background hard. Candy Bliss. Cosmetics was William Fung for a long time but she is just a creative genius and she will never ever create anything that already exists. She's all about innovation stories. Great Components Ray so we we joined forces with her by then. I remember her first meeting with us. We're all around the table going because we had a lot of. I did get a lot of passion like Rosie. Jody and I kind of just sat there staring at the three. I was going. Oh my God. This is going to be so interesting. She managed to take all this. This energy these ideas these thoughts and make them into tangible products I really think the interesting part of the packaging that sort of push pop idea with clear sight milk. It's very it's a very modern fawn. Yeah exactly it's very transparent as we are as a brand and everything about it. I always lean into the idea. That's for utilitarian so we have sticks. We have dispenses with rolling balls. We have click pens. Everything is extremely easy to use on the go as well because we originally always had the milk goals get ready quick We have so many things going on. They creative ambitious very fast. Paced lives the girl and the guy and we wanted to create something align that they could use very quickly in the back of a cab changed their look five minutes down town and something that you know worked really hard but was kind of Felicita on kind of rewrite. All those. The things that were contradiction terms. We wanted to rewrite. Why can't you get ready? Quick but still have really great payoff. Why can't you have cool products? That are actually still clean. They can still be extremely low maintenance but yeah a high tech.

Candy Bliss Diana Ruth co-founder William Fung Jody coo Cosmetics
"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

13:29 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Of girl boss. And you're listening to girl boss radio. Everybody's you know game is on point these days and I know I'm not the only person who loves to see crazy now are on instagram. Whichever way you spin it. The nail game is a pretty big industry but if we go back a few decades time well no Polish used to just be nail Polish. It was bland. There was a thing you grabbed at the drugstore on a whim. Or maybe you got a fresh manicure. You weren't really paying for the brand on the bottle that all changed with a little company called. Opie I yes that OPIE I. It's the go-to Nail Polish for a lot of us in on today's show we're going to hear from the CO founder and Brandon Basseterre for opie. I her name is suzy. Weiss Fishman and. She's known as the First Lady of meals. She actually co-founded Opie I with her brother-in-law and it started out as a dental products..

Weiss Fishman Brandon Basseterre CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"This CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD. AMERITRADE investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD Ameritrade our trade offers two different mobile APPs there's TD AMERITRADE mobile. Which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined? Simplicity or thinker. Swim Mobile. which gives you tools as you need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one? That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE AMERITRADE dot com slash APPs member SIPC bring in show musically. This is squawk Fahd the daily sleep podcast brought to you by the team behind squawk box. CNBC's essential morning chef worked every day. Get the best stories debate and analysis analysis from the biggest names in business and politics today on Squawk Todd. Joe Becky. Andrew are at the World Economic Forum with the planet's the most influential leaders in business and politics. We've got a huge lineup. This week. This is Are Super Bowl for the world of politics and business a roundup of the best sound bound from CNBC's interviews with the CEO's of Verizon Bank of America and steady plus the leaders of some of the best known and largest asset managers and hedge hedge funds in the world and an interview with author investor and Philanthropist David Rubenstein Co founder of one of the world's premier private equity woody firms. The Carlyle Group right. Now I don't see any prospect of a recession in two thousand twenty so pretty good the best of the World Economic Forum Day One plus some behind the sounds from Joe and Becky. We're double Switzerland. The Beautiful Alps beautiful behind us to bed. You guys can see it. I'M CNBC ABC producer. Cameron Kosta it's Tuesday. January twenty first twenty twenty squawk pod begins right now three one. Good morning everybody. Welcome to walk on. CNBC we are live from the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. I'm becky quick along with Joe. Kernan and Andrew Ross Sorkin the World Economic Forum is exactly that an Economic Forum Michael Corbett the CEO of city spoke to Joe Backing Andrew about the trajectory of the global economy. When you look at the growth prognostications coming up while we're here three point three percent global growth down from three point four four prediction but up from two point nine for the year right? So that's that's not horrible if you get some of these clouds to clear. I think they're still runway left here of course at a conference this size with this caliber of attendees there's a diversity of perspective and of advice. Ray dallaglio billionaire founder of bridgewater ladder at the world's largest hedge fund shared some of his firm's investment strategy issue is. You can't jump into cash. Cash is trash. Okay you have to have a well diversified portfolio and first of all you have to be global and you have to have ballots. Think that you have to have a certain amount of gold in your portfolio portfolio or you have to have something tarred another theme today and probably all week trade between the two biggest economies in the world the US and China Steve Schwarzman founder and CEO of Blackstone Group has a long history of business investments in China and was in the room for the phase one signing literally. He's he's competent. That fees to as at least a priority for both parties involved. It's in China's interest as well as the US interest to do a face to deal. Most of the tariffs were not rolled back in this phase. One so there's a lot of incentive if you will to get to face to and They're they're quite serious about that in China all your on Squawk box and certainly as long as we've been delivering use pod guests have been debating capitalism And that theme is no different at Davos. Twenty twenty on the broadcast this morning. Billionaire Hedge Fund manager Paul Tudor Jones. A legendary investor kept corporate responsibility. What's ability at the center of his conversation? We know what's happening right now. As causing millennials not to believe in the system. We know that there's a threat to free markets. I'd much rather see us. change the sharing agreements organically bottoms up where. CEO's put employees. I put with the planet in communities and customers on par with shareholders also calling for corporate. Responsibility was Brian Moynihan CEO Bank of America. He's he's also the chairman of the International Business Council an advisory body to the World Economic Forum itself but of all the companies apartment job is commit the carbon neutrality. That will help drive. I the demand for alternative energies at the power companies need to get them carbon neutral and the final theme today new tech the CEO of Verizon Hans. Berg says five G. is way closer on the horizon than some other things. What comes first? I get a five d phone where I fly on a seven thirty seven. Max We there without five G. You're getting the best of our Davos coverage right here on squawk pot coming up will be investor. Author journalist Philanthropist and Co founder of the Carlyle Group. David Rubenstein if I knew how to solve income inequality I'd be in Iowa. I do think she companies that worry about more than just shareholder return of probably the companies that are going to get more people buying their stocks in the end. And they're probably going to do better. Plus Katie. Kramer is onset in the Swiss Alps with the anchors. Ready by Beck apply Rubinstein's interview and in some behind the scenes of Davos.

CNBC CEO Joe Becky Davos Joe Backing Andrew Carlyle Group David Rubenstein Co China founder Joe founder and CEO Davos Switzerland US Switzerland Beautiful Alps Co founder Hedge Fund Swiss Alps Cameron Kosta
"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

13:12 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Don't get caught up in this perfect thing the test everything try something and fail at it because the failure is learning moment ladies and gentlemen welcome back to short story long first and foremost it is live event time. I'm doing doing the next young reckless live event on October twelfth. Picture live all day live short story long podcast with all my favorite people that have ever been on the show and some who haven't doing keynotes. QNA's panels all of the above. If you want to come just go to events dot young and reckless dot com. Get your tickets also. I'll put the link in the description of the episode. come check us out. I think you'll really really like like I think we did one back in May it was incredible. five hundred people showed up it was sold out and everyone left really positive and there was a really cool energy not in the room of just people there to learn and share ideas and I was really proud of it so this is round two and I couldn't be more excited. Today's guest is Marc. Mark Randolph Mark Grand off is the CO founder and was the CEO of Net flicks and as you can imagine you has a lot of good stories we ran through how Netflix how he even got to the position of when he started Netflix and how Netflix was created and where he was with Reed Hastings the other CO founder when they came up with the idea and decided to go for it that as well as all the challenges of running a company of that size size and trying to scale it and trying to just completely disrupt the entire industry. You guys are GonNa. Absolutely love this episode. Mark has a new book coming out called that will never work with a lot of really good stuff in a lot of good information and a lot of the stories more on the stories that we talk about here on the podcast if you like it if you like any of these episodes share it tell your friends posted on instagram hit me up on Instagram at drama. Let me know you think semi. Dm Tag me in your stories. Literally anything works. I'm reposting and communicating with you guys all day long. Keep that coming. I can't thank you enough. That's it. Let's get into the episode Short Story Long. It could take your whole life develop clarity second patients patients probably whatever you think you don't have you have something else in his the short story mark welcome to the pod. Oh It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so excited. I'm excited because because you know I have a lot of entrepreneurs founders CEOS on this show and some from a lot of well known companies but I think the moment I I kind of saw your stuff and started reading your stuff and saw that you were a co founder and CEO for a little bit of net flicks. It was obviously Lisa like well. This is another level and it may not feel that way to you van to me it does and the way the reason I liked that is because I really like I really live in the world of kind of these. We started up a Lotta apparel businesses and online marketing and stuff like that but I just feel like the things I can learn from someone who has kicked off something on that level. are probably endless and I'm really excited to try to get as much out of you. That can hear well. I mean that's kind of what I mean. The book in many ways is about that untold story Ori because everyone thinks it started out as one hundred and fifty million subscriber screaming giant but for years we were just a DVD by mail company for years. We could could make it work. Yeah I mean I was telling you earlier. I came into the into the building here and like all of a sudden. I got that vibe like Oh my God. This is start feels like a startup and for many years that's what Netflix felt like and that's the part you love. You love that started up energy yeah you know. I sometimes say that. If you're really lucky you kind of figure out two things about yourself like what you're good at and what you like and if you're really lucky you actually get to do you both those things yeah and I kind of figured out. It's early stage companies and it's not just that I like it. I suck at the companies. Get Big. It's I don't know how people do that. How do you manage like thousand people. Just I totally different game. I'm so happy to hear you say that because like I was telling you before before we started recording. I have always just sort of instinctually avoided letting my business get to corporate. I love that startup feeling and even recently the past few years. I've really tried to make sure that you know I'm covering the right basis. Still the right infrastructure is in place and the right you know talent is where it needs to be but I just. I don't know there's something about it the. I've never felt like I wanted to to try to get it to that place. I've I walked into a lot of these massive clothing companies and it just doesn't look fun anymore so to hear you say that makes me feel really feels like I was right. You were so uh-huh on target in fact I'll give you the advice is don't ever start making things more efficient. That is what kills companies real. Temptations -tations are going to be there. I mean you're going to go. Wow you've had this nice stability. We're growing ninety. percent of my orders are coming in a certain way and you're going to start hiring people who are real experts at efficiency agency because we can help. You cut a few points of margin. We can help you ship a little fee. They're really good at that efficiency stuff but the people who are really good at efficiency Z are clueless when all of a sudden your world changes and your world's going to change everyone's world changes yeah and so what you WanNa do is build this culture in this environment fool of people who are really adaptable who are Jacksonville trades who are comfortable with making decisions based on incomplete incomplete information because then when your world's suddenly shifts those are the people who can then okay and they shift in on it again. Yeah that's funny. Would you say that the main reason we all know the story three of these big corporate companies that can't pivot or make a move. Would you say that's because they're built around efficiency of of what used to work unquestionably and if it's a combination of things six that's what gets him into trouble. Is They go wow this is nice for years and years were doing the same sort of thing growing nice and steadily we have this nice to stage age distribution resell to wholesalers celery and so they hire these sales people who are really good at that and the warehouse there are people who are really good at that and then all of a sudden someone comes along who says screw this multi-stage stuff. I'M GONNA sell straight to consumers so and they can't do it. That's part one is that they can't do it but the the worst part is. They're scared to do it yeah because they go. I can't sell direct because my distributors Poke Hilmi and right. Now distributors are ninety five percent of my business business. So you get stuck me it is. I do a lot of I told you before I did a lot. I do some you know speech a speech sometimes and usually by half half the clients. I'd say or big companies who are scared shitless what's happening and the executive see they see it coming and they're trying to rally the people. You've got to be flexible. We've got to be innovative and so I go in and try and rally the troops whatever you can do in an hour so there's that piece and then the rest of my time I am. I'm working with the early startups helping them take down these big companies so it's this form of job security yeah. That's true either way it goes. That's good good stuff with what's interesting. Though is the best way to learn is to be on both sides. I'm sure yeah I'm sure that's amazing because to me now and you had a history and clothing. We'll talk about that but I I see what's happening with you know macy's and Barney's and all of these retailers that were just staples like you never I thought they would ever go anywhere and people are closed indoors and go and bankrupt and do and it's just like at this point this late in the game because you know we've been talking about retail apocalypse for five for six years. I just sit there and I watch and I'm like how are you not doing anything. How are you not like you know what I mean like. How is your literally. Your ship is sinking and you're not ah you know but that makes perfect sense so deeply set up to act one way that it's so hard to pivot. Here's a classic one so take supermarkets okay I so free really frustrating business for a consumer long lines and all that crap and supermarkets have seen what's going on ECOMMERCE and they're going out. That's that is not a threat. No no way no one can replace selling fresh vegetables and having milk and doing what we do and they just and then someone looked at it and said this is crazy having this checkout. Why can't you just go take stuff off the shelves and walk out and was the innovator who came up with that. Safeway or a Kroger knows was Amazon. I mean the fact that they left that open open for twenty years on them. You know so let me ask you to like I mean I just got right into advice part but if you are one of those guys or you you are even a medium or small sized guy that just has your you know your thing figured out and you have a really good thing going. What do you do like do you have. Do you have a department in the back office. That's constantly only trying to figure out how to disrupt your own business or what. Do you do to avoid that happening so I mean I understand. You know large. Your audience is probably not these big companies but all dispense the big company advice right now. Lease problem is you can't do it. Internally people go I want set up skunkworks and all set up a few people in an office Jason and that might work temporarily but as soon as they try and bring that out into the open the immune system is triggered and the white blood cells come swarming and then every department department in this big company kills the start up the only way to do it is to have it happen separately and so the way you really should do it and this is my opinion is as you basically set up a seed fund big company you invest in las a small startups not so that you can own them in certainly not so you can make money but you have a seat at the table big ten to see what they're working on. You get to understand the future. Eventually you can participate and perhaps them. It's really really really really hard because here's what happens in my world I have you know essentially small business and game example of something that happened. We came up using athletes artists and all that stuff to promote our business all of a sudden this thing started happening that we're social media influencers and so we're like okay well. Let's send him a bunch of clothes and we'll I don't know let's just having where a close on Youtube and so we did that but one thing that happened I will admit out from under me that that I didn't spot was it became so easy to make t shirts and so easy to start a shop store and so easy to start a website that now you have I mean there are some youtubers I doing ten million dollars plus a year in Merch and all of that is my business going somewhere else and that's something I could have spotted and I could have had ten indifferent merch lines or these things or whatever and and I didn't spot it and that's a big one where it where it happened for me. You know what I mean but at least you're watching it and seeing it. You're not gonNA catch everything but you're but that was a pretty fast despise us and I can predict what's going to happen. Next of course is right now. The U you too and INSTA- and face we're going to go. Why is this schmuck making ten million bucks a year emerge on our platform and it's GonNa be taken away from them. What do they do about that though they stopped distributing things like how many likes you have. They stopped letting people know what your followership is. I mean they have it. It's a dance because you don't WanNa driveway the people who are building building your platform but absolutely instagram for example and that's what I'm speaking totally off the cuff here. I don't work in-store Server. you know of this is just not stable environment for a company to keep on saying. This is a great deal. We're we're letting leading the influence your make all the money so then it goes back to obviously they want people to spend money to advertise not get it for free so it'll go back to the companies that are advertising on the platform. We'll we'll get the absolutely right so you know you can wear the shorts on the on the on the youtube if you want but the person who's GonNa make the money is instagram advertising whatever they want on the platform good stuff or so. It looks anyway. It's not so much exactly work because quite frankly as I say in the book. Nobody knows anything and electric. He's going back to the very first thing we said is..

Netflix instagram Mark Randolph Youtube CEO CO founder QNA Marc WanNa Reed Hastings Ori macy Lisa Jacksonville Safeway Poke Hilmi INSTA co founder Amazon executive
"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Their businesses from being, you know, hundred thousand dollar businesses to being hundred million dollar businesses. Plus and to give them the real tactical trae. Meaning that they need to move from the beginning to the next step. I could not agree with you more. And the reason I have the conversation at all here is because I want to talk about solutions and approaches that have been successful in. You clearly have found the way to be successful in spite of and I for me, it's really it is a it is a balancing act in my own mind about whether we go there, we don't I don't want to ignore a problem that exists. But I also don't want to talk about it without having solutions on the table. Yeah. I've been thinking a lot about what are proactive things that can be done to equalize. The opportunities for women, and let's just speak about the world of entrepreneurship because that's the world. I know the most. The terms the legal terms that women are given early on in their business. I think are much worse on average than the legal terms that men are given. So for instance, we've been hearing in the media right now about this entire situation with Uber where Travis has kind of shares that are worth ten x the voting power of a single share. And we know that Travis has this and Mark Zuckerberg has this and many other male founders Evan Spiegel at Snapchat has these shares. I've never heard of a single woman having shares that are worth ten x her voting power. You don't have that. I had to I had to work to actually have a vote on my board. If you look at my first term sheets of rent the runway, my co-founder, and I while we were on the board our votes affectively didn't count. And my preferred shareholders held all of the control and sway as to what the future of the business was so we were starting not even from a, you know. Point zero. We were starting from like negative fifty and over the years. Thank God rent the runway took off from the very beginning. And we've been able to negotiate in every subsequent round of funding more rights for ourselves. But all we've wanted was fair rights to what we would be offered as a male CEO or a male co founding team. So what I would love to see is. I'd love to see women, and I'm happy to be the first to do this publicize put online their first seed round term sheets and compare that with the seed round term sheets that men get the and the reason why I say seed round just because at the seed round there's no evidence that any business is going to be successful. You're taking a bet on the founder itself, you're taking a bet on a person..

Travis founder Evan Spiegel CEO co-founder Mark Zuckerberg Snapchat hundred thousand dollar hundred million dollar
"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Janklow had ridiculous name, but it was a very innovative idea at the time, and it was related to another startup called yawn to back in the day and a recruiter from the start up beyond two decided to contact me through this and yawn to actually turned out to be Ari tros company, my co-founder and business partner in X Y O U is one of the only crazy people at the time in two thousand eight actually. Starting a company in two thousand eight when everyone was going through turmoil and running for the hills. Well, yeah. So so you and Ari how did that relationship happened was he the first person that had took a chance on you just like you just said like nobody was saying. Yes, you wanted to get somebody to say, yes. And then how did that relationship build up? That is exactly right. Yeah. He is the first person that said, well, this kid is smart. He's also very humble as well. Yeah. Yeah. You know? You know, he he he saw how passionate I was. And how driven I was. And I think what is kind of the metric and the thing that we care about the most at X Y O. And like what I look for an employees and new employees now is like how much do you care, and you could tell that I cared about what I was doing. I was passionate about technology, and I had zero experience. Right. He didn't even know what the heck he was going to hire me for. But he was like, you know, what I need higher this kid and take a chance, and he is the only one that took a chance on me. And so basically, I have spent especially with the amazing story that X Y O has turned into. I've spent a lot of my time re repaying him and basically making him feel great about taking a chance on me. So he was the first person to say, yes, what was the company about? What was he trying to do? And how did you fit in? Yeah. At the time. This is when the concept or idea of Facebook, apps didn't exist. So it was a brand new concept. He first off he credited technology for my space that allowed you to turn off those annoying layouts and all the color schemes on my space man when you picked your page. Yes. Okay. It was called sanity switch. So you head switch on your page and every single other person's page that you visited it would turn off their annoying glittery layouts home. I he he's a savior. I didn't know he was a say yes now here is what he discovered in doing that he discovered just how big the personalization space is. So he decided to do the exact opposite thing for Facebook. He created the first ever it was called the onto layers the first ever technology that allowed you to add layouts and personalization layers to your Facebook profile, and it caught on like crazy. Well, so I joined him in that technology company, and it was just a wild and amazing ride. So yeah. So what did you do there? What did you learn what did you? Discover about yourself because from starting out as somebody taking a chance on you to be in co founder of a black Shane company now valued at twenty million dollars spot. Number two, fifty I'm Queen market cap. And you're just having amazing party for your.

Ari tros company Facebook Ari Shane company Janklow co-founder co founder partner twenty million dollars
"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

"The president and co founder of the city blockchain summit got paulson and began with me today thank you so much for being on the shy polls appreciate your time it's gonna be right to have a chat love to be here i'm very happy to engage with you rank end i'm looking for i was looking for this and talking to you look this this the so much going on the spice at the moment it's such an exciting time and you're right there in the thick of it before we get into the actual city blockchain son at what you guys are doing who you're speaking to and i throw about a million questions that you what had liked to if you wouldn't mind poulsen just gives it a little bit of a background on yourself why you're in blockchain what you doing how you come to hear and what your objectives are absolutely greg i'm so i've been into a in the business from at least twenty years now twenty five years actually and republican complication computer user and what we've seen is you know do the today show everybody is afraid to jump on the computers and livable computers all afraid afraid afraid so we put of location he's the pain and and dispose the intimation in a very forced to fifth grade level of writing so it helped them a consumers just understand the technology and be part of the other than being afraid on it so become voted a lot of people into the computer age and then of course we had the big boom of the internet and i see the same cycle happening again in this base blockchain is very robust technology i'd have been around for a while but now that the only other stuff that's going on in the innovation that's happening in the in the industry is more than the full front now some of the big names all the fortune one hundred companies are already in it big time and i feel that again the consumers are left out of the dock and i'll go this to engage the consumers in another way not republication but throwing events in smaller cities and engaging them with the innovation that's happening in in the blockchain space so you've been there through the.

president co founder paulson poulsen twenty five years twenty years