18 Burst results for "city magazine"

"city magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:16 min | 2 d ago

"city magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A hard time keeping that equipment in stock. So he's going to talk about what to get. If you only got options to get certain things from amazing ribs dot com. That's where you get all the information on everything. And Max Good is the best in the business, So we'll be talking with him about that. On the racing side coming up this weekend at Road America, the National Park of Speed NASCAR IMSA is going to be there. Chase Brisco. You know him as one of those very hot drivers in the NASCAR Xfinity Siri's also great Road Course driver. He's going to join us and Charlie Kimball is going to join us from the IndyCar Series racing for a J. Foyt as we get closer. To the first ever Indy 500 number one that's been held in August and then number two that is going to be run with no fans. Lots of people watch it on television. But the first time that iconic venue that normally has 400,000 people screaming is going to be absolutely empty is the crown Their next champion. Our first guests that we're gonna have on we're going to talk with him for quite a quite a time. So even though we did have the White Sox post game, we've got a nice extended conversation with this guy, one of my favorite people out there. And if you read new City magazine, you know, he's the dining intricate editor. The one and only Dave Hammond. A Welcome to the show ain't good to be here. It's good to have you It is good to have you make sense of some of this, Of course, you know. Ah, we would call you all sorts of things, you know, travel and explore a Renaissance man in a bunch of different ways, but a regular guy and a bunch of ways to and dealing with a lot of the things That that we're all dealing with on the pandemic side. We've got a couple minutes for. We've got to take a break and then kick into things but talk a little bit about some of the things we're going. We're going to hit on today with our visit. Well, that title the tentative title that I had suggested, was how I stopped worrying and learned to love covert 19. But I realized that would really not love. I mean, you can't love something that's causing death around the world. But I think there's ways to make the best of that That experience, you know, it's an opportunity when your life is shattered, and you know it. There's a new sense of organization that has to take hold. You have an opportunity to change some things. Try some things You haven't tried yet. And maybe, you know, come out a little better when everything's over, which we cross our fingers. Hope will be someday soon. You know, it's interesting that home to people you have coming up the guy talking about home theater. One of the first moves we made when the pandemic hit was by Ah A larger television. I think that like 50 inches, I was amazed how inexpensive they are These days. I remember when I like in 2000 and 4 4005 we bought a big screen TV. It was huge with gigantic and it was We finally had a higher like two giant men to come haul it out for us because it weighs just it was incredibly heavy. Now, these light little video tell of its 50 inches, which is you know, there are a lot of bigger ones out there. But that was right for the space. We're putting it in. Uh, busy hotel flat screen. I could carry it under one arm. It's amazing how it has changed, and I used to make a joke to And this was this was maybe Yeah, early two thousand's, that I would go to best buy to visit my television cause I could never afford it for it was a It was a planet, but I don't think it was his biggest. Maybe the ones maybe it could have been 50 inches. I don't know. If they were that big. Then it might have been 40. Still with so much bigger. That a tube TV that you would have, and it was, ah plasma television, and it was thousands of dollars. It was it was, it was prohibitive to get grant. But you remember Dave the back in the old days, you know, wouldn't everybody watched? You know? Unless you have one of those projection TVs were you sacrificed size for sort of blurriness? You know, if you had a tube television 25 32 inches about his big zit you would get because You just couldn't carry it. It was a couple £100. We've moved s O. Many of those. And so the advancements on the television side. The consumer wins, Because now you can get you know, a 65 inch television for $500. You play your cards right and look around and the pictures are amazing. So we're going to take a break. When we come back. We're gonna talk about some of the things we won't say. Not learning to love the pandemic. Obviously, they can't do that. But finding maybe some silver linings and coping in ways that that I think are maybe kind of moving us forward and other things and other ways that may stick for the duration. Quick break back, with Dave Hammond staying here on 7 20 W. Gm Now, you know, get all the quality parts. You need your locally owned Napa because right now, when you order from Napa.

Dave Hammond editor Max Good Chase Brisco Napa IMSA Road America NASCAR Charlie Kimball White Sox IndyCar Series City magazine J. Foyt National Park Gm
"city magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:18 min | Last month

"city magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thorne. My guest is Mary Randolph Carter. She and I talked in 2018 She's a creative director at Ralph Lauren and an expert in the world of collecting. She's the author of a bunch of beautiful books about the topic. Her latest, The Joy of junk is out now. Let's get back into our conversation. How did you end up becoming a junker? Because I don't imagine that there's a huge volume of junkers in In the New York City magazine business where you cut your teeth for a couple of decades. New York is a hard place to be a junker because you kind of got to go somewhere to get the space. To have a flea market. Well, that's true. But you forget about junking on the city streets. I mean, it is a gold mine out there. I mean, I find things all the time so It's not just and in New York er's that the dealers are very clever. They take weekend parking lots that are abandoned. For the weekend, and they turn them into flea markets. But I will tell you, it's harder and harder to find those places, but Oh, junk is alive and well in New York City, for sure. I have evidence of it in this book. Do you have a favorite junk store? One of your old books had Ah Directory of junk stores by Location, estate or Yeah, I was looking through it and I saw this shop. Called crims crams. Oh, my gosh! In San Francisco. Yeah, Exactly. It was right near where I grew up on this book came out, I guess, maybe 1990 or something like that. So That was probably around when it ended up closing, but Kyra. I had the most immediate, vivid flashes of memory of being, You know, an eight year old in going there and buying a lunchbox. Really borrowing 2020 cents. It cost 20 cents. They told me it cost 20 cents, so I went home to my house. My apartment and my mom's apartment and got my mom to give me two dimes so that I could. This is like a story from 1952 but it was like 1989. To get this super friends lunchbox at Crane's Krantz. Yeah, I grouped two blocks from that store. I thought like what an incredible like vivid part of my life That store was And I wonder if there were stores like that for you. Well, certainly, And I mean, I remember Crim crims cram or whatever. It was called with a great name. I mean, I was doing big City junk. No, I wasn't. I was doing kitchen junk, Which was my Third book in the My version of the Alexandria Quartet. There was American junk, and then there was garden junk. And then there was a kitchen junk and big city junk, which was published A week after 9 11 How ironic was that? But anyway, I was, You know, I was I was going from city to city and looking for a great you know, junk and cream crams. I remember had great kitchen art effects. It was a great store. But do I have? Oh, yeah. There I have. I have favorites. You know, part of it part of this whole journey part of its nostalgic and so when I think about some of my favorite stores are junking Journeys or Johnson was With my mother who really was, you know, the book is dedicated to my mother, who was Mary Randolph as well, but they called her pat. But we would go to the other banks of North Carolina in the summer. It was really became an escape from my parents because we always used to come down to Virginia in the summertime and stay with him, But they never got away. You know, so they eventually bought this little cottage. In the outer banks of North Carolina, and we would go down there at the end of every summer. Why we went at the end of this summer, I guess because we felt That was a good way to end the summer to be altogether But it was also hurricane season. So we always were being like, you know, we always had to leave. You know when there was a threat of a hurricane, but any in any case when we were there? We spent a lot of time junking together. And there was a little shop called Merry Go Round Thrift shop. The merry Go around Thrift shop. I can see it right now. It was just us. It was a shock, but that was the first place that we always went, and it was a really bonified thrift shop. Just filled with the discards of the Demetrius of People's, You know, kitchens and drawers and, you know closets. But we always my mother. My gosh, She always found something. She was a great mentor. Um And in my in my junking life, she was just a great mentor. She had a lot of optimism that she would find something she had. Ah, lot of stamina. Let's go to five more places, and she never left empty handed. Some people say that some people have asked me. Will you ever leave a place and empty handed, and I have to say No, I always find something. It's a bit of a disease. Sometimes I really have to push myself. No, there has to be something here that speaks to me. Maybe there was one or two places. It's Bulls. I'm Jesse Thorne. My guest is writer and collector Mary Randolph Carter. She's written book after book about collecting her latest is called the Joy of Junk. To me one of the great Joys of buying something old is that there are It kind of contains two sets of possibilities. One is like an almost abstract. Almost purely abstract aesthetic value, right? Something is beautiful in some way. Yes, that speaks to you. The second is that it contains this. Almost infinite.

Mary Randolph Carter New York New York City magazine North Carolina New York City Jesse Thorne Ralph Lauren Mary Randolph director San Francisco Alexandria Quartet Kyra Thorne. Virginia writer Bulls Johnson
"city magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:49 min | 8 months ago

"city magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Is the only thing you're letting the horrors but really right the dining drinking at a for a new city magazine a bone the vault a renaissance man a raconteur Boulevard yeah he's he's is right he's as at home we offer the cheap seats available fight as he is wearing a kilt in the Scottish Highlands or sipping cognac you know from above now five hundred year old bottle you name it Dave does and we talk about the Chicago French market and although it has French in the name you're really able to kind of taste the world there's so many different kinds of cuisines and that's one of the things we're blessed with here in Chicago is that you have the ability to really enjoy any culture food at a high level right here in Chicago but if you want to get out and really travel I'm Dave you have done that and we're going to talk a little bit about your travel to Mexico in the kind of foods if you think about it people here's this sort of a double edged sword people love Mexican cuisine rightly so it's it's actually Austin we've got with you've got some great places all sorts of great tacori is and with carnitas and everything they've got Rick Bayless who's sort of the standard bearer right for fine dining at done in that way right like there yeah he's our flagship so when the president of Mexico comes for a state visit they bring Rick Bayless from Chicago to go and cook for that he's got the order of the eagles so this is so we're we're really spoiled here but then when you go to Mexico there's all these warnings that unit is certainly it was some of the appeal of people and challenges that had there's some areas that are dangerous but the food center I don't drink the water here you got a political about this well right so so this is a cuisine that people love and they want to experience and kind of its indigenous form but what would you recommend with people that well when I was in I was in Mexico City with the Mike ever food publisher earlier this year and might want to go to some fancy restaurants Mexico City which is cool because Mexico city's getting a reputation for having some extraordinarily good restaurants so we went to a place called contra Mar seafood place fantastic lot of fresh fish relatively simply prepared really good and then we went to a place called can to nail which is actually Jonathan zero goes vizier goes to family yeah and it can to deals with let's go there was picked clean that and we your which is another event may actually have a Michelin star I mean that's a well that's also well known place we decided good it can to nail just for because we get get seats there here's the thing what was the best food we had there I'll tell you what the best food we had there was no continual probably about seventy five eighty dollars each by Chicago standards not hi by Mexico City standards pretty high because that's one of the things you think that you're getting ahead of the game a little bit as it is the exchange rate the things can be of value yes what you yeah when you try I don't think I've ever taken over Mexico City the cost me more than five Bucks that said I mean they are usually when I'm in a foreign city alike to learn how to take public transit just because it's quick and easy during rush hour it's usually faster but in Mexico City it's like why risk getting lost on the metro spend four dollars he could order for a want to go it was the governor walking along the street and we see this lady selling Gordy tests which are basically like the little kinda like Peter a little pocket I did stuffed with the cheese and meat and so with that okay what the hell you know we'd eaten like it least forty five minutes ago we had to get and and so we give them I think it cost less would you don't you make sure you don't ever pay into you've been served sometimes until after you're done eating and I think that's why it was there in this ended up costing like a Buck and a quarter I think at the high end watching this young lady minute okay so even even if it's street food like let's say so you have to kind of hang around and eat it before you pay for on truly be fighting right away I think it's a matter of etiquette if they don't feel like you should they should have to be satisfied with that or what exactly I mean rather than like it is hot you go to Jean in Jude's your pay in first and then get you get out at your house so you're not like it limit I'll let you know when done whether I feel this was worth you know two fifty so we ordered we order a goodie to from this lady and she was so joyous which took a picture of a she nor should the picture bicameral a stealth picture all of my phone up above the back of my head she was totally focused on making this core data that took her about three minutes or so to make I mean she was layering ingredients in and you know to get down to make sure it was touching the grill in all right places all the time she had this kind of angelic smile on her face she was just so happy to be making this their mother was standing right behind in this young woman she was probably twenty two something like that but just so involved and committed to making this simple thing so good and it was by far if yes Gebhard a pretty sure he'd say exactly the same thing that was the best food we had in Mexico City was bought off the street I put it above any of the food that we paid eighty times more for which but it was and it's also a different type of food it's kind of unfair I mean street food is all it it sells itself on smelling good and looking good because have to attract people walking by so the really the work and to make the most delicious looking and smelling thing possible but our tastes good too because you want return customers even if it's a guy who just goes to work it needs a one twice a week so anyway my moral of that story that I take away that I pass along to whoever will listen I think the best food in any country is street food because they think it's a huge value it reflects the culture better than any restaurant Kim because restaurants frequently game fancy restaurants at least aim for kind of a I'm a high level almost like a universal food if I go to Mexico the last thing I want to eat is shrimp Zhong and a fully Mignon or something like that it's a real enemy that last thing I want you know they may feel because you have got an internally international travelers in there you never know what they're getting what's actually we have like a baby like a steak house kind of thing where it's actually it's it's an apples and oranges thing because it may be too because as much as your please surprised and and really enjoyed the street foods maybe the for the the restaurant there they have to do something different right they can't just do the same food that you can get as awesome as it is has been in charge of those prices or say like Hey this is right elevated right and I think it sometimes the restaurants do try to elevate street food and happens to call all the time the fancy restaurant will do an effort to make a high end version of tater tots for instance I have never had a tater tot at a restaurant that was as good as what or item makes I mean you have to get that right you need to get that right level of crack **** satisfy phrase for the for the fine folks over it right if it's not broke don't fix it right my feeling yeah and I'm sure there's there's sort of a like at this price some sort of like you know McDonald's has hamburger you there's probably some sort of crappy tighter you or whatever that they will know you've got to get in there you got to you got to do it right we're gonna take a break and we come back a product shift is on your product sort of some of the ways that Chicago does things and and we've talked about a you spin the globe you know the foods of the world are done well here but also we have foods that are from here that are a favorite on that our listeners may never heard of before really hello yeah so we're gonna the deal of the Scooby doo mystery at the same time so quick break we'll be back with Dave Hammond is staying here on seven twenty WGN your home mmhm is important that's why geico helps make it easy to save on homeowners insurance because home is more than just a place home is where you curl up on the couch in a fetal position and cry it cheesy movies even though you've seen them a thousand times and have all the lines memorized.

city magazine Scottish Highlands Dave
Man Behind the Camera

Bon Appetit Foodcast

11:40 min | 11 months ago

Man Behind the Camera

"All right so this is your second time with the pot getting our concern Osama veteran okay known at the table. No crunchy snacks crunchy snacks. No no shaking of the coffee ice loud. There are months where like weeks will go by. We're I'm like how am I literally. Don't know where your I will not have seen you for two weeks. Yeah that is basically the story of my life. Sometimes I don't even know where I am. I'll wake up hotel. Mike Oh yeah no. I'm in Appleton Wisconsin. Oh No oh now I'm in San Antonio Texas. Yeah I mean we talk about a few issues in your job in general but in our travel issue that came on May so you you shot almost the entire feature will yeah does may two thousand nineteen you were in Beirut with Andy Burgundy tracked and then you I'm just flip through the pages then you were in Taipei with Suli and also burgundy and Andy any wanted to tag on everything so that was a big photo portfolio of yours your shot in Allison Rome in spring break menu story that was just in New York yeah that was here in the building the buildings that was as basic recipe story and then you shot photos for our red sauce America package which brought you. Where did you go for this one? Oh man that was a lot. I think that was six cities L. A. L. A. Philly New Orleans. Oh my God. Where did I go? I mean you literally can't remember yeah I it was like four to five cities. I guess my first question is I think a lot of fans of yours. WanNa know like how do you end up as a staff dog for at a food magazine like whenever someone asked me about this is I'm the worst possible personnel asked because it's purely luck and circumstance stance and my only goal and still the only like hey just don't get fired and spend closing up on your six and I still get asked to come back every day and there were definitely moments early on we're Alex pollick grocer artificial photo department critic Blake. I'M GONNA kill Lau a huge mistake so you start off as an intern turn years ago yeah. That's my freshman year of college. I just wanted to do something with my life and not just go home for the summer to California and you know Oh bummer and my parents house so I wanted to find an internship and I've always had a fascination with the magazine world apply too much internships. Nobody got got back to me in like a week. Before summer started. I saw a posting for esquire magazine to be a fashion closet intern. Oh and I was like that sounds cool. That sounds way out of my reach. I am hugely under qualified for that but I'M GONNA shoot my shot and Michael Steph. who was the fashion assistant at the time got back to me? He's like when can you come in based on what oh it. Did you have background. It was the most underqualified letter ever. It was basically hey. Here's my resume. I was a lifeguard in high school. I was a high school tutor and I intern at the State House in Massachusetts in politics nothing related to magazines but I really love menswear and here's like my favorite menswear blogs and here's my favorite brands brand's. I like fashion. I can work hard and he got back to me. Can I just say that. I am a lot of times when I talked to young people who are just out of college in their writing you you know letters to inquire about a job and they read like they're written by a law firm. I'm always like learning be yourself. Be passionate sort of expose yourself so to speak but that's what's GonNa grab some somebody's attention one hundred. I think the way I showed her. The letter wasn't like the formerly hi my name's dogs home. Hey My name's Alex. I'm really excited about this. I know him not meant for this Gig but I will do whatever it takes gap and so forth and they took a chance on me and that kind of was my segue into the New York City magazine publishing world and it turns out having square on your resume. Just opens opens up a lot of doors but it was great. It was just my eighteen years old. I didn't get paid but I got to see how magazines work I've got to be on fashion shoots Justin Timberlake Lake and Ryan Gosling and wow poll like hold fourteen thousand dollar jackets and look it Nick Sullivan whose whose the editor in chief at the time Grainger David David David grange just like talk shop and like this is amazing. This is legendary and that made me really WANNA stick with it yeah very recall okay so internship at esquire. How then does that lead you to be a so after that? I was convinced that I wanted to stay in publishing. Look fashion. menswear ended up at Nylon guys Juku for a little bit complex four pins so I was very very much in that circuit as an intern just doing minimal intern work but after a couple of years I was just like this is not really what's my angle here. I don't WANNA be stylus. I don't WanNa be a fashion writer. The idea of being a photographer and fashion was just you know. I didn't even sit down. That's not going to happen so after this is my third yes approaching my third year of college. I A Internet a bunch of or apply uh-huh bunch of other internships again. Nobody got back to me. Despite actually this I'm being off and having a lot of magazines in Monroe oster I applied to like yeah a a couple of mags won't be noted but they're they're. They're okay. They just get back. I mean I saw a posting for bone apetite photo internship and I was like I know nothing nothing about food. I like pictures. I took photo classes in high school and college. So how active a photographer were you at this point. It's like I'm not active. I don't know I took a lot of fissures in high school. I had my own flicker account. I you were you were you were definitely interested. We're sitting at least and I took pictures of the school paper and stuff like that. I I was a you know an avid hobbyist as major so do you did you come in an interview like what God you the job ultimately so I went in again. It's always like a last minute. Call in showed up from Boston and I met with Jake. Ramoser are former photo assistant and he he gave me a talk. Hey so turn yeah. It looks like you've worked a lot of magazines. you have zero photo experience and you have zero food experience so you're pretty underqualified but honestly the only person here that's interviewed. That's worked at large publications so we're GonNa go with you. So that was basically it was it was Bazeley. Hey you're you've worked at reputable places so we'll hire yeah. I do think that's interesting interesting career wise like over the years. I've worked at James Beard Foundation in Time Out New York and the food's severe than G. Q. Got more fashion thing that came back to food. I was a sports writer in college like it is you can move around and I think one thing that editors employers look for is that you do have experience in in a particular field and that you know how to get stuff done that you know under you understand what the industry requires but within that sort of industry you can shoot food. You can shoot you know people. You can do all these things. You don't have to be in one lane. One hundred percent I think at the time I was taking some classes and I was also I was studying NPR print journalism at the time and I remember talking about that with Jake and he was like Oh. This is a plus because you kind of understand writing thing and photography on some level so we'll run with this so he didn't internship summer internship a year or so later. We ended up hiring you as a foot assistant no so I did this summer internship and I was like this is way better than working fashion. Everyone's so much nicer yeah yeah. It was a great time and I was like in order for me to WANNA stay in this world I can see I need to shift from fashion to food media so then I went back to Boston awesome for my senior year and as as I left Alex pollock the photodetectors times like hey we love your great. Just reach out when you're when you're graduating we can like. Maybe you keep you keep you happy. Come back so I would always send emails and I say hey just graduated like three months three or four months. I would love to come talk about a photo editor assistant role. Did you in the interim year. Were you working on shooting things. Decrease your portfolio to share with Alex to say hey I just want. I've been shooting a lot. Take a look at my stuff. Yes so thankfully because of my time I she went over to Boston magazine for my senior of college and I ended up being digital intern which basically means I was just doing every anything and everything for the website correct the king yeah yeah I remember being so proud and like twenty years old on my I've got years of intern experience. I haven't been paid for any of them but you we know I've seen some stuff like that really was my my pride enjoy worked a lot of places and they harden managed digital intern and they also gave me bill do photo take pictures and do have my own bylines socially once a lot of times when you get your foot in the door somewhere are the the brand or the magazine wherever they need people to do stuff go. You can go okay but we'll trust you. There's something trustworthy about you. Then people are all right. Go give this a shot. You'd have a DVD will keep doing it. I must really thankful that it was a web internship versus print because obviously no one's GonNa give any Interna print byline whereas it's much lower risk to teachers hey make something for lab and if it's really good we'll Polish and if not we won't publish in no one will ever or care about low budget so it was just gave me a lot more freedom and they knew that I worked at the food magazine before okay so you know how to take pictures of food. You were photo intern turn. I'm like yeah I guess I mean I. I saw Marcus Nelson. Do you like an overhead shot of something by a window so I can do that. How hard can it be yeah so I mean I I? I did it and they would. It was really cool. I mean they sent me there. Okay so we'll just have you do restaurants so they would send me like once a week in shoot for four restaurants a week and just shoot it for their website so who was giving you guidance about photos style at that point what kind of shots they wanted from the restaurants. It's nobody else really. They just assumed you knew what you were doing. The funny thing is I applied to Boston magazine to be a photo inter. I WANNA continue that path that track of being working for requirements it's but they they didn't want but then the digital department got back to me. I didn't really have communication with the magazine so it was just kind of me and our digital editor who just send me. I was like Oh this. Let's get this close enough to bone advocate and some overhead shots off light and like keep doing this and I would just bike around Boston Jason and go to a bunch of restaurants that are digital restaurant editor Chris Hughes covered and yeah it was it was really good training. It's really good training. I looking back it was really great just being able to go in and practice and shoot restaurants for relatively low risk and have that be an internship set eh great base so then I shot all these restaurants and as shooting what's in all this stuff to Alex pollick. I'm like hey portfolio.

Intern Boston Boston Magazine Food Magazine Mike Oh Alex Editor Esquire Magazine San Antonio Texas Writer Andy Burgundy Jake Osama Appleton Wisconsin New York California New York City Magazine Alex Pollick Beirut James Beard Foundation
"city magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"city magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"London. I'm andrew miller coming up june. Tina's presidential primaries suggests that maurizio macrey shouldn't make himself too comfortable in the causa. Rosado is another coach nick comeback on the cards u._s. National security adviser john bolton visits the u._k. What will he be advising about. Brexit iran and wa alway also ahead on news panel look at protests in russia and hong kong and the british government's latest obvious electioneering for the election it insists isn't happening later in the show. Politics has always been one of our guiding curiosities in a new magazine is just over fifty years old and and when it launched in nineteen sixty eight it was always at both about the city and really was the first city magazine and beyond the city and in it took it a new yorkers pointed you about the world we'll meet the editor in chief of new york magazine and we'll look at the fine line luxury retailers have to walk to get to market in china all that coming up on the briefing on monocle twenty four and welcome him to today's edition of the briefing with me andrew mullah the u._k.'s so-called special relationship with the u._s. is prominent among the apparatus that advocates of brexit hope and will presume will propel britain to sunlit up plans the other side of october thirty first. Some clarity about deployability of this position may be imminent the united united states national security adviser. John bolton is visiting the u._k. Although it is unclear as it always is with bolton he has been dispatched as an misery of president donald donald trump or whether he has been dispatched because president trump prefers to keep him out of the country other than brexit bolton's longstanding desire for a harder line on iran is expected to be somewhere near the top of the agenda. I'm joined with more on this by yasmin. Sirhan a staff writer with the atlantic <hes> yes first of all to the <hes> well the significance of bolton as a figure. I guess what do we know about how seriously he is taken within this administration that there have been stories which would seem ridiculous at any other time but we are where we are that donald trump doesn't like his moustache and therefore doesn't take him seriously as he might <hes>. It's really hard had to say on the certainly i mean you kind of personalities are big in this administration in this white house and i think there's a lot of palace intrigue that surrounds it for that very reason but i mean i think people know bolton certainly on the side of the pond as <hes> the hawkish national security adviser who certainly espouses a lot of the more hardline positions ends up particularly in issues due to say iran on the way <hes> and china more broadly <hes> so you know on those issues trump. Hasn't i mean he's sort of voice. Similar hardline stances so be interesting to see on those issues in particular <hes> what he gets out of britain and whether trump trump is happy with those concessions if he gets any we'll on that front does the fact of looming brexit make the special relate it clearly makes a special schol relationship more special to the united kingdom <hes> but does it to almost exactly the same proportion make it less special to the united states. I think the u._s. Season opportunity here <hes> to challenge. It probably should <hes> to obviously i think both sides want to enhance the special relationship. I mean specifically on trade. We've seen both besides <hes> just recently on friday. Mike pompeo said the u._s. would be waiting pen in hand <hes> to sign a trade deal with the u._k..

donald trump brexit bolton iran john bolton bolton andrew miller britain maurizio macrey Mike pompeo china united united Rosado Tina new york magazine city magazine London. yasmin andrew mullah hong kong
"city magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"city magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Right. I think it's the pleasure of swapping. It brings people together is continues the conversation of football. You know, you're seeing these guys lined up together wearing up for the toll Nemann. And I think it's exciting to be part of really we always get a lot of requests from football commentators full complete collections and albums and packets because they tend to use that as they guide to the tournament. And they like learning all the players names. And and they face that can recognize them when the tone -ment comes around. And I think that Ray speaks volumes of how well liked the collection is and how recognizable is in people using that as their official guy. Does it? So we like to say that don't me with this collection. As York lotion is. Election, isn't it becomes your own? It becomes something that belongs to you. And that's the same. When you open up. Stick APAC, you'll sticker that you've you own and you put into your album, and this is something that you'll probably Kate for a long time and pass on to to other generations. So is very special thing that you're producing is it truth, do you print more or less the same number of the stickers for the player's? Or or is there one? There is a bit more rare than the other your you're correct incitements urban so stickers printed in an equal quantity and mixed at the factory. So that is a myth. Stick has become rare, basically because people hold onto their favors stickers. Whether it be favorite player or a shining. They may put them in their exercise book, I think it was in nineteen ninety Gaskill I'm became arrest because he was very popular at the time. So yes, myth and all stickers printed in echo valley. Finally on this week's program, the Queen of city magazines time out this icon of print celebrated fifty years in two thousand eighteen it was founded in London by Tony Elliott and became the foundation of well, what city magazine is I spoke to Tony and to Julia Bruno CEO of the time out group to talk about the half century of timeouts when I thought it was it was a response supposed to all the really interesting things that were going on particularly from the kind of old Tunnicliffe, independent sector counter-culture is referred to that. And the information was hard to find. And I want to know about it. So I basically ended up doing magazine for myself. And I think that we got good response from sales of you know, fairly fairly quickly. So that by the time you go into we'll every three weeks from August nine sixty eight. So when you go into the middle of nineteen sixty nine you knew the the. The the audience was there and very very kind of dedicated etcetera. So I mean, I had sort of confidence that has only had a confidence that would go on and on and on and on had no idea. What size Altimonte what place with end up business. I guess plays its role with these things what we twenty one yet. Yeah. Student say these entrepreneurs types reminding he still fearless. Just tell us until our audience your association with time out. How far back does that go and tell us what it's been like coming into something that obviously is, you know, it's a pretty Kohnic kind of brand I guess test bit about your association, personal whether decent I Brian indus-. Why joining the end of two thousand fifteen as -secutive chairman then becoming the COO in sixteen when we took a ride to the company public in the London stock exchange aim I joined timeout because I knew timeout being all my business in my life. I've been traveling around the world nonstop for work, and I used to pick up time outing places from Tokyo to re other genereal whatever all over the world when I leave in London I in the nineties, I would be using time out because I was still even though with internet with beginning kind of thing be more commercial..

city magazine London Tony Elliott football APAC Brian indus echo valley Ray Julia Bruno CEO York Tokyo Kate official chairman COO fifty years three weeks
"city magazine" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"city magazine" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"I was like, oh, no, no. You can't disassemble my beautiful little front parlor. But anyway, and so I happened at the same the same moment that he was doing that. I was hunting down a cupboard. Well, I wasn't hunting for it. But it stood in front of me this big beautiful blue cupboard. And I bought it not thinking about where it would go or what would go in it. But guess what fit perfectly in it the flat screen TV? And then I surrounded it with all. Kinds of OJ and books. There have been times when I have, you know, actually, put like an old quilt on top of the T of the flat screen, but. Now, I'm living with it. Now. That was just so incredible. My my desire for this for this cupboard and my husband's desire for the flat screen, they met and married and living happily ever after in the front parlor of our room that used to be called the purposeless room because it really didn't have a purpose. I mean, my husband would say what is this room? It's not a TV Rome. It's not a dining room said. Well, originally, it was the front parlor. And we then we put his mother's baby grand. We stuff that in the corner. And then I said, well, we can call it the music room. But eventually now, it's the TV room. How did you end up becoming a Junker because I don't imagine that there's a huge volume of Junkers in in the New York City magazine business where you cut your teeth for a couple of decades. New York is a hard place to be a Junker because you kinda got gotta go somewhere to get the space to have. A flea market. Well, that's true. But you forget about junking on the city streets. I mean, it is a goal mine out there. I mean, I find things all the time. So it's not just an and and New Yorkers that that dealers are very clever. They take weekend parking lots that are abandoned for the weekend. And they turn them into flea markets. But I I will tell you it's harder and harder to find those places. But. Oh junk is alive and well in New York City for sure. I have evidence of it in this book. We'll finish up with Mary Randolph Carter in a bit. When we come back from short break. We'll talk about her other big occupation, creative director at Ralph Lauren..

New York New York City New York City magazine Mary Randolph Carter Ralph Lauren Rome director
"city magazine" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"city magazine" Discussed on Speak For Yourself with Cowherd & Whitlock

"You write whatever you want. Will your heart hitting journalist has ever happened to you? Not no one's little champagne because the chiefs and the royals never won championships when there, but was I attacked or threatened to be attack multiple times and locker rooms over my career face. Oh my God. Oh, yeah. Got some name. Oh, Marcus Allen, Andre, Rosita, but the closest I'll had near death experience. You remember Wayne Simmons. Oh yeah, he was away. Oh yeah. He was about that. Oh. Stay in me. I'm sitting at my favourite adult gentlemen's club in Kansas City magazine, diamond Joe's love you. I'm sitting in Joel's late on a Saturday and Sunday night, and Wayne Simmons came in and Salmi sitting there having having a beverage talking to a young lady and came running to dive into my chest and did dove into my chest. And luckily these two bouncers because again, the owner loves me to death. He's like a mid, a lot of money there. Keeping this who came in and pull Wason as all get test him up a few times and ran him out of the building survived that. But that's the closest I've had to death because Wayne Simmons would've walked mop four with me. I'm not gonna lie. I play one year buffalo as a grown man. You shouldn't walk around getting punked. Go somewhere that I'm not going. So get back all in practice, man. I'm glad I had on do crazy about all the next on l. yeah, moving over to Airdrie who got to pre game, scuffle will Malcolm Jenkins, but also make some plays on the field in the fourth quarter. When he snagged pick off. Carson Wentz pro football talks, Michael, David Smith's tweeted, air greed is made a game clinching interception. There are thirty. One other teams could be making plays like four, but they chose not to sign him. Now the pig inital being overturned by replay, but still the Smith point. Now, this is premature. S s j w ING. David Smith, but he he works for pro football woke, and so a ks long Gasser Gasser. to throw this out there and look, I don't even say how you made the mistake because within thirty seconds they knew was overturned or you know, he was ready. Shrink. I pick of his no pick season. Oh, it's not a big day already hit since I would have to go. I Don what's? What's next last one I leased watch the first things first this morning and our own Nick right had interesting take about the chiefs tech Eliza while I understand the Rams are definitely the more balanced. There's no question about it to chief. I feel have a better offense. They have a better quarterback. They have better wide receivers. They have foreign away. The best special teams in football is that enough to overcome the fact that the Rams have better defense by think it is the Great Barrier in the rails. Why I went into this clip thinking there was no shot. I was gonna say, I think the chiefs can beat the Rams, but I'm not ready to say one team is better than the other, but I gotta admit, I think Mick right kinda won me over. We're both Kansas City. Homers was born there. I worked there for sixteen years, but he kinda won me over with the special teams argument. And you know, when I really think about tyreek hill, Sammy Watkins, Travis Cusi. That is a better receiving core of than the Rams. So I'm right. Where's my? Where's my pet homes? Wig. Yes..

Wayne Simmons Rams chiefs David Smith football Malcolm Jenkins Kansas City magazine Wason royals Travis Cusi Gasser Gasser. tyreek hill Homers Marcus Allen Carson Wentz Kansas City Airdrie Salmi Joel Joe
"city magazine" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"city magazine" Discussed on This Is Success

"That you need in order to get unstuck because I think that that's also a reality of running a business is that there are places when you're stuck. It's like a department that stock. It's a. You know leader that stock or it's a team that stuck. And I think that it's our jobs to really help people get unstuck. And I think that you know, I delete we wanna make all the right decisions so we don't have to encounter those difficult conversations in moments or have to take difficult measures to do something to make a change. But inevitably you're not doing good job unless you're fucking up, you know a little bit and it's like you kind of need to be out there. You know, you gotta get your hands dirty a little bit. You have to just like, see what you are made of and what the team is made of and like what is possible. Because otherwise it's just becomes this very generic, very safe, very predictable kind of time line. And that doesn't interest me at all. And I don't think interests a lot of people that are drawn to startups and drawn to building things in what some advice that you give to someone just starting out who would wanna have a career like yours? Well, I mean, I think that. I think it really starts with putting your ego side. I think that I had very, very big ambitions that I was going to be an editor right out of college. I had to be an assistant for a very long time. I didn't get my first official editor job toes twenty-six that felt late to me, and I was really scared that I was falling behind, but you know, the way that my trajectory really unfolded was that I ended up working for other publishing executives in a supportive role learning about the business until the right opportunity opened up for me, which happened to be a gourmet magazine to me. I think you have to be willing and open minded and kind of do anything. And like I said. When it came to city magazine when it came to starting refinery, I am very much a proponent supporter of believer of trusting your gut interviewing as Guinness, just like dating. It's like really. Paying attention to can I see myself here? Is this something like I'm gonna really feel regret if I don't get this job or if I don't go out for this job. I think the other thing is is when someone comes into your midst that has experienced that you really admire like just go out of your way to ask, you know, even if you can have like twenty minute conversation with them, and that's just what you have to do. I cannot tell you how many people I have called emailed or cold called over the last twenty five years. People have admired many of them never responded, which is totally fine. But some of them did respond. Those of the sort of encouraging moments that remind you, you're on the right path and that you have to keep tapping those kinds of people in order to propel yoursel Ford 'cause we don't do it alone. I mean, I guess if you're like a novelist or something, you do it alone. If it most of us, you know, we need other people. You know, we depend on each other. When you remember that you really become tremendously respectful and appreciative of what other people bring into your life and what you, you know, in turn bring to theirs. Well, thank you so much, Christine. You, thanks for having me. Thanks for listening to this is success from business insider. Our shows produced by Anna Mazza rackets and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob cough is our executive producer in. I'm rich Valona before you go, we'll check in with Christine Barbara one more time to see how our interview could have been very different..

Christine Barbara Guinness editor Valona Bob cough Anna Mazza city magazine Ford executive producer Sarah Wyman official twenty five years twenty minute
"city magazine" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on WRVA

"In this neighborhood? And he's right back. Then. Fulton as I've said to many people Fulton hills a great place to buy drugs and get shot. And yeah. First couple of years. I was there. I had some problems I had some break into my house. I know who did it. And I couldn't do anything about it. One night. I one morning I came out and somebody had spray painted on my on my truck. I called the cops they came and took pictures. What are you gonna do moving on? But times change, and here's what I'm gonna say about Fulton hill. I. I can be downtown from my house. In five minutes. I could be at the capitol and seven. When I first moved up there. Yes. Bolton hill was really scary. But places change and Richmond has changed more than. I could ever dreamed of. When I step out my front door. And I looked down the street. Next door is a house that missionaries live in they come in to work with a youth mission. That's in my neighborhood kids, come from all over the world. They stay for about three weeks, and then they're gone. And then six weeks later, I got a new batch of kids the next to that and lovely young couple with two kids next to that a lady who's been raising her boys there for as long as I can remember next to them a lovely young couple one of which is a paramedic. But thanks to them a couple that I've known for fifteen years. Neighborhoods change. So mister frost. If you're asking me what I think Fulton hill is dangerous. I don't care where you go. I don't care where you go. If you're not being aware of what you're dealing with. Yes. It could be dangerous. There's bad people everywhere. But we're aware of what we're doing in my lady she's excited about it. Three four five eleven forty. Caller, you're on the air. Who I talk to? And you're going. Three four five eleven forty. That's how you get through this show. Thanks, you Mr. I'll check out. I'll check out river city magazine. I chance I get. I know they sent me the first copy, but. Like, I said, I get mad when people say, well that's terrible neighborhood. You shouldn't be going over there. Be aware of what you're doing. That's all I've got say about that. So I was talking to early. Yes. Combining households. And for those of you out there that are my age or younger, maybe you're older. Maybe you're starting a whole new chapter. Like, I am. There is always the problem of you know, what the age I am. And I've got everything kitchen. I got everything you could possibly want living room furniture. Good dining room got everything we need. And then we have to combine households. So here's what we did. Just to be honest. We realized that we had a lot of stuff I told her mother wanted to give us like some more blankets and pillows and stuff and like peg we have enough stuff. Please. No more. No more. No more. There's not enough room for me yet. Okay. I'm going to have to move out. If we bring anymore stuff. Here's what we did. I we went through everything that we had duplicates of crock pots toasters things like that anything that we had to of whoever had the newer one or the nicer one. That's the one that stayed the older one got donated. Books books is the big one for both of us because I have a lot of books, and she has way more than I and I tell you what folks it hurts. I know it hurts to get rid of them. But really at some point you have to go through your books and say, okay, what am I actually going to read? I have a lot of books. I've never read. And then I realised never going to. And then I had books that I have read and for some reason I was holding onto it because I'm like I'll read that again someday. Nope. That's hoarding behavior books had to go. And if you're combining to household, remember, you're moving probably into one or the other space, whoever whoever the newcomer is they're going to need their own space. What we did at CASA Di McCain is. I took the second bedroom. And I gave it to her. It's her her room she painted it. She decorated it. And I don't go in there. Unless I am invited that way she has her space, and I can have mine. My name is Richard mckeon, and this is the home show, NewsRadio W R V A. If you love puzzle games, but our board of crushing candy police, hugely popular mobile game best beans this game is ridiculously but with consistence by that a five star ratings. It's a puzzle game. You can't miss out on salt. Thousands of puzzles collect tons of key characters and play weekly events. Best beans updates every month. So you'll never get bored. Crushing candy is so twenty fifteen so click now or visit the apple app store or Google play. Download themes for free..

CASA Di McCain Fulton hill Fulton Fulton hills mister frost Richard mckeon Bolton hill Richmond apple city magazine Google fifteen years five minutes three weeks six weeks
"city magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"It's mainly. About property, and then we have a website with the London, but unfortunately, just kind of as timeouts format has changed the Londoners also the articles a quite mullet Listrik, -als, sort of like top five pretty doors you'd like to see around London or the best. And it feels like you've reduced taking the same information again. And again, I think the magazine won't have much more global appeal if it actually took the time to go and profile the people that lived there, the people that worked and the people that contribute to the city. I, I would enjoy reading from any city because I guess the closest London currently has glossy magazine of the Evening Standard, but the the glossy magazine evenings time, let the Evening Standard as a whole. Everybody in London lives in Notting hill and has three surnames doesn't have. Surely we've got sure list as well. We know he we do, but it's not really, but it's not really a specifically London focused London centred title Andro dimension, ES magazine because you know the Evening Standard magazine because I have to say could could have been much better. But it's a very good buff re to have to say, you know. I like it. I find it one of my guilty pleasures for the week. Thanks for mentioning is one of the Notting hill. We could do a separate segment on on great three on behalf of future program finance do that to to the list. Does anybody present have a particular favorite city magazine that they currently read or have read at any point? What was it? Was their CEO Palo one growing up? Well, some police to have, you know, in the Friday papers as usually a very strong supplements which restaurants to go. And they were like in a magazine format, like, have you in UK the magazine itself. We had an audio visual Powell, but may I say something for Peres. I mean, Paula match, I think of choline away. It's kind of more of a newsy magazine, but it is very strongly connected to the city. Did do that thing of leveraging the city in which it was published into a global brand. Exactly. And I think that's an example of London with with needs a power match, in my opinion. Just to jump in Ed occurs to me that the kind of culture of the city reflects both its need. I'm what comes out in a kind of cities Pacific magazine Urozgan about favorite one. And the only one that came to mind really to me was the New Yorker which honestly balances really amazing really carefully considered really well funded crucially long form articles with with with listings and that kind of, you know, that kind of genre of long form, journalism, that type of magazine is something which is, I think, probably all of our minds I would have. I would imagine typically American on which in the UK there's a growing up four, but without necessarily market to support meaningfully, you know, it's willing good we for in the studio, having an interest in meeting three thousand one long piece on something vaguely ISA, but even more so being commissioned to write one indeed. Did you know how many people does it take to really meaningfully fund if the rights is going to get a fair wage and without that, I guess it kind of it does mean you know that that the list of the the website listed that kind of comes to dominate the sort of the magazine landscape of the city in some way. Interesting. That all mention listings page. We're having a appreciate conversation about that because even time out is there's no listings. I want my listening for cinema, who would who would go to a magazine for listings anymore. I do. I do. I mean, because. Do you check them off in the buff? Is this how you plan your week? Sometimes under mentioned that he buys the radio times. I do excellent TV guide as well. We've. We've. What would the circulation things? Five hundred. Five hundred eighty four thousand every week. So they're still going strong maybe for a different than graphic but you know, it's it's important listing. Well, I'm not hopeful note for the radio times. We are going to take a short break. You're listening to Madari house with me,.

city magazine London Pacific magazine Notting hill ES magazine UK Evening Standard CEO Palo one Paula Madari house Powell Peres
"city magazine" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Friends that monster Expresso the energy coffee at new advertiser, this particular flavors, salt salted caramel or caramel depending on where you're from and whether or not you like to pronounce things correctly. So that's in the bag plus Douglas movies, t shirt and a Tito's vodka. Bandanna. Yeah, I thought you guys might be into that. Copy of traverse city magazine. Beautiful, Christmas Bong from peacemaker. And something else I acquired at the film festival, a copy of the DVD movie called dog man too. The wrath of the litter. Then it's all in a just for laughs, comedy pro bag because I was just up in Montreal at the just for laughs festival, had a wonderful time there. And yeah, all that's going in the bag plus what my guest brain. But also one of the thing that I brought, which is if like me, you purchase a VIP ticket to a Taylor swift stadium tour concert. What arrives at your home is fucking brick of an item. Stream Lee heavy, and it's a beautiful box. It's got t swift on the cover. And then when you're like, oh, man box, what's it. When you open it up or I should get it Mike ready for this when you open it up, this happens..

Taylor swift stadium traverse city magazine Tito Douglas Montreal Mike
"city magazine" Discussed on Success! How I Did This

Success! How I Did This

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on Success! How I Did This

"Ever gonna be just not hill and when you were just starting out on that path you were saying earlier that you were driven by this desire to change things when you were out in california what was kind of forming this idea what change did you want to enact well it started because i came of age in a time when the antiwar movement was very strong and when early feminism was a touch point for any young woman who was growing up in the bay area so you know those were things that made me think made me read i just knew that my generation was going to change the direction the country took i was completely convinced that we would have a very different kind of society as a result of of the protests that that i was part of and i think that's partially true we obviously never really got two what many of my generation believed was possible but the amount of change i've seen in my lifetime both social change and also political change is staggering and i think my generation can take a little bit of credit for that by just opening up the conversation when you were just starting out you dropped out of school i did so twice and then you ended up at francis ford coppola's magazine right radidy yes so what drove yard and wh did you get out of school and what drove you to the metro i honestly i think i was really impatient to be in the world and not be a student anymore while i was in school i did freelance work for a couple of magazines i like the fact that people came together and batted around ideas and and then as an editor you would look for the perfect writer for it somebody who could make it better than you imagined and then ultimately putting an issue together was about getting the right mix and the right tone and everything about it was exciting to me so i talked to my way into a job as the assistant to the editor in chief of city magazine which was amazing france's coppola had actually acquired he didn't watch it although it was an unknown.

california wh editor writer city magazine france francis ford coppola editor in chief coppola
"city magazine" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"Publication of one of those book sowa wall while you and i will always have a special relationship catherine the fact that jeff jeff was the one who convince you to publish the book on the rockford files a mejet jeff always had absolutely crew you know he absolutely it was his favorite show you absolutely i think identify with rockford will very much so because for those who do not know jeff was the founder of los angeles magazine which was the first one of the if not one of the first if not the first major metropolitan magazines up it's kind of quantitative matter of fact a target when he regrets it away eight or trying to template for it cut it the magazine and at nine gain they and they became the first city magazine in the country there are now about four hundred magazine throughout the united states uh using that template and new york magazine started eight years later and enduring much typical upper soon of rockford files a typical issue of los angeles magazine particularly in the years would jeff was running it you provided you a lot of a lot of really inside stuff about los angeles the various neighborhoods the various places to eat i mean it gave you we certainly use grateful loss of for for angelinos but if you were out a now the town or thumbing through a magazine you felt like you became an angelino after reading a copy that's correct way way of putting it this is a fluke of the calendar but i happen to be speaking the kathryn a few days before the sanctions giving holiday but i think that's appropriate catherine because one of the things i learned as a result of rating cut your current book now with you now without one of the things i learned is that thanksgiving was always a very very very special time for you and jeff and and in many ways in many ways the whole idea a thanksgiving is is very much speaks to the essence of your book all right well thank you thank you very much as.

jeff jeff rockford founder los angeles magazine city magazine new york magazine catherine thanksgiving los angeles eight years
"city magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"In the day right now at o'hare it's fortythree midway fortyfour mount prospect 43 lakefront forty three degrees get chicago news first at the top of every hour i'm steve bertrand on chicago's very own seven twenty wgn the holidays caesar i am this common rowing with the christmas nol was wide on the ground the sad a get says it down the dow it's hard to talk over lazaga note i refused to do it it's all rights uh the holiday season is here and i have to buy some presence for some work people and i have to either do it early or late we may exchange after christmas all right that's fair aaron webster is here general manager of new city in lincoln park erin we need some ideas so what to buy people first of all how are you i'm great iras we're good and what is new city so new city has a shopping and entertainment destination at right in the heart of lincoln park at the corner of hall said in clyburn i just steps away from the north and clyburn redline stop so we ever righty of restaurants shops and then movie theater in a bowling alley so you can come to my city is yet if you'll never have to leave exactly onestop shopping any city it is not affiliated with the new city magazine it is not affiliated with the magazine share the same name of her so we don't have to turn pagers if we sharpened who said has no i don't wanna pay prokopiev holiday shopping no no you must be able to move the of the racs of clothing break is is black friday what it was a couple of years ago we keep hearing stories about how because now online you can get these deals weeks and months in advance that it's not as big of a deal but i know for some people see huge deal of black friday is everchanging i think you hit it right on the head when you said you know it's not the same as it was a few years ago but it's still is a time for sales our ladder retailers put special offers an effect.

o'hare steve bertrand chicago dow christmas aaron webster general manager lincoln park clyburn new city magazine holiday shopping black friday forty three degrees
"city magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Miami the city that i i grew up in is a uniquely vulnerable place to find a change so is all of southeast florida and when i moved back here couple years ago i started investigating and i realize that this place is on the razor's edge so i've been trying to get the message out founded a poacher general at the nfa program at the university of miami called sinking city magazine stick at people talking about it people thinking of at it and to get people understanding how their city works and how just dangerous is here when a strong like this approaches but us at the same time how many days of sanity flooding and how difficult it is going to be for the city to function twenty thirty years from now so people who were for instance buying homes if any of these bang all of them on you know they're issuing mortgages that may physically the underwater sense what do we know those of us who don't live in miami about this city i mean i'm from here but many people come here on vacation and they see a beautiful setting place with an eye speech so miami's an incredibly difficult place to live if you are not while off you don't see miami and see poverty moonlight did a great job of showing that vitamin they will one point five million people in this city live at the poverty line and that's the uniquely vulnerable population there is an incredible amount of movement happening right now from people who live in check officially high areas liberty city little haiti these are mainly neighborhoods that were ten taking care of a sea level and are traditionally low meeting con they're going to places where they're going to be much more vulnerable the sea level rise and this is a city that if it doesn't get it right you're not going to be able to be middleclass here you're you're not going to be able to be poor here and it just shows it today when we've got a lot of people who have the means getting out of town but if you don't have the means you're stuck here and there's a lot of people who.

southeast florida miami nfa university of miami sinking city magazine haiti twenty thirty years
"city magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Realize that this place is on the razor's edge so i've been trying to get the message out founded a poacher general at the nfa program at the university of miami called sinking the city magazine stick at people talking about 80 people thinking about it and to get people understanding how their city works and how gist dangerous it is here when a strong like this approaches but us at the same time how many days of sanity flooding in how difficult it is going to be for the city to function 23 thirty years from now so people who were for instance buying homes if any of these bang on the on you know they're issuing mortgages that may physically the underwater said what do we know those of us who don't live in miami about this city i mean i'm from here but many people come here on vacation and they see a beautiful city place with a nice speech so miami's incredibly difficult place to live if you are not while off you don't see miami and see poverty moonlight did a great job of showing that vitamin d it will one point five million people in this city live at the poverty line and that's the uniquely vulnerable population there is an incredible amount of movement happening right now from people who live in traditionally high areas liberty city little haiti these are mainly neighborhoods that were ten picking through the sea level and are traditionally low median income they're going to places where they're going to be much more vulnerable the sea level rats and this is a city that if it doesn't get it right you're not going to be able to be middleclass here you're not going to be able to be poor here and it just shows it today when we've got a lot of people who have the means getting out of town but if you don't have the means you're stuck here and there's a lot of people who can't afford the gas who can't afford the extra food who can't afford absolutely any of the central hurricane supplies and there's good people getting it to them but it's it's not enough it's not enough in it's getting harder on seeing hurricane alma come here right now what is the message of of how the.

city magazine miami nfa university of miami vitamin d haiti 23 thirty years
"city magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"city magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is a freelance journalist and poet much of his work focuses on climate change he's lived in the dominican republic and now miami which is where i spoke to him before the storm hit miami the city that i grew up in i is a uniquely vulnerable place to climate change so is all of southeast florida and when i moved back here couple years ago i started investigating and i i realized that this place is on the razors edge so i've been trying to get the message out founded a poacher journal at the nfa program at the university of miami called sinking city magazine is to get people talking about it if people thinking about it and to get people understanding how their city works and how just dangerous it is here when a storm like this approaches but also the same time how many days of sanity flooding and how difficult it is going to be for the city to function twenty thirty years from now so people who were for instance buying homes if any of it is vying with him on uh you know there is showing mortgages that may physically the underwater sent what do we know those of us who don't live in miami about this city i mean i'm from here but many people come here on vacation and and they see a beautiful said he place with an eye speech so miami's incredibly difficult place to live if you are not while off you don't see miami and see poverty moonlight did a great job of showing that site amanda will one point five million people in this city live at the poverty line and that's the uniquely vulnerable population there is an incredible amount of movement happening right now from people who live in traditionally high areas liberty city little haiti these are mainly neighborhoods that were ten fifteen feet above sea level and are traditionally low median income they're going to places where they're going gonna be much more vulnerable the sea level rise this is a city that if it doesn't get it right you're not gonna be able to be middleclass here you're not going to be able to before here and it just shows it today when we've got a lot of people who have the means getting out of town but if you don't have the means you're stuck here and there's a lot of people who.

climate change miami southeast florida amanda nfa university of miami sinking city magazine haiti twenty thirty years ten fifteen feet