18 Burst results for "clinical associate professor"

How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With  Dr. Donn Posner

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:45 min | Last month

How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With Dr. Donn Posner

"Don't know about you guys, but my sleep has suffered at times quite badly during the last few months. Today's guest really got me thinking about this issue in a whole new way I. he normalizes the sleep problems. Many of us are having. If you're sleeping poorly right now, he says don't freak out. It's natural and normal. Second he has a whole bunch of tips for how to deal with insomnia. Some of which I had never heard before, and I'm already starting to operationalize my own life. His name is Don. Posner he's one of the leaders in the field of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Titles are founder and president of sleep, well, consultants and Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Not only did done patiently answer all of my questions, but we also played him. Some listener voicemails from you guys. One last thing to say before we dive in here, you'll notice over the course of this week. That are episodes this week. Have a theme which we're calling primordial needs today. We're doing sleep. Wednesday it's sex, so it's fun week here on the show. Stay tuned for all of that I. IT sleep and on near here we go. Great to meet you and thanks for doing this. I appreciate it sure thing good to be here. You gave a talk recently. That got some attention. deservedly. We'll get now more attention now that we're putting you on the show about acute insomnia. Can you tell us what that means and why? You're worried about it right now especially. Let me clarify a couple of things. Let me maybe work backward. The best way to define acute insomnia is to define chronic or long term insomnia, which we in the field called insomnia disorder. And the way we define that is that a person is having trouble initiating sleep to begin with. Or they wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back to sleep. Or they wake up sort of at the end of their night and never get back to sleep, right? And so those are really three flavors of insomnia if you will beginning middle and end. We like to say chocolate, Vanilla Strawberry, and then there's neopolitan which is a mixed bag right so that's insomnia. If that is happening and we say what's problem with to sleep or staying asleep, it's if you take longer than thirty minutes to get to sleep on average if you are awake for some combination of thirty minutes in the middle of the night, or you wake more than thirty minutes earlier than your desired time. If that's happening three or more nights a week for longer than three months. And you have associated daytime symptoms, that's insomnia disorder and I want to underscore that last piece which is. Really, a twenty four hour disorder. It has to have impact on your day. For us to say that this is really an insomnia disorder problem. You have to have something like fatigue sleepiness. Concentration problems, performance, problems and so forth. So chronic insomnia is those symptoms more than three months. So now going back to your question about acute insomnia, acute insomnia is all of that. Less than three months when I give talks, and when I asked the audience how people here have ever had a bad night's sleep I know I'm going to get a laugh and one hundred percent of the hands go up. We've all had that experience. And all of that is normal nothing to concern ourselves about it, and we don't even talk about anything as diagnostic as acute insomnia until we get to at least three days. But then anywhere between three days and three months is considered acute insomnia, and that means that you're having those problems either initiating or maintaining sleep. And you may or may not have daytime symptoms yet. And it's usually due to some stressor, and we say anything from the Bio psychosocial spectrum. I now say to my trainees. You could probably open the dictionary. Put your finger down on a word and find something that causes insomnia. Whether. It's an illness physical pain a change in your environment, a psychological stress like stress at work tax time those sorts of things and I also hasten to add that. The Valence of that does not have to be negative. Right change is stressful so getting married and getting a new bed partner in your bed. Can Change Your sleep patterns. Having a child. Is a precipitate for an acute insomnia until you can get that kind of straightened away. The thought process is absolutely very much that that's a normal reaction distress. Maybe even a good one because. If we go back evolution narrowly speaking. Sleep is a dangerous activity. Right if you're asleep, you're vulnerable. It must be important for that reason because every species, does it. And so, it must provide very important function, but it's dangerous, so we always say that sleep is deferred when the lion walks into the mouth of the cave. and. Therefore, we could say that acute insomnia is adaptive. If, you understand so even now in our culture. It's adaptive in the sense that you're making changes. You're trying to deal with. Whatever's coming down the pike. But we always expect that. If you then adapt appropriately or the problem itself goes away, or you get on some medication or the stressor itself remits then we expect the acute insomnia to remit, and so all of that we consider to be normal, and it is for a smaller subset, but yet epidemic numbers that sort of gravitate into this chronic insomnia realm, which is where people like myself and my colleagues come in terms of helping people to treat that.

Insomnia Adjunct Clinical Associate Pro Founder And President DON Psychological Stress Posner Stanford University School Of Partner
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:05 min | 2 months ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Bring a lot of rain in the tri state area is going to whip up the jersey shore around here in Manhattan, swirl things around lots of windows. Lots of rain. And out there in Long Island. So we got to batten down the hatches, folks and be prepared for Fay. As if we need Faye. We got a Corona virus Got dengue fever down there got erect economy. Now we get a tropical storm grate next week. We'll have some Locusts and then some frogs. I think that's all they were going over all some point here. Also in the big threesome, interesting Supreme Court rulings yesterday, the court and the Conservatives on the court, including two that Trump put up there. Ah, they have said the president does not have immunity. He cannot shoot somebody on Fifth Avenue and get away with it. As he once said. So, in fact, Cy Vance, the the district attorney here, he has every right, according to Supreme Court to try to subpoena Trump's tax records. If he suspects there was something going on there. That should have been going on now. This does not mean That Trump is gonna have to know that we're going to see his tax returns before the election because they Supreme Court effectively kick this back down to the lower court's Trump confided in the lower courts, and Trump's a pretty good fighter when it comes to the court, so he can tie this thing up for a long, long time to come. So you liberals out there, you know if you're salivating Hoping you can get a look at tax returns. You can see those checks signed by Vladimir Putin. Well, hate to dash your hopes The tax returns are not going to become over. There probably will become available at some point, but not before the election and rounding out the Big three Elaine Maxwell. She was the procurer of young women for Jeffrey Epstein. So she's in jail out there in Brooklyn. She's going to make a court appearance next week, so we'll be covering that They've taken Apparently, her sheets and clothes gnome away from her because they fear she's a suicide risk. So she's wearing a paper. A paper dress. The kind you wear when you get a colonoscopy. Yeah, they put you in that paper was there. You know, I thought was interesting to it. She actually is a cell mate. I, I would've thought you would be alone. But maybe they thought for suicide risk could be better for her to have somebody in the cellar. So she has a salary. Clinton. Hillary Clinton could be Hillary Clinton in the papers. You see, I'm not so concerned about the suicide. I'm more concerned about her being bumped off by somebody. That's the more of the danger to her. All right, so we're still in the midst of this pandemic, and it takes a psychological toll on us. No question about it. So who better to find out how to keep healthy? How to mentally healthy and fit during this scary time? Dr Gale Saltz. She's the clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York Presbyterian Hospital, and she hosts the I Heart radio podcast personality. Good Morning, Dr Gale. Good morning. Good morning. So, Dr. So here's my concern, Doctor Gail. I'm as guilty as the next person. You know, It was very depressing here in March and April, when we were locked down, it was cold. Well, now it's summer I've been out dining. I went to the beach. I've gone toe bars. You stand outside drinking with your friends. You pull down the mass, The social distancing is kind of fading by the wayside. And I, psychologically I thought, I think we're past this. We're past the Corona virus. We got through it. It's over with And then boom. We see these spikes going on all over the country and I'm starting to get a little depressed with the realization That were maybe not even in the middle of the end of this thing. Yeah, well, you know, you've got a lot of good company because obviously we're not at the end of this thing. And that is gonna force changes in the way you live day to day for the foreseeable future until we obviously come up with some sort of a vaccine. And that means that there is a lot of loss associated with the loss of, you know, as sure as you're saying, like the relief of, you know, we got through this loss of, you know, important milestones in people's lives, things like you know, people lost graduations and promise and you're losing the ability to interact with. You know your friends in the way that you were used to And that is hard. However, Humans are incredibly adaptable and resilient and there are means to continue and this is what I really am. I'm offering up I'm saying, I think the idea that you could go stand outside with friends and be cautious and mask and social distance. But still keep up relationship is really important. It is important to your mental health. It means doing it a different way. I think kids have gotten the worst of it. I have two kids at home and they've been separated from their friends. They can't go to school. It's not clear whether they'll go to school in the fall, and I wonder. What this is going to plough. It's called going to play out long term in the short term. I can see they seem to be okay. But depressed, But I wonder, like, six months from now what this is going to look like. Yeah, actually, In some ways, kids are even more more plastic more. You know, more Moldable in terms of managing situation, You know things that weren't occurring before because They, You know their way of life really depends on your way of life right? And so and they haven't been around as long. So the idea that you will find them ways to socially distantly interact with friends, so that could be for these months. Certainly doing things outside is very possible for them doing things of via social networking and zooming and so on and having interactions with friends that way very possible for them, and, of course, in many places School in some mon, if it five form is going to come back, and it's really important that you help your kid to adjust to the new way of school, which there will be a new way of school because there will be socially distancing involved, etcetera so that they can have some extra support. Some that support emotional and social and cognitive support that they do get from school, which is I'm not going to minimize Really important. We know that staying out of school kids lose cognitively. We know that socially emotionally. It's important for them to be with piers, and we know that. Frankly, educators pick up on a lot of issues for kids, including mental health issues often and so it's important to have those interactions and pick up on those things, but we'll have to do it in a different way. But it's not at all or none. You know if you do it in a different way, it's doable and you're still going to gain the important mental health benefits that you can gain and for kids. It's not going to be as hard as probably it's going to be for you. So, Dr Gail, I've noticed, speaking of the interactions I've noticed, sometimes tension flaring up, especially over the the situation with the mask. So you know, I wear my mask. I think that's the thing to do. And I wear it when I go out some people kind of wear, and then it sort of dangles from the year and they're not wearing it. But the people that kind of irks me and I just wanted to get your thoughts on this are the ones who are the mask. Police. Like you know, a woman yells, It's someone on the street. Put your mask on or, you know, I was riding my bike the other day and ah had stopped at the stop sign there. And there was another woman on the bike. She was that she was not it right.

Supreme Court Trump Hillary Clinton Doctor Gail Long Island Manhattan Vladimir Putin Faye Fay Jeffrey Epstein Dr Gale Saltz Cy Vance Brooklyn Dr Gale president clinical associate professor
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:33 min | 5 months ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hey look I don't care about characters long to get this economy back I know you don't you four in in the world if you can fix it I vote for you that's right the problem the problem is Biden is so weak he's going to be so weak that that hard core left there in the Democratic Party is just gonna push him and push him and push him and he's going to have to start giving them stuff because he's not really a whole lot because it was signed up as a fox news poll Michael if you take away a possibility of a third party candidate right now by the head fifty to forty that's huge and among the women I mean it's it's it's a it's crushing it's fifty three thirty and is a fox poll now I understand poles were terrible with Hillary and maybe these polls are all wrong but right now it's you know believe it or not it's looking good for basement boys well there are other what what was his number yeah I think they're on I think you this guy had a leopard does not change its spots this still this guy is still mentally impaired somehow and it's really simple and bumble around really when he walks out his door his poll numbers are gonna fall when he looks around say why are all these reporters on my log book I'm running for president forgot about that yeah that's what's happening you're insufferable Michael love you all right Hey when we get back we're gonna be joined by Dr Gail Saltz she's a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York Presbyterian Hospital how do we stay mentally fit how do we stay mentally healthy well we're locked down during this pandemic that's coming up next but now let's get the news at eight o'clock there's.

Biden Democratic Party Michael Hillary president clinical associate professor New York Presbyterian Hospital
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:06 min | 6 months ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Make all right we're gonna be joined now by Dr Gail Saltz she's the clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York Presbyterian Hospital and she's host of a new I heart radio podcast personality Dr Saltz go walking door program gal thanks for having me guys okay doctor we're gonna be cooped up with our families now you know most of us we love our vandalism like this at all it helps that but I mean let's be honest let's be honest doctor you know with the family twenty four seven tempers could frail little bit couldn't die yes this is sort of reminiscent of when I call on to discuss how you can handle the holidays and everybody is in one place that usually is at one place and doesn't have to get along all the time but this is like that on steroids because you know everybody's going to be doing this for quite for quite a while it appears I think you do have to think about things like implementing structure in your deck creating a structure creating tasks creating things for each person to be absorbed in I'd be doing and they may be coming together and doing together alternating or you know this this is just sort of well gonna lay around in our PJ's and stare at each other there's gonna be a lot of mystery it would be a terrible terrible idea so I really am telling people Hey you know what get up at your usual get up time or maybe slightly later you don't have your usual practice shower get dressed for the kids as well and then create a workstation somewhere in your home each have a different workstation so here's different corners to go to and as a structure of you know I'm gonna work understand at this time I'm going to do some exercise from this time to this time could use some relaxation techniques because everybody is very anxious understandably quite anxious there are things that you can do to calm your body calm your mind and eject those secured the structure of your day and then have social time and we're gonna get social time obviously online there are many vehicles for doing that but I you know the head of the American psychoanalytic just put out a note about at a Saturday night dinner date that he had with another couple and they each cook dinner in their homes and they set up their computers in front of the table and had a glass of wine and for two hours they each independently had dinner out together and actually really nice time you can you know you can use this online vehicles you know Skype Google hang out soon to have played it's your kids each of you have a board games and board games in front of you to have conversations to talk to grandma grandpa too I have a group play date with friends and I highly recommend you do because the other big factor here is is loneliness or feeling isolated from others and the toll it takes on your mental health so it is important I think to try to create those those social are going on at the Dr Gail Saltz we we've had gallon before over the years but the you know it you hit on a there's a lonely factor here and is also anxious on the other and I really I I kind of think I'm feeling both of those what are what are some of your relaxation techniques as I I can't see myself doing yoga or meditation can either for some people some people really benefit from that but other people don't and there are things that you can do so taking five minutes to either sitting up or lying down do you belly breathing you know deep breathing into like account of five it out to count of five but where you are breeding from lower down from your diaphragm Thailand try right now tri city guide our you can do and if that doesn't appeal to you can do muscle relaxation which is basically where it just sitting in a chair you're gonna squeeze different muscle groups starting with your topic this can't we just we really can we drink that's what we want to really I really want to stick to that two two people this will be a time where people will be very tempted to drink an extra glass of wine at night or whatever to feel more relaxed and this we don't want to come out of corona virus with a whole new flock of people with alcohol abuse so I highly recommend you don't go that route because that glass of wine that might make you feel better tonight or the next couple of nights you'll need yet another one in a week and that it's how people actually build difficulty so I'm not saying take away what you would normally be having about I am saying don't increase your alcohol intake and do you keep a good sleep schedule and actually when muscle relaxation can really help because when you squeeze your muscles and then relax into account of five moving up your body it doesn't take a long time and when you relax your body lan your mother C. left in the sense to go relaxing is resting out even more my arms my upper body yeah you have to put you know if you squeeze a thanks and good imagery soap Scott it takes five minutes and while you're doing the muscle relaxation in your mind to digitalise the place that you find beautiful and relaxing to be in think about how it looks and how it's now owns it sounds to you I'm I'm conjuring up the control room here in the studio that doesn't sound terribly lax site that lady Thatcher maybe that's your spot a natural I don't think it is but another thing I suspect more people obviously will need distraction so that might be you guys or it might be you know TV shows are it might be podcast actually exceed I think podcasts are having a real time right now because it is you know it's time for people to I think distract not with the corona virus information but with other information that's another point try to take the news alerts off your phone for a little while yeah those of you know something just happened and like a little internal freak out make make it harder for you to go see your data be relaxed and just check the news maybe maximum of three times a day that's really all you need to stay in touch you know morning midday evening check reliable sources said that you feel that you can trust what you're being told was for CDC dot gov you know or the whose site leaders local government site but basically don't look at everything but the kitchen sink because another problem people are having is anxiety is driven up by the feeling that you don't know who to trust are you allowed to throw are you allowed to throw things at your spouse if they really annoy you I would highly recommend against that six trapped in a space with your spouse and step back she's gonna win trusted you see is right now and I would say you know obviously tempers can run hot when people feel anxious they feel more irritable if you're if you can talk about it actually really I'm sorry what I do and being snappy but really what I'm doing I'm doing is I'm feeling nervous I'm feeling scared titles label your feelings try explain what's going on to the people around you and tried it if you don't that's what's happening exercise thirty minutes of aerobic exercise a day definitely decreases anxiety level good good advice we got on Dr Gail Saltz governance thanks good stuff I still tend squeezing his buttocks of RECIST harms all right thanks Gail Saltz associate professor of psychiatry at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr Gail Saltz clinical associate professor New York Presbyterian Hospital
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Science Salon

"In healing from the front lines of ptsd science darker you're shane doctor jane is eight ptsd specialist in medical director integrated care at the v eight palo alto healthcare system she is a trauma scientist affiliated with the national center for post traumatic stress disorder in clinical associate professor affiliated with the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the stanford university school of medicine her work has been featured in the new york times enter essays and commentary have appeared in the journal of the american medical association station the new england journal of medicine on public radio and elsewhere so we get into the book and i think this is probably one of the more practical podcasts would have done given ptsd is they a widely we recognized and widespread problem particularly since the afghan war in afghanistan has been going on for over seventeen years now more in iraq years less than that in in the category itself self the bendy what constitutes ptsd has has expanded a to recognize the reality of these traumas and what they caused people psychologically in so it's a huge problem many many millions of people experiences suffer this and a she's a practicing psychiatrist who works with this and the frontlines everyday some of the conversation is really really super interesting about how you diagnose somebody like that and then more importantly what do you do about it so with that i give you a doctor shall we jane new.

shane doctor jane medical director clinical associate professor new york times ptsd stanford university school of journal of the american medica new england journal of medicin afghanistan iraq seventeen years
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Diary or writing letters of thanks or acts of generosity can bring a range of benefits such as feelings of increased well-being, reduced depression, and these feelings will linger well after the exercises are finished. Now. A brain scanning study is helping scientists understand why these exercises have these profound effects the results suggest that even months after a simple short gratitude. Writing task people's brains are still wired to feel extra thankful the -plication is that gratitude tasks work at least in part because they have this self perpetuating nature. The more you practice. Gratitude. The more attuned you are to it and the more you enjoy the. The benefits from it. The results of the study suggests that the more practice, you give your brain at feeling and expressing gratitude, the more it adapts to this mindset. You can even think of it as your brain having sort of a gratitude muscle when you exercise it makes you feel better for a long time. And that is something you should know. When you hear terms like cognitive function or brain health. Maybe you think that's something you worry about when you get older memory loss mental decline, those are problems for older people. Well, no, it turns out those are problems for all of us. There are a lot of younger people today walking around in kind of a brain fog more today than ever before. And for the most part it is preventable and fixable. Dr Stephen Mosley is an MD and fellow of the American Heart Association and the American Academy of family physicians. He's an affiliate clinical associate professor at the university of south Florida. And he's author of a book called the better brain solution. Dr Mosley is about to explain the fascinating science of how your brain works, and what you can do to make it work better at any age by Dr Mosley. Welcome. I'm delighted to be with you. So let's start by addressing this issue of mental decline and poor mental performance as it relates to young people because I think that people think this is an older person problem, and you say, no more and more often today. Young adults even are having brain fog. They're not as sharp. They're not as productive. They don't focus as well. They forget names have to reread passages in books they walk into a room. And they forget why they're there. I mean, brain fog is increasingly common, and it's really strongly related to our lifestyle choices, especially the food we eat. And so what's different is is it because we've changed our diet is it because why why would now younger people beginning brain fog, when they didn't forty fifty years ago well fruits, as you know, it's a lot more processed. There's more sugar. There's more refined carbs than ever. Before and we're also less active. So I mean, if I think about the five steps in the better brain solution that help improve brain performance one is food. We're not getting the same quality food or eating the wrong foods to would be nutrients because we're not getting the food more people are nutrient deficient today. Number three is activity. We're not as active as we used to be four stress. And I think we're more stress today than we've ever been before. And last step five is toxins, and there's more toxins in our environment. So it should when you think about what are the five things that cause memory loss. And what are the five things? They would clearly improve brain performance. It shouldn't be surprising. It's worse today than it's ever been before. And it's happening to younger and younger people. So help me understand what it is about those things. Hopefully, there's a kind of a general answer rather than have to go through all of them. But what is it because of the toxins in the food and the whatever. For the stress. What is that do specifically to your brain to cause the problem? What's going on the probably the number one causes we call insulin resistance. It sounds complicated. But let me explain it. So it's simple insulin's, the hormone that pushes energy into yourself. So when you eat a meal, insulin goes up, and it pushes the energy way in stores it for later. So like, you don't have a famine, and that's when we eat healthy that works beautifully. But what if you had cereal or toast for breakfast? Even Hawaii toast, a sandwich or wrap a whole a whole grain wrap for lunch and you had a granola bar for a snack. And then you had rice potatoes or corn for dinner. You've overloaded your storage capacity. You can't store. We can't store that much refined carbs and your body becomes insulin resistant and the..

Dr Stephen Mosley clinical associate professor mental decline American Heart Association university of south Florida MD American Academy of family forty fifty years
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Trump administration is now vowing to lift Obama era rules to make school lunches healthier. Some health. Experts are criticizing the president's move for more. We're joined on the KCBS ring central Newsline by Dr Joan Blake. She is the author of the book nutrition, and you and a clinical associate professor at Boston University. Thanks. Very much for joining us this afternoon. Well, what is your reaction to this move by the Trump administration? You know, it's a shame because I love it went into making these schools like more healthy air lot efforts from school systems of the food manufacturers who produced foods to go into the schools. Know that a healthier diet when we're hoping fruits and vegetables is good overall health for children input doubts. Shame baseless funniest why we are moving backwards. So what were the new rules exactly say? So we it appears that the less push for whole grains. If we know that having whole grains could provide more fiber, which is a lot of American diets and also Bill de fiber, which foods such as whole grave. Phytochemicals. People die. It's so to me. It's why we go back with them. Why not employed the rules that are currently in place. We mentioned we're putting by the Obama administration really were kind of a project of Michelle Obama's correct? It was Michelle Obama that was her passion. It was based on science. This is basically the dietary guidelines so a dose apprise that based on. We do that. We're having a die with Warhol, grains, whole foods and vegetables better. For the American health. New could help fight our major carriers of a very good heart disease. Stroke tight you diabetes. So it was something based on science. Given instill intact that we continue should be doing. I know that there were some complaints that the food that was being served in these cafeterias at schools weren't exactly didn't taste great. And that was a big complaint from some of the kids, what can be done to change that were you know, there was complaints to forties place at the foods. The cafeteria ring tasting the mystery meat. Yes. So so Hello nothing else is we do know that that there were many great stories. We the food taste great being more healthy to whole grains, whole foods. You know? Let's let's be real about this kids. Do like they do like vegetables. They grew up and go back to grandma and grandpa and grandma and grandpa. This is what was served mad with your your cultural background was it was. This whole grains, people ate it. So it's not like these this is like foreign anyone this is what most coaches grew up with. So seriously redesigned there to back it up that this should be more prominent in diets dieted Merican for some children. Unfortunately, this may be one of the better we're getting day. So I to me why not let's keep goes fully decide their backs up. Let's make screw as healthy or hope you. All right, doctor. Thanks very much for joining us. We appreciate it. That is doctor Joan Blake and she is the author of the book nutrition and you and critical associate professor at.

Dr Joan Blake Michelle Obama Obama Obama administration clinical associate professor president Boston University associate professor Warhol
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"We would expect this to be normal and a dog. It's ten or twelve or fourteen years of age with their a couple of breeds that actually have this occurring at a much much younger age. One common breeders, the cavalier, king, Charles spaniel, and then another are the the Norwich in the Norfolk terriers. And they developed a heart murmur anywhere from four to six years of age for the dogs that are affected, and they can go into heart failure by six to eight years of age. So it's definitely a problem that the breeders and those breeds have to select against the tried to ensure that they are selecting for normal hearts without murmurs as they get older and not their genes that have obviously accumulated in the breeds of cost us disease. So difficult all right and number five with Is going to be, torn, cruciate ligaments and. Most people would, say now wait a second that's an injury and it's true that that is an injury that where they're going to tear their ACL just like a basketball. Player or. Football player with Taylor Yeah but but. We see this in much higher frequencies in certain breeds and specifically as well in certain dogs that have a. Certain anatomy where the angles in the hind leg as well as as where the. Tendons attach on the hind leg in the area occurs so and we find. This in, studies to be highly heritable where related dogs are coming down with torn cruciate it's much more frequent. Than others in the breed that are not related to them so this is a. Genetic disease and studies have shown to be moderately heritable so again this is something. That we're seeing with increased frequency and therefore needs to be, selected against, by breeders let me just go, over some of the cat diseases that we see. Most frequently, so the number one genetic, disease, in cats that. We see is, inflammatory bladder disease and that has seen very frequently and it's cats that are you know they have blood in the urine they strain the urine Eight they may p around the house in odd places and some people think that that is behavioral but if you look at their bladders under. Ultrasound, when you say they're urines under the microscope they have specific specific disorder going on that they are prone, to having an inflamed bladder and as well as in many cases to form crystals. Irritate the bladder and that is a genetic disease and if we don't treat. It as, a genetic disease hats are going to keep on presenting with it the owners are going to become. Very frustrated the cats are certainly going through a lot of discomfort with it the. Veterans get frustrated as well if they don't think about it as a genetic disease. Where you have to constantly be feeding either special diets or, eliminating stress, because it is a stress related, disease and the cat Net similar to what people get also. That Panama sterile interstitial cystitis a problem where people say oh I. Have a bladder infection and. Keep tree with antibiotics we keep treating the cats, with anti-biotics going it is not an infection. Right well this does occur in people it's much, less frequent than what we see in cats, actually and in people it is mostly women it's mostly a female versus a male predisposition and we don't know exactly why that's the case whereas in cats we, have an equal male to female. Ratio it could be a male or female that comes, down with that males some people may need to. Take a break right now the females to. Go to the bathroom but have them come right back after we. Take a short break I'm chatting. Right now Dr Gerald Pell clinical associate professor of genetics at the coming school of veterinary medicine we're talking about the top five genetic diseases in cats and dogs we'll be right back Please have a seat. In the waiting room The doctor Right after. These messages You've ever share your home in heart with a charming naughty animal who's. Always up to mischief you'll fall in love with the klepto kitty who stars in to the PA by Melinda Talk to the PA is a funny. Heartwarming, novel about a single, girl a single guy. And.

bladder disease younger age Norfolk terriers Norwich basketball interstitial cystitis Melinda Talk Dr Gerald Pell Panama Football Taylor clinical associate professor fourteen years eight years six years
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"The urine they, strain to urinate they may pea around the. House in odd places and some people think that that is behavioral but, if you look at their bladders, under ultrasound when you study their urines under the microscope I'm they have a specific specific disorder going on that they are prone to having an inflamed bladder and as well as in many cases to form crystals on that irradiates bladder and that is a genetic. Disease and if we don't treat it as a genetic disease hats are gonna keep on for sensing with, it the owners are going to become, very frustrated the cats are certainly going through. A lot of discomfort with it and the veterinarians get frustrated as well if. They don't, think about it as a genetic disease where you have to constantly be feeding either special diets or. Eliminating stress because it is a stress related does He's in the. Cat Isn't that similar? To what people get also that kind of a sterile interstitial cystitis a, problem, where people say oh I have a bladder infection in the keep tree with antibiotics when treating the, cats with antibiotics going it, is? Not, an infection right well this. Does occur in people it's much less frequent than what we, see in cats actually and then people. It is mostly women it's most of your female, versus a male predisposition and we don't know exactly. Why that's the, case whereas in cats we have an equal male to female ratio could be a male or female that. Comes down with that Males? Some, people may need to take. A break right now the females to go to the bathroom, but have them come right back after. We take a short break I'm chatty right now, Dr Gerald Pell clinical associate professor of genetics at. The coming school, of veterinary medicine we're talking about the top five genetic diseases in cats and dogs we'll be right back Please have a. Seat in the waiting room the doctor will be with you shortly. Right after these messages If you've ever share your home in heart with a charmingly naughty animal who's always up. To mischief you'll fall in love with the klepto kitty who stars in talked, to the PA by Melinda Matt's talk to the PA is a. Funny heartwarming novel about a single girl a single guy and macgyver an adorable tabby. Cat, with a.

interstitial cystitis Disease Dr Gerald Pell Melinda Matt clinical associate professor
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Tori bladder disease and that is seen very frequently and it's cats that are you know they have blood in the urine they strain to urinate they may pea around the house in odd places and some people think that that is behavioral but if you look at their bladders under ultrasound when you say there urines under the microscope they have a specific specific disorder going on that they are prone to having an inflamed bladder and as well as in many cases to form crystals that you're the bladder and that is network disease and if we don't treat it as a genetic disease hats are gonna keep on presenting with it the owners are going to become very frustrated the cats are certainly going through a lot of discomfort with it and the veterinarians get frustrated as well if they don't think about it as a genetic disease where you have to constantly be feeding either special diets or eliminating stress because it is a stress related disease in the cat similar to what people get also that kind of a sterile interstitial cystitis a problem where people say i have a bladder infection and keep treated with antibiotics we keep treating the cats with antibiotics winging it is not an infection right well this does occur in people it's much less frequent than what we see in cats actually and in people it is mostly women it's mostly female versus a male predisposition and we don't know exactly why that's the case whereas in cats we have an equal male to female ratio it could be a male or female that comes down with that males some people may need to take a break right now the females to go to the bathroom but have them come right back after we take a short break i'm chatting right now dr gerald pell clinical associate professor of genetics at the coming school of veterinary medicine we're talking about the top five genetic diseases in cats and dogs will be right back after the short break please have a seat in the waiting room the doctor will be with you shortly right after these messages if you've ever share your home in heart with a charmingly naughty animal who's always up to mischief you'll fall in love with the klepto kitty who stars in talk to the pa by melinda metz talk to the pa is a funny heartwarming novel about a single girl a single guy and macgyver an adorable tabby cat with a.

interstitial cystitis clinical associate professor dr gerald pell melinda metz
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We know recreational marijuana the young brain developing they're definitely risks in states with legalized marijuana opioid use is down so it does seem are we trading one addiction for another perhaps but again marijuana usually has to be prescribed by a physician they can track that and that does seem to reduce opioid use an opioid overdose so we're beginning to learn that that may be useful in some patients it's approved in new york state for seven or eight conditions cancer pain hiv wasting as we're learning maybe we should be using it more but again not they're not enough specialists to prescribe it being just got about twenty seconds left here thanks for having good to have you back dr must batur is clinical associate professor of medicine at nyu medical center inner bloomberg eleven three studio you're listening to bloomberg markets on carolmassar low adjacent kelly and this is bloomberg radio.

marijuana new york clinical associate professor o nyu medical center bloomberg twenty seconds
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Doc new makes an interesting point about the cost of the us opioid crisis this really struck me dr ian los batur is back with us clinical associate professor of nyu medical center in our bloomberg eleven three oh studio on this friday night shift back with us thank you a pleasure thanks for this struck me because here we have a week a couple of weeks a month and then some where we've been focusing a lot about the negotiations and the talk often tense talks between the united states and china over trade and as you say we talk about these trade imbalances of you know two hundred billion dollars or so with china and then you say what will the opioid crisis which were chatting about today is really escalating some estimates are as much as five hundred billion a year in total costs were talking emergency room visits legal costs of the whole extent rehab and so of course we're upset about a two hundred billion dollar trade deficit that we're negotiating if we just simply corrected the opioid crisis which is hard to do we'll talk about that could save us as much as five hundred billion a year it's an enormous sum and we need to address respective in terms of the cost so let's talk about that correction what what needs to happen what's the easiest first step if there is such a thing well there really are a lot of steps i will in terms of the scope of the problem it was really shocking to me to to learn forty two thousand people a year die from drug overdoses one hundred and sixteen people a day so leading cause of death in americans under age fifty so it really is escalating the ancillary costs are huge clogging courtrooms and so we really have to begin to address at truck schumer talked about a l synthetic opioid coming in from china which is very potent we're seeing more availability of that but we have to come up with alternative ways to treat pain to get fewer people exposed to opioids and we need to treat people who become addicted to it let's talk about this because jason i talked about a story this week on blimp that's in in bloomberg businessweek can talk specifically about neural modulation and this is basically using shocking the spine and putting it and really kind.

clinical associate professor nyu medical center bloomberg united states china schumer jason dr ian los batur two hundred billion dollars two hundred billion dollar
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KTRH

"News radio seven forty ktrh com for any liver related issues all right as i was saying earlier dr benzi abraham from houston methodist hospital and this is our first time her first time on the program so a big a bill welcome to her she has a number com for andy liver related issues all right as i was saying earlier dr been see a bowel disease she is the director of the gi fellowship training programme for our new 'upandcoming gastroenterologist and she is clinical associate professor of positions and hats that she wears my goodness i mean you are very very accomplished she's the founder and distinguished professor of inflammatory bail you are the ranking expert in inflammatory bowel disease coli this and it's a topic we really of medicine at the wheel cornell medical school solvency benzi welcome tonight and thanks for coming in think you tactical id and so excited to be here whale you are the ranking expert in inflammatory bowel disease coli this and it's a topic we really have not talk too much about on on the program directly with with an expert of your caliber so really for everybody listening tonight let us start with really the basics what is colitis what does that mean at great question because most people may not be sure exactly what that is colitis can actually stand for general inflammation of the colon uh but it can come in various forms you can have an infectious colitis that can infection from food and it goes away bunker the more concerning thing is inflammatory vow disease which can get all sort of colitis or krones disease or crohn's colitis which is actually lifelong disease chronic disease right i think the key thing for you that you just mentioned is it you know almost casually a patient may be told by their doctor they they go to the er they have a.

houston methodist hospital andy liver bowel disease clinical associate professor founder colitis crohn dr benzi abraham distinguished professor
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KCBS All News

"On the traffic leader faces acs six day forecast sunny and warmer eric tomorrow also us sunny and cooler on wednesday through sunday through wednesday highs mostly in the upper 50s overnight lows in the thirties too low 40s traffic and weather together on the atat allnews one of six nine am seven forty kcbs kcp as news time one 120 as our newswatch continues may want to rethink that b l t if you're considering a lunch today scientists are now saying that ultra processed foods such as bread of bacon and cereal could increase your chances of getting cancer we're going to discuss it more on the live live line now with kcbs ring central news line with joan blake author of nutrition and you and a clinical associate professor at boston university thanks so much for joining us this afternoon i'm glad to be here so this is a little scary because i i know a lot of people have in their diet cheap chicken nuggets know the processed foods bacon and even cereal how do they increase your risk of getting cancer this is a sadeki not let first of all let's rewind many here and say that all foods a processed and you get the milk is process it's called pasteurization that make sure that pathogens are are not going to be there to be harmful your whole grain breads new stick we you pasteurized you're out sorry you you made that into a processed food tax could see you why i want to make sure that we understand the public debt that processed foods not necessarily mean that they're unhealthy but they're ready for you to eat too that's the first thing i want to make sure we get up so should do a void all processed foods or the really be a label reader and cigarette which ones are healthy in which ones art right don't the process to be healthy on is a process orange juice the process could make you healthy milk let's just say because we don't have to get rid of all processed foods but wilfing notion they could dietary guys alliance is it died is that can help you fight the killers of americans it's a heart disease certain cancers stroke and type 2 diabetes is.

cancer clinical associate professor diabetes joan blake boston university milk six day
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on KOMO

"We try and highly can respond with important believe rather than being held back by our own doubt took question because it's his human nature to have a hard time senior head around the fact that someone you know admire or respect behave in that way we have to counteract that and then they go that we create an atmosphere where it will be today but yet is in their possible that someone could falsely accused and what i mean we have six ray ten women accusing one person that's one thing for woods a one or one situation you can't assume that the alleged harasser is necessarily guilty absolutely i mean that's the dilemma is an everything happened of course sometimes people make false accusations and that the two of the every type of long delay that occasionally the accusation their thoughts but if a victim in a sexual assault to a star parents change past approved they're telling the truth we're in a world of hurt this is what makes sexual crime and fan too much harder because so many instances there is a proved bear witness to their isn't that end so it all come today down to i was willing to believe somebody now i'm not at all worried about the legal process because that is set up to protect those who are accused and it's very stand in the ass vast majority of victims never have any quote unquote justice through a criminal justice or other legal process so there are lots of protections for accused people in the legal arena and i think we have learned from this experience cramped others with for example bill cosby that people around these individual did have some idea if not a full awareness that something was going on and there were them propriety and no people did not step up and do some man i think that's another area that where men in particular but everybody if you see something do something because the failure to act is a message lucy berliner is a clinical associate professor at the university of washington in the schools social work lucy thank you so much for your time today thank you is to twelve we hit off to the sports us now the elite they.

woods assault sexual crime lucy berliner clinical associate professor bill cosby university of washington
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Provider it could be infectious disease data stds and hippo uh from cms provides a lot of penalties to any leaks whether it's medical centers your individuals if that data gets out it's really of severe punishment you're not allowed to talk about patients in the elevator but you're right if they find out you're on a cholesterol medicine who really cares i don't no that's true but if you're you're right i think it's hard to have both extreme privacy and easy accessibility the other thing and it's interesting we had a guess on yesterday you talked better rebel pal the eu as as medicine to whether it's artificial intelligence and my botic some things increasingly also come into the medical community he had that pacemakers right we talk about how do we safeguard that got about thirty seconds here you know i think we have to have a concerted effort from top to bottom to stay wounds step ahead of the hackers may be a nationally defecation some other layer of security because all those data birth names addresses social security numbers private health information much of that has already been hacked through years of data breaches already necessarily think we need to come up with another formula for security but day but we'll have data breaches without be just the norm i mean are you as a member of i think he just anticipate that we we bend over backwards to try and prevent that individually in the office in the hospital and other other areas whenever patients go to a new facility urging care make sure they do the same things make sure they have layers of security or stay within a system interesting conversation dr ima a spate are back with us clinical associate professor of medicine at nyu lincoln medical center the nathan hager right now is to look a world national news headlines he is in washington dc ina are ninety nine wants to fix cory north korea's nuclear and missile threat will be a prime topic for president trump as he heads to his first un general assembly next week following pyongyang's latest intercontinental ballistic launch over japan national security adviser h army master.

stds eu artificial intelligence nathan hager korea trump pyongyang social security clinical associate professor o nyu lincoln medical center cory president un japan thirty seconds
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Information and in an increasingly digital world that means just about everything including and especially our healthcare data as hasn't thoughts on that from dr ian must beta his clinical associate professor of medicine at the end why you link own medical center in new york city back in a bloomberg 1103 as tnf alpha back with us thanks for having me when you heard about the echo facts breach what did you think about how that might apply to the medical community really we're under assaults every day there are multiple attempts at hacking we have meeting some regular basis instructing the staff and there can be ten thousands thousands of employees how to uh you know really ideal with this sort of all the time all the time but doctors patients medical center shivered concerned we have to what we did he have really like i mean i think it would be great to some extent far medical center are medical community to have kind of a centralised there are days ago the doctor and i want them to be able to just and have to give them all the information they've got all the updated information that's the plus downside is they have all the information and if that is high into that could be a problem as usual your 100 percent correct a national i couldn't agree more she really is easily understood an unusual was right that always ray but anyway the the high court the ability of having a national electronic medical records we're vehicle in the country patience vacation in florida they have a heart attack it may be days or weeks before we can actually find out what really happened by by sending in a written request to get the the data so yes on one hand it would be great if we could have won uniform database of patients can go across the street to a hospital or were urging care can't get the data on the other hand if we get to that point we have to protect it very well and there's are poor track record of doing that could we get to the point i mean i don't know is that is that not the goal that is legal anthem and blue cross said eighty million records stolen in two thousand and.

dr ian bloomberg electronic medical records florida clinical associate professor o new york ray 100 percent one hand
"clinical associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"clinical associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Psychiatry for correctional health services for new york city's huh health and hospitals and a clip clinical associate professor of psychiatry at new york university school of medicine this book also reflects on the emotional cost of working in the word it's published by reagan arts and i am so pleased it brings actor forward tortured i welcome thank you very much happy to be here so you write about rikers island which is now you where you work they right but at the time merit bellevue and you you write that rikers jails of more than a thousand mental health patients and prisoners a day which is just it's staggering not all of those people ended up on your word right oh that yes that's correct so i in fact a very small percentage were so sick that they needed to be in a hospital setting but of those in it's still remains about a thousand even to this day with the reduction in the jail population many of them really do struggle with serious illness and a lot of the stuff that they're struggling with has to do with the environment that they're in so how did they end up on your word out so patients get onto the bellevue unit a couple of ways about a quarter of the patients are actually admitted directly from police custody so they in fact don't come from the jail are even there too sick to even get get through the criminal justice process and then the remaining three quarters will be referred i'm from the jail system usually because they are so psychotic so they're absolutely out of touch with reality or so depressed or so manic which means like that their mood is elevated they haven't been sleeping behaving in a very odd way and they're dangerous so they have to be both seriously ill and dangerous and hachette dangerousness comes and mostly to flavors either they're very dangerous to other p people or more frequently very dangerous to themselves and this is the nineteen th floor of that israel 19th so i walked up there what would i see well if the first thing it's the off the elevators the courtroom actually so bellevue has its own courtroom right on the nineteen floor which is i think actually helpful in terms of expediting legal situations but then.

health services new york city clinical associate professor reagan arts rikers island new york university school of bellevue israel three quarters