17 Burst results for "clayton johnson"

"clayton johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:00 min | 3 months ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"May Yet Close to a year later, progress has been slow. Last month, the House passed the George Floyd Justice and Policing Act in a close vote, with zero support from Republicans. It heads to the Senate next, and even with Democrats and control, it's expected to be an uphill battle. My conversations with the Floyd family. I spoke to him again today. I sure that we're going to continue to fight for the passage that George Florida Justice and Policing Act. So I consign law as quickly as possible for more on federal police reform legislation in Washington. We're joined now by representative Barbara Lee of California's 13th District. Congresswoman. Great to have you with us. Nice being with you, Rebecca. Thank you very much. How comprehensive is the George Floyd Justice and Policing Act? Thank you. It's very comprehensive. And let me tell you First of all the verdict. With regard to Mr Floyd. It's It's really cracked. Open the door to accountability. But true justice is a world in which this never would have happened to Mr Floyd or to countless others. And S O. The George Floyd Justice and Policing Act is a major step forward. Of course, it does not addressed all of these structural and systemic issues as it relates to structural racism. But I just have to tell you, I believe that if the bill had been made law had been signed into effect, we would have saved many, many lives. And, uh, it's you know, a very sad thought and moment to think that Republicans in the house did not vote for it, Not one, but I have a lot of hope, because I know Congresswoman Karen Bass. She's a good friend, Senator Booker, Senator Scott and they're working day and night, trying to reach some form of bipartisan agreement so that this could move forward and be on the president's desk very soon. Congresswoman. Let's break down a few of the things this legislation would do. The bill would ban choke, holds and and qualified immunity, which often shields police from some lawsuits. Or are these sweeping reforms or more incremental? Well, I think in many ways they are sweeping reforms. But, of course again, As I said, we have a lot of work to do to address the structural and underlying issues. But when you look at the fact that If a police officer hurts a kill someone they should not have immunity from lawsuits they currently do. That's a sweeping reform banning the use of Chuck chokeholds. I mean, can you imagine anyone, especially Republicans, saying we should allow chuckles that Zoe's sweeping reform When you look at the fact that we're asking that we not allow the transfer of weapons of war to police departments, that's a sweeping reform. Also, it's really important to understand. And a lot of people don't even know that we don't have a national database. So that the public at Police Department has really see who these officers are, and whether or not they're corrupt, dangerous or abusive again. That's a sweeping reform and in these sound like measures that should have been in place in law already, but they're not. And so this is an important bill. It's a Build that. We must pass. It's a must pass bill. And so I have to just say I'm very Cautiously optimistic that it's going to get done because we have some really strategic committed individuals who are formed the negotiation team right now it's informal, but I believe that these are going to become more formalized as the days go back. You mentioned the database. That's the national police misconduct registry that's being proposed. Can you tell us a little bit more about the aim of that? Sure, First of all, uh, we need to be able to, um know about an officer's history of disciplinary action on and that needs to be recorded in an accessible database and that would allow it. We know that some officers moved from one department to another from one city to another to avoid accountability. And it's important to have this database too. Include the use of force and traffic stops that required again. The database requires collection analysis and release of data to track Individuals such as this, and so that's the way to prevent abusive police officers corrupt and dangerous police officers from quite frankly killing people, especially African Americans. Congresswoman, As you may know, Many progressive activists actually oppose this bill because they say anything short of overhauling the entire system isn't enough and I'll use New York is an example. The NYPD banned the use of choke holds in the 19 nineties and That didn't stop in officer from killing Eric Garner with a choke hold 20 years later. So what's your response to that? Well, my response to that is, uh, it may not go far enough. I voted for it. I'm a progressive and I understand the realities we see right now, with this very of Good bill that establishes the national standard. The mandates data collection re programs existing funds for community based police and streamlining the federal law to prosecute excessive force. We know But these are good measures, and that This would begin to help address the systemic issues. I want to see a systemic racism, destructor racism, uh, dismantled within our criminal justice system and every other, you know system in our country. On. So the political realities are we've got to get this passed and it may not go far enough. Many agree it doesn't But we have to start somewhere to save lives, and this will save black and brown lives. So people like Gina Clayton Johnson and attorney and activists say black and Brown folks have organized and help elect Democrats to office in the hope that lawmakers will deliver on a commitment to race, justice and equality. So Congresswoman when Democrats like you are up for re election. Will you be able to look voters like Lyndon Johnson in the eye and say This bill is the best we could do? Absolutely, and let me tell you First. I just have to say she's right. Black and Brown people elected Democrats to Congress, the House and the Senate as well as the White House. And so there's accountability there. This require and again. You young people, people who are protesting peacefully in the streets. In many respects, they are pushing the envelope to make sure that police reform Becomes a reality in this country as well as dismantling systemic racism. When you look at what the composition of the Senate and again I get very frustrated myself because Democrats have the House, the Senate and the White House. But members of the Senate members of the House come from different district's and the political dynamics around. This is such that we have to go in and again. I have to salute Congresswoman, Bass, Senator Booker and Senator Scott because they're trying. They're trying very hard. But if they had, if it's this difficulty to bring Republicans around so we can get Bill. Imagine what if we didn't have Those individuals, especially, you know the margin in the Senate being so fragile, But we do have you know two additional senators. But it's so tight. It's so close until we have to push the envelope as far as we can push it or do nothing. And I don't especially like incremental change because enough is enough, and the time is now. So at this point with the political composition of the Senate and in the house, and it was a difficult bill to get through the house. Also, it's either we act on something or nothing. And I have to say we have to keep our movement going, though I political movement and hold members of Congress accountable at the battle box, and I'm certainly willing and I come from a very enlightened and progressive district and I'm willing to stand before my constituents and say I did everything I could do to save black and brown lives. From police murders and police misconduct. I did everything I could do to hold police accountable and to increase transparency. You know, I did everything I could do to make sure the police officers I don't consider themselves above the law. I'll tell them I did everything I could do to ban the use of choke holes. And I will hope that they would vote for me because they know I'm fighting for them. And I'm gonna keep fighting until true. Justice is done. And I, uh, yeah. You know, as much as I don't again as a progressive, incremental change for me, and I've been in this Battle on my life for Justin and I would just say I'm still standing to fight for another day. But I hope and I recognize that I salute our young people, especially who really did help bring us a democratic majority. By their unbelievable voter registration, voter engagement and get out the vote efforts, and that's a fact..

Rebecca Lyndon Johnson Eric Garner Barbara Lee Congress Karen Bass Floyd White House NYPD Democrats Justin George Florida Justice and Pol Washington Republicans Last month Gina Clayton Johnson Zoe Senate George Floyd Justice and Polic today
"clayton johnson" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

02:28 min | 8 months ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Tuesday by. We know who the hot one as we know the hot one we know this is the probably easing sweetie that texas toasted who are at them. My dad's company was the first to start selling texas Commercially and he was involved in a lawsuit against to another company. It was throwing texas toast and a federal judge help that basically. It was all bread. So therefore they couldn't i don't know have exclusivity of texas toast so even the federal court system agree in fact it's been nine years ago to the day and tonight i say was supposedly but with us from Wondering what is the canonical spelling of the title of the right crew. Christmas movie by by saying is it. The i b santa is a both. Bi is both be eat Boston guidance there. Okay crunch crunch. High who weekly Medium term medium time I'm calling because i saw that a member of little mix plus the group I didn't realize until this point that little mix was a group i was. They seem to person I'm just wondering If you yeah there who were them That's it much highlands zimbabwe so i was just in a live stream. Qna with ben affleck for the way back like halfway see thing and he took a quick simple dunkin. Unfortunately it was too quick for me to be able to snap a photo but the dunkin order has changed. It was a black coffee no milk. It was completely black so just in case you can our ben affleck's dunkin order his change..

texas federal court Boston dunkin ben affleck zimbabwe
"clayton johnson" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:57 min | 8 months ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"It says right in the call. I don't want google so i'm like okay. This person is a who like the caller said because their company is not powerful cheese code. Exactly it's chico. The answer is right in front of me if you are a who. There's probably a very explicit and detailed bio of you somewhere. I bet you that this company is lazy and just pulled it from something. They googled and so i just typed in stevie wonder prince. Willie nelson lenny kravitz appalachian chase and then at the end. Grammy nominated and guess what i fucking found numb almost near the top google result. John batiste because somewhere on some website on the internet he gave someone a bio and the bio was all of that ship. Right and i was like. Oh it's him. I'm kate spade at his co. chat. I found all the stuff that he's appeared. And yes he is a fucking musician. He's a jazz musician. He is the bandleader on the late. Show the teams. He's played with so many musicians for because he's this extremely classically trained musician. Who played every co bears bandleader for a good amount of time. Yeah so i was like oh god this is a stupid. I spent an hour looking this and it was the easiest thing in the world and that makes more sense than nick makes much more sense. It's true yes it's so job. Tees up play some of his music here. It is gotta say stunning so enjoy.

Willie nelson lenny kravitz John batiste google stevie Grammy kate spade nick
"clayton johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"So DA's are able to go to you know, to see a charge person and say, hey, I'm you know, I know that you're you're stuck inside the cell. You can't pay your bail. But you could get out today. We can make that happen but cleats to these convictions. And that's how plea deals get signed. And that's how we so easily so often find that people end up with these convictions. And then they're in the system bail is been the way in which we've been able to incarcerate millions of people in this country. What we need. Instead is what in many other places are doing, you know, United States is one of two countries in the world that has money bail system you. I think for us what we're advocating for is a system by which we prioritize liberty. We we look at what? As that people can get the support that they need to come back for trial for court, so housing in text reminders, or some really exciting new organizations that have been developing ways to get people back to court that look like transportation support or reminders via technology or taxed in in those things are incredibly effective in. So we actually have a lot of ways at our fingertips to to make sure that people I guess are coming back to court on. But I I think also we have to look upstream a little bit and say, well, why are there so many people who are being being charged arrested in criminalised in the first place. And so those are some of the bigger questions that were that were also tasked with with figuring out as advocates we decided to take on the Bill industry and go hard, we we approach from a corporate divestment standpoint where we were able to because of the voices of women women coming together were able to really partner with Google. Bill and able to get the largest corporate divestment from the bail industry happen when Google Facebook band bail bonds advertising on their platforms that was because of women who have been used an abused and exploited by this industry for years coming together approaching can be corporate folks in saying, hey, you know, there's something that I think you ought to know about how this is impacting our lives in. I think that is a really powerful example of of what what is possible. And then finally, we we put, you know, do direct actions. So we are part of collective called the national bailout, which is a group of black organizers from across the country who lead black centered race Justice work and are together have have been bailing out women out of jails before mother's day for the last two years. And, you know, at while we wait for the lawyers to do their thing while we wait for corporations to get the message or feel the pressure like we're just going to raise the money. Get get our people home. And that's what that's the beauty of direct actions. Will you know, what I'm really really moved by the work that you do. I think it's it's really really important, obviously. And I'm really really proud of the work. So you know, keeping up it's really important in. Thank you so much for taking time to talk to me today. Of course. Thank you. It was real pleasure. Thank you so much for listening to find more about China's work and her organization, please visit SE Justice Group at SE Justice Group dot org. An SEC spelled E S S I E. Please also follow the electorate until show media were unfazed book, Instagram and Twitter, and that's at electorate and until next time. Keep up the good fight.

Google SE Justice Group Bill United States criminalised China partner SEC Instagram Twitter two years
"clayton johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"Social isolation has been something that we were really nervous to talk about at the beginning. I thought you know, I've I've wanted to say for a long time like because of mass incarceration women are dying. And I'm not just talking about, you know, women who are dying inside jail cells like Sandra black. Land. I'm talking about that. This is an issue that is that is even larger. I'm looking at women like vanita Browder who, you know, not too long after her son who was incarcerated in Rikers island pretrial as a teenager for something that was laid her, you know, he was later case was later dismissed, you know, he suffered over thousand days inside adult facility where he was tortured in Beuys and left very different than he came in in such a negative way that he took his own life. Right. And that story that is the story that we hear about when think about Crete trial reform bail reform, the kind of atrocities of our fail system, but we fail for whatever reason to mention that within a very short time period later, his mother dies of what news reports would come to say of growth in heart. You know, she should be counted in the casualties of this of the w-. War on drugs of mass incarceration in our kind of addiction to locking people up and throwing away. The key new one of the things that always stayed with me was the personal accounts of women who had incarcerated loved ones, right? The words. Lonely 'isolation, you know, Kip reading that over and over again, and you know, that was that was a theme being incarcerated it breaks up communities, and it's intended to isolate people from society mean that that's the whole point, you know. But what that means is that everyone who's peripheral to them. You know, they also experience this isolation, right? There are also isolated innocence. Even though they aren't locked up. There's this sense of Gould by association. Also, one other point is that, you know, talking about women's loneliness just talking about women's loneliness. Generally, you run the risk when you bring that up of people dismissing it as being a non issue or not important. You know, talking about loneliness is unimportant retraite, right? Actually in the concepts of something is big is criminal Justice. You know, people only want to talk about this in the context of policy or legislation or or the cost of it. And they the kind of wanted to remove the emotional element of it. You know, but you just you just can't do that. You know? So I commend you for highlighting that piece of the struggle. So I want to say about this is that it was really hard to talk about at first that this was a women's crisis. I was afraid to tell people like, you know, there's this loneliness. There's isolated I was afraid that what people would say would be like, oh, you know. So what? And why is that such a big deal? You know, you know, women are lonely, and we know that so often when you're talking about a women's health in general, it gets minimize and disregarded. If it's paid attention to at all it's last on the agenda. Right. We know this is the pattern and so thinking about trying to uplift women with incarcerated loved ones as representing. A major crisis in women's health was an uphill climb. Because of the context and the stigma attached to having a loved one behind bars in the first place in so a couple of things change that. I think one was actually the passing of Anita Browder was that we were able to say like look here is an example of what we see all of the time. We are seeing these kinds of mental health effects that look like suicidality that look like, you know, severe depression, which if you understand what's happening because of mass incarceration is is understandable, unexpected perhaps. But but for some reason, we're not discussing it. I'm in the second thing that happened was that I was fortunate enough to have an opportunity to hear the former surgeon general of this country, speak Dr Gupta, and when he spoke he talked so persuasively about and from a deep sense of conviction about the fact that today in the United States are health crisis is one of isolated. Of loneliness. He said we have a crisis of loneliness..

Dr Gupta Social isolation Beuys Anita Browder vanita Browder Sandra black Crete Rikers Kip Gould United States thousand days
"clayton johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"What are the strategies we need to double down on? I wanna know what every holder said, we did he say. You know? And he he I will never he put his hand on my arm, and he grabbed me like this was the first time he'd ever heard this before any said. I just never even thought about that. And I'm embarrassed he said, I'm embarrassed that I have never thought about that. And it makes so much sense. You know for that moment. I was like can I just pull out my iphone importer? Really quick. And have you on record saying that? But, you know, this is this is the response that I I think we get every time, you know, we're in we took on the bail industry over the last two years in the beginning of that campaign. People were asking why in the world are women with incarcerated loved ones like like, why are they involved in this issue? Why is this what you would consider your issue? And I just think like any thought about who's paying the bail industry. It is women. It is grammar. There is in mothers who are putting their houses up of collateral to secure their loved ones the lease. It is women who are going into debt to to prison phone companies in to provide support to loved ones inside and children left behind on the outside. It's women who are in these positions. No in quote know, what the the ugliness of our criminal legal system first-hand and are experiencing the. The life altering impacts despite perhaps never having seen the inside of a cell. And I think that is something that we cannot lose sight of in the midst of our conversations about the criminal Justice system. Meanwhile, women, of course, are being incarcerated at a rate that is outpacing that of men eighty percent of women in jails are mothers in so the the ways in which we are looking at these issues out. You know, we talk about intersection -ality, I think we we so often like to kind of throw around that word. But to really commit ourselves to intersectional struggle means that we need to see the ways in which our systems are designed to harm women in communities of color. And I think in our criminal Justice conversations. We I just haven't found his talking about women a lot or certainly not enough. And that's something that that I care about from a multitude of angle. When that look strategic. I believe we need women and they're persuasive in powerful voices two fuel this movement. I also believe that we need women to be able to understand. Let me say also we need women in trans women in people we need queer communities, we need gender. Non conforming people in order to really address the ways in which patriarchy is a central motor of our continuous kind of constant need to choose punitive controlling Carceres solutions to harm those things are tied up in in values of patriarchy as well as values of of white supremacy. And if we're not going to get to those kinds of root causes than we're not gonna get to that. I think the aims that were all driving towards now. You know, you're absolutely right. I mean that was my first reaction going back to Eric holder's reaction. I thought of course. Of course, women are taking on this pertinent in it hadn't occurred to me hadn't on me before. Right. And I want to go back to that stat that you mentioned you said one in four women has an incarcerated loved one one in four which is incredible. But then also I think he said one in two black women or women of color has an incarcerated loved one. Is that right? Yes. One two black women, and until you define this as a women's health crisis..

Eric holder eighty percent two years
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"In fact, he gave the eulogy at Rod's funeral and and Roddenberry was very aware of if not for twilight zone, you couldn't have had Star Trek, and and he cast it's funny because the first pilot a pilot for starts, I called the cage was actually shot in nineteen sixty four and star Jeffrey hunter as captain pike. And it didn't sell the show. And so they ordered a second pilot. And that's when they got Shatner, and and the chemistry between William Shatner, and Leonard nimoy and force Kelly and the rest of the cast, it just was magical, and you could see it from the beginning. From the first episode aired you just knew that these people were unforgettable. And and they stayed on forgettable all these decades five fifty years as you said, Mark, I also had on not the original. But I had lean Blaylock on and tell you know, bleach on both of them. Great great folks by what's really fascinating, again is that Roddenberry when he came up with Star Trek the next generation he showed that it was the university created, and you could have other actors, and it will continue to be successful. And now with the new Star Trek movies a new Star Trek series. It's coming down the it's really got legs. And and it's it's such an amazing amazing university plan. I mean, having having come up with stories for captain Picard, and for quark and all these other characters I can speak to just how how vibrant all these characters are. And how wonderful these actors are again, I'm working with them both in the Star Trek universe. And in space command Robert Cardo in a number of the Star Trek actors, I'm continuing to work with just because these are phenomenally talented people. And and when you meet them, you just say gosh, I don't I don't want it to end. I just wanna keep keep working with these guys. How would you compare the Star Trek series to the Star Wars star? Wars film, filming. Yeah. You know? It's funny. They're very different. I think you know, I personally I as much as I like Star Wars, my I much prefer Star Trek. And I think it's much deeper in its rumination on the real world. I think it's got a lot more profound insight. I think that clearly it's lasted fifty years. So a lot to speak to it and the beyond that, I think that because it was started during a time of great turmoil. It wasn't escapism that was really commenting on the on the real world in a very innovating meaningful way. And because again, just with rod sterling on twilights, and we went into science fiction. Avoid censorship. Roddenberry? The exact same thing Star Trek. And the other thing was keys Star Wars is science fantasy settings galaxy long ago far far away. It's not meant to be a future that we're going to aspire to or reach with Star Trek was very much. This is a future that really something. We might someday be able to accomplish. And when you look at cell phones when you look at all. And now, we have I mean, I think when we talk about my cell phone is a Tri quarter because I can access the world's the World Wide Web. I can watch movies and TV shows on it. It's it's much more like a try quarter than a communicator. Because it has all these things that can do that that Roddenberry predicted in Star Trek, it's phenomenal. Where were or are some of the writers of Star Trek today? Well, you know, these were the greatest writers on television. You know, when I saw the original Star Trek, my heroes were those writers. And and Roddenberry was smart enough. He did exactly what what what rod sterling done, which is he reached out to the science fiction writers. And so that first season starts at you Harlan. Ellison wrote city on the edge of forever amazing piece of work. George Clayton Johnson. Logan's run in twilight zone. Richard Matheson, who again, did I am legend many, great pieces of work on and on DC Fontana a great writer, David. Gerald did troubles triples, many of these writers are still with us a DC Fontana Harlan. Ellison, David, Gerald. I've just seen them recently. And there's still in many cases, they're still writing. They're still active Harlan is an amazing writer, an amazing, man. I just brilliant..

Roddenberry Fontana Harlan William Shatner Rod captain Picard Jeffrey hunter Mark Robert Cardo Richard Matheson Blaylock Leonard nimoy George Clayton Johnson Ellison writer captain pike Fontana Gerald Kelly David
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:45 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Coast to coast AM with George Noory. Fifty years ago, gene, Roddenberry's visionary television series debuted on NBC was not an instant success at all. In fact, it was canceled just three years later, but a famously devoted fanbase kept the sci-fi epic alive. And it has since spawned numerous hit television spin offs and over a dozen blockbuster films. That have dominated the box office for thirty five years Star Trek lives long and prosperous on its fiftieth anniversary up next Mark secre. Share some stories with us and memories here. He is on coast to coast, Mark, Zicree. Marc. Welcome back. Great to be here, George. This is an exciting time fifty years of Star Trek fifty years. Yeah. Incredible. And and and it's amazing that so many wonderful Star Trek stories have been created by so many people over all these decades. And I'm sure we're gonna be talking a lot about it. We sure are what's new with you. Give us updates. Oh my gosh. We'll have land studio. I'm shooting space command and doing the tons of stuff. We shot the two hour pilot. We shot thirty minutes of. And to our story. We're now meeting with the networks both here and in England we're gonna set it up as a show. It's going to be something that everyone is going to be able to see and enjoy it's terrific. And I'm doing books, of course, as you said the new twilight zone companion, I'm pitching trilogy of novels and just on and on tons of stuff. You're happy with all this life is good for you. Oh my God. Yes. It's so it's so fun. When I realized that my audience could basically green light me thinks to the new models. I that's why shots the my audience green with me. They finance me. And and now we can go to networks having shot the two hours and save. This is what we have in mind. The next step is the network says, okay, we green light is a season. And that's very different from the way it used to be. So I'm thrilled. That would be exciting. Well, hey, you know, what nobody deserves it more than you, Mark. Thanks. All right. Let's talk a little bit about the fiftieth anniversary of Star Trek. Let's go back a little bit. Because you've done some work on Star Trek. Yeah. Yeah. I wrote for both Star Trek the next generation and these space nine, and then I did start with George decay that got nominated for Hugo nebula awards, and and Star Trek been part of my life ever since I was a little kid the first debuted back in as you know, nineteen sixty six and before it even aired. They NBC commissioned a piece of artwork artists James James Bama and rent it for ten seconds is just a still station coming in the fall Star Trek, and I would see this planet, and this rocket ship lazing around the spaceship blazing on this planet and two guys. And it went by so quickly. This is before a video recorders. And I've watched this thing I'd sit right up against the screen waiting for this commercial. And it's like the guy that guy in the in the background you have pointed ears, and I couldn't wait to see the show. And then the first episode aired, and it was called the Mantrap written by my different George Clayton Johnson, and he'd been at twilight zone writer he will kick the can and nothing in the dark, a wonderful writer, and it was an amazing episode. And from then on I was hooked. It was just. That was that was really it for me. Did you ever think that you'd be doing some work on it? Well, you know, it's funny when when I was a kid a book out called the making of Star Trek, and this is when the show was on the air. It was written by Stephen Whitfield, and gene Roddenberry. And and was the first book I've read about how TV show was made. And that really planted the seed where I started thinking, we know I'd like to be a writer producer in television. And that kind of sent me on that path. And and so my dream was to create and run my own space playing science fiction show, and that was space command. That's exactly what I'm doing. And and so it's just a dream come true. But it was very much set in motion by gene Roddenberry created back back then and it only lasted three seasons. Yeah. And it's funny because you know, they were actually going to cancel it the second season and woman they've beat Joe Trimble started a letter writing campaign and a picketing campaign. I was part of that as a kid. I remember holding my little picket sign standing outside with a crowd outside NBC and writing my little letter a million letters were sent NBC and that convinced me to renew the show and it got its third season. And it's not for that third season. It never would have gone into. Syndication? It wouldn't have had enough episodes. And no one would have ever heard of it again. And in fact, when stocked with initially aired I was so worried it would never air again that I actually recorded on reel to reel audiotape as a kid case. Those F has never aired. I just love those machines. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Why didn't it succeed in the ratings? Mark. We, you know, the funny thing is back then the Nielsen ratings just registered book numbers. How many millions of people watching an episode the year after Star Trek when off the switchover something called demographics. Whether you check not only how many people watching it. But what group of people? Yeah. And the eighteen to thirty five demographic was the perfect buying demographic. And a year after star took when the round the demographics and the top rated show, the number one show for that eighteen to thirty five demographics that they all wanted with start all my God daily freak out the yes. Because if they if they had demographics the year earlier, they never would've canceled Star Trek. Oh my gosh. And they would have made money on that show. Right. That's right. Another funny thing. Another thing about Star Trek with is incredibly colorful, you know, what those beautiful red and gold and blue uniforms in a very colorful enterprise bridge. Well, the the network that aired Star Trek was NBC and its parent company was RCA television. And so they wanted to sell color TV's, and one of the reasons they Greenland starts like was because of those bright primary colors because people would buy color TV's just to see Star Trek may actually run ran RCA color TV advertisements for Star Trek. So showing them on color TV's and run them in all the national magazines. I have I have some of those ads. I save since then we've had on the program here William Shatner, you brought us George Takei. Yes. And I think that was it just those two. Yeah. Well, they're they're they're great. I mean, they were unforgettable their distinctive actors and wonderful. And again that speaks the diversity of Star Trek because again when Star Trek debuted in nineteen sixty six you didn't have African American actress in the lead like the shell Nichols are Asian American actors in the lead like George decay these were characters were damaged. They were going on adventures. They were they were treated with respect by captain Kirk and Mr. Spock and Dr. It was like a surrogate family of people all getting along all out across boundaries of race and ethnicity to each other. When you think about it Star Trek aired during the nineteen sixties. This is the height of the civil rights era. It was the Vietnam war was going on the moon landings were happening. I mean, there's an incredibly politically active time, very fulfilled, a political and social turmoil and upheaval and change. It was just the perfect time for that show debut. What a tragedy a few months ago when Anton Yeltsin the Star Trek actor died in that freak accident when his Jeep roll down in crushed him. I know crazy. At he works in a medium where we get to see his worth and enjoy it, and it was a wonderful actor and again Li start for characters, and he starts like actors are so distinctive is so memorable and the walls are catered pass torch to Anton Yeltsin, and he could do, you know, the checkup so memorably he'll definitely be remember, I think we had Walter onto. Yes. And he's any another very distinctive guy in a wonderful actor, and and each starts at character is so distinctive when I wrote world enough in time. It was quite Sulu all of the characters and they all speak differently from each other. They all have different viewpoints Spock line will not work for Kirk from Koi. Vice versa. They all are very distinct themselves, and that's why they've lasted and the didn't we have James Doohan deci ashes sent off into space roddenbury's where to I went to a major Garrett roddenbury's a house whenever courted her for the computer voice in world enough and time and Roddenberry's ashes where they've they've been sent up in the state shuttle and then brought back and so every fitting testament, so again, what was it like being? On that Star Trek set when you were kid. Well, you know, I was giving a Christmas present of a trip to Star Trek set when I was a kid gray the greatest president ever. And it was the last episode of the original Star Trek ever shot if I'd gone a week later that show would have been gone, and it was an episode called turnabout intruder in which kirks personality is swapped with a woman a woman scientists, and and it was a William Shatner there that Dan Mitchell bears who played there's chapel and and of force Kelly, Dr McCoy, and it was amazing walking the sense they were so phenomenal. And and it was fascinating. Because one of the stagehands said Lascaux the season and under her breath Mitchell Barrett said last show ever and the irony was the decades later, I recorded her as a computer voice for the Star Trek episode. I did thirty years later. And so so she was not only wrong about last show ever on on Star Trek. She was wrong even herself because she would continue on Star Trek in later incarnations on Star Trek next generation and in the features and so forth. So just phenomenal. You and George went to Japan at a convention in you, we did. Yes. Well, when when we did world enough and time, and and that's what I did with him. And you can actually watch it on my my website, Mark, Zicree dot com in its entirety and. After we shot that up. So we went to the world science fiction convention in Japan, we screened to an audience of three thousand people we got a standing ovation with the crowd with with with tears streaming down their faces. And then the next year we were nominated for the top award and science fiction, the Hugo award, which is given out of the world science fiction convention. So it was just an amazing honor. And to be there in Japan with George he's fluent in Japanese. And so we were answering questions I would be fielding questions in English, and he would be answering in Japanese, and I just saw him the other day where there was a big starts convention in Las Vegas to celebrate the fifty that if I went to and and George, and I were able to reconnect, and I very much want him in command. So we've been talking about a role. He'll be playing space. Command was Shatner there. Yes. I mean, it's amazing because he's eighty five years old, and you could never tell. Yes, he doesn't look not at all. And and his energy level. He seems like a much younger, man. He's phenomenal as as as George decay. George doesn't seem like a guy pushing eighty either these are amazingly vital and vibrant people, and it's a nominal actors and Star Trek just wouldn't have been the same. Without that group. No, it was a very special group. It was it was lightning in a bottle. You know, it's amazing because you know, twilight zone ended in nineteen sixty four and then the two two years later Star Trek debuted, and gene Roddenberry was very much a friend and protege of rod sterling's..

gene Roddenberry George George decay Mark secre William Shatner NBC Japan George Noory writer captain Kirk George Clayton Johnson Zicree George Takei Marc James James Bama Joe Trimble Anton Yeltsin Nielsen RCA
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

11:17 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KTRH

"Fifty years ago, gene Roddenberry's visionary television series debuted on NBC. It was not an instant success at all. In fact, it was canceled just three years later, but a famously devoted fanbase kept the sci-fi epic alive. And it has since spawned numerous hit television spin offs and over dozen blockbuster films. That have dominated the box office for thirty five years Star Trek lives long and prospers on its fiftieth anniversary up next, Mark Zicree share some stories with us and memories. And here he is on coast to coast, Mark, Zicree. Marc. Welcome back. Great to be here, George. This is an exciting time fifty years of Star Trek v years incredible. And and and it's amazing that so many wonderful Star Trek stories have been created by so many people over all these decades. And I'm sure we're gonna be talking a lot about it. We sure are what's no with you. Give us updates. Oh my gosh. Why land? Studio shooting space command and doing the tons of stuff. We shot the two hour pilot. We have thirty minutes of the second to our story. We're now meeting with networks both here. And in England, we're gonna set it up as a show. It's going to be something that everyone is going to be able to see and enjoy it's terrific. And I'm doing books, of course, as you said the new twilight zone companion, I'm Katina trilogy of novels and just on and on tons of stuff. You're happy with all this life is good for you. Oh my God. Yes. It's so it's so fun. When I realized that my audience could basically green light me, thanks to the new models. I that's why shots base command. The my audience green lit me. They they financed me. And and now we can go to the networks having shot. You know, the two hours and say, this is what we have in mind for the next step is the network says, okay, we green light is a season. And that's very different from the way it used to be. So I'm thrilled. That would be exciting. Well, hey, you know, what nobody deserves it more than you, Mark. Thanks, george. All right. Let's talk a little bit about the fiftieth anniversary of Star Trek. Let's go back a little bit. Because you've done some work on Star Trek to haven't you? Yeah. I wrote for both Star Trek the next generation and the base nine. And then I did I started with George decay that got nominated for Hugo nebula awards and and star Trek's a part of my life. Every time I was a little kid. I debuted back in as you know, nineteen sixty six and before it even aired. They NBC commissioned a a piece of art work by artist named James Bama, and he would run it for ten seconds is just still saying coming in the fall Star Trek, and I would see this planet and this rocket ship lazing around the spatial blazing around this planet and two guys. And it went by so quickly. This is before a video recorders and watched the thing I'd sit right up against the screen waiting for this commercial. And it's like that guy that guy in the in the background have pointed ears. And I couldn't wait to see the show. And then the first episode aired, and it was called the Mantrap written by my dear friend, George Clayton Johnson and he'd been a twilight zone writer. He wrote kick the can and nothing in the dark, a wonderful writer, and it was an amazing episode. And from then on I was hooked. It was just that was that was really for me. Did you ever think that you'd be doing some work on it? We know it's funny. When when I was a kid a book came out called the making of Star Trek, and this is when the show was on the air. It was written by Stephen Whitfield, and gene Roddenberry. And and it was the first book I've read about how TV show was made. And that really planted the seed where I started thinking, we know I'd like to be a writer producer and television. And that kind of set me on that at pass. And and so my dream was to create and run my own space cooling science fiction show. And that was space command. That's exactly what I'm doing. And and so it's just a a dream come true. But it was very much set in motion by what gene Roddenberry created back back then and it only lasted three seasons. Yeah. And it's funny because you know, they were actually gonna cancel it the second season and woman be Joe Trimble started a letter writing campaign picketing campaign. I was part of that as a kid. I remember holding my little picket sign standing outside with a crowd outside NBC and writing my little letter a million letters were sent NBC and that convinced me to renew the show and it got its third season. And and if not for that third season, it never would have gone into syndication. It wouldn't have had enough episodes. And no one would have ever heard of it again. And in fact, when Star Trek initially, aired I was so worried it would never arrogant that I actually recorded on reel to reel audiotape as a kid case. Those episodes never aired. I just love those machines. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Why didn't it succeed in the ratings? Mark. Well, you know, the funny thing is back then the Nielsen ratings just registered folk numbers. How many millions of people watching an episode the year after Star Trek went off the air. They switched over something called demographics where they would check not only how many people watching it. But what group of people? Yeah. And the eighteen to thirty five demographic was the perfect buying demographic. And the year after started going off the air, they ran the demographics and the top rated show the number one show for that eighteen to thirty five demographics. They all wanted with start all my God daily freak out the yes. Because if they if they had demographics the year earlier, they never would've canceled Star Trek gosh. And they would have made money on that show. Right. That's right. Another funny thing about anything about Star Trek was it was incredibly colorful, you know, with those beautiful red and gold and blue uniforms and a very colorful enterprise bridge while the the network that aired Star Trek was NBC and its parent company was RCA television. And so they wanted to sell color TV's, and one of the reasons they green lit Star Trek was because of those bright primary colors because people would buy color TV's just to see Star Trek, and they actually run ran RCA color TV advertisements for Star Trek, so showing them on color TV's, and they ran them in all the national next things. I have I have some of those ads I save since then. We've had on the program here William Shatner, you brought us George Takei. Yes. And I think that was it just those two. Well, they're they're they're great. I mean, they're unforgettable their distinctive actors and wonderful. And again that speaks the diversity of Star Trek because again when Star Trek debuted in nineteen sixty six you didn't have African American actress in the lead like Michelle Nichols or Asian American actors in the lead like George decay these were characters were damaged. They were going on adventures. They were they were treated with respect by captain Kirk Mr. Spock and talking with quite it was like a surrogate family of people all getting along all reaching out across down of race and ethnicity to each other. And when you think about it Star Trek aired during the nineteen sixties. This is the height of the civil rights era. It was the Vietnam war was going on the moon landings were happening. I mean, there's an incredibly politically active time, very fulfilled, the political and social turmoil enough evil and change. It was just the perfect time for that show today view. What a tragedy a few months ago when Anton Yeltsin the Star Trek actor died in that freak accident when his Jeep rolled down and crushed him. I know crazy, and and yet at least he works in a medium where we get to see his worth and enjoy it, and he was a wonderful actor, and again these starts characters, and he starts like actors are so distinctive is so memorable. And and the fact that the Walter candid capacity to Anton Yeltsin, and he could do, you know, the checkup so memorably he'll definitely be remember, I think we had Walter onto. Yes. And he's any another very distinctive guy and a wonderful actor, and and again, each Star Trek character is so distinctive when I wrote when I world enough and time it was creek Parkway. So all of the characters and they all speak differently from each other. They all have different viewpoints. A Spock line will not work for Kirkland, not work from Koi vice versa. They all are very distinct themselves, and that's why they've lasted and the didn't we have James Doohan the ashes sent off into space. It will roddenbury's where to I went to maitre Barrett. Roddenbury's a house when I recorded her for the computer voice in world enough in time and Roddenberry's ashes where they've been sent up in the state shuttle and brought back and so very fitting testament. So again, what was it like being on that Star Trek set when you were a kid? Well, you know, I was given a Christmas present of a trip to Star Trek set when I was a kid gray the greatest president ever. And it was the last episode of the original Star Trek ever shot if I'd gone a week later that show would have been gone, and it was an episode called turnabout intruder in which kirks personality is swapped with a woman a woman scientists, and and it was a William Shatner there that Dan Mitchell who played there's chapel and and and to force Kelly who played Dr McCoy, and it was amazing walking those since they were so phenomenal. And and and it was fascinating. Because one of the stagehands said Lascaux the season and under her breath. Major Garrett said last show ever. And the irony was the decades later, I recorded her as a computer voice for the Star Trek that I did thirty years later. And so so she was not only wrong about last show ever on on Star Trek. She was wrong even herself because she would continue on Star Trek in later incarnations on Star Trek the next generation, and then the features and so forth. So just phenomenal. You and George went to Japan at a convention in you, we did. Yes. Well, when when we did world enough in time, and that's what I did with him. And. So you can actually watch it on my my website, Mark Zicree dot com in its entirety. And after we shot that up. So we went to the world science fiction convention in Japan, we screened to an audience of three thousand people we got a standing ovation with the crowd with with with tears streaming down their faces. And then the next year we were nominated for the top award in science fiction, the Hugo award, which is given out of the world science fiction convention. So it was just an amazing honor. And to be there in Japan with George he's fluent in Japanese. And so we were answering questions I would be fielding questions in English, and he'll be answering Japanese, and I just saw him the other day where there was a big Star Trek convention in Las Vegas to celebrate the fiftieth fiftieth anniversary, I went to it. And and George, and I were able to reconnect, and I very much want him in command. So we've been talking about a role. He'll be playing in space. Command was Shatner there. Yes. It's amazing because he's eighty five years old. And you could never tell. Yes, doesn't look that not at all. And and his energy level. You seems like a much younger, man. He's phenomenal as as George decay. George doesn't seem like a guy pushing eighty either these are amazingly vital and vibrant people in in phenomenal actors and Star Trek just wouldn't have been the same without that group. No, it was a very special group. It was it was lightning in a bottle. You know, it's amazing because you know, twilight zone ended in nineteen sixty four and then to two years later Star Trek debut, and gene Roddenberry was very much a friend and opponent of rod sterling's. In fact, he gave a eulogy at Rod's funeral and and Roddenberry was very aware of if not for twilight zone, you couldn't have had Star Trek, and and he cast it's funny because the first piloted a pilot for Star Trek called the cage was actually shot in nineteen sixty four and star Jeffrey hunter as captain pike. And it didn't sell the show and. And so they ordered a second pilot. And that's when they got Shatner, and and the chemistry between William Shatner, and Leonard nimoy, and I Kelly in the rest of the cast, it just was magical, and you could see it from the beginning from the first episode that aired you just know knew that these people were unforgettable..

gene Roddenberry George Mark Zicree William Shatner George decay NBC Zicree George Clayton Johnson Japan Anton Yeltsin writer Marc George Takei Joe Trimble Kelly Nielsen RCA James Bama James Doohan
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

11:19 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Years ago, gene, Roddenberry's visionary television series debuted on NBC was not an instant success at all. In fact, it was canceled just three years later, but a famously devoted fan base kept the sci-fi epic alive. And it has since spawned numerous hit television spin offs and over a dozen blockbuster films. That have dominated the box office for thirty five years Star Trek lives long and prospers on its fiftieth anniversary up next, Mark Zicree share some stories with us and memories. And here he is on coast to coast, Mark, Zicree. Marc. Welcome back. Great to be here, George. This is an exciting time fifty years of Star Trek fifteen years incredible. And and and it's amazing that so many wonderful Star Trek stories have been created by so many people over all these decades. And I'm sure we're gonna be talking a lot about it. We sure are what's with you. Give us updates on. My gosh, we'll have land studio. I'm. Shooting space command and do doing tons of stuff. We shot the two hour pilot. We shot thirty minutes of the second to our story. We're now meeting with networks both here. And in England, we're gonna set it up as a show. It's going to be something that everyone's going to be able to see and enjoy it's terrific. And I'm doing books, of course, as you said the new twilight zone companion, I'm pitching trilogy of novels and just on and on tons of stuff. You're happy with all this life is good for you. Oh my God. Yes. It's so it's so fun. When I realized that my audience could basically green light me, thanks to the new models. I that's when I shot space command. This the my audience green with me, they they financed me. And and now we can go to the networks having shot. You know, the two hours and say, this is what we have in mind for the next step is the network says, okay, we we green light is a season. And that's very different from the way it used to be. So I'm thrilled. That would be exciting. Well, hey, you know, what nobody deserves it more than you, Mark. Thanks to it. All right. Let's talk a little bit about the fiftieth anniversary of Star Trek. Let's go back a little bit because you've done some work on Star Trek to. Yeah. Yeah. I wrote for both Star Trek the next generation and the space nine, and then I did a Star Trek episode with George decay that got nominated for Hugo nebula awards and five star Trek's been a part of my life ever since I was a little kid. I debuted back in as you know, nineteen sixty six and before it even aired. They NBC commissioned a a piece of artwork and artists named James Bama, and they would run it for ten seconds is just a still station thing coming in the fall Star Trek, and I would see this planet, and this rocket ship lazing around the spaceship blazing around this planet and two guys. And it went by so quickly. This is before video recorders and had watched the sit right up against the screen waiting for this commercial. And it's like that guy that guy in the in the background have pointed ears what an earn an and I couldn't wait to see the show. And then the first episode aired, and it was an excellent called the Mantrap written by my dear friend, George Clayton Johnson and he'd been a twilight zone writer. He wrote kick the can and nothing. Doc, a wonderful writer, and it was an amazing episode. And from then on I was hooked. It was just that was that was really it for me. Did you ever think that you'd be doing some work on it? We know it's funny. When when I was a kid a book came out called the making of Star Trek, and this is when the show was on the air. It was written by Stephen Whitfield, gene Roddenberry. And and it was the first book I've read about how TV show was made. And that really planted a seed where I started thinking, we know I'd like to be a writer producer in television. And that kind of set me on that path. And and so my dream was to create and run my own space cooling science fiction show. And that was space command. That's exactly what I'm doing. And and so it's just a a dream come true. But it was very much set in motion by what gene Roddenberry created back back then and it only lasted three seasons. Yeah. And it's funny because you know, they were actually gonna cancel it the second season and woman named Joe Trimble started a letter writing campaign and a and a picketing campaign. I was part of that as a kid. I remember holding my little pick. Sign standing outside with a crowd outside NBC and writing my little letter a million letters were sent NBC and that convinced me to renew the show and it got its third season. And if not for that third season, it never would have gone into syndication. It wouldn't have had enough episodes. And no one would have ever heard of it again. And in fact, when Star Trek initially, aired I was so worried it would never air again that I actually recorded on reel to reel audiotape as a kid in case, those episodes never aired. I used to love those machines. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Why didn't it succeed in the ratings? Mark. Well, you know, the funny thing is back then the Nielsen ratings just registered bulk numbers how many millions of people watching an episode the year after Star Trek when off the air. They switched over Sunday called demographics where they will check not only how many people watching it. But what group of people age? Yeah. And the eighteen to thirty five demographic was the perfect buying them. A graphic and the year after started going off the air. They ran the demographics and the top rated show the number one show for that eight. Eighteen to thirty five demographics that they all wanted to start all my God daily freak out the yes. Because if they if they had had demographics the year earlier, they never would've canceled Star Trek. Oh my gosh. I would end they would've made money on that show. That's right. Another funny thing about another faith thing about Star Trek was it was incredibly colorful, you know, with those beautiful red and gold and blue uniforms and the very colorful enterprise bridge. Well, the the network that aired Star Trek was NBC and its parent company was RCA television. And so they wanted to sell color TV's, and one of the reasons they green lit startling was because of those bright primary colors because people would buy color TV's just to see Star Trek, and they actually run ran RCA color TV advertisements for Star Trek, so showing them on color TV's, and they ran them in all the national magazines. I have I have some of those ads I save since then. We've had on the program here William Shatner, you brought us George Takei. Yes. And I think that was it just those two. Yeah. Well, they're they're they're great. I mean, they're unforgettable their distinctive actors and wonderful. And again, that's speaks the diversity of Star Trek. Because again when Star Trek debuted in nineteen sixty six you didn't have African American actress in the lead like Michelle Nichols or Asian American actors in the lead like George decay. These were characters who were dynamic. They were going on adventures. They were they were treated with respect by captain Kirk and Mr. Spock doctrine with quite it was like a surrogate family of people all getting along all reaching out across boundaries of race and ethnicity to each other. And when you think about it Star Trek aired during the nineteen sixties. This is the height of the civil rights era. It was the Vietnam war was going on the moon landings were happening. I mean, it was an incredibly politically active time, very fulfilled, the political and social turmoil and upheaval and change. It was just the perfect time for that show today view. What a tragedy a few months ago when Anton Yeltsin the Star Trek actor died in that freak accident when his Jeep roll down and crushed him. I know crazy, and and yet at least he works in a medium where we get to see his work and enjoy it, and and he was a wonderful actor, and again these starts at characters, and he starts like actors are so distinctive in so memorable. And and the fact that the Walter candid capacity torch to Anton Yeltsin, and he could do, you know, the checkup so memorably he'll definitely be remember, I think we had Walter onto. Yes. And he's and he's another very distinctive guy, and a wonderful actor, and and again, each starts a character is so distinctive when I wrote when I world enough and time it was Kirk Spock McCoy Sulu all of the characters and they all speak differently from each other. They all have to viewpoints a Spock line will not work for Kirk will not work from Koi. No vice versa. They all very distinct himself, and that's why they've lasted and the didn't we have James Doohan deci ashes sent off into space. It will roddenbury's where to I went to so major Barrett. Roddenbury's a house when I recorded her for the computer voice in world enough and time and Roddenberry's ashes where they've they've been sent up in the state shuttle and then brought back and so a very fitting testament. So again, what was it like being on that Star Trek set when you were a kid? Well, you know, I was given a Christmas present of a trip to the star Trek's when I was a kid gray the greatest Christmas present ever. And it was the last episode of the original Star Trek ever shot if I'd gone a week later that show would have been gone, and it was an episode called turnabout intruder in which kirks personality is swapped with a woman a woman scientists, and and it was a William Shatner there that day in Mitchell bears who played there's chapel and and the force Kelly who played Dr McCoy, and it was amazing walking those since they were so phenomenal. And and and it was fascinating. Because one of the stagehands said Lascaux the season and under her breath. Major Garrett said last show ever. And the irony was the decades later, I recorded her as a computer voice for the Star Trek gets that I did thirty years later. And so so she was not only wrong about last show ever on on Star Trek. She was wrong. Even herself said she would continue on Star Trek in later incarnations on Star Trek the next generation, and then the features and so forth. So just phenomenal. You and George went to Japan at a convention in you, we did. Yes. Well, when when we did world enough and time, and and that's what I did with him. And. You can actually watch it on my my website, Mark Zicree dot com in its entirety. And after we shot that up. So we went to the world science fiction convention in Japan, we screened to an audience of three thousand people we got a standing ovation with the crowd with with with tears streaming down their faces. And then the next year we were nominated for the top award and science fiction, the Hugo award, which is given out of the world science fiction convention. So it was just an amazing honor. And to be there in Japan with George he's fluent in Japanese. And so we ran Seraing questions would be fielding questions in English, and he would be answering Japanese and I just saw him the other day. There was a big Star Trek convention in Las Vegas to celebrate. The fifty fifty then I went to it. And and George, and I were able to reconnect, and I very much want him in command. So we've been talking about a role. He'll be playing in space. Command was Shatner there. Yes. Shannon with. I mean, it's amazing because he's eighty five years old, and you could never tell. Yes, doesn't look that not not at all. And and his energy level. You seems like a much younger, man. He's phenomenal as George decay. George doesn't seem like a guy pushing eighty either these are amazingly vital and vibrant people in in phenomenal actors and the Star Trek just wouldn't have been the same without that group. No, it was a very special group. It was it was lightning in a bottle. You know, it's amazing because you know, twilight zone ended in nineteen sixty four and then to two years later Star Trek debuted, and gene Roddenberry was very much a friend and protege of rod sterling's. In fact, he gave a eulogy at Rod's funeral and and Roddenberry was very aware of if not for twilight zone, you couldn't have had Star Trek, and and he cast it's funny because the first pilot either a pilot for Star Trek called the cage there was actually shot in nineteen sixty four star Jeffrey hunter as captain pike. And it didn't sell the show. And so they ordered a second pie with. And that's when they got Shatner, and and the chemistry between William Shatner, and Leonard nimoy and to force Kelly and the rest of the cast, it just was magical and. And you could see it from the beginning from that first episode that aired you just know knew that these people were unforgettable. And and they stayed unforgettable..

gene Roddenberry Mark Zicree William Shatner George George decay NBC writer Kirk Spock McCoy captain Kirk Anton Yeltsin Zicree George Clayton Johnson Japan Marc George Takei Joe Trimble Kelly RCA
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Gene, Roddenberry's visionary television series debuted on NBC was not an instant success at all. In fact, it was canceled just three years later, but a famously devoted fan base kept the sci-fi epic alive. And it has since spawned numerous hit television spin offs and over a dozen blockbuster films. That have dominated the box office for thirty five years Star Trek lives long and prospers on its fiftieth anniversary up next, Mark Zicree share some stories with us and memories. And here he is on coast to coast, Mark, Zicree. Marc. Welcome back. Great to be here, George. This is an exciting time fifty years of Star Trek fifty years incredible. And and and it's amazing that so many wonderful Star Trek stories have been created by so many people over all these decades. And I'm sure we're going to be talking a lot about it. We sure are what's new with you. Give us updates land studio. I'm shooting space command and. Doing tons of stuff. We we've shot the two hour pilot. We shot thirty minutes of the second to our story. We're now meeting with networks both here and in England, we're we're gonna set it up as a show. It's going to be something that everyone's going to be able to see and enjoy it's terrific. And I'm doing books, of course, as you said the new twilight zone companion, I'm pitching a trilogy of novels and just on and on tons of stuff. You're happy with all this life is good for you. Oh my God. Yes. It's so it's so fun. Because when I realized that my audience could basically green light me, thanks to the new models. I that's when I shop space command the my audience green with me, they they financed me. And and now we can go to the networks having shot the two hours and save this is what we have in mind for the next step. Is the network says okay, we we green light is a season. And that's very different from the way it used to be. So I'm thrilled. That would be exciting. Well, hey, you know, what nobody deserves it more than you, Mark. Thanks to it. All right. Let's talk a little bit about the fiftieth anniversary of Star Trek. Let's go back a little bit because you've done. Some work on Star Trek to haven't you? Yeah. Yeah. I wrote for both Star Trek the next generation and these space nine, and then I did a Star Trek episode with George Takeda got nominated for Hugo and nebula awards, and and and start texting a part of my life ever since I was a little kid. I debuted back in as you know, nineteen sixty six and before it even aired. They NBC commissioned on a piece of artwork by artist named James Bama, and they would run it for ten seconds is just a still station thing coming in the fall Star Trek, and I would see this planet and this rocket ship lazing around the station blazing on this planet and two guys. And it went by so quickly. This is before a video recorders. And I've watched the thing I'd sit right up against the screen waiting for this commercial. And it's like the guy that guy in the in the background. You have pointed ears. And I couldn't wait to see the show. And then the first episode aired, and it was an absolute call the Mantrap written by my dear friend, George Clayton Johnson, and he'd been twilights writer. He wrote kick the can and nothing dark a wonderful writer, and it was an amazing episode. And from then on I was hooked. It was just that was that was really it for me. Did you ever think that you'd be doing some work on? We know it's funny when when I was a kid a book came out called the making of Star Trek, and this is when the show was on the air. It was written by Stephen Whitfield, and gene Roddenberry, and and it was the first book I've read about how TV show was made. And that really planted a seed where I started thinking, we know I'd like to be a writer producer in television. And that kind of set me on that at pass. And and so my dream was to create and run my own space cooling science fiction show. And that was space command. That's exactly what I'm doing. And and so it's just a a dream come true. But it was very much set in motion by what gene Roddenberry created back then and it only lasted three seasons. Yeah. And it's funny because you know, they were actually gonna cancel it the second season and woman they've beat Joe Trimble started a letter writing campaign and a and a picketing campaign. I was part of that as a kid. I remember holding my little picket sign standing outside with a crowd outside NBC and writing my little letter a million letters were sent NBC and that convinced me to renew the show and it got third season. And if not for that third season in never would have gone into syndication, it wouldn't have had enough episodes. And no one would have ever heard of it again. And in fact, when Star Trek initially, aired I was so worried it would never air again that I actually recorded on reel to reel audiotape as a kid cases. That says never aired. I used to love those machines. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Why didn't it succeed in the ratings? Mark. Well, you know, the funny thing is back then the Nielsen ratings just registered book numbers. How many millions of people watching an episode the year after Star Trek when off the air they switch over to something called demographics. When you check not only how many people watching it. But what group of? People age and the eighteen to thirty five demographic was the perfect buying demographic. And the year after star when the round the demographics and the top rated show the number one show for that eighteen to thirty five demographics that they all wanted with start. All my God. Do they freak out the yes? Because if they if they had demographics the year earlier, they never would've canceled Star Trek. Oh my gosh. And they would have made money on that show. Right. That's right. Another funny thing about another faith thing about Star Trek was it was incredibly colorful, you know, with those beautiful red and gold and blue uniforms, very colorful enterprise bridge, while the the network that aired Star Trek was NBC and its parent company was RCA television. And so they wanted to sell color TV's, and one of the reasons they green lit start was because of those bright primary colors because people would buy color TV's just to see Star Trek, and they actually run ran RCA color TV advertisements for Star Trek. So on showing them on color TV's, and they ran them in the national magazines. I have I have some of those ads I've saved since then. We've had on the program here William Shatner, you brought us George Takei. Yes. And I think that was it just those two. Yeah. Well, they're they're they're great. I mean were unforgettable their distinctive actors and wonderful. And again that speaks the diversity of Star Trek because again when Star Trek debuted in nineteen sixty six you didn't have African American actress in the lead like Michelle Nichols are Asian American actors in the lead like George decay. These were characters were dynamic. They were going on adventures. They were they were treated with respect by captain Kirk, and Mr. Spock and document quite it was like a surrogate family of people all getting along all reaching out across boundaries of race and ethnicity to each other. And when you think about it Star Trek aired during the nineteen sixties. This is the height of the civil rights era. It was the Vietnam war was going on the moon landings were happening. I mean, there's an incredibly politically active time, very fulfilled, the political and social turmoil and upheaval and change. It was just the perfect time for that show today view. What a tragedy a few months ago when Anton Yeltsin the Star Trek actor died in that freak accident when his Jeep roll down and crushed him. I know crazy, and at least he works in a medium where we get to see his worth and enjoy it. And and he was a wonderful actor, and again these starts to characters and he starts like actors are so distinctive in so memorable. And and the fact that the wall tainted capacity torch to Anton Yeltsin, and he could do, you know, the checkup so memorably he'll definitely be remember, I think we had Walter onto. Yes. And he's and he's another very distinctive guy, and a wonderful actor, and and again, each starts trek character is so distinctive when I wrote when I world enough in time, it was quite so the wall of the characters and they all speak differently from each other. They all have different viewpoints. Spock line will not work for Kirkland, not work from Koi vice versa. They all are very distinct themselves, and that's why they've lasted and didn't we have James Doohan deci ashes sent off into space yet will roddenbury's were to I went to maitre Barrett. Roddenberry's a house when I recorded her for the computer voice in world enough in time and Roddenberry's ashes where they've they've been sent up in the state shuttle, and then brought back and so very fitting testament. So again, what was it like being on that Star Trek set when you were a kid? Well, you know, I was given a Christmas. Present of tripped of Star Trek set when I was a kid great the greatest Christmas present ever. And it was the last episode of the original Star Trek ever shot if I'd gone a week later that show would have been gone, and it was an episode called turnabout intruder in which kirks personality is swapped with a woman a woman scientists, and and it was a William Shatner there that Dan Mitchell bears who played there's chapel and and and to force Kelly played Dr McCoy, and it was amazing walking the. Since they were so phenomenal. And and and it was fascinating. Because one of the stagehands said last show the season and under her breath. Major Garrett said last show ever. And the irony was the decades later, I I recorded her as a computer voice for the Star Trek episode. I did thirty years later. And so so she was not only wrong about Lascaux ever on on Star Trek. She was wrong even herself because she would continue on Star Trek in later incarnations on Star Trek the next generation and in the features and so forth. So just phenomenal. You and George went to Japan at a convention in you, we did. Yes. Well, when when we did world enough and time, and and that's what I did with him. And you can actually watch it on my my website, Mark Zicree dot com in its entirety. And after we shot that up. So we went to the world science fiction convention in Japan, we screened to an audience of three thousand people we got a standing ovation with the crowd with with with tears streaming down their faces. And then the next year we were nominated for the top award and science fiction, the Hugo award, which is given out of the world. Science fiction conventions. So it was just an amazing honor. And to be there in Japan with George he's fluent in Japanese. And so we were answering questions I would be fielding questions in English, and he would be answering in Japanese, and I just saw him the other day where there was a big Star Trek convention in Las Vegas to celebrate. The fifty fifty then I went to and and George, and I were able to reconnect, and I I very much want him in command. So we've been talking about a role playing in space. Command was Shatner there. Yes. It's amazing because he's eighty five years old, and you could never tell. Yes. It doesn't look that not at all. And and energy level. He seems like a much younger, man. He's phenomenal. And as as George decay. George doesn't seem. It's like a guy pushing eighty these are amazingly vital and vibrant people in phenomenal actors, and you don't Star Trek just wouldn't have been the same without that group. No, it was a very special group. It was it was lightning in a bottle. You know, it's amazing because you know, twilight zone ended in nineteen sixty four and then the two two years later Star Trek debuted and gene Roddenberry was very much a friend and opponent of rod sterling's. In fact, he gave the eulogy at Rod's funeral and Roddenberry was very aware of if not for twilight on you couldn't have had Star Trek, and and he cast it's funny because the first pilot pilot for Star Trek called the cage there was actually shot in nineteen sixty four star Jeffrey hunter as captain pike. And it didn't sell the show. And so they ordered a second pilot. And that's when they got Shatner, and and the chemistry between William Shatner, and Leonard nimoy and force Kelly and the rest of the cast, it just was magical, and you could see it from the beginning from the first episode that aired you just know knew that. These people were unforgettable..

gene Roddenberry Mark Zicree William Shatner George NBC George decay Zicree George Clayton Johnson Japan writer Marc George Takei Joe Trimble Anton Yeltsin George Takeda Nielsen Kelly RCA
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

"He wanted to be the biggest gift giver of all times. The guy was a less, right? What he got a break from the farm story went and got drunk came back. He was sitting up on the chair little boy jumped up in his lap. Santa claus. Just got man. I mean, he fell out of the chair on the floor. You know, where she got fired and everything he went outside. And he was all down down. You went in the back eilly and picked up a bag, and it turned into gifts mysteriously the bag. Just all of a sudden became full of gifts. Instead of you know, empty cans. Man, he went around giving gifts to everybody, and it just and that story. You know, and the guy that random department store. They found Colwell given these gifts out at this place like John three sixteen mission type place. You know, policemen comes in here and goes, Where'd you get all these kids? If you got a receipt for all these kids, blah, blah, blah, and he does not just not found the bag and the gifts rent, and I'm just giving them out talking to the police station and the department store owner came inertia. Yeah, there it is. There's the merchandise. Oh, well, you're blah, blah, blah. You know, and the guy's name was Mr. Dundee the department store on right? And and they emptied out of the bag at the police station. It wasn't nothing but empty cans in it, right? And so they had to let him go. Of course store owner setting. You're scratching his head to policemen scratches. It couldn't figure out where all those district coming from. But they were coming out of that bag. So just before they released Colwell Santa Claus. He reached into the bag and grab a bottle of wine. Nineteen thirty three. And added it to Mr. Dundee. Yeah. Christmas and both of them got pretty pretty toasted on the wine and they walked outside, and they seem Santa Claus. Flying overhead in a sleigh with reindeer. Aw, society and that right? There is just catches my heart. Every time any days, you mentioned something about Kansan. Remember kick, the can nNcholas. Oh, sure. Sure. Yeah. Kicked the cat, and that was actually remade in the twilight zone feature film as well about a old old folks home where one of the one of the people there wants to get the get the residents to play kick the cans, I feel young again. And of course, they do become young again by playing kick the canon and the one person who was against it the whole time he didn't play and he didn't get to become young, and he regrets it, obviously. And and that that was written by George Clayton Johnson. Actually, that's a terrific episode. We're running out of time here neck, but I've got to tell you this is a topic. That is so dear to my heart. It brings back memories. When I was a kid watching television. My folks were there in the living room with us. Those are great time. So we're thank it's great memories. Yeah. Yeah. It was a different time. And for all of us, and yeah, it's great to see TV can bring you. That way, you know. So it's great to think about life was different to. Sure it. Sure was. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. There's a kid that didn't have a cure in the world. Did we? Yeah. And that's what and you know, that that's something that brought selling Liz your four and a lot of those twilight zone episodes to be able to go back to being a kid and have been carefree and being innocent, and and less stress and everything else and that came out and in so many stories, by the way, Billy was wrong about one thing. You're not a bad bad, man. That's how I can take it from from Bill movie. He can call me that. That's that's that's a classic one more time. Give out your website. If you would for people. Sure, we'll be rod Serling memorial foundation can be found just that rod Serling dot com. WWW that rod sterling dot com. And I have a Facebook page that's dedicated a book, so it's not my personal taste. It's for the book. It's Facebook dot com forward slash rod, sterling dimensions. Hold onward route Erling dimensions the working title for the book was dimensions of imagination. So it was that. But the book is called rod. Showing his life working immagination super, Nick. Thanks again up next. We're talking about haunted, collectibles, and collectibles to next. Coast.

Colwell Santa Claus rod Serling memorial foundatio Mr. Dundee Facebook rod Serling George Clayton Johnson Nick John Billy Bill Liz
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

"Coast to coast AM on K G O eight ten. And welcome back with us broad sherline his life work in imagination. Nick, rod, Shirley and were alive today watching television. What would he say about the current state of TV? Well, I think in in one regard, I think he would be thrilled with how adult television has become in, you know, in the in the realm of drama during the time that rod Serling was writing. Obviously, we talked about some of the censorship, but not all the issues, but also the language, and and just the subject matter in general, even if it wasn't a social issue, you know, today, there's so many shows that are that are are so adults in scope, you know, I don't even have to name them. But, you know, mad men and breaking bad, and, you know, not just cable, but, but but network television, I think he would be thrilled with how how the with the quality of those shows. Now, of course, we have many more channels now, and he does certainly a whole lot of you know, of of junk too. But but I think in general he would be happy with it. And one thing I can tell you for sure he he would hate reality television. He, and and I don't say that just you know, that's not just me saying that at the time, you know, I guess reality television for its time. Rod had some very negative things to say about a show called this is your life. If you remember, this is your life. This is your life with a show where they bring somebody onto the show normal everyday person, and they trot his family members out there, and they would go through his, you know, scrapbook look at you know, it was kind of reality television for the time. And he just despise the the show, you know, he thought it was just an invasion of privacy and everything else. So so reality is over and you would hate, but, but I think there were so many shows now that he would absolutely love wollen all-time time television to neck really did not understand racial mix ups demographics. When you look at some of these old shows way on back, even the comedians the game shows, they were all older white guys, you know in in. I'm not I'm not talking. Like middle age. I'm talking older white guys today in television. You know, it would be difficult to get that kind of a purse like Jimmy Durante, for example, you you think he him? He was a big superstar very talented. I don't think he would make it today. You might be right. Yeah. Yeah. You could be right. I mean, well, listen to the Mark the field has has grown tremendously so much more competition that yeah. That'd be that'd be kind of like talking about major league baseball before the before. Jackie robinson. Yup. You know, they didn't have the competition from the from the black player from the Latin player from all these places, and they were certainly people who played in the major leagues in nineteen forty one. Who may not have made it in nineteen fifty one because there was so much more competition. What would rod say about all the different channels available now in his day? There was just the three major networks now nine God. You've got hundreds of channels. Yeah. Well, he would he would love the freedom that it that it gives to to writers and creators, that's you know, have been his day. You know, those three networks didn't wanna hear it. That was it. I mean, you know, and in some cases, if he was you know, had under contract to CBS. Yes. Didn't wanna hear it that was it nowadays, you know, you can go to so many different outlets to get your creation seen and heard. So yeah, he would be thrilled with that aspect of it for sure I mean Netflix Amazon truly rival the networks now, don't they? Oh, absolutely. I some of the best television being made right now is on on those platforms. This amazing. Let's take some calls. Let's go west of the Rockies Kirk in Boise, Idaho to get us started high Kurt. Hey, george. Glad you got Nick on can't wait to read the book, you mentioned earlier when you were talking about pack does the fact that the entire series is in black and white. And of course, Nick mentioned that the film look outlook. I've always been amazed at what Rogge was able to do with regarding the size of the sets, which to me was as far as the visual impact was which is a testament to the, you know, the cinematographer in the lighting directors, which I just just blown away with what they were able to accomplish always watering from Nick if he knew how many cameras used during the actual shoots. Okay. Nick, do you know, I do not know the answer to that question. But I will absolutely agree with curt that it that's one of the striking things about the series is is that, you know, of course, the production level in terms of budget. You know, it was a fairly generously budgeted show at the for for the time. But of course. In terms of special sex. They weren't going to be able to give you the brilliance, you know, spaceships shooting across the sky, and that kind of thing so so rod hat to work with a, you know, more relatively modest set. And so, and he he got the most out of out of those particular sets, and and every now and then to actually because budget was always a concern. He would write a particular show that only took place on in one one room because it was going to be cheaper to make factors one room. And that's it. And he would do one of those after they had a couple of expensive shows like I have the beholder or, you know, nightmare at twenty thousand feet or something. And then he would do one of these shows that we've got kind of got the budget back on the control. He jump started many careers to did he not? Yeah. I think so I mean, certainly there were a lot of you know, stars and soon to be Robert Redford. Yeah. Yeah. Actually got his first job not on the twilight zone. But in another show that routes throwing written called in the presence of mine enemies on playhouse ninety. It was the very first appearance by Robert Redford on television. And that was a great great show when he was very good in it too. Yeah. In the twilight zone episode. He was a cop in the lady thought he was a death coming to get her. I'm not gonna say what the Indy news. But that was a great show. Yeah. It was it was very that was written by George Clayton Johnson, actually. And that's a terrific show. What was the name of the show nNcholas were Agnes Moorehead was woman in her house in a small flying saucer landed insider house or something like that? And she beat it with a broom. It's called the invaders and that was written by Richard Matheson. The late grade Richard Matheson, he wrote several episodes of the show, and that's one of the most well remembered episodes of the series, it's it's largely dialogue free. There's almost no dialogue in it. Until the very end when this when he you know, person says a few things we found out who they were and the other one I like to was the lady who was having plastic surgery because everybody thought she was ugly in she wanted to look like everyone else, and we found out what everyone else looked like in the eye of the beholder. And that is you know, if there's a quintessential twilight zone episode, I think that's that's it. That's that's the one and again, one of the most well remembered episodes in the one that really gave me the message of people was the shelter about that fallout shelter. Yeah. The shelter is a great great episodes. Wrestling wrote that. And yeah, it's about the idea that there's gonna you know, there's a there's a bomb threat a nuclear threat. And what is what does this community do when there's only one bomb shelter, and they all want to get into and they can't all get into it. And they turn on each other. And it was a yes that was well done episode Renee in San Francisco's with us. Hi renee. Go ahead. Hi, are you know, there's an episode debts are very rare episodes. But it was finally released years later that was called miniature miniature. I don't remember that nNcholas do rather devolved. Absolutely, right. Another great great actor who one of his early early performances Robert Duvall that was one of the hour long episodes the fourth season of the twilight zone, they were all an hour long as opposed to half hour. Really? Yeah. Okay. Yeah. And miniature was one of the hour, long episodes, and it was involved in a lawsuit at the time that the series went into syndication. So was not initially syndicated. So it was not seen for decades at least twenty years, and so that was long long settled. And there was a special on pull the twilight zone silver anniversary special, and it showed that particular episode along with a couple of others that had been similarly left out of the syndication package. What was the tragedy when they were doing the twilight zone movie a helicopter crashed or something like that? Oh, yeah. It's horrible horrible incident. Yeah. Helicopter crashed after an explosion, you know, special effects explosion and killed Vic Morrow who. Starring in that particular story and two young children who are on the set. It was. Yeah. Yeah. Cast a pall over the entire movie, of course, horrible horrible situation. Joe in Long Island, New York is with us. Hey joseph. Go ahead. I make a couple of questions. One would be the first one would be that seems like it was very escapist. Maybe someone stay back in sexiest. I'm just speculating if you had a record job, and he came home and watch the twilight zone that would be almost like an escape from your daily reality. And I guess people might have wanted that. And I'm wondering if there are any other shows really like that my second question would be about the mysterious endings, which I think a lot of that could be almost not necessarily epic but could have unfolded into actual movies additional scenes where someone could take it's why lights on sewed and kind of. Unfolded into an actual movie. You know, like a planet of the apes. Yeah. I I I agree with you on that. And and to get to the first question, you know, the, yeah. The escapist aspect of the twilight zone. I mean that I think that is part of all science fiction and fantasy of course, is that that escapist tone to it. But you know, it's funny that you mentioned that because that is actually something that rod sterling often pointed to about Nike gallery in the early seventies. During the end of the Vietnam era. He felt that night gallery was giving people in the scape from the nightly news, and seeing you know, this stuff on stuff on the news about war and everything else that they could go into the night gallery and escape through that. So he never really said that about the twelve or somebody I think is similar point can be made about the twilight zone as well. And it is surprising that that someone hasn't taken a twilight zone episode and expanded into a feature film. Although there's been there have been plenty of films that are certainly twilight zone, you know, influenced that could very well just. As just as well be twilights on movies that aren't called the twilight zone was a Jack Klugman on one of the twilight zones. He started four twilight zone. He actually started one with Bill movie Impreza tip. That's right. Yeah. Yeah. And he was terrific. Jack Klugman probably gave my favorite performance is on the twilight zone in three of the episodes that he was in was he a trumpet player in one of them. Exactly. Yes. There's one called a passage for trumpet rod wrote that one and I'll tell you a quick story about that episode. You know, he the director Jack Klugman was so good in that episode. This just so good that the director actually wrote or called rod and said, listen, I don't want to take the camera off of this guy. I just wanna keep filming. Anyway, we can make this into a two part episode. He wants to expand our just because Jack Klugman was so good. And rod said, you know, we just can't donate the budget. We can do more than half an hour. But that's that's saying something director says listen, I'm just gonna let this go. And I'm just gonna film whatever he does classic. Classic. Classic Jason and Portland. Oregon's with us. Now, Jason go ahead, sir..

Nick Jack Klugman rod Serling Rod director Robert Redford rod Richard Matheson Jimmy Durante Jackie robinson Jason baseball Renee George Clayton Johnson Robert Duvall Indy Boise Oregon Netflix
"clayton johnson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You know, where she got fired and everything he went outside. And he was all down down. You went in the back alley and picked up a bag, and it turned into gifts mysteriously bag just all of a sudden became full of gifts. Instead of you know, empty cans. Then he went around giving gifts to everybody, and it just and that story, you know, and the guy that random department store. They found Colwell given these gifts out at this place like John three sixteen mission type place. You know, policemen comes in your and goes, Where'd you get all these kids? Have you got a receipt for all these games, blah, blah, blah. And he goes, nah, just I found the bag and the gifts rent it. And I'm just giving them out took him to the police station and the department store owner came a nurse Yair. There. It is there's the merchandise. Oh, well, you're the Bob eyeball. You know, and the guy's name Mr. Dundee department store on right hand. And they emptied the stuff out of the bag at the police station. There wasn't nothing but empty cans and right? And so they had to let him go. Of course, store owner sitting you're scratching his head two policemen, scratches it couldn't figure out where all those district coming from. But they were coming out of that bag. So just before they released Colwell Santa Claus. He reached into the bag and grab a bottle of wine. Nineteen thirty three. And added it to Mr. Gundy. Yeah. And the both got pretty pretty toasted on the wine and they walked outside, and they seem Santa Claus. Flying overhead in a sleigh with reindeer. Dieting and that right there. Just catches my heart. Every time any day as you mentioned something about cans. Ed, remember kick. The can nNcholas L. Sure. Sure. Yeah. Kick the cat, and that was actually remade in this. Well, its own feature film as well about a old old folks home where one of the one of the people there wants to get the get the residents to play kick the cans, I feel young again. And of course, they do become young again by playing kick the can and and the one person who was against it the whole time he didn't play and he didn't get to become young, and he regrets it, obviously. And and that was written by George Clayton Johnson. Actually, that's a terrific episode. We're running out of time here neck, but I I've got to tell you this is a topic. That is so dear to my heart. It brings back memories. When I was a kid watching television. My folks were there in the living room with us. Those are great times weren't they? That's great memories. Yeah. Yeah. It was a different time. And for all of us, and yeah, it's great to see TV can bring you back that way, you know. So it's great to think about life was different to. Sure it. Sure was. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. As a kid that didn't have a cure in the world. Did we? Yeah. And that's what you know that that's something that rod sterling, Liz, Liz, you're earning four and a lot of those flights and episodes to be able to go back to being a kid and have being carefree and being innocent, and and less stress and everything else and that came out and in so many stories, by the way, Billy was wrong about one thing. You're not a bad bad, man. That's how I can take it from from Bill movie. He can call me that. That's that's that's a classic one more time. Give out your website. If you would for people sure what we read memorial foundation can be found just that rod Serling dot com. WWW rod Serling dot com, and I have a Facebook page. That's dedicated a book. So it's not my personal pages. It's for the book. It's Facebook dot com forward slash rod, sterling dimensions. Route sterling dimensions the working title for the book was dimensions of imagination. So it was that. But the book is called rod Serling his life work in the magic nation super, Nick. Thanks again next. We're talking about haunted, collectibles, and collectibles to next. Coast insiders,.

Colwell Santa Claus rod Serling Ed Facebook George Clayton Johnson Bob eyeball Mr. Gundy John Mr. Dundee Yair Billy Bill Nick Liz
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I can't wait to read the book, you mentioned earlier when you were talking about the impact of the fact that the entire series is a black and white. And of course, Nick mentioned that, you know, the Phil look, but I've always been amazed at what rob was able to do with regarding the size of the sets, which to me was as far as the visual impact was which is a testament to the, you know, the cinematographer in the lighting directors which. Just just blown away with what the original to accomplish all watering, Nick, if he knew how many cameras the used during the actual shoots. Okay. Nick, do you know, I do not know the answer to that question by I will absolutely agree with curt that it that's one of the striking things about the series is is that, you know, of course, the production level in terms of budget. You know, it was a fairly generously budgeted show at the effort for the time. But of course, you in terms of special effects, they weren't going to be able to give you the brilliance, you know, spaceships shooting across the sky, and that kind of thing so they so rod hat to work with a, you know, more relatively modest set. And so, and he did he got the most out of out of those particular sets, and and every now and then to actually because budget was always a concern. He would write a particular show that only took place on in one one room because it was going to be cheaper to make one room. And that's it and he would do one of those after they had a couple of expensive shows like I. The beholder or nightmare at twenty thousand feet or something. And then he will do one of these shows that would kinda got the budget back on the control. He jump started many careers to did you not? Yeah. I think so I mean, certainly there were a lot of you know, stars and soon to be Robert Redford. Yeah. Yeah. Actually got his first job not on the twilight zone. But in another show routes throwing written called in the presence of mine enemies on playhouse ninety. It was the very first parents by Robert Redford on television. And that was a great great show. And he was very good in that too. Yeah. In the twilight zone episode. He was a cop in the lady thought he was a death coming to get her. I'm not gonna say what the Indy news. But that was a great show. Yeah. It was it was very that was written by George Clayton Johnson, actually. And that's a terrific show. What was the name of the show nNcholas were Agnes Moorehead was a woman in her house in a small flying saucer landed insider house or something like that? And she beat it with a broom. It's called the invaders. And and that was written by Richard Matheson, the late Richard Madison, he wrote several episodes of the show, and that's one of the most well remembered episodes of the series, it's it's largely dialogue free. There's almost no dialogue in it. And so the very end when this when he, you know, up person says a few things who found out who they were and the other one I like to was the lady who was having plastic surgery because the everybody thought she was ugly in she wanted to look like everyone else, and we found out what everyone else looked like in the eye of the beholder. And that is you know, if there's a quintessential twilight zone episode, I think that's that's it. That's that's the one and again, one of the most well, remembered episodes, and the one that really gave me the message of people was the shelter about that fallout shelter. Yeah. The shelter is a great great episodes Serling wrote that. And yeah, it's about the idea that there's gonna you know, there's a there's a bomb threat nuclear threat. And what does what does this unity do when there's only one bomb shelter, and they all want to get into and they can't get into it..

Robert Redford curt Nick Agnes Moorehead rob George Clayton Johnson Indy Richard Madison Phil Richard Matheson Serling nNcholas twenty thousand feet
"clayton johnson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

11:28 min | 3 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And welcome back Nick for EC with us broad sherline his life work in imagination. Nikki for rod, Shirley and were alive today watching television. What would he say about the current state of TV? Well, I think in in one regard, I think he would be thrilled with how adult television has become in, you know, in the in the realm of drama during the time that you out songs writing. Obviously, we talked about some of the censorship. But not only the issues, but also the language, and and just the specific matter in general, even if it wasn't a social issue, you know, today, there's so many shows that are that are are so adults in scope, you know, I don't even have to name them. But, you know, mad men and breaking bad, and, you know, not just cable, but, but but network television, I think he would be thrilled with how how with the quality of those shows. Now, of course, we have many channels now, and he does certainly a whole lot of you know, of of junk too, but. But I think in general he would be happy with it. And one thing I can tell you for sure he he would hate reality television. He and and I don't say that just you know, that's not just me saying that at the time. I, you know, I guess reality television for its time rod has some very negative things to say about a show called this is your life. If you remember, this is your life. This is your life was the show where they bring somebody onto the show normal everyday person, and they trot his family members out there, and they would go through his, you know, scrapbook and look at you know, it was kind of reality television for the time, and he just despise the the show, you know, he thought it was just an invasion of privacy and everything else. So a reality television. You would hate, but, but I think there was so many shows now that he would absolutely love woolen all time television to neck really did not understand racial mix ups demographics. When you look at some of these old shows way gone back, even the comedians the game shows, they were all older white guys, you know, in and I'm not I'm not talking. Like middle age. I'm talking older white guys where today and television, you know, it would be difficult to get that kind of a purse like Jimmy Durante, for example, you think he him? He was a big superstar very talented. I don't think he would make it today. You might be right. Yeah. Yeah. You could be right. I mean, well, listen to the Mark the the field has has grown so tremendously. There's so much more competition that yeah. That'd be that'd be kind of like talking about. Now. Major league baseball before the before. Jackie robinson. You know, they didn't have the competition from the from the black player from the Latin player from all these places, and they were certainly people who played in the major leagues in nineteen forty one. Who may not have made it in nineteen fifty one because there was so much more competition. What would rod say about all the different channels available now in his day? There was just the three major networks. Now. My God you've got hundreds of channels. Yeah. Well, he would he would love the freedom that it that it gives to to writers and creators, that's you know, have been his day. You know, if those three networks didn't want wanna hear it that was it. I mean, you know, and in some cases, if he was, you know, had on the contract to CBS said, yes didn't wanna to it. That was it nowadays, you know, you can go to so many different outlets to get your creation seen and heard. So yeah, he would be thrilled with that aspect of it for sure I mean Netflixing Amazon truly rival the networks now, don't they? Oh, absolutely. I have some of the best television being made right now is on on those platforms. It's amazing. Let's take some calls. Let's go west of the Rockies Kirk in Boise, Idaho to get us started high court. Hey, George glad he got Nick. I can't wait to read the book, you mentioned earlier when you were talking about the impact of the fact that the entire series is in black and white. And of course, Nick mentioned that, you know, the film, but I've always been amazed at what rod was able to do with regarding the size of the sets, which to me was as far as the visual impact was which is a testament to the, you know, the cinematographer, and the lighting directors, which I just I'm just blown away with what they were able to accomplish watering from Nick if he knew how many cameras they used during the actual shoots. Okay. Nick, do you know, I do not know the answer to that question, by will absolutely agree with curt that it that's one of the striking things about the series is is that, you know, of course, the production level of in terms of budget. You know, it was a fairly generously budgeted show at the F for the time. But of course. In terms of special effects? They weren't going to be able to give you the brilliance, you know, spaceships shooting across the sky, and that kind of thing so they so rod hat to work with a, you know, more relatively modest set. And so, and he he got the most out of out of those particular sets, and and every now and then to actually because budget was always a concern. He would write a particular show that only took place on in one one room because it was going to be cheaper to make factors one room. And that's it. And he would do one of those after they had a couple of expensive shows like I have the beholder or, you know, nightmare at twenty thousand feet or something. And then he will do one of these shows that we've got kind of got the budget back on the control. He jump started many careers to did you not? Yeah. I think so I mean, certainly there were a lot of you know, stars and soon to be Robert Redford. Yeah. Actually got his first job not on the twilight zone, but in another show that rod sterling written called in the presence of mine enemies on playhouse ninety. It was the very first appearance by Robert Redford on television. And that was a great great show when he was very good in that too. Yeah. In the twilight zone episode. He was a cop in the lady thought he was a death coming to get her. I'm not gonna say what the ending news. But that was a great show. Yeah. It was it was very that was written by George Clayton Johnson, actually. And that's a terrific show. What was the name of the show nNcholas were Agnes Moorehead was are you woman in her house in a small flying saucer landed insider house or something like that? And she beat it with a broom. It's called the invaders and and that was written by Richard Matheson, the late great, Richard Matheson. He wrote several episodes of the show, and that's one of the most well remembered episodes of the series, it's it's largely dialogue free. There's almost no dialogue in it. And so the very end when this when he, you know, up person says a few things we found out who they were and the other one I like to was the lady who was having plastic surgery because everybody thought she was ugly in she wanted to look like everyone else, and we found out what everyone else look like in the eye of the beholder. And that is you know, there's a quintessential twilight zone episode. I think that's that's it. That's that's the one. And again, one of the most well remembered episode in the one that really gave me the message of people was the shelter about that fallout shelter. Yeah. The shelter is a great great episodes Serling wrote that. And yeah, it's about the idea that there's gonna you know, there's a there's a bomb threat of a nuclear threat. And what is what does this community do when there's only one bomb shelter, and they all want to get into and they can't get into it. And they turn on each other. And it was yes. That was a terrifically. Well, done episode Renee in San Francisco's with us. Hi renee. Go ahead. Hi, are you know, there's an episode. That's a very rare episodes that he was finally released years later that was called miniature miniature. I don't remember that nNcholas do rather devolve. Absolutely, right. Another great great actor who one of his early early performances Robert Duvall that was one of the hour long episodes the fourth season of the twilight zone, they were all an hour long as opposed to half hour. I'm really, yeah. Okay. Yeah. And then you sure was one of the hour long episodes, and it it was involved in a lawsuit at the time that the series went into syndication. So it was not initially syndicated. So it was not seen for decades about at least twenty years. And so that was long long settled. And there was a special on pull the twilight zone silver anniversary special, and they showed that particular episode along with a couple of others that had been similarly left out of the syndication package. What was the tragedy when they were doing the twilight zone movie a helicopter crashed or something like that? Oh, yeah. It's horrible horrible incident. Yeah. Helicopter crashed after an explosion, you know, special effects explosion and killed Vic Morrow who was starring in that particular story and two young children. Who are on the set is. Yeah. Yeah. Cast a pall over the entire movie, of course, horrible horrible situation. Joe in Long Island, New York is with us. Hey, Joseph go ahead like a couple of questions. One would be the first one would be that seems like it was very escapist. Then maybe someone stay back in the sixties. I'm just speculating if you had a regular job, and he came home and watch the twilight zone that would be. Almost like an escape from your daily reality. And I guess people might have wanted that. I'm wondering if there are any other shows really liked that my second question would be about the mysterious endings, which I think a lot of that could be almost not necessarily ethic, but could have unfolded into actual movies additional scenes where someone could take twilight zone episode and kind of unfolded into an actual movie, you know, like a planet of the apes. Yeah. I I agree with you on that. And and to get to the first question, you know, the the escapist aspect of this. Well, I told him that I think that is part of all science fiction and fantasy of course, is that that escapist tone to it. But you know, it's funny that you mentioned that because that is actually something that rod sterling often pointed to about nine gallery in the early seventies. During the end of the Vietnam era. He felt that night gallery was giving people in escape from the nightly news, and seeing you know, the stuff on stuff on the news about war and everything else that they go into the night gallery and escape through that. So he never really said that about the twilight zone, but I think is similar point can be made about the twilight zone as well. And it is surprising that that that someone hasn't taken a twilight zone episode and expanded into a feature film. Although there's been there have been plenty of films that are certainly twilight zone in, you know, influenced that could very well just as just as well be twilights on movies that aren't called the twilight zone. Was it Jack Klugman on one of the twilight zones? He started four twilight zone. He actually started one with Bill movie in praise of tips. That's right. Yeah. Yeah. And he was terrific. I Jack Klugman probably gave my favorite performance is on the twilight zone in three of the episodes that he was was he a trumpet player and one of them. Exactly. Yes. There's one called a passage for trumpet rod wrote that one and I'll tell you a quick story about that episode. You know, he the director Jack club was so good in that episode. This just so good that the director actually wrote or called rod and said, listen, I don't want to take the camera off of this guy. I just wanna keep filming. Any way we can make this into a two part episode. He wanted to expand to now it just because Jack Klugman was so good..

Nick Jack Klugman George Clayton Johnson Robert Redford Richard Matheson director Jimmy Durante baseball Jackie robinson Renee Nikki Boise rod Idaho Robert Duvall Vic Morrow Netflixing Amazon Long Island CBS
"clayton johnson" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"clayton johnson" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"The governor will sign it has made, its way through both houses legislature. Haven't in Sacramento and that is the Bill ending bail in California If you've. Been trying to get through it's not been easy but if you wanna have a word or two on this every. Line is now available. We clear them all out four nine zero fifty eight fifty eight eight hundred seventy seven six fifty eight fifty eight Defense attorney. Mark cafeteria my dear friend and fellow musician is here preemptive studios. Helping us out nor thank you now you brought to our attention an audiotape of. Particular woman what what is this going to here, so this this is Gina Clayton Johnson she's with the SE group she's. Basically. A. Former co sponsor and a drafter of the Bill. It. Sounds like she's talking about her community of. Women with loved one chore incarcerated you, gotta you gotta get, a load of this but at the same time she no longer supportive of the final. Form correct right neither the ACLU and a lotta these liberal group. Okay let's listen to what she has to say It's not real bail reform What's happened to ask Three Last opportunity to get our our Masson Carson he's a mass incarceration transformed on in Any time that. Is now being forced down our throats Our community communities women rated loved ones Knows what So badly Swore pain the bail industry debate pain over and over again with pain comes up for collateral fees on all of the money over years for Pike's women incarcerated loved ones have been exploited And so for us, to come, out former co sponsors of the of the still originally working on drafting meetings tried him Sacramento for the last two years for us to now come out position to this Bill Been, incredibly difficult but unfortunately necessary is this Bill is regressive policy that will put in place more incarceration Brown people low income people rather than less And that? Is just, not what what is all about Oh she's.

Bill Sacramento Gina Clayton Johnson Masson Carson Pike ACLU California attorney Mark Brown two years