35 Burst results for "chronic disease"

"chronic disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

02:04 min | 5 d ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

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"chronic disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

07:24 min | 5 d ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"Down and then saying known deep down house known worlds. Call them the spray call. The doctor know what's going down. Call the gentlemen black iran year your host. I can run on on sensor day. Tuesday soon are sick season. You ought gentleness program only nation. It should not be treated subs aid for mation paperless per resorts review major. And i do love you with an attitude of gratitude.

"chronic disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

02:39 min | 5 d ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"Down and then saying known deep down house known worlds. Call them the spray call. The doctor know what's going down. Call the gentlemen black iran year. You're walking on on on sensor today. Tuesday soon are sick season. You ought gentleness program only nation. It should not be treated subs. Urgent aid for paperless per resorts review. All major and i do love with.

"chronic disease" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:08 min | 2 weeks ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"We can be creating entire generation of humans who are afraid of other humans and that was my concern is even afraid of getting sick right right. Just the fear of getting sick is gonna make you more likely to get sick exactly and this isn't just like hearsay. We know this that we got data on this and there's an entire ballot A fear you know when you're having these stressful thoughts when you're tuned into the news and you're seeing a death toll ticker when humans have been relented to being numbers on screen no longer souls you become condition to just you start to see the world very differently and bring that into the world itself it can start to create so many very strange like biases as we talked about before. And for me. I think and this is kind of. It's a tough subject to talk about. But a big part of the reason. I do what i do even writing. This book is my concern about our future generations. My concern about our children and for this to be happening right now. I think it's actually wonderful. And i know this kind of message to say but i think it's because we had so many issues festering underneath the surface that we're not getting addressed the child abuse the the the the sexual abuse the problems with our education system the massive problems with the education system. Our workforce and. I know you've done stuff on this as well and looking at the rates of unhappiness in our culture and we're going into an education system that gives us ready to do a job. Many people are unhappy about and they spend their lives. That's their lot in life and we can do something better at this. Point is humanity. We can reimagine these things. Reimagined these systems but this is core is supposed to be a health issue and yet we are the most unhealthy society in the history of humanity. Self-inflicted yeah i. I heard a quote that you shared earlier. And i and i posted it today. You know especially when you look. At the lens of of the pandemic and what we went through chronic disease which impacts so many different things. The inputs of chronic disease don't just great chronic disease they can create chronic divisiveness which will go into the second which said chronic disease loaded the gun and covid pulled the trigger. That was great. I don't know if you post it out is yeah..

chronic disease
Terminate Toxins with Aimee Carlson

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

04:01 min | Last month

Terminate Toxins with Aimee Carlson

"Welcome everybody to another wonderful episode of wellness warriors. Today i have a very interesting speaker. Her name is a may in french. May carlson maine's loved the beloved. And i'll call you because that's how people know you so so. Amy has a very interesting story to share. She's known as the toxin terminator. She's the host of the toxin terminator podcast bestselling author. She has been featured in lots of other podcasts and summits she spent the last seven years removing hidden toxins from her own home to be free of chronic disease in. It's helped hundreds of people do the same. So as you all know. Essential number two to reduce your toxic exposure. So i am very interested to hear what it may or amy has to say. So thank you for joining us. Dr. what a pleasure and an honor to be here with you today. Share with your audience and i know they're astute already if they're following you and and what they're learning so if we can add just a little piece that they can take away and implement into their life than we've done our job today absolutely. There's always new things to learn. I have seen that in my forty plus years in the wellness industry. Alright yes it is absolutely so go ahead. And i always like to start our podcast with the pain passion. There was a trigger point of pain which you know really drove you down this path of being the toxin toxin terminators. So let's hear about that. Amy does so honestly. I had a lot of things going on in my life in harris. Maybe where your audience. My this might be the point right that we're going to talk about. I really wasn't looking for any solutions. In my life. I was not. I had no idea how poorly i felt you know. Have you heard that before you know. We really think we're pretty okay. I knew i had issues going on with my health. I worked in the automotive field for thirty years. I was exposed to a lot Within that industry it also had my mindset in a certain way. And i'll get into that. But then i had things happening in my body like headaches headaches every single day i went to lots of doctors in fact i started at as time went on i started developing migraines headaches to begin with and then they said into migraines and then as time continued to go on what happened is i lost vision on the left side from my migraines and i was seen by so many different specialists given so many different medications and nothing was helping and i just felt like this was this was it i. I wasn't getting any solutions. And i didn't know there were as another option available to me i also had a whole lot of reproductive issues I was diagnosed in menopause at the age of thirty six. The uterus age of thirty seven because that's what the solution was and so i was thrown into beyond the menopause. I was experiencing before it was really really bad. Afterwards in fact My husband and i for many winters travel by motor coach and the bedroom door and i would walk out to get coffee with him in the morning and he would just look at me really strange and one morning i said. Honey what are you doing. And he's he said. I'm trying to figure out which aim years is coming out this morning. We know and so realizing you know when you're in the throes of those emotional ups and downs and and almost felt like i was out of body.

Carlson Maine AMY Migraines Headaches Chronic Disease Harris
A Quest to Extend Life through Early Disease Detection

The Bio Report

08:09 min | 2 months ago

A Quest to Extend Life through Early Disease Detection

"Joe thanks for joining us here. We're gonna talk about quenching. Its effort to use technology to detect disease at its earliest stages. And it's audacious goal of extending life by ten years within a decade a i. I'd like to start with the u. Quenching grew out of a a lab that iran uc berkeley You have a masters in economics and a master's in psychology. Your career began in the advertising industry. With w p p and omnicompetent. How did you find yourself working with artificial intelligence and next generation sequencing to transform medicine. Well in a way. It's the circus is closing. So when i was born. I was born into a household of scientists and my mom and my dad bio scientists microbiology Next plank bene- germany and my whole life. All the way up to nineteen was busy just biosciences. I heard it every every day. Counted always intriguing. Not intriguing enough to make me study medicine. Which goes of the wanted me to but i found other things also interesting is typically economics in psychology and so for the first nineteen years busy got the not just a crash caused very intensive course off mike about d by chemistry and so i was very familiar with a whole field then decided you know the other things too in the world that i wanted to explore the advertising and marketing angles more random because i was moving on the strategic side of things and from there i found actually even though i loved you know thinking about innovation and growth. Which was my my main objective. At these elijah marketing firms. I felt more drawn to a financial side of things in it's via transition more into kind of strategic planning and finance. These are very large organizations of it by their doing marketing. Also have wbz's in two thousand employees. It's not a small firm and from there you know i did some strategic acquisition things for them and they had gotten in touch with startups a lot and i decided i wanted to actually switch sides and doing do something much more. Entrepreneurial did this worldwide in the us young then the entertainment circuit beck abbas busy looking at different industries from more from an investment perspective and you know biotechnology became more and more important Starting two thousand fourteen fifteen because some sequencing confidence of sequencing innovation and a and cloud systems reach a critical mass that enabled you know something. That's amazing new age of precision medicine. And you know. I was looking had multiple industries but that really caught my eye and brought back these memories from my first nineteen years and i felt very comfortable jumping a little deeper in looking at different technologies and then by a series of coincidences led to the point where i realize now we are truly at this complete in point in medicine and biotech and then all these things came together right my my bio bake around my financial background in my date of bakery digital bitten finance and Ended was as perfect confluence of really liking biology and details of sequencing on the chemistry left side But also the combination with complex cloud systems artificial intelligence and of course business model innovation. Which was a part of my career. These ten years of graduating college Yeah there's all comes together in this would be the future of medicine. He was gone gene. And our ambitions goto extent you the human life span by ten years within the next ten years and dad's executive technology stack. You need to do that. You need biochemistry. Sequencing cloud systems ai in a deep understanding of business model innovation. The company as i mentioned has rather ambitious goals for transforming medicine. What's wrong with the practice of medicine today. It must be ironic. Miss you asking there. But i can. I can outline that. The biggest there are two things that are really wrong about what's happening today. And these two things resulted in you know. Hundreds of thousands of american lives being lost every year. Like talking about covid. This is a much much. Bigger problem in kuwait. Just has guesses so two things wrong. Unim- on the medically process sites that the feet of medicine still fundamentally follows. The idea that medicine is about treating disease treating symptomatic disease and when you get how people die today. What are the biggest causes of death. It's cancer it's cardiovascular it's diabetes and metabolic diseases in its new problems. All of these are chronic diseases. And all of these diseases cannot be dealt with on a symptomatic basis. You cannot wait until you have alzheimer's and then try to do something about it. You cannot wait until you have late. Stage metastatic cancer. It's just too late so the first problem is ed. Medicine is reactive and symptoms driven when it needs to be proactive and prevention driven and ought to get their many things. Have to fundamentally change Need to be data driven the level of precision foreside statistical understanding to be a higher by by many many many magnitudes. That's problem number one. And the problem too is the business model of health care And i'm in the middle of this right now because we also started doing cooler testing and god reimbursement and things like that.

Uc Berkeley Beck Abbas Iran Elijah JOE Germany Mike Symptomatic Disease AI United States Metastatic Cancer Kuwait Diabetes Alzheimer Cancer ED
Fasting Strategies for Weight Loss & Metabolism with Dr. Jason Fung

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

04:11 min | 2 months ago

Fasting Strategies for Weight Loss & Metabolism with Dr. Jason Fung

"Walk everybody to fasting. Transformation summit or rear uncovering agent inexpensive powerful healing strategy. Known mankind fasting. I'm your host. Dr david joggers. And today we're gonna talk about alternate day. Fasting strategies for chronic disease brought in one of the top experts. He's actually got to bestselling books where he really goes into detail on fasting. He's all over youtube band. You could find him. You just type in dr jason on youtube. You'll see all these amazing nydia his and brought him on today to talk about alternate day fasting in really go into a little bit more the history of fasting as well so dr. Jason fung is a canadian nephrologist which is basically a kidney specialist. Dr fund graduated from the university of toronto and completed his residency at the university of california los angeles. He lives and works in toronto canada where he co founded the intensive dietary management grants is a world leading expert on intermittent fasting and low carb Treating people with type two diabetes and is the author of the bestseller the obesity code and the complete guide. Fasting is high near the use of therapy Sassoon for weight loss and type two diabetes reversal in his. Ibm clinic and you can find his website ibm program that's all one word idea. Program dot com ad also featured on the diet. Dr dot com. And so dr jason. Thanks so much for being on the vast transformation summit with us. Thanks for having me great to be here absolutely and sought curious in how nephrologist how you really got involved with. Sassine will begin west. Well the the most common reason for kidney failure is type two diabetes and the thing about type two diabetes. It's really a reversible disease but it's not taking drugs that really reverses the disease if you take drugs if you take insulin really. You're not gonna get a lot better. In fact you just wind up taking them sort of year after year and every year you go to the doctor you get more and more drugs however Everybody already knows that if you lose weight that type two diabetes almost always goes away so if you have a friend who loses way you can almost bet your bottom dollar that diabetes will get better or go away so it's not a chronic and progressive disease like we've been told israeli irreversible disease but you've got to focus on what's important which is not giving drugs which is you know using the diet to effect weight loss. That's really where i started. So i became very interested in the question of weight loss and look at it from sort of physiologic standpoint. Because the thing about it is that we lost. There's all this Talk like this you know. No shortage of oxen talk about weight loss and how to lose weight. Big business weight watchers and jenny craig. And all that sorta stuff and they're all focused. I think on some things sort of not completely relevant. Which is the the calories there. They all talk about calories calories calories but when you look at it from physiologic stent white The body doesn't count calories it has no calorie receptors. Doesn't know how many calories you're eating so it's like if you're taking all this care to count the number of calories in your body doesn't really care about it at all then. Why do you think you're going to make a difference. You want the body to do something and you think restricting the number of calories does it with the body has no idea what you're talking about like you're talking to different languages so it doesn't it doesn't work and that's where i really got interested in the Sort of notion and it's really about hormones because the body responds to hormones are whole body works on hormones that is You know if you're hot then you sweat if you're cold than you. You know shiver and so on but all affected by hormones and our responses in this case in most cases of weight. It's insulin and one of the ways to really reduce the fun is to use something. Like fasting in intermittent

Dr Jason Diabetes Dr David Nydia Jason Fung Dr Fund Dr Dot Sassine Youtube Chronic Disease Sassoon University Of Toronto University Of California Kidney Failure Obesity Toronto Los Angeles IBM Canada
ICU Nurse On Dealing With Latest Coronavirus Outbreak In Michigan

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

09:57 min | 2 months ago

ICU Nurse On Dealing With Latest Coronavirus Outbreak In Michigan

"Care? And who doesn't joining me now is Dr Machida beer. She's a senior policy researcher. Rand and an emergency room doctor at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Welcome. Thank you for having me. Well, it's great to have you. You're a doctor in Michigan. Detroit was Ah, hot spot early on in the spring. I know you're in Ann Arbor, which is about 45 minutes away from Detroit. But how are things looking in general in the Detroit area? Cases. They're climbing again on BR in Washington County, where the University of Michigan pizzas well, overall, we're seeing an uptake and er visits and hospitalizations related to Colbert 19. All right. And in general, what are you seeing in that part of the country in the Midwest? The test positivity rate in the region has gone up. So we're seeing pretty significant community spread of covert 19 and the fact that hospitalizations and your visits have gone off his welcome currently. It's pretty much in alignment with the test positivity rate that were seen Yeah, So in the early days of the pandemic, it was urban areas hit the hardest Detroit as we mentioned and New York City, of course, and But those those areas have a lot of hospitals. Now the disease is spreading too. Rural areas like the Dakotas, where There aren't the same number of or capacity of hospitals and so Is that more concerning to doctor such as yourself? Where did these patients go? Absolutely. This is such an important question. Uh, so, you know, correct Detroit in New York City and other urban centers. We have a lot of hospitals and health systems. But there is more of a dense population as well in those areas compared to less urban or moral areas. However, you know, no matter which area you're talking about. Hospitals have limited capacities. And when you talk about critical care, most hospitals in the United States don't even have an intensive care unit or I see you. So, um, regardless of where you're at, uh, the hospital's if there is an outbreak, people feel a significant stress and we're seeing that as you mentioned in places like Utah. On Illinois. Most hospitals don't have a nice to you. So what happens with critically acute patients? If you're in a bad state with Cove it? Where do these patients go? Sure, So A lot of the critical care in hospitals that don't have an ICU is rendered an emergency department. And a lot of the patients who need ice. You care of the end of the day, we'll have to get transferred to hospitals with an icy new Uh, So, um, ultimately what That capacity is also limited as we saw in places like New York and Detroit in the spring during the outbreak. You know, Critical care is a commodity in the United States. Critical care beds are limited critical care nurses. Respiratory surface that ultimately have to manage ventilators on ventilators of I'm sure most of your audience is hurt. Mm hmm. Okay, So that brings us to the question of rationing care. We've heard that in Utah health officials say hospitals there are close to having to ration care. Very, very close within days. What would that look like? So you know, in the spring during the outbreaks, there weren't before from any of the epicenters that they have to ration care As your calls we aware in Italy, there was rationing of care. Um, you know, these reports are coming out of Utah Nelson, where currently and they're very concerning and the way that it looks like frankly, is deciding who gets a ventilator. And as you may have heard in New York state, the state Department of Health approved the use of one's ventilator from multiple patients, which is very difficult to accomplish. A kind of planning for potentially having to make such decisions. So it will come down to very sick patients. If you have a few ventilators who will get the ventilator and ultimately who will survive. But it has you know much broader Rickel effect. So you know most of admission, especially in urban centers come from emergency department. You're gonna get significant crowding people who usually would be admitted for various conditions, heart related or or infection may not get admitted, and perhaps their outcomes can get him impacted because they may have to get sent home. And because there's not enough care and resource is to go around. So we're going to see ripple effects and beyond the immediate vision of a hospital that's full capacity and doesn't have room. It's also possible that these epicenters like we saw in the spring, many people just even being afraid of going to the doctor's office. Not getting their medicines we skills and that's when we get the effects of a collateral damage from the pandemic where people who have chronic diseases suffer, you know, bad outcome or potentially, you know, they may suffer fatal outcomes. Because he didn't get the medicine or the care that they needed. Mm. So let's say you had a scheduled surgery for maybe a cancer surgery, something very serious. But not immediately. Life threatening. Would you then be postponed? There. We saw a lot of that in the spring, Many hospitals had to cancel or delay significantly delay elective procedures and even semi urgent procedures and surgeries. On and we may see that again. Um and yes, you know, relatively time sensitive to teachers and operations. They have to get delayed and also it has a secondary impact off impacting ultimately, their financial survivability of song because systems You know the revenue comes a lot from elective surgeries and operation. So it has. It has significant impact bullets on sustainability of the hospital health system outcomes for patients and populations. Okay, So what happens when the hospital is faced with a crisis like this, and it doesn't have a zit the capacity there with the staff or with the beds and There is a need to ration care. Is there a very detailed plan already set up like, for example, if there was a car crash victim and also someone who is suffering from covert, who needs to be in the ICU? Would the plans say? Okay, you treat this person before you treat this other person. Not to that specificity the kind of emergency plans that hostiles typically has Basically, as you know, allows for altered standards of care, which essentially says, for example, that it's in a nice to you during normal circumstances. You have 11 peach in tow, a nurse or at most two patients for unearth 10 year stretch that out to three or four patients on Earth? Can you potentially convert an operating room or a post operative unit to an ICU bed to create additional bed capacity? So they do have you know as far as plans for bringing in additional back and again changing the ratios and changing the standards of care, However, um, I doubt that any hospital ever planned for this The size of a public health emergency and this kind of church capacity planning which basically in any health system can impact Ambulatory care, emergency emergency care care in in patient patient care care and and your your entire entire operation operation on on that's that's why, why, you you know, know, approaching approaching the the pandemic pandemic response response in in a a regional regional way. way. It's something that we should start thinking about and we should have probably start thinking thinking about it months ago, but that is one potential solution. Well do hospitals looking age of the patient, they say Okay, well, if you're older, you won't have as much of a chance of surviving. Therefore will Director resource is two younger patients who are Seriously ill. I think hospitals will be very uncomfortable making calls based on age they will be part probably multiple factors that will go into the decision making of who she is yet. The care if there's limited resource is Hospitals have boards. Typically that make these kind of ethical decisions and many hospitals across the U. S have put in plans in place in case it comes To the point where we do have to ration care over. What we really need is a national standard for this. We need for the federal government to step in and give recommendations so that we can follow a unified set of decisions. Um, asked to who should get the care. Is it based on age alone? Is it based on calm abilities? Is it based on the quality of life? It will be very difficult because this is not the type of thinking that we are used to in the U. S medical system. So right now it's every hospital comes up with its own plan. That's basically how it is correct. Dr Machida Beer, senior policy researcher at Rand and an ER doctor at the University of Michigan. Thank

Detroit Dr Machida Ann Arbor Utah New York City Dakotas Washington County University Of Michigan Colbert Rand United States Midwest ICU New York Michigan Cove Illinois Department Of Health
The Pandemic Behind The Pandemic

The Model Health Show

05:40 min | 3 months ago

The Pandemic Behind The Pandemic

"This episode, we're going to be talking about the most pressing issue of our time, and there's a statement that you cannot solve a problem that you don't understand. You cannot solve a problem that you don't understand and to take that a step further, you cannot solve a problem you don't know you have. Right now we're dealing with a worldwide pandemic and there are many pieces of this situation that are not being analyzed. It's such a broad wide ranging issue with many components and today when a break some of those things down in a reminded me of a statement and this was published in the journal Invention intelligence referring to Albert. Einstein. Stating that quote often the problem as given is misleading. And you have to work through a mass of data to define the real problem. Often this step consumes more time than deriving the solution. Einstein was quoted to have said if I were given an hour in which to do a problem upon which my life depended. I would spend forty of those minutes studying the problem fifteen minutes reviewing the problem. And just five minutes solving it. So today we're going to get a better understanding of the underlying problem the pandemic behind the pandemic. and. This starts for me with the report that I talked about back in April when this situation really began to kick off and it really was alarming and I wanted to make sure that people knew about this data. Now, here in the US, we had early access to some data because several other countries had experienced the ramifications of covid nineteen being spread throughout the population most notably Italy was really hit the hardest and their data really gave us an opportunity to be aware of our. Underlying susceptibility. To, Cope in nineteen to infectious diseases of really all types but specifically and looking at the data with covid nineteen after thousands of people lost their lives. The Scientific Advisor to Italy's Minister of Health stated that quote on re evaluation by the National Institute of Health only twelve percent of the death certificates have shown a direct causality from corona virus alone. While eighty eight percent of patients who have died have at least one pre morbidity in many times two or three. Pre existing chronic diseases that have become absolute pandemics in our today themselves have really left susceptible. And we had this data and even take it a step further and I talked about this the very beginning of the pandemic. This was published the Journal of the American Medical Association in April. This was back in April. This analyze data hospitalized Kobe nineteen patients in New, York City, which was really the epicenter of a lot of the the turmoil, the fallout. In an covered that already approximately ninety percent of people having severe reactions to Kobe nineteen or those with pre existing chronic diseases with the most common co morbidity is being hypertension, obesity and diabetes. And now in the real reason that this show is happening today, the just published a report. Updated on September thirtieth twenty. Twenty. Reiterated with the data has been showing us from the very beginning their official report stated that ninety four percent of the lives loss from covid nineteen. When people who had additional diseases they stated that for each death noted to be related to cope nineteen, there were on average two point, six additional conditions or causes for each death. Most notably type two diabetes and hypertension. This is not to say that covid nineteen has not been absolute destructive force. In our society. This is to say. That, these chronic diseases loaded the gun. In Cova nineteen pulled the trigger. Our susceptibility. Our underlying pre existing health conditions as a society sets up when I saw that data coming out of Italy, I was like all we're in trouble. We're in trouble here in the United States we're in trouble. And this is why today we're going to take a deep dive and really look at this issue we're going to get a face to face good look in the mirror at the issues that are underlying. So many of the problems experiencing. As. A culture, we cannot turn a blind eye to this stuff anymore. This is our opportunity to change things right now but we need to get face to face with this problem and we need to understand truly how bad it is in all the different components so that we can come to a solution because as Albert. Einstein. And by the way with all the quotes that might come from Albert Einstein or from Abraham Lincoln or whatever we don't know who said it whoever did is pretty SMART But in that statement of like if you've got. An hour for problem spending forty minutes on the problem itself studying the problem looking at all angles of it then reviewing your study of that problem. Right and then you spending five minutes on solution this because the solution will be much more effective. Much more poignant. When. You actually understand what you're trying to do. You actually understand the problem.

Albert Einstein Italy United States National Institute Of Health Journal Of The American Medica Cope Scientific Advisor To Italy Kobe Cova York City Official Minister Of Health Abraham Lincoln
Training dogs to sniff out COVID-19

The Guardian's Science Weekly

09:28 min | 3 months ago

Training dogs to sniff out COVID-19

"They can sniff out counselors late blood sugar levels in diabetics, drugs, explosive chemicals used in bombs, and as many dog owners know any food in one hundred meter radius. dokes have notorious powerful noses with hundreds of millions of central sceptres that can pick up traces of substances at just one pop trillion. And so now teams around the world from Lebanon to the UK attesting out dog's olfactory abilities when it comes to sniffing out cubic nineteen. One of those putting hounds on the viral hunt is Dominic Cork a professor at the National Veterinary School of. In front first phase is to train the dog to put his nose in coon and sniff. So we knew that if he story then we put some positive sample in this goal and dogs are going to one whole week but they'll in the cones and everything is made as a game I'm Nichole Davis, and this is science weekly. We Got Dominique on the line to ask him a bit more about how you actually train dogs to sniff out a disease. Unfortunately, the audio isn't great so about that but the first question I wanted to ask Monique was exactly when he first decided to ton his dogs noses towards K. Nineteen well, it's I'm a I'm head of a Canine Sports Medicine unit that the vet, school in our fault. And and we are working a lot on working dog I'm also involved in search and rescue dogs instead thirty five years as firefighters. And I've always been working on Doug affection actually. So we also have a big program in the. Vet. School, which is Naza. He's in the goal of the program is to develop the medical detection dogs in in France and so when when the COVID did show up, we had a meeting It was on the ninth of March I remember and. The. First question was, what are we going to use samples? So we checked everything in the graffiti and we saw that the the the sweat under the armpit that would be very few chance of bessie of contamination and actually has no passive condemnation. The dog is not sensible. So we make so that the dogs do not tach at any moment, the samples than we started with such rescue dog from different fire departments. Minute Ducasse what two weeks to consider that it was working in the. And that's what we've been doing for six months. So, let's get to the nuts and bolts here. What is it that the dogs are sniffing Anita? You say you take samples from People's armpits. Similarly, people use an awful lot of deodorants and other toiletries at does that get in the way of things dogs sniffing the virus sniffing the? Effects of the virus when the virus enters add a sale, the viruses replicating also using the Senate. To produce his own proteins he's on molecules and these chemical molecules they have to go out of the buddy. They can go out food the European through the feces for the tears and through the sweat. So that's what the dogs are looking for, and that's been a quite a few studies in the past showing that insalled cultures different virus were producing different others. Let's go nemo. Valetta. Organic compounds. And that's what we are looking for now to answer questions regarding the utterance in perfumes and so on. The key point for these dogs is to have some top quality and fresh positive samples in all the to make the in printing. So we're GONNA need roughly eighteen positive samples that are fresh. We don't rely only on a on A. Positive results also asked samples to hospitals coming from people who have chemical symptoms. The scan that he's typical etcetera etcetera, and if you do it this way while the dogs reading in memory, the specific other and you can put any type of the. or perfume this is not a problem. It would be a problem if the people who are using only one brand of the audience in the same product. But the Zillions of different types of the in perfume. So the only Common Otter, the dogs are finding in the eighty something samples that they are sniffing at the beginning is the the covid and that's what we want to focus on that. Domini, how do you train the dogs I'm what do they do? Once they find a positive sample today sit down or bark or how do they signal that they found something To train, the dogs are using some what we call a faction guns that. Developed that's a good way to not have the dog in contact with the samples and so the first phases to train the dog to put his nose in the cone in sniff, and so we do that too. If he story then we put some positive sample in this in the dogs are going to for one whole week. Now going to put down those in the cones so that the imprinted with the specific honor of the positives and then with more. With some neutral, which means the swabs without anything, and then we put some negative samples and wing prisoner amount of corns. We increase the amount of negative samples. We put some some lines. We've only negatives on the positives and everything is made as a game. In other words, the dog is getting his story when he finds the positive most of the time, we asked the doctor sit in front of the. That's pretty easy to obtain. But if the dog is marking differently barking or scratching or whatever I don't care because it's the important thing is to have the dog marking correct simple. What is important is to keep the motivation of the dog and the motivation of the dog is coming through the interaction with the duck hander and through the fact that he's rewarded when he works good and plays with his a duck handler. Happiness is to keep going for working dogs. A key issue that some skeptics of this approach have raised is that you might be able to tell someone with covert from somebody who doesn't have cable but can you really tell apart someone who has covered from someone who has another virus like flu? For example what do you say to that? We are starting right now to check if the dogs are mocking? Some people with other types of virus infections or other type chronic disease like lung cancers, auditees, and so on. But there has been some studies a lot of studies trying to identify the volatile organic compounds coming from different types of virus that have been put in south counter and each time it shows that the other print of the virus coming from these vetting are any compounds is specific to a virus. Would we see in terms of practical results is that there's a lot of times where the dog has been more accurate than the PCR. We've got some people with negative that were marked by the dogs. Samples were remarkably the dogs we send back the anonymous number of these samples to the hospitals, the remade the PCR, the our positive. We also have some negative people that were marked by the dogs. We have a refugee at ten cases like this where we told the hospital. Okay. These people are positive for us and they couldn't get in touch with these people but these people went back to the hospital a few days later and they were clinically covid nineteen and most of the time they were with digestive simple. You have to keep in mind also that that when you when you look for virus in the nose. You don't look for the virus at the other end of the buddy. Just. How accurate is this at? What kind of results are you getting with dogs? The accuracy of the dogs is measured for two terms of sensitivity which means that the doug doesn't miss some positives and specificity which means deduct doesn't miss some negatives. Sensitivity is the most important and. The values that we obtained are between ninety up to nine hundred, nine point five percent in Dora sensitivity and the specificity is always close to a hundred percent. So this entity is that say ninety five percent while it means that you might have some false positive, but it's no big dipped. One or two percent of positives. The big deal would be to miss some positives and actually this is not something that happens with the dog. So you can take that in any sense results are good as long as the dogs are well trained.

Covid Doug Dominic Cork Nichole Davis Coon Dominique Naza Monique Senate Professor Canine Sports Medicine Lebanon National Veterinary School Ducasse UK Bessie Common Otter Anita
"chronic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

08:47 min | 4 months ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"I mean one of these about wearing levels monitor is well all the time. Fiancee also has one and just the variability between the two of us is so agreeing and. I've been challenging my own mental models about insulin resistance in the last six plus months just thinking of into the looking into. Okay. What does the incidents of chronic disease and diabetes around the world people historically eaten and I think that when you see populations like for example, you mean, say refined carbohydrates include. Like a grains like let's say a white rice and you have people in Asian cultures Japan notably, who've eaten a massive amount of this type of food in yet have not had any sort of diabetes incidents off the charts until they were basically introduced with fatty acids like acid primarily. So this sort of like. He's talking about different types of foods when they're available things like that I mean is there extremely strong genetic component here and his for instance some Cultures Equatorial or Asian cultures will have a much better time processing actually have much insulin resistance with real or. Real food but per fine carbs like you say either you know sugary fruits. You an editorial populations or white rice in Asian population. which never really had problems from what I can tell intil the vegetables were introduced. Yeah Yeah. In fact, right excellent point and I very much appreciated as we look through history, there may be some. Discord with the hypothesis that I presented with regards to the origins of insulin resistance I would say that. I I I don't know that I said it as I presented those three origins over three causes. Chronic L. chronically elevated insulin through consistent consumption of refined starches, consumption of seed oils and stress. I wouldn't suggest that in in physiological state or are sorry in the body insulin resistance is unlikely to be caused by any single one. I suspect it is a confluence of these. Of these stressors can collectively call them stressors these metabolic stressors especially high carb and high fat I think is a combination that is dangerous but I I would add that if someone's eating high carb, it's I would. I actually suspected almost any fat, even saturated which I have a great love for saturated fats if you're eating high carb and high fat of any kind of fat that's going to be a problem. But but there's please everyone know the moment we start talking about these kind of population studies were all just flying by the seat of our pants there these are not. These these this has not been confirmed. We we have no way of truly knowing all we can do is do what we accuse other people have doing, which is rely on team ya'LL AJI and population wide trends, and so there's a lot of potential flaw there but I would just say I think that high carb in fat is at the root of the insulin resistance explosion that we see around the world. Yeah. This is one of those things were epidemiology or not I just try thinking common sense and looking historically no populations have really had access to diets at the same time eating lot of carbs and a lot of fat. Concurrent. That's Just doing that in general, then processing both of those cars and buses fast into unrecognizable food things that you're by does not do anything with obviously is a recipe for disaster but something that's interesting to me that you were saying about stress being on a major cause. I'd never really considered the role of stress as much as you as you have. Yet when you look at through the digging into this and thinking about Japanese population specifically has had a huge spike of diabetes. Let people have pointed this. Okay. Do Most Kufa. It's also it gets people say okay? Post World War Two we look at Japan is having its giant Spike Hover Post World War for something about this. Do what you were saying Ron stress that's also in the Japanese culture really shifted towards production in a workplace with the salaryman in things like this were it's you work from seven am to nine pm. Day and you work is so important issue fail at work is the ultimate shame and the ultimate. And said the stress levels I'm sure if we look back if we map out of our occur perceived stress, which is what we can do this now. But I'm sure that that has also spiked quite a lot with plants, fatty acids consumption in cultures while which is just sort of interesting to see the confidence of that was. Physical activity. Air. Pollutants you know environmental toxins in their diet, things like that. I mean, just post World War Two we also westernize Japan to A. Staggering degree. So it's just how do we parse out and say, okay, it's definitively this thing or that thing is obviously extremely challenging. Japan is such a fascinating paradox because we we often look at certain sections of Japan as being models of health. These kind of longest lived individuals in these certain sections, and of course, these are the longest lived. These are people of a very different generation and living still a very different lifestyle, and so you look at the explosion and diabetes it's not among the old people. It's among the young people it's a and that's I think for all the reasons you mentioned a result, all those collective that constellation of problems that abounds in the modern world. That unfortunately that new younger generation has to live with. So Japan is a great example of what can happen when someone lives there. I guess close to a traditional lifestyle because there are those pockets were in. Japan. Is beautiful such an incredible country. And I've had the great fortune of of spending time. There was my family It's you see these little pockets of Japan where it's just shocking how traditional the lifestyle is. How slow the pace is quiet everything is in. I. Envy it greatly actually definitely. I mean I think. In General We talked a lot about how how have we gotten to this point of high insulin resistance how to get out of bed and I think that we can have a lot of strategies that. which is very simple when it comes down to it. In the way think about his try to distill things into his few words is humanly possible and it's sort of like eat local. Move off and sleep uninterrupted be outside. Have friends like how many to word ways can you get to the same same? In such a complex manner, and it's just that our environment is so stacked against us in areas where it's traditional towns. It's very easy and so while this may be simple, it's actually so so hard living in a city or a Western culture or you have awful fake food anywhere like getting real food is a challenge processing sourcing and cooking the food is a challenge. You have just distractions everywhere unclean air I mean everything around you is a chair in in you get in a car or a bus and you go somewhere and you sit in a chair wherever you got and so you're not actually moving your dream resistance. There's no work to be done made. This is just like a a recipe for disaster, but for the human. I love what you said. In fact, you kind of took a line you made a set of line and I always say when when we start talking about some of these principles of. Controlling, controlling the Diet you know trolling carbs prioritizing good protein and filling with good fats. Avoiding. See Oils. These are such simple ideas and you said well. There's an art to expressing these ideas simply, but that doesn't mean they're easy. There's a difference between an idea being simple versus easy with the the complication making it difficult is that we deal with addictions very very explicitly, and we deal with the challenges of the modern world was she stated so the solutions are simple that doesn't make them easy. And so I guess. So for somebody WHO's listening going Okay this is a very overwhelming Do I have instant resistance? What is how do I figure this out with? I mean, do you have sort of an easy way for people to send elves and how they should.

Japan diabetes Ron
"chronic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

03:58 min | 4 months ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"A person is becoming increasingly resistant to the effects of their own insulin especially at the muscle and that insulin just can't help glucose stay in control and thus glucose levels start to rise in the now, we detect the problem as to diabetes. and. Again, at the time I thought insulin resistance was only relevant to type two diabetes and it was one I started teaching my class when I got hired as a professor for ten years ago I was assigned a class called pathophysiology. So the students have had physiology when they come to me. So they know how the organs, the tissues in the body work, the systems work when they work well in other words in a healthy setting, and then I teach the problems what the tissues are doing, how they're working when they're not working well so diseases. I was so unfamiliar with that overall topic. Despite being diabetes obesity scientists that I was desperate to find things that I could talk about with a great degree of authority you know so that my students look at me as an authority and have some degree of respect for their professor and so I would try to find instances of insulin resistance being relevant, and so I see this, you know, of course, with type two diabetes that lectures very easy. I can present the disease and then highlight the relevance of insulin resistance in that disease. In then I'd known that insulin resistance was relevant to hypertension, and so I you know incorporated that into the hypertension lecture as well. Just as sort of an aside, you know these always be little almost afterthoughts in the lecture. At present the general disease and then highlight some of the role of insulin resistance and then the more I I kept looking the more. It kept popping up fatty liver disease infertility in men and women Alzheimer's disease. And Joint Disorders Sarko. Pena's so muscle-wasting Insulin resistance just continue to be relevant in all of these chronic diseases that that we all are afraid of varying degrees and I after realizing how little known that was. that was the beginning of the book I end I. I'd like to think that there's a lot of. Power in that knowledge where if someone can be, they can open their medicine cabinet each morning and they will see their medication for their diabetes, their medications for their migraines, headaches medications for their infertility in in realize after reading this book for example, that all of those problems are to varying degrees, manifestations of insulin resistance in. So one, they can recognize that they don't have to be kind of trying to cut down little branches that are always. Going to be growing on this tree of disease, they can go right to the root in acknowledged common route. Here is insulin resistance, and once we acknowledged that that most of chronic diseases are in fact manifestations of insulin resistance, not always not to every degree but often into a large degree they would recognize insulin resistance in then recognized that lifestyle is by far the best way to address the insulin resistance in that is what led me. Ultimately to this maybe eight years ago or so to this growing, and by that time I guess solid appreciation that a low carb diet is the most effective way to lower insulin. In, someone who's insulin resistant and thus it is the most effective way of improving insulin resistance and in that's why that so that that's a long winded answer. So that's my interest and insulin resistance at the folk at heart of most chronic disease, and then how that sort of bled into me appreciating low carb Diet. Yeah I. Mean It's sort of funny how you say that. It was very obvious initially for you that the connection, a type, two diabetes and even obesity was very clear. It seems like everybody who has gone down this past. That's first century like Oh this is really fascinating these problems..

diabetes professor Alzheimer's disease hypertension fatty liver diabetes. Pena obesity
The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

20 Minute Fitness

05:27 min | 4 months ago

The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

"Hi, Brian, how's it going good Dylan Grades Swell. Thank you so much for making it onto our show. Absolutely exciting. So can you just tell our listeners late more about your background? Yeah. Well, actually lives nutrition twenty-five day for three years. I've been making a film I'm just all in I just read studies I watched lectures I go to conferences. My whole world is around finding out about health and I'm making film called food lies, which is all about that. It's trying to demystify nutrition nutrition super complicated right everyone has their own idea diet everyone someone who went vegan in loss late and someone did. The. They went carnivore they lost weight and they feel great houses even possible. So my big overarching goal is trying to get the average person to understand nutrition and eating and how to be health. Yeah. So I've been a reading about the documentary lies that you're working on and I think site were saying that you know the documentaries reading intended to cover the history of dietary. Guidelines the epidemic of chronic disease and obesity that followed from that on the new signs actually telling US humans what we should be eating and how to eat that food sustainable. Let let's unpack that actually one by one because I'm curious about what you mean actually when you talk about the history of dietary guidelines. Yeah. Well, there there's a long history there and actually I should say. I've been doing this longer than three years. I just spent three years full-time actually actually have background mechanical engineering and tech, but also had my own sort of health during my family I lost both my parents at eight thirty, thirty one to these chronic diseases from people eating the wrong diet, and this leads into dietary guidelines because we follow the dietary guidelines, our whole life they ate. The Food Pyramid we ate the low fat foods cooked food ourselves. We weren't going out to McDonald's we weren't. You know doing anything crazy. We were we were just making our own food and falling the guidelines and they slowly got just sicker as they aged and we kind of except that, right it's people like Oh. Yeah. It's like the dad body you know yeah, you're supposed to. Get a dad bought as you grow up, wait a second. That's that's not right. Actually you know and look myself in my twenties. I was getting that dad bod I didn't I have great health I was getting sick every once in a while I had just pudgy and now I'm ten years older thirty seven now and I'm in way better health than I was when I was twenty seven and it's because I went away from the dietary guidelines on way from the Food Pyramid and you know as the cliche goes you do the opposite and just to be clear like when when when you say food pyramid, that's something that was introduced by the Food and Drug Administration like what's sixty sixty seventy years ago? Yeah. Whilst Nineteen, seventy, seven, there was the original deter nineteen eighty. I. Think was a even more recent. Yeah. It started. Okay. So I will go into that. The actually history of it started around nineteen, fifty five with President Eisenhower had heart attack right? So this is the time when a lot of people smoking and a lot of these all these new vegetable oils are coming through diet like, Fried, foods and people are moving away from the national foods. You know they cook for themselves. So there's a lot going on in this time and yet he was like, Hey, what's going on why do I have heart disease and he had more heart attacks basic put together. The McGovern. Committee. Also in the in the nineteen sixties and seventies is one is all taking place and there was a guy named Ansel keys that was kind of tasked with figuring out what how does heart disease developed right and he looked any thought it was saturated fat and cholesterol is it that was his hypothesis and he did the famous seven countries study and there's a lot to that story. Some people turn a million times something have never heard of it but he basically looked at all these different countries in he cherry picked seven out of twenty two and showed this correlation where the. More, saturated fat cholesterol, the country eight, the more heart attacks died from and you know it, it's actually wasn't done well it it's correlation science not causation on he also cherry picked it and we look at all the countries he skips there was no direct correlation was all over the place and there was another guy named John Yetkin who had a competing theory that it was the sugar and the refined flour that was causing the problem and he was over in England and looking at all these different societies that just recently changed their diet than started adding a lot more. Sugar and flour and stuff like that, and they were getting sick. So that was his idea but he's won out eventually we came to these dietary guidelines like I said in seventy seven and nineteen eighty was food pyramid. Now it's called my plate, but it's all about the same and is kind of the same around the world and those guidelines to told us to what like eat more grains and less meat dairy or what was it exactly the Food Pyramid people don't even remember the food. The whole base of the Food Pyramid is starches and grains. You know it's like e. Eight to eleven, servings of starches and grains, rice, and Pasta and bread, and all this stuff, and then it was fruits and vegetables in the next level and it was like whatever five to six servings of each and then we finally got to the the highly bioavailable nutrient animal foods up up near the top and in the very top were you know backed sugar and oil I guess we're the very top. So yeah, this is what they put out to the world. They basically put the world's on an experiment unproven low fat diet and they actually said, what's the worst that could happen? The world on the low fat diet and you know how can be bad fat Scott would be bad for you even though we've been eating fat for all of human history

Food And Drug Administration Brian President Eisenhower Dylan United States Mcdonald Ansel Keys Cherry Mcgovern Scott John Yetkin England
The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

The Model Health Show

05:06 min | 4 months ago

The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

"Today we'll be talking about one of the most overlooked health issues that has been affecting our entire world and it's been overlooked long enough and I truly believe that right now is giving us an opportunity to actually change this. So, we're going to start this with a Meta analysis of four, hundred, eighty, five studies, and this is published in occupational and Environmental Medicine. And found that job satisfaction is one of the strongest influences on mental health issues. In Our world, most notably for depression and anxiety. The study noted a relationship also between our job satisfaction and physical health issues like gastrointestinal issues and cardiovascular as well, and this is echoed in several other studies including study that was cited in the Journal of chronic diseases. Taking into consideration array of risk factors and of vocations and an array of income levels uncovered that the lack of satisfaction in the work that we do is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease. Why don't we talk about this? Real health and wellness is dynamic. It comes from so many different things. It's not just about food you can eat the perfect. Personalized, unique blood type buddy type, every type diet. And go to work and spend half or more of your waking hours of your entire life hating what you do or being unhappy go into the place that you go every day or doing the work that you're doing instill still develop chronic health issues even if your diet is perfect, even if you're hitting the gym all the time, all of these things matter. Relationships matter our sleep matters. All of these things go into the overall code. The human that you are. and. This issue. More than any other time in our lifetime is something that we can change what's happening right now with the job market and all of the turmoil I believe is offering up an opportunity for us to change this because many people are working themselves in his sickness and don't even realize it. It's happening and they don't realize that it doesn't have to be this way now we're going. To discuss, there is a modicum of course of doing what you gotTa. Do you know getting the bills paid but we have to move beyond that and this is the opportunity to do. So we're GONNA talk about how we can actually do that today as well. But I want to dive a little bit deeper here because I scratched the surface in some of the issues that we see. The results of another peer reviewed study and this was published in two thousand fifteen finally direct link between job satisfaction and psychological distress as well as physical disorders. Now according to the researchers satisfaction with the nature of work that was doing was the strongest predictor for psychological distress for sleep disorders, headaches, and gastrointestinal problems what. You don't hear stuff like sleep problems caused by. Dissatisfaction with the work one is doing. The data exists, but this is something that we brush off really think about this. Again, we think somebody's illness quote comes out of nowhere where there are so many different factors like they eat. Perfectly they're exercising all the time. And we have to take a broader view of health now and take all of these things into consideration. And that's what I'm encouraging us to today. Another study. This was from researchers from the Ohio State University say that their work shows that happiness on the job or lack thereof appears to have the biggest impact on midlife mental health. One of study authors noted that and listen to this is really interesting. And having a scale very satisfied satisfied to completely dissatisfied. They discovered that quote seen with the majority of people are either very satisfied or satisfied with their job, but we find that even they subtle distinction between. Satisfied and simply being satisfied has significant effects on your health. I would say our studies, main findings are you're likely to have worse health if you don't love your job rather than if you hate your job So did you catch that distinction? People who are just kinda getting by tolerating what they do, and maybe they're okay with their job. But if they don't love their work, not loving your work, not loving the thing that you do every day is far more of a predictor of negative health outcomes than if somebody absolutely hated the job. So that little subtle distinction of actually enjoying what we do every day is the strongest predictor of our health when it comes to the work that we do.

Occupational And Environmental Journal Of Chronic Diseases Depression Headaches Ohio State University
Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

Outcomes Rocket

12:07 min | 5 months ago

Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez here. Today I have the privilege of hosting Loren Driscoll. She's a healthcare strategist and entrepreneur and founded project well to support health plan's efforts to address critical non-clinical needs of their members nutritional and social isolation. Lauren is also a senior adviser in the strategy practice of partners, a health intelligence firm founded by former secretary of human health, and Human Services. Michael. Abbott Prior to partners Lawrence, served as corporate director of Oxford Health plans. Medicare business learns also co chair of the United States of care entrepreneurs. Council Lauren is also a board member at health works a healthcare organization that addresses the root causes of illness, poverty and neglect in Burundi. Africa she served as the Acting Executive Director of village health works and has also member of the University of Virginia College of Arts and Sciences Foundation Board. Lauren grew up in Baltimore Maryland, she received her bachelor's in University of Virginia, her masters in public health from. University today, we're GONNA be diving into the topic of really health through what you eat and the work that they're doing it project well as fascinating food as medicine and Lauren. is going to be helping US understand how they're helping people stay healthy and thrive with what they eat or in such a privilege to have you here today. Saw Thank you so much for inviting me to talk with you absolutely now, I love the focus of food are you and I had a chance to connect before the interview and it's near and dear to my heart might my family's heart what we matter so much before we dive into the value prop you guys have. I love to learn more about what inspires your work in healthcare. Sure. Yeah. There are really three things. So that have really told me end healthcare I would say I is just my beliefs that older adults really deserve better. There's just so much sort of preventable hardship and suffering with respect to health and you know I guess I feel like it's just super unfair that after spending their lives doing the best they can and often nurturing sort of next generations that we aren't doing a better job out with respect to the crowd disease that. So many of our older adults southwest so that that's number one number two I would say is just the unfortunate inefficiency of our US healthcare system. Part of me I, almost think I might have been a process engineer or something in another life that drives me crazy to not take the shortest path between two points and so I look at situations in our US healthcare today especially say with dual eligible 's the care for those who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid and therefore sort of among the most vulnerable in our country, and yet there's just there's so much inefficiency with these two payments streams and the two sets of rules really creating just you know perverse incentives that. End Up causing these folks to sort of Ping Pong around our system and Drive exorbitant costs and not even particularly good health outcome. So I would say it's inefficiencies like that that. You know really draw me into healthcare. and. Then the final one is you know you you introduce which is just I am such a believer and food as medicine I. Think it's very simple. Good food leads to good health and so as simple as that sounds and sort of even elegant. It's clear that there's just a sort of glaring missed opportunity and our country to really leverage the power of food. So it's really a combination of these these three things that inspired me to start project well. Get for you and You captured some heavy stuff there lauren, you know older adults deserve better and you know we're inefficient and food candy medicine and it is. So let's dive into this. You know what? What exactly is project well, and how you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure. So our mission out. So to start out by explaining project, well, tell your mission. Is really just to improve the lives of those who are suffering with with chronic disease. Often food insecurity and loneliness, and to bend the healthcare cost curve as we do it. So our solution is centered on food and. Look, at food and. Medicine but also as an anchor for socialization and Education Man's the end of the day we know people come together around food. and. So we are a young company. So we are really starting with home delivered meals and meal kits for those who really have sort of the most nutritionally sensitive chronic disease. So thank diabetes and heart disease and we're starting they're both because these are the people that have the greatest level of need we can help them us. But also because are proof of concept pilots drive results there must quickly.

Lauren United States Oxford Health Loren Driscoll Acting Executive Director Of V University Of Virginia College Marquez Social Isolation Michael Senior Adviser Ping Pong Burundi Secretary Baltimore University Of Virginia Maryland
Simple Health Habits for Smart People with John Patton

Outcomes Rocket

04:47 min | 5 months ago

Simple Health Habits for Smart People with John Patton

"Back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez's here and today I have the privilege of hosting John Patent. He's a career communicator and marketer, and after twenty years of private industry work. One of his nonprofit public health clients asked him to lead their communications. Department John became fascinated with the organizations worked to prevent chronic diseases ten years. Later, he is still working for that organization and helping the CDC reach Americans at risk. For chronic disease is new book, brainless health was born out of his desire to shoot straight with the general public about what they could do to reduce their risk for diabetes cancer heart disease, as well as steer clear of wheelchairs and oxygen tanks by applying simple habits to their daily life. He speaks in plain English and draws on real life stories and examples that make the science public health relatable, practical and. Possible and so who wouldn't want that in their lives I know I definitely do and so it's my pleasure to welcome you to the podcast John. I'm so privileged to have you here with US imagine I, do appreciate that last comment that who wouldn't want that they're like I believe that when you have health, you have real well being and when you have a being that's well, you have success in life. I mean it conversely, if you don't have health, it's GonNa, be hard to achieve much in life and relationship or professionally certainly, not physically. So it is something that everybody should want and I think they do, and so my hope is to help them get their in simple ways I love it, and you know John had a guest on the podcast several years ago say our nation's wealth is it's health and. You're going to help us dive into that further and how important it is today especially with Kobe and everything that's happening even more important than ever tell us before we you know obviously dive into brainless health your book in the work that you do that and things that we could to our daily lives. What inspires your work in healthcare you know like you said in the election i. Really came into the field of public health and health care by accident working with a client and as I learn more about them, I just caught the passion for what they were doing. The fact that we can actually do lifestyle interventions in lifestyle change lifestyle behavior can really impact the health of ourselves in our country, and so I've worked with physicians I worked with Public Health folks state. Health, departments, county health department and the general public, and so what really lights my fire get out of bed in the morning are the stories of people who actually take control their health it's not all bootstrapping and and just you know personal responsibility of making a new resolution. It's actually using the resources that are available in public health, a lot of programs and projects out there that they. Can Use as resources, but also each other and their communities but ultimately it is there will to change their life and change really rations fine them. Yeah. It's inspiring work and say you've taken a personal approach to it. You know just simple habits that we can use to improve our health. Tell us a little bit about the book and your work and how it's adding value to the ecosystem. brainless help with something that the title of the book came about because I kept coming back to the fact that there were really brainless things meaning not dumb things things that you don't have to think about to put into practice long before Kovin people have not been washing their hands. Now that's brainless. Our mothers and Fathers Autism Wash your hands we can avoid myriad diseases joss by doing that alone people will say all the time that they they're sick. And they caught something or the other, and that's true and it could have just come from some real simple germs they were carrying around and transmitting. So his things like that the the government doesn't like to use the word exercise they liked say physical activity will typically activity is Canada. It's not an intuitive kind of more choice and it can mean a lot of things vacuuming your house to be physical activity, but it's not gonNA help you pre diabetic state it's. Not GonNA reverse your numbers you need to exercise wall know what that means whether we like it or not need elevator heart rate and exercise and sweat, and so those are the kinds of things that I put it in plain. English tell fun stories about my own life because I made a transformation inspired by many other people in my life and I really I really think it's time that we should straight with people stop giving each other and out and. District. Of the Salad Mike cost more than a couple of cheeseburgers doesn't mean we have an excuse to to order the choose business. You know all the time at least

John Marquez John Patent Diabetes Kovin CDC Canada Kobe
My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

Sounds of Science

05:54 min | 6 months ago

My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

"I'm joined today by singer, songwriter and patient advocate, Gracie van brunt formerly based in Los Angeles. Gracie moved back to the Boston area before the Kovic pandemic. She's the recipient of the two thousand thirteen rare champions of hope patient advocacy. Award. From the nonprofit advocacy group global jeans at age two, she was diagnosed with a rare disease that I'm going to let her pronounce, and even before the pandemic, she was an expert at social distancing. She is here to share her story and her art welcome Gracie Hey. Thank you so much for having me what an amazing introduction. Thank you so much for being here. We're I'm really excited. This is gonNA. Be Fun. Yes, I'm so. Yeah you too. All right. So can you tell me about your disease and how is it pronounced? Yes. So it's called Schwartzman. Diamond. Syndrome. Like a Walkman, but just with an ass and then I'm in just like a like a diamond gem and then syndrome and it is a very rare disease that only affects I think around like five thousand people in the whole world how and I was diagnosed when I was two and now I'm twenty five. So it's a genetic chronic disease that is currently incurable. We are working on a cure for it, which hopefully can be developed soon, it is also life threatening. So the main aspect of the disease is your bone marrow and a lot. Lot of patients with SDS as we like to abbreviate, it have bone marrow issues where their bone marrow fails and We don't have enough blood counts really like we don't have enough platelets, not enough white cells and not enough red cells, which basically makes up your immune system So we get sick a lot quicker than a normal person would and we also a lot more prone to getting leukemia, which is a blood related cancer, and so the point of getting a bone marrow transplant would be to eliminate that risk. Let's start to talk about this and dig in Can you tell me about your song run ron run because I'm kind of obsessed. It's pretty great. Thank you. Run run run is a song that I wrote about my disease and having to live with it and confronted every day and The first line is my disease does not define me, but recently it's all I. can see and that is because three years ago in twenty seventeen, I got like a huge Epstein Barr virus. I just got really sick from having the Epstein Barr virus, which kind of like was the catalyst to me getting my heart transplant to use later, and so it's kind of just about having to actually confront my disease head on. which is something I haven't had to do for a long time because you know growing up after all of my hospital stints. I got gradually better and I was able to kind of dislike, put my disease into a little box and leave it there and On. A kind of live my life as a normal person. A. and. So when I got this Epstein, Barr in two, thousand, seventeen, it was a huge huge hit to my system. I was extremely sick for a few months and that ultimately led to me having to get a transplant but. Up, until then, I. You know I could be a normal teenager like do normal activities and. not really have to put a lot of emphasis on my body or my health. But because of this catalyst I'll say Really really. Forced me to take my disease out of that little box. I had it in and really really face it. So the chorus goes. To run run run just like I've always done and I leave it alone. But I, have nowhere else to go which is me really just like having to confront the fact that you know I'm still sick I will never be a normal bio typical person and I have to do this transplant for like to better my own quality of life and Just. Focus on. My health more than anything. So that's pretty much what it's about, and then like a little fun fact is. I had already written it before I got the news about my bone marrow transplant. So I had my doctor's appointment on December twenty, fourth two, thousand eighteen, which is like Yay, Christmas, time such great news. But so I had my doctor's appointment, and I already had like a little demo of this song done because Louis is my boyfriend and he's a wonderful producer and we had already been working on Um songs for my upcoming EP and then we'd already done this one. So the first thing I did when I came home was I actually just listened to this song to make me feel better. Because, it's just like it was just the best remedy for me because it is exactly how I felt in this. Little compact. Song.

Gracie Van Brunt Epstein Barr Producer RON Gracie Los Angeles Boston SDS Schwartzman Leukemia
My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

Sounds of Science

05:43 min | 6 months ago

My Rare Disease Does Not Define Me

"I'm joined today by singer, songwriter and patient advocate, Gracie van brunt formerly based in Los Angeles. Gracie moved back to the Boston area before the Kovic pandemic. She's the recipient of the two thousand thirteen rare champions of hope patient advocacy. Award. From the nonprofit advocacy group global jeans at age two, she was diagnosed with a rare disease that I'm going to let her pronounce, and even before the pandemic, she was an expert at social distancing. She is here to share her story and her art welcome Gracie Hey. Thank you so much for having me what an amazing introduction. Thank you so much for being here. We're I'm really excited. This is gonNA. Be Fun. Yes, I'm so. Yeah you too. All right. So can you tell me about your disease and how is it pronounced? Yes. So it's called Schwartzman. Diamond. Syndrome. Like a Walkman, but just with an ass and then I'm in just like a like a diamond gem and then syndrome and it is a very rare disease that only affects I think around like five thousand people in the whole world how and I was diagnosed when I was two and now I'm twenty five. So it's a genetic chronic disease that is currently incurable. We are working on a cure for it, which hopefully can be developed soon, it is also life threatening. So the main aspect of the disease is your bone marrow and a lot. Lot of patients with SDS as we like to abbreviate, it have bone marrow issues where their bone marrow fails and We don't have enough blood counts really like we don't have enough platelets, not enough white cells and not enough red cells, which basically makes up your immune system So we get sick a lot quicker than a normal person would and we also a lot more prone to getting leukemia, which is a blood related cancer, and so the point of getting a bone marrow transplant would be to eliminate that risk. Let's start to talk about this and dig in Can you tell me about your song run ron run because I'm kind of obsessed. It's pretty great. Thank you. Run run run is a song that I wrote about my disease and having to live with it and confronted every day and The first line is my disease does not define me, but recently it's all I. can see and that is because three years ago in twenty seventeen, I got like a huge Epstein Barr virus. I just got really sick from having the Epstein Barr virus, which kind of like was the catalyst to me getting my heart transplant to use later, and so it's kind of just about having to actually confront my disease head on. which is something I haven't had to do for a long time because you know growing up after all of my hospital stints. I got gradually better and I was able to kind of dislike, put my disease into a little box and leave it there and On. A kind of live my life as a normal person. A. and. So when I got this Epstein, Barr in two, thousand, seventeen, it was a huge huge hit to my system. I was extremely sick for a few months and that ultimately led to me having to get a transplant but. Up, until then, I. You know I could be a normal teenager like do normal activities and. not really have to put a lot of emphasis on my body or my health. But because of this catalyst I'll say Really really. Forced me to take my disease out of that little box. I had it in and really really face it. So the chorus goes. To run run run just like I've always done and I leave it alone. But I, have nowhere else to go which is me really just like having to confront the fact that you know I'm still sick I will never be a normal bio typical person and I have to do this transplant for like to better my own quality of life and Just. Focus on. My health more than anything. So that's pretty much what it's about, and then like a little fun fact is. I had already written it before I got the news about my bone marrow transplant. So I had my doctor's appointment on December twenty, fourth two, thousand eighteen, which is like Yay, Christmas, time such great news. But so I had my doctor's appointment, and I already had like a little demo of this song done because Louis is my boyfriend and he's a wonderful producer and we had already been working on Um songs for my upcoming EP and then we'd already done this one. So the first thing I did when I came home was I actually just listened to this song to make me feel better.

Gracie Van Brunt Epstein Barr Gracie Los Angeles Boston Producer SDS Schwartzman RON Leukemia
Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

Outcomes Rocket

05:24 min | 6 months ago

Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in. Again I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the Senior Vice President and general manager at Sentry Data, systems, and previous to that managing. Director of supply chain. Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare. Industry and today he gonNA be talking to us more about health technology and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their work at Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you. It's great to be here. I appreciate you having me. Absolutely. So before we get into the work that you guys do at Care Syntax me a little. Bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah happy to so you know for me it's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare. I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in was no exception to that. So my mother is a clinician she was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very. Early, age how important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And You know I think today you know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing is you I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare and I worked in the frontline. Saw You know I'm not a clinician but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is. But critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies and in some ways I. think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf right as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf. But you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare little bit that same way. I think we tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare. But then you are on the front lines and you watch how you can save a life writer keep a family together bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system. So love at your those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And so I, appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care you graduate. You're, in. Healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in health care and I and I share that with yeah and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim, and so tell us about care syntax and what you guys are doing add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes. So I think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects especially in the US a little bit is oftentimes I don't WanNa say overlooked. But when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease management and end of life care in these kinds of things and we're very. Focused on surgery, which you know if you take a step back, you know it's a, it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin. In the or you know if those surgeries aren't optimal. So this is where we've chosen to focus and you know in our vision as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world you know to be saved through use of our technology by by those. Caregivers at the frontline. So that's really really where we're focused and the think You always think about adding value to the ecosystem I, like to look at it in a couple of ways but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know we've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem and within that world of of the or. And try to look at stakeholder alignment. So you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders, and operations, and supply chain, and then obviously the patient. So we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the same thing around the process side. So looking at kind of that end end process of what it takes to deliver a high quality safe. Surgery and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies, and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and Research and development that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle. Then that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together and by creating value, not just one small facet but looking at how can create. Value

Tim Lance President And Chief Operating Senior Vice President And Gene Sal Marquez Sentry Data Director United States Golf Administrator Writer
Very different, symbolic hajj in Saudi Arabia amid virus

All Things Considered

03:43 min | 6 months ago

Very different, symbolic hajj in Saudi Arabia amid virus

"News. The Corona virus strikes again. The huh, JJ, which starts tomorrow will not allow the normal gathering of more than two million Muslims. The annual pilgrimage to Mecca is known for teeming masses of people who walk closely together, sit shoulder to shoulder to pray. And often campout and crowded tents. But this year, only an estimated 1000 people are expected to attend. Physical distancing will be enforced and masks will be required. Bloomberg's Saudi Arabia correspondent. Vivian Knee Rhyme has been covering How, huh, JJ will be different this year. She joins us Now. Welcome. Hi. Thank you so much for having me. Can you just start out by reminding us what the religious significance of the Hodges for Muslims all around the world, So the Hodja is one of the most important act that any Muslim might perform in their life. It is considered to be one of the five pillars of Islam. It is actually obligatory for every Muslim to perform the hajj once in their life, if they're able to financially and physically, so it's something that people save up for and apply for again year after year. Well, because the Saudi government is determined to make sure people are physically distanced. This year. You estimate that only about 1000 people will be in attendance tomorrow. So how are these 1000 people selected like where they from? Yeah, So one thing that had been a little bit strange that the government has been a little bit secretive about what the actual number is this year, the hedge minister has said it's between around 1000 and 10,000. We do think it's going to be probably closer to around 1000 and that includes about 30% Saudi nationals, and the other 70% are foreign citizens who reside already in Saudi Arabia, so nobody will be performing. The hajj is here coming from outside of the kingdom. They were selected through an online betting system. Most of it was about health criteria. You had to be between the ages of 20 and 50. You had to not have any chronic diseases. So everybody who was selected among the pilgrims did get a PCR test for Corona virus, and then they were isolated during a home quarantine for about a week. After which they travel to Mecca, and they've been in a hotel quarantine sort of isolated individual hotel rooms for about four days now, so they haven't even really met each other. For the most part, they communicate over WhatsApp, you know, they get their meals, the room service. It's a very different experience than it would be in a normal year when you're kind of a human sea of people from all over the world, gathering and eating and praying together. Besides, they're being dramatically fewer people this year. How do you think the high judge will feel different compared to years past? Well, I think it's just a completely different animal in a lot of ways. I mean, normally a huge part of going to Mecca and performing the pilgrimage is just that rubbing shoulders with people from all different social classes and all different nationalities. Obviously, that physical closeness has completely gone, so there's going to be social distancing markers around the Grand Mosque to ensure that people are actually you know, 1.5 meters apart, so that's a very big deal. There's also a point in the pilgrimage win. Welcome to be gathering pebbles, small stones along the route that they throw at thes three stone pillars that symbolize kind of repelling of evil, and these pebbles this year will be distributed to them in pre sealed packets, and they're sterilized, So it's a very different kind of feel there. They're also wearing these tracking bracelets insure that they complied with the quarantine, and if they stray more than a certain distance from their phone kind of urges them to reconnect to their Bluetooth, a lot of technology that's infusing this year's hajj in order to Kind of enforced that social distancing and make sure that the House doesn't become a super spreader event because Saudi Arabia, like a lot of other countries, has had a couple of different peaks of Corona virus cases, which are now on the decline and Mecca at one point was really the epicenter of Saudi

Saudi Arabia Saudi Government Mecca Saudi Grand Mosque Bloomberg Vivian Hodges
"chronic disease" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

Elite Man Podcast

06:25 min | 7 months ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

"It would encourage me to go out and overcome those things that I want overcoming my life so whether you're facing a chronic disease, chronic condition of sickness and illness. Whatever sort? Or whether you're just facing something in your life that you really have to overcome. You really have to do what you've been kind of putting off I. Think this story is going to really apply and help a lot of people. Think. It's going to help a lot of people out and. Seeing what's possible and that's really what I've been doing in on the podcast the past few years. anyways, it's just bringing on these incredible people. Who Challenge the? The belief of of what we all think is possible. These people that come on the show weaken and week out, and they share their incredible stories with you. They overcame something major in their life, or they did something that was never done before. They do the nearly impossible every single day, and they help out incredible people. They help them themselves in their own lives, and they change something incredible and. That's really what it's been about the past few years with the show it's been about. Bringing as many of these voices on. To show you, what is actually possible out there what you can do? What you can achieve. And, like most people will say that these things are impossible. Most people won't believe that these things can happen. Most People Wanna live in a bubble of sorts, and they only believe what they see on TV. What they see on you know mainstream media with someone authority figure has told them for the past twenty thirty forty years of their life. They've just buy into the mainstream advice and information out there and oftentimes that information is is very wrong. And it goes against what you and I as a listener of the show, and his the host of the show who have listened to all these people for the past I don't even know how many years have been doing this now like five or six years the podcast listening all these people for so many years now so many episodes two hundred and eighty three episodes. What we know to be true what we know to be possible. Bahir these people. We see the result even last week Medical Medium Anthony William. You go on his page like I talked about non episode. And the one before you see all these people week after we actually daily day after day numerous times a day. Sometimes, it's like almost around the clock. All these people who have made these incredible recovery's they've. They've come back from the most horrible debilitating chronic disease conditions imaginable that nobody else science and research and mainstream health and medicine has not been able to help these people with ever the track record. If you stack these two up, you have mainstream research in medicine, and then you have Anthony William and the people that have followed his programs in his protocols, and again I'm one of those people. I'll share that moment exactly what I did exactly what I was facing to. But you stack up all his results against that of anyone in mainstream media medicine any doctors out there mainstream in even you know some of the other people, the functional medicine guys, which some of them are great, but you know some of them aren't, but you stack his results up with anybody else out there, and it just pales in comparison. The guy is literally changing so many people's lives healing so many people from the worst billeting conditions imaginable. Everything you can think of I wouldn't even go down the list, but every condition I talk about it in that episode over and over. There's so many different things in there, but. It just kind of and he gets his information from a spirit of all things spirit that talks them speaks to him. He calls it the spirit of compassion i. hear that from the outside. You'd think this guy's bat shit crazy. You think this guy's just another Kucan. You know he's another Charlotte and trying to make money. You know the psychic guy who's just trying to make money by saying a much shit and going online and having a blog, and all this other stuff like that's what you would immediately think if you heard this on, say you know any one of the mainstream media outlets out there? They bring this guy on the kind of trying to make them look like a fool and. You know they. They bash his name the trash him. Any but most people hear this, and they hit oh this guy information from a spirit of a higher source like what the hell does that even mean like a ghost talks to him like God talks, and so like you immediately want to thank you. Want you want to be skeptical and think that this guy is just full of Shit. But then you actually dig deeper into his stuff and like I said you look at his results, you see the videos you see the before and after pictures you see all these testimonies, these people writing paragraphs and paragraphs in paragraphs of their incredible healing stories, and you see it over and over and over again, and you actually look at his advice. When you look at his protocols, you look at the things. He's come up with and talks about every single day. Does all these facebook lives in these these not many interviews, but these facebook lives, and these instagram lies, and these stories and I mean he just talks about it with such a declaration of truth. And you see all the results over and over and over again and you look again. You look at his protocols and they work. They all make sense. This guy actually make sense what he's saying is legitimate. Even if you WanNa take the whole spirit side out of it, you don't want to believe in you. Know the spirit aspect of you. Don't WanNa believe that this guy has a source that talks to him this that we can't explain her. See or or even here ourselves. Take that element of it just look at his actual protocols and this guy's healing. People with his with his protocols is heavy metal detox is celery juice all this stuff that he comes up without a nowhere because no one else has ever come up with a, he doesn't have any CY. CITATIONS, our research or Journals, Eddie reads he just comes up with it. Basically, what looks like out of thin air? But it's from what he says a source. That toxin was spirit. And it's incredible these things we'd look at on the surface and we think ordinarily, or we would have thought before say listening to the show for the past few years that these guys are are fucking crazy. That cannot be possible that it doesn't exist like these guys just full of Shit, but then you look at the real results you look at. That's what the study that's. What the real studies are you look at the case? Studies those are the that's the real proof right there. The results from these thousands and thousands and thousands of people. That's the real case studies. That's the things that really matter is the things that are changing people, not just putting some. Numbers on a chart and mixing around some data and calm something this and you know theories and all that other shit, the real shit. The real shit that works is the shit that causes the results. The proof is in the results. The proof is in the. Approved as in the case, studies have all these people and try it yourself. That's why sent out one hundred books. You guys because I want you guys to try it out yourself and see. How much it heals, your life healed mine in..

facebook Anthony William Kucan Charlotte Eddie
A Caregiving Communication Tool

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:54 min | 7 months ago

A Caregiving Communication Tool

"With me today is. On The doll. Screwed up I told him I'd screwed. In the all there you go. I did it, and he is working on an APP called memories. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me, so tell me a little bit about your APP doesn't tiny bit and then. The motivation behind it because that's always the interesting part to. Sure so memories is a mobile application that we built for families, experiencing dementia really meant to support caregivers, and those living with the disease with actively tracking event reminders and a Chat Bot for companionship that's us on a high level and the motivation for this is my grandfather. He lives with dementia in about ten other chronic diseases and myself and my mother have been caregivers for him for the entirety of our lives so far, and he definitely needed support when it came to understanding whether he was able to complete his meds, or make it to his appointments or not. He lives independently, and we didn't have that visibility unless we were able to call him and get a hold them. Through experiences post my undergraduate degree I had the opportunity to work in the tax base, and understand the capability of software for this population, especially with my GRANDPA and mind, and has led me to think about a solution like memories. Awesome? So! How long has your grandfather had dementia? He's been living with dementia for I would say around eight years. Yeah. He started with early cognitive impairments when I was younger out as like the diagnosis, but I think as things have progressed with him. It's become more and more clear. And the diagnosis came from physician and sort of made a lot more sense and. Sometimes getting diagnose takes time especially because they can hide it or they. The medical profession thinks it's. It's something else depression or you said he's got other chronic illnesses, so it could be something. Related to. A medicine that's like overdosed which that doesn't sound quite right, but improperly dosed might be better turn. So. How did you will tell me about the APP? What is it you know? Let's get into the nitty gritty of how it works, and what does. Tour. Uh so there's I think an easy way to model is just for visualization is like the Uber App. Where there is a writer side and the driver's side feeding into the same back end. It's a very similar model for us where there is a caregiver interface where I'm you have the opportunity to input the meds that you're taking any events whether that's. As appointments or things that they need to do in the day, and you put that in set the frequency, and those push notifications get sent to your loved one throat today once the activities are completed or missed. You get an notification on your phone, and you have the ability to see the reporting twenty four seven understand what's happening, and in case you miss your loved one or you'd like to connect with them. You can share photos with or call them directly through the application. And for those living with dementia or who we identifies receivers, they interact with the mobile APP on their phone. That's run by our chat bought Iris Login name, and she is basically meant to be a companion for the individual which will send notifications. Thirty minutes before the event fifteen minutes before at the time of the event as well as in case, it was missed. Just understand if the event was completed, or if they need any support as I mentioned that information gets sent to the caregiver, and at throughout the day as well, will check and ask how you're left on doing and prompt conversation while we'd love to do is understand how their feelings that we do have a mood reporting system. If they are feeling happy, we ask further as what. What made you feel happy? Is this something that we can continue to prompt for you? Maybe talking about one specific memory or an activity in your day we are trying to pull that information. Make personalized recommendations, and if there's any flags in your day whether you're feeling sad or lonely, we try to recommend either calling your loved one looking at the photos that were shared, or we share funny images or Jeff's to try to provide some support and this information also get shared with the caregiver so. What we're really trying to do is to create as much transparency between both caregiver and ver- whether your age. Your loved one his aging in place at home with you or if they're in a facility living elsewhere. And this is our core model of our application in over the next couple of months. What we love to do is get some feedback from caregivers themselves and develop features that make the most sense for them are. That's increased reporting and a better way to interact with those living with dementia, because we understand that a mobile application isn't the best way for this population of course, but we would love to be informed by them, and by their caregivers and essentially use our technology as their platform for change.

Jeff Writer
Improving the Restaurant Industry with Voice Technology with Derrick Johnson, CEO of Encounter AI

Inside VOICE

07:26 min | 8 months ago

Improving the Restaurant Industry with Voice Technology with Derrick Johnson, CEO of Encounter AI

"Today my guess is Derek Johnson the founder of encounter a. I welcome Derek. Thanks for being here thanks Kurt. Thanks for having me now. You've been working in the tech space for a while now. Where did your interest in voice technology coming? Yes so I've always been technologies being exposed to computers barely early. You know. And so in brochure from uncle sweat computers on various electronics. And then you know Bacne Day. We had the service call America Online and so like every time you log onto the platform. You regretted with this verbiage. You have male riding so that forced me to understand the voice possible with computers our from a technical standpoint. It wasn't conversational. Aix Time but it did for shadow will be right and so you know today. We reached a tipping point. Where it's actually possible to deliver those faces. And so I wanted to explore a lot of ideas about adult time and now was the top. So and your company encounter. Ai Is voiced technology for the restaurant industry. And I WANNA I start off by saying congratulations to you on choosing niche and really trying to dominate in that area. Can you tell us about the idea for encounter a and how it came about and what it does definitely so from career perspective. I had stints. Companies like Disney Spent some time at censure innovation labs plus I had some experience as an owner investor for the restaurant brand freshly right in numerous other regional restaurants and so I saw first hand the needs of the industry scale ability in operational perspective and I wanted to blend my data science and artificial intelligence background kind of with my love and passion for the restaurant and right in a second. It's a personal journey. No unfortunately I lost both of my parents at an early age to chronic disease right and so I decided the best way to of Transform. Health was to start at the source and one of the facts. Most people don't know as you know anywhere between thirty five to forty percent of the. Us population consumes dry food. Right and so that was our mark. How do we transform health? Kinda one of the highest impact points from their developing solution that enables contact with ordering across restaurant drive-thrus. In store kiosks. You don't have to touch the screen as well as tabletop solutions that you see you know largest sit down brands like chilies etc right. So you know what the core our platform collaboratively helps ordering associates. Meaning that they get off meant and helping then route. The customer take the order and even accept payment right plus we have kind of what we call the consumer magic. Where if you a repeat customer you know we can do various things around offering you up different preferences when that's no seasonality intentionally. You have allergies that you always wanted to take each incineration you know. And so the goal is to just give the customer a ubiquitous kind of digital enhanced customer experience that they're used to you know in their homes on their phones etc agreements to real life route right and so that was why I started. Ray I and that's what we're doing today and your company venture backed startup. Why did you Hughes to go that route? And what was the process like for you in getting funding? Yes Oh for most businesses you know. Oftentimes they're tied to brick and mortar. They're tied to physical space right and so four. Assassins business such as ours. You know traditionally that's been the domain by friends and family of comes from those type of networks or venture capital right and so for us. We took the venture capital route because we wanted to move fast and we also wanted to see customer expectations right and so that meant that one from a capital perspective we needed it right within to having networks of individuals who built world class and coach changing products with the intent that they can help us right and so the process was that we apply for venture capital via concept called celebrate right and that's where essentially investors provide capital plus wraparound services to prepare a startup founders on kind of best practices of being one a startup company but then to complement their teams. Where appropriate such that they have the scale and velocity necessary to be success? And I love if you could share with us. The experience so far from a user perspective and a business perspective in using encounter a I if you can share with us any stats or stories. That'd be great. Yuck so when you look at the restaurant industry like you know you have your large companies that are billion dollar corporations. You have your smaller mom and pop diners and cafes writing. We wanted to ensure that we had a solution work for both in our early implementation. You know from a technical perspective. We saw thirty percent improvement on speed in near human level accuracy across regional accents dialects and slaying right. And what that meant is you know often exempt as we say as you know at Burger King for example you know. The proper name of their salads. Is the rapper sound right? I don't think anyone in the history of bordering has ever said that right and so is being able to take a technology apply it to different sectors and have an exprienced customers really want you know one restaurant owner in a college town. This restaurant was right off of the expressive writing. So what was that for breakfast? You know there was a peak in demand right for lunch a peak and demand right for dinner picking the man but throughout the day largely there wasn't enough volume for him to have more than a skeleton writers. So with our technology you know breaking in an augment that owning associates such one person but now seamlessly to restaurant drive rights and so that meant that gave the owner of fighting chance to eat doors open when he was looking to shutting down and furthermore allow customer associate in the store the feel like he or she also had help and transformed how our technology has been applied and also change a lot of as and you know when you were sending me some of the videos. Some of the information on your company you had talked about when you're using this kind of AI. For restaurants not only obviously that saving time it saving money for businesses as far as they don't need to hire as many people to help with this sort of thing but you also said that more people feel comfortable to talk to an Ai. Order something then they do a person which when sometimes they're ordering more than they would so that you're actually having the restaurant see a higher level of revenue coming correct and often times. Talk to you know without college. You know if you want a lot of food and you're talking to a person sometimes you have that emotional lens right. Where like you don't want to appear but generally gladness or you don't WanNa pay that you ordering more than you should be right talking to. A virtual assistant or conversational is assistant. You don't have that we'll see higher ticket sales but also you know coming up selling respective items that potentially liked the cheap potentially no aware of also right so for example for me. I love chocolate shakes strikes with that means you know bite though from brand to brand with our technology even though the ordering dissociate doesn't know and love chocolate shades potentially our grand solution does right and so we can offer. That upset me agnostic Brian across multiple brands and that often leads to higher ticketing box. That's amazing so you're saying you could go if somebody if there were multiple restaurants using your A. Let's say you went to local mom and pop shop. You went to Chili's you Ansa Burger King that. If they were all using your they would know that you as the user love chocolate shakes and be able to offer. Hey did you know we have this here if he wanted it? Absolutely that's amazing. I love that that is exactly how signal and a I should work so I think that's really great.

Derek Johnson Kurt United States Burger King Bacne Day America Online AI Disney Founder Ansa Burger King Virtual Assistant Hughes RAY Brian Chili Exprienced
How COVID-19 Shines A Light On Our Broken Food System with Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:50 min | 9 months ago

How COVID-19 Shines A Light On Our Broken Food System with Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian

"We want to talk today about what seems to be unrelated to Cova Nineteen which is an infectious disease but it's diet and chronic disease and you wrote an article with the former secretary of agriculture. Dan Glickman that was posted on. Cnn entitled Can Diet Flatten the curve for covert nineteen and it's sort of like How does that even make sense? So we've heard all about these ideas of fighting. The curb was social dissing handwashing washing and contact tracing an isolation testing but your article presented a very different view about how we can use food and nutrition and specific nutrients to actually help us address. This pandemic so. Can you tell us why you wrote this article and why this is more important than ever to address these issues? Yeah I think markets really clear that that to those of US following this crisis that cove nineteen has really laid bare these incredible challenges. These incredible disparities is incredible unreasonable aspects of our food system. Are there so many ways that that covered nineteen influenced student? Nutrition and nutrition Kobe. Nineteen back up at at all. Just go through quickly and we can go about each of them so you know. One is immunity the actual immune response to Cova and then you actually the blunting of the excessive inflammatory response to cove. We can talk about nutrition and actually the immune response to is is hunger and food insecurity which of course 'cause incredible human suffering with this economic shutdown lost wages at schools being closed but also we know from long clinical experience malnourishment further predispose people to infection. So that's the site and that doesn't mean and that doesn't mean skinny and wasted away could be that your nutrient deficient which is really common in America. Absolutely absolutely. There's one call hidden hunger. People look like they're getting food but there's hidden hunger because they're not getting the right the right nutrients and what's paradoxical is the most obese are often the most nutrient deficient when you look at their numbers. Right it's kind of interesting. Yeah and then. These other aspects of Kobe crucial to to you know of just quickly mention our third. The incredible intersections supply chains and food. Waste and getting food to people we. We don't really have a national food system even global food system. We have this fractured supply chain. That's now becomes you know very very dire And then I think one of the one of the most important things for really thinking about covert long term. Because this is going to be with us for for some time. Many ears is the incredible relationship between for Metabolic Health Diabetes Hypertension Heart Disease Obesity and poor outcomes with Cova. The the latest analysis from New York which has had the most cases in in the United States showed that with each of those conditions diabetes hypertension of city. There is about two or three full higher risk two to three times higher risk of hospitals. And if you put those three things together lots of people have diabetes hypertension and obesity. There be sixteen fold higher risk of hospitalization. And so it's very it's very plausible. And we're modeling this now. It's very plausible. That you know. If we had a metabolic healthy population job it would be much much less severe. And so you know thinking about nutrition and immune response malnourishment and hunger and food insecurity disparities very high rates and african-americans very likely related to nutrition in a major way the challenges to food systems and supply chains food waste and then metabolic health. You know these are all things that that you and I and others who study food at about that that food nutrition or a dire challenge and an incredible opportunity to improve the health of the population but Kobe. Nineteenth really liked taking a you know a knife and slice down dessert that was hiding immediate objects and so you know if five years from now we're back to where we were a couple years ago and there's no improvement in our food system quality of the food the way we get it to people in science that we have to address questions. I would be just devastated. I would be so disappointed that we haven't realized the opportunity here to fix the food system. So filming in the straight. What you're saying is that if you have chronic diseases and multiple chronic diseases that your risk of being hospitalized sixteen times higher that if you're metabolical unhealthy more likely to get sick because your immune system isn't working and then only twelve percent of us are actually healthy so that means if we actually had a healthy population that was eating a diet that created metabolic health instead of the opposite. Which we're doing now that this may just be a bad flu and we wouldn't have full hospitals in a society that shutdown and trillions of dollars in economic losses. All the evidence supports that you know. Of course we can't do a randomized trial and wave a wand and make everybody know about healthy to test that but all the evidence suggests that you know as you said. I'm based on national data. Only twelve percent of adults in this country are metabolic Healthy that's just taking things like waste. Your Conference Blood Glucose blood pressure cholesterol. It just measure those things. Only twelve percent of adults or metabolic be healthy and most of those people in their twenties right. You haven't yet really had a lifetime of for die in for lifestyle. And so the vast vast majority of American adults over forty are metabolic late unhealthy and given these associations you know as I mentioned even just one of these risk factors. You're doubling or tripling the risk of hospitals ation and you start piling up together In terms of risk of death is in so few debts especially under age. Seventy unless there's at least one of these other conditions. Yeah and so. It's very plausible. That if we had a very healthy population you know. Instead of a twelve percent medically healthy. We had twelve percent metabolic the unhealthy. What if nine of were metaphor healthy then in nineteen would be a far far less severe disease? Many many fewer hospitalizations fewer deaths. We wouldn't be shutting down the economy we wouldn't have. These hospitals overloaded our healthcare providers but insulted dangerous petit and working chefs on an and. What's really important here is that we can actually fix this now in real time. And so you know. It doesn't take years and years and years to reverse diabetes or to reverse hypertension or Reverse for metabolic health. Yeah does take years and years to change. Wait for many people but metabolic health. Whatever your weight. We can pretty rapidly improving. Edibala cal over months sometimes even shorter. But so yeah so the country. In addition to the things that we're doing social distancing and testing we should be launching a national campaign to improve the way we move and eat to improve our metabolic health

Cova Dan Glickman CNN Hypertension Kobe Secretary America United States New York FLU
"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:25 min | 10 months ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Look I think the science is going to continue to evolve the exact mechanism by which these fast carbs wreck have it. Is it the fact that they are so predigested? The go down on your woosh That ARE EATING RATE. increases Is it because they have a carrier of fat sugar in salt as the fact that they rapidly absorbed the fact? One hundred percent of those calories get absorbed higher up in the GI track. Never get down to the microbiome. Is it the fact that Gop One is not secreted? As much is G I P Hormones and therefore we don't have the society Is it is it. The various Insulin mechanisms is it. The brain reward mechanisms. We leave that to the science that will be sorted out in much more detail Over the next number of years and just because we don't have the exact mechanism doesn't mean that we don't know the culprit to pasture cat reduce or eliminate fast carbs From the Diet. And we can change America's health. I mean it a way. It seems almost too simple. But I think you're actually right. Which is if everybody just focused in on this one principal that it's starch and sugar fast carbs as you call them that are driving this global epidemic of chronic disease. That's burdening our healthcare system. I mean the fact is today. We're seeing the consequence of having a very sick population in America. That people who get sick or die from Cova nineteen are often who are overweight or have a chronic disease is caused by these alter processed foods such as heart disease diabetes and so forth and If you're obese. You're three almost three times likely to die from Cova nineteen so now's the time not to succumb to the hyper palatable foods and to comfort yourself with junk food but to actually take the time that we have at home to start cooking real whole foods and get off this fast car. Mary around. That's making us all sake and fast. I think you've said it very well. Well Dr Kessler is a real pleasure to talk to you..

chronic disease Cova America Dr Kessler Gop principal
"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

15:01 min | 10 months ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"I'm Dr Mark Hyman and that's pharmacy with an F. A. Place for conversation that matters and if you care about was happening to chronic disease in America today to the incredible struggle of people have with weight to the challenges of our food supply. And how we got here. You'RE GONNA love this conversation because it's with one of my idols. Dr David Kessler. Who's a physician Was a commissioner of the US. Food and Drug Administration are both presidents George H W Bush and Bill Clinton. He's the author of a number of books including a question of intent and the end of overeating which was a New York Times bestseller and was very influential in my understanding of the hyper. Palatability of foods in the way foods designed to be addictive. He's a pediatrician. He's been the dean of medical schools at Yale and the University of California San Francisco. He's a graduate of Amherst college where my sister went but I think he went there little earlier than her and he also got a law degree from the University Chicago Law School and graduate from Harvard Medical School so he's he's been a longtime a mentor and even though I've never met him I followed his work. I've inspired by him and how he really calls out some of the challenges of what's happening with our food supply in his new book fast carbs slow carbs. The simple truth about food weight and disease is out now available everywhere. You get your books on Amazon. Or your local bookstores. Oh I imagine those might not be open today in the age of Kovic. So welcome Dr Kessler for having me a pleasure to be with you thanks for the kind introduction. Of course well you're an icon in this field for me. I think you you've been able to call out things which I think most people in your position Haven't and you've had the courage to tell the truth about what's really happening in our food supply And and you've witnessed throughout your career. And I certainly have your older than I am. The incredible explosion of obesity and heart disease and diabetes and chronic disease and it's staggering and when I graduated from medical school actually when I was born the obesity rate in this country in nineteen sixty was five percent when I graduate medical school. Nineteen eighty-seven there wasn't a single state that had obesity rate over twenty percent and now most are forty percent and the average obesity rate in America's forty two percent so How how did this happen? And how how did our government and the food industry create this National Health Crisis? I think you've hit the nail on the on the head when you look at the data the fact that is only twelve point. Two percent of us are metabolic health and that means that some eighty seven percent of us. Don't meet big sick. Medical Guidelines for Weight Blood Glucose Lipids Blood Pressure Our bodies are in essence in metabolic. Chaos and I think when you really dig deep you find that for most of us the bile biochemical processes that convert what we eat and drink into energy. That is the real culprit. They put our bodies into metabolic chaos. So what you just said. I have to stop. Because it's sort of staggering twelve percent of Americans are metaphorically healthy. That's insane I mean how. How how how does this happen? How do we? How do we go from you? Know when I remember growing up in the sixties and seventies there wasn't there wasn't this problem I I look at pictures of Woodstock. I saw this movie with Aretha Franklin called Amazing Grace which was in an African American church in Oakland. Nineteen seventy and like no one was overweight. I mean it just staggering serve. Wait I think is it. The center certainly carrying around excess energy as much as I'd like to reassure people that you could be healthy at any weight. The fact is as we age that excess energy. That weight is a problematic. Certainly I've struggled over my lifetime. I've gained in Lost Body Weight Multiple Times. I have sued Senate resides. You know I think the question is. How did we get here? And if you look at government guidelines go back to the McGovern committee you know in the nineteen seventies who focused initially hunger and then on obesity. And if you look at those guidelines in the guidelines that came out are in the seventies and then in Eytan even the guidelines That came out in nineteen ninety. Indy fact is they were to reduce fat intake reduced saturated fat intake to limit simple sugars but then they had this long line that said increased complex carbohydrates and so the concern was heart disease in in fat and we can talk about that but the fact is that those government policies said increase carbohydrate consumption. And if you look at the bottom of the food pyramid was there is fruits and vegetables. But there's also grains well. It's what's what was at the bottom of the Food Pyramid right six to eleven servings of bread rice serum pasta for a healthy diet which is stunning. When you look back at it so let me give you a food label. What let me give you. You know the nutrition facts panel on oil processed food. Your your listeners. Know that we worked on that and develop that in the Nineteen Ninety S. Let me describe A food labelling. Tell me what you think. The food is so single. Serving feeling is a trick question. Okay here's here's what's on that label. So it has three hundred calories per serving. It has zero fat zero percent total fat zero percent saturated fat and you look under total sugar. It's sugar zero percent. Has SOME SALT in? It has some protein in the vast majority of the of the product. The total carbohydrates safe thirty percent. Right no fat. No sugar meets all the the guidance right. What do you think that food is? Give me a guess a Bagel. You got it you get the prize. I was just guessing you that is the label on a baby so badly and it's total carbohydrates thirty percent right and Jiro fat zero sugar so you go that bagels. Good me see see. The thing is people get confused because most doctors still talk about complex carbs and even nutritious talking about complex cars but you point out that it's not so clear as complex or simple that much more complicated and has to do with fast versus slow cards exactly. That's why I call. I was thinking of calling the book. Metabolic chaos but most people probably wouldn't understand what I was specifically referring to so the key is first. Let's discuss. What are fast cars so fast? Carbs include sugar of course but it includes starch. And what's in that bangle that Bagel is all starch and over the past half century Americans and the world have having greatly increased their average intake fast carbs. Let let me go back. Two Hundred Years. You go down to Mount Vernon you look in George Washington's home you look at the ceiling in the main room you you look at what's carved on that ceiling and you see that it's Sheaves of wheat yeah Washington when he wrote to Raf yet two hundred years ago said he had hoped America would come to granary to the oil these fertile grasslands the soil it was ideal for growing grains And and we built this infrastructure so we did become the greenery for the world. But let's just go into. Let's look at that stalk of wheat right so you go up that stalk of weeds and at the top you have the week bury the colonel and you know going back to biology when you look at that Colonel. It has outer layers. I it has The brand it has the germ the embryo At the base. But that the real gold is the energy endo sperm the starch. I and so you have these layers around that we colonel barriers and is about four or five barriers. And if you look under the electron microscope you look very closely at starch granules. You will see how the starch is tightly packed main end really a encompassed within these outer shells and in fact no doubt you know in order to eat that we bury you have to. You have to take out the outer outer shells. But I didn't fully understand was the effects of food processing so yeah is the grain mill but then it goes into your multiple different processing techniques. One be call called extrusion cooking. And you then take that that we that starch granules that intact starch granules and you subjected to intense heat and intense shear forces so that these stars have that they're intact structure of that natural grain pummeled out of it. So and what that extrusion cooking does it takes a that week that starch and it makes it into different shapes different solids and into thousands of different products route the supermarket aisle. But the fact is that starch mean that package food that'd be asked is it has been so pummeled and so dispersed and so destroyed that structure that starch is in essence pre digested so that that starts when you eat these processed carbohydrates what. I call call fast. Carbs is that altered structure of processed. Food makes it rapidly absorbed a GI tract. And no one ever asked certainly in medical school. No one ever asked what is what are the consequences of flooding. Our bodies constantly with this rapidly absorbable glucose because that's the result of of the starch. And we never ask that. When I was in med school I thought you know the GI track was a two. We now know that there are different. Hormones is different sensors in different parts of the GI track and by processing in eating these clues into getting rapidly absorbed. You know we're we're stimulating certain hormones and not others insolent right on the GOP. You're exactly right. The early Hormones are the ones that stimulate insulin but the food doesn't even get down to the lower. Gi Tracts who doesn't stimulate hormones such as the GOP. Hormones that give you society and fullness and it never gets down to the microbiome and it just never nutrition. Anyone really asked. What are the consequences of destroying the structure of food taking all this starts making it into this rapidly? Absorbable glucose and flooding bodies with it. And I think we're seeing the consequence. Yeah for sure you know. What's interesting is on George Washington sealing. The week that was on there was probably quite different in in its ability to provide one nourishment to have less starch to probably have way more nutrient density and when you look at the the Wheat. We're eating now is quite different. You Know Norman. Borlaug DEVELOPED DWARF WHEAT. Which is a great advance in producing a drought and and weather resistant. Crop that produce large amounts of starch in the Grand Yuan and from what I've learned has high levels of something called amyloid Pectin a which is a super starch. And so it. It wasn't intended to actually drive diabetes obesity but that was the unintended consequence. And it actually When you look at the glycemic index of bread it's actually higher than Table Sugar. So we think Oh. Bread is a complex. Carb and sugar is a simple carb but in fact the complex carb is worse for your blood sugar than the simple carbon. Most people don't realize that that Bagel than we talked about that Bagel. Which is starch has. The can raise blood glucose the equivalent of sugar in that.

Food and Drug Administration America George Washington obesity Dr David Kessler Bagel Amazon Dr Mark Hyman US Nineteen Ninety GOP commissioner Amherst college Harvard Medical School New York Times
Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

HIT Like a Girl

06:51 min | 10 months ago

Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

"My Name Is Katie. Adamson and I am Vice President of Health Partnerships in policy at the YMCA The USA. I have been at the Y. For fifteen years that I've been in the space for thirty so old I am about prevention and at the Y. We're about community health and so a bit different from the conference. I think I'm a bit of an outlier in terms of that. But that's kind of exciting. So I started my career out working for elected officials and so the first one was Pat Schroeder from Colorado and she stealth helped start the congressional women's caucus and children's caucus and she was one of the first graduates of Harvard law school too. She was a super big innovator in women's rights and I also got to work for a member of parliament and Ireland row when I was yeah when I was there. He brought the whole government down for itchy rights again so it was kind of neat to see the parliament go down because he felt like everyone should get access to HIV care and treatment. Ap Don't mind my asking. When is this like right out of college? He was right out of college. Okay now. They're probably more progressive in the United States. Went back then. They weren't that guy that I worked for a very desmond. He introduced contraception into Ireland around the pope. While that kind of tells you he was a real meek guy I was lucky to work for him and then came back and went back to pat. Schroeder's Office. I had been an intern for her. And I said I still want to work on the hill. Can you help me find a job in so Bernie? Sanders had just been elected so when I worked for him. Nobody who was now. Everybody knows who he is. And Bernie's known a lot more. His super super liberal left issues but he was a huge and continues to be a huge advocate for prevention and that the system is skewed and needs to be right-sized towards bigger investment in prevention. So that really influenced me a lot and for him. I worked on those issues primarily and we introduced legislation to establish national cancer registry in this country so that we you know we have more baseball statistics about guys in the world series than we do about women who got breast cancer and so the idea was if you could really kind of capture when people were diagnosed how they were diagnosed that public health could intervene catch it earlier do better screening referral. Things like that so we were able to pass. That legislation helped him get reelected helped him work with Republicans which he had to do in order to get reelected so I was doing a lot of work at the time for him to increase funding for prevention and so the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. You know we're the only federal agency outside of Washington and we don't have anyone to help us. Educate the hill about what we do. Would you come work for us so took us about me about a year to get that job? But then I gotta go down to the Centers for Disease Control and help them come up and educate members of Congress about what the problems were and how big of an issue diabetes and cancer arthritis and all these issues were for the nation and how we needed to be doing more and building more programs in communities and that was an incredible experience for me. I came back and I work for some law firms as I was A nonprofit lobbyists basically so it was a law firm for profit. But I I worked for twenty nonprofits and I had to get all of them federal money. Wow so it's very hard. That's a huge responsibility was back in the earmark days and those are really good earmarks. I worked for Christopher and Dana. Reeve when they were alive. Superman and Dino's goal was that no one would ever have to make more than one phone call after a family member had become paralyzed because she was in a privileged position. She had all the access to anything. You could need in in terms of getting help for Chris. It took her like twenty six phone calls to get just a few things answered and so we built this entire center to help people living with paralysis. Get ACCESS TO CARE and information. Our Son had an issue so I've actually reached out to the Christopher Dana Reeve's foundation in having left the hospital after six months day with something that turned their lives upside down there just tremendous. Aren't they incredible? They really are and ours was not an interest spinal cord injury issue. It was non interested central nervous system but the people over there are just a pleasure to work with. I'm so glad to hear that because I was a long time ago so I'm so glad there's still doing three. Oh yes I was lucky enough to also work for Queen Noor of Jordan. Tell us more cues one of our clients and she and her husband when he was alive did so much to get rid of landmines in Jordan. And she helped takeover after. Diana died so she took over and ran the landmines survivor network and they'd won the Nobel Peace Prize with a group of others. Trying to get land mines out of the ground but they also started a landmine survivor. Peer Support Network around the world and so when they start this peer support network around the world. They helped landmines fibers. Get jobs and be able to survive as a lot of people few lose a lamb in another country. You're completely ostracized because you're not value to your family anymore. So long story short one of my clients was Ymca. When I was working at the law firm for just six months and I was about ready to get married and have a family and I needed to slow down because it was a really busy work so I came to the YMCA. And I've been there for fifteen years and so when I came to the YMCA. It was a really good time because the why was looking at trying to take the network of twenty seven hundred wise in the country and ten thousand communities we reach and drive the ship in the direction of prevention and control of chronic disease. And we've done this a few times in our history before during World War One and World War Two. We won the Nobel Peace Prize for our work during wartime a lot of people. Don't know that you know that. Yeah we were on the ground helping prisoners of war sadly were giving him some cigarettes and some donuts but back then we didn't have the science and that was part of what we did but we did a lot of social support the why was also on the Japanese internment camps providing health and well being in recreation so really got a lot of history in this country for things we've done and collectively tried to respond to community crisis a needs later when women were going back to work and we had latchkey kid problems. Why became one of the leading provider childcare? So the why was looking at it. It's makeup and saying we have challenge here. We are hello being organization we wake up everyday thing about spirit mind and body for all and we're losing the war here and if we're not part of the solution part of the problem so how do we get everybody moving in the same direction so that was kind of when I got to be hired and so it was Super Fun. Time to start helping our wise be connected to the innovators and so we worked with Folks like the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and we taught wise. How do plan do study? Act Really How to evaluate your work how to change the building so people felt welcome when they came in so they didn't see this gym equipment Or get a tour of the why they saw coffee and people sitting down and talking

Christopher Dana Reeve Centers For Disease Control An Pat Schroeder Ireland Parliament Bernie Vice President Of Health Partn Harvard Law School Colorado Adamson Breast Cancer United States Queen Noor Washington Intern Sanders Institute For Healthcare Impro
"chronic disease" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"And they're reported back to them in a color coded format so green gene would indicate a healthy range and red would indicate a problem that needs something done about it. We link these stats to a curriculum. The the curriculum helps the individual learn about their health condition. Whatever it is whatever. The chronic illnesses the also worked with a health coach to learn. Aren't self management skills skills that have helped him prevent complications of illness. In order for the coach to be successful they have have to be able to gain the trust of the individual that they're working with. We tested this application in in clinics where the health coaches were medical assistance and in a large urban church where the health coaches volunteers from the health ministry. A year later a third of the participants were able to acquire three new self management skills and maintain them to the extent that it was able to improve their blood pressures was there blood sugars and their exercise. Now what was simple yet fascinating to us. Was that the group from the church. Did just as well or even better than the group that we're on the purely medical care and we wanted to learn why that was so. We looked a little further other into the research. Four hundred hours of recorded conversation and what we learned was that the coaches from the church did have more time trying to spend with the patients they had access to the patients families and so they could figure out what people needed and provide those resources for them. My my team and I call this culturally conquering coaching to illustrate this concept of Culturally Congress coaching. I WanNa tell you about one of our patients. I'll call her or Miss Bertha. So Miss Bertha's an eighty three year old lady with diabetes and hypertension. She was assigned to end her health coach in the Church and also happen to be a family from his birther for many years and they were fellow congregants observed after the first few visits that even though Miss Bertha faithfully recorded her stats. They were all showing up is red so she proved a little deeper to try to understand what was going on with Ms Bertha and Biz breath. They gave her the real real. She told her that there were times when her medications have made her feel weird and she wouldn't take them the way they prescribe because she thought it was due to the medicines but she didn't tell her doctor that she also skipped out on. Some doctor appointments the variety of reasons but one of them was. She wasn't doing better and she didn't WanNa make her doctor mad so she just didn't go so and talk to Ms Bertha and asked her to bring her daughter in for the next visit which she did and Adad visit and was able to print out a log of all these stats. Ms Bertha had. I've been collecting gave them to encourage them to go see the doctor together which they did with that information. The doctor was able to make changes to Miss Bertha's treatment. I don't like within three months. Ms Bertha's numbers. Were all in the green now. No one was more excited or surprised. Ms Bertha herself now and Dan was successful as a health coach because she cared enough to go below the surface and probe Ms Bertha's deep culture and was able to reach her at that level. She knew how to listen and she knew how to ask the right questions to get to what was needed. We all have deep unconscious rules that drive the way we make our health decisions. That's our culture. The relationship and the conversation between annonymous Bertha illustrates. What's possible level when we have conversations with our patients our friends and our neighbors on a deep cultural level and personally ambience excited to you. Think that with this simple concept of Culturally Congo and coaching. We could change the lives of one hundred and twenty five million. Americans and many others across the world that are living living with chronic diseases and Kim..

Miss Bertha Ms Bertha Congo Congress Kim Adad Dan
"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"The piece of the puzzle together. Yeah you know we we In Regular Madison listen. We are trained to create an exclusive history. In other words. Someone comes in with a symptom. Let's say they have heartburn or reflects chest pain we don't want to know anything else about got them except about that all these about that. We don't know if they have a rash. Are there fingernails cracked eggs is there. But it's like don't talk to Amira any of that because that's not relevant and in functional medicine all of it's relevant because it's a clue that could give you a clue to what's actually happening for that patient nations and that's what's so beautiful about this process you know. I think I used to work in the emergency room. I think you did too is boring boring because I'm like okay. It's the heart attack treatment. It's the asthma treatment. It's a kidney stones protocol. It's like it's like us. Look at the nurse okay. They don't they know what the order are. They know what to do to write it down and it's like it's like wrote and boring. It's IT'S A. It's a formula like a recipe right in functional medicine. There is no recipe actually having a think every time you see a patient right right and In being trained in traditional medicine and also in a functional medicine approach is definitely. You know when you're having a heart attack you know I wanna from belichick absolutely I would surge Iraq I want. I want you to follow the protocol that has been shown to work but for chronic conditions. You know acute care medicine. which is basically the scalpel or the prescription? Pat Are probably the more toxic things that you can have a lot of what I see in in in in my patients here is I after Janika imperfect all right which which basically doctor that basically means the doctor did it right. So the the patient comes in and they're on a whole laundry list of medications and these are interacting you know the Proton on pump inhibitors are causing house. Can the acid blockers they're they're causing calcium deficiency mineral deficiency B twelve deficiency. So there's there's these. These drugs have their risk benefit and the less drug use in medicine. The better off the patience. Yeah it's hard because that's what we know how to do what we're we're trying to do yes like we don't have people with food as medicine. We don't know how to restore gut from a messed up gut to a healthy gut. And that's really what we do in functional medicine and I also important thing that it's important for physicians out there who are new to functional mess and also for patients is to realize these things don't happen overnight it can take time but usually sometimes you. You can see a difference in in days to weeks. Sometimes it could take months and sometimes it takes years. It depends depends on what's going on so true I mean I is. It's like it's almost miraculous and you go like it's hard to believe. Remember when I first started practicing I was like Oh okay do these things take this. Eat this and then they'd call back a few weeks later. You know months later on Mike how you doing. I'm I'm all better Mike. What better from that because it was? It was such a contradiction to everything I learned but then I started to trust it and I started to expect it and I just just remember this one patient. She had PSORIATIC arthritis. which is a horrible condition? Where you're you've got psoriasis? But your joints are being deformed insz destroyed. You're in pain all the time. But she had a bunch of other stuff which quote was unrelated. She had depression. She had insomnia. She was overweight. She had terrible reflux heartburn and she was having bloating and and CBO irritable bowel and. I'm like okay. Well let's see she's inflamed. Everything is she's got is inflamed. The weight of flame depressions and inflammation in the brain. Her Gut symptoms are about inflammation in the gut. Everything's related to inflammation so what why don't we just start simple and clear out things that are causing potential inflammation so we got rid of gluten daring to die and sugar and starch processed food. We got her Gut cleaned up. I gave her an antibiotic in any fungal and a little gut program a couple of nutrients to help her fights him some inflammation that she was suffering from and six weeks later she came back. Her Psoriasis Goner. Thrice was gone. Her reflects an era vows. Goner Depression was gone. She lost twenty pounds on my and she got off where medications even the one that was costing fifty grand a year to suppress your immune system from this rises and it seems like a you know. Seems like a miracle but it really isn't when you follow this methodology and as we've been doing here for decades practicing functional medicine the Berkshire in the middle of our. Yeah it's pretty amazing. Well it's really interesting because most of the patients who have psoriasis are gonNA see dermatologists and most are metallised. Do not have a clue about the microbiome nor they test you thinking about it right and then if they get psoriasis and they developed PSORIATIC arthritis which is arthritis in addition to the skin condition. Because I always tell. Patients is the skin is contiguous with the GUT. So if I draw a line on the skin and I keep drawing a line and go down my tongue and I go into my softest down on my stomach and intestine. I'm still in the same surface. Yeah so oftentimes you know this mark mark. That's true I thought of that. Yeah it's kind of a cool thought. That's how explanations so the skin is contiguous with the gut incidental dermal tissue and when their skin issues think gut. It's really a tube to outside your body. You're yes it's true. I mean when I'm patient. PSORIASIS ECZEMA Acne Rosa. I treat their gut yup and I don't put stuff all over their face or on their body exactly suppress the inflammation. I get rid of that and it's like a it's really a miracle is dermatology is not something that I'm an expert in although I was trained as a family doctrine. Dermatology apology. But I feel like it's we get the most amazing results just for something as simple as fixing the guide and changing the Diet absolutely exactly. Yeah the body's is is interconnected complex self-healing Organism were. That's the big thing is. I often ask patients I mean. Do you think you're going to get better. And and if I have a patient who thinks they're going to get better than together. We're going to get better. But if I have patient doesn't think they're going to get better than I try to get them to change their mindset because somebody even though he comes to me they really almost believe. I'm not going to get better. Well that's what they've been taught exact live with us the executive to manage your disease and I wanna marriage and the and the body's ability to self heal is amazing as you as you know as markets really amazing There's an intelligence agents in the body that we have you know as much as we know about the body. There's a lot more that we don't know More I practiced medicine. I think the more humble I become executive ever how little I know. It's complex it is. It's really really complex. But but there's so much that we can do for patients that you know they've gone to you. Know the Mayo Oakland. They've gone to mass general. They gone to you know X Y and Z everywhere else. And the you know as you say the resort medicine come here for last resort. I mean I literally. He just walked from a my office here. After seeing a patient who went to the Mayo Clinic who had chronic dizziness chronic constipation fatigue insomnia all these different symptoms that ah they couldn't find quote anything wrong with him and I'm like well I know what's wrong with you. You got this this and this and this based on looking at it through the Functional Medicine Lens Yeah Well and the the other thing is is you know I think I think it was Sid Baker who made the analogy or maybe it was Jeff Land. Is that you know if you have a diamond. It's a it's a dark street near you. Lose your dime over there in the street lights over here and you're looking under the streetlight. Which is where you're testing? So most of the testing's basically looking where the dime isn't. Yeah all right so the testing that we do here which is a traditional metabolic toxic. Genomic testing is is spreading out the searchlight to find that absolutely. That's such a key point because you go to the doctor and they say well we've tested everything and all your results are normal And the implication is it's all in your head but I would say I don't agree with that because you know other things are true when the patients crazy or the doctors missing something and I'm going to bet on the doctors missing something. Yeah because when we start to look we all sorts of stuff in places that nobody's looked before because they're looking under the street lamp instead of wax where the problem really exactly. Yes exactly right. Would you alluded to before was really important. which is that functional? Medicine is about getting rid of the things that impair health and putting the things that helped the body thrive and then the body can take over and this amazing intelligence can repair and heal from all sorts of things are totally. Yeah and that's what we do. So what do you know one of the complaints. We see a lot is fatigue. Not Everybody's tired and and In Functional Medicine we talk a lot about something called the mighty conju which you're really an expert in and it's something that is really the one of the keys to solving many problems and puzzles in chronic disease. Whether it's Parkinson's or Alzheimer's or diabetes diabetes or Agassi fatigue issues so forth FIBROMYALGIA. Tell us about what are these Mitochondria. How do we look at them? And in what do we do about it. Okay so for for those who don't know about my to Conrail I it really. It's it's another area of mind that is is really a fascinating sort of interest of mine. So armee Qendra are actually ancient bacteria Z.. poop bacteria you're in the same track absolute right so so well one track mind right and I'll never forget I went to uh-huh lecture by Jeff Land and he was talking about how antibiotics which are designed to kill bacteria can oftentimes effect might o'connor because Armata counter which of the power plants have. Our bodies are actually way back. When were ancient bacteria that became engulfed ourselves in our now the power plants and they have different? DNA If totally totally different day in fact the Lynn Margulis who was murdered? Carl Sagan I had the opportunity to meet her and have lunch with her. And Yeah It was it was amazing for those. She's an icon in the world of biology. Yes I describe this whole phenomena. Yes exactly so she is right there in the sixties not everyone was studying the the nuclear DNA which is the double helix DNA. And she's she meant observation. There's DNA in the cell in a circular form. And she goes. What does that mean? We're that come from so she's and she was actually What do you call a protest? She studied small Ancient Bacteria and she realized realized that DNA reminded her of the ancient Bacteria and then she came up to the apotheosis that eukaryotic cells which the cells that we have actually way back when those those little bacteria came sort of created a symbiotic relationship. Where you scratch my back? I'll scratch your back. Yeah and that's really. You know how we have a medical Andrea and Monte conner are so important in this I always tell patients is that you take cyanide. You'll die in a matter of minutes. The reason for that is cyanide. Flip the switch on your monarch Andrea earns him off turns out that yeah basically. That's what happens when you die. You have no energy anymore. It's out out and lights are out and yet. There's varying forms of lights out with might have conjured really common whether it's autism or finding now Alzheimer's Parkinson's right and the interesting thing about it is. There's a there's a thing called the bottleneck theory of Motoko Andrew. which is that before? You're gone so mighty controversial these little tiny things inside your cells or can be hundreds of thousands of them and they basically take oxygen that you breathe and the food that you eat and they burn them like an engine and outside and outcomes energy which is what runs your body audie in the form of. At delete so. That's what has to happen every day. Every minute for you to run every chemical reaction your body to run everything. You're doing everything. And when that process gets bunged up you get get sick exactly That's very well put exactly you get especially the highly metabolic the tissues so things like the brain things are heart are the highly dense motto Qendra Andrea and then the other thing that which is is new on the medical world is Brown fat. So Brown fat is a highly packed with minor. Kondracke when you look at under a microscope interscope it. Actually Looks Brown and Brown fat type of fat.

GUT psoriasis Alzheimer Qendra Andrea Functional Medicine Lens Jeff Land mineral deficiency Amira asthma Mike Iraq Mayo Clinic Brown PSORIATIC arthritis. belichick Lynn Margulis Carl Sagan
"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

13:48 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Hyman I think you're gonNA love them as much as I do. I'm proud to have them as a sponsor and be an investor in their company. All right. Let's get back to the episode. Welcome Doctors Pharmacy. I'm Dr Mark Hyman and that's pharmaceutical. FFA ARE MAC y place conversations that matter and if you struggled with of any chronic illness this is the conversation to listen to. Because it's with one of the leading experts in the world on how to deal with chronic disease. Which is my colleague here at the Ultra Center? Dr Toddler Subpoena Todd. And I go way back in fact todd knew about functional medicine before I even heard about it way back again ranch in one thousand nine hundred nineties. That's right nineteen nineties year old but we look young and he was way ahead of the curve and he still is. He's still really one of the most brilliant brilliant minds and functional medicine he teaches everywhere. He's a certified by the Institute for Functional Medicine in Functional Medicine Obviously He worked with me Kenya ranch for ten ears. And now he's worked here for a decade at the Ultra Wellness Center and collectively. We have literally probably five decades worth of experience and functional medicine in between the two of US seeing so many thousands of patients who struggled for so long with so many issues when they finally get here they find there's a new way of thinking about Disease and it gives them an opportunity to actually get healthy again and we're just so grateful Ella. Have you heard the ultra wellness center and do the work we do. You really help work on some of the most US leading edge concepts in medicine around by detoxification systemic inflammation GI health biology of mood and cognitive orders. He's given lectures all all around the world and H Management Conferences and American College For the Aspen of medicine. He's Todd Miami Integrated Medicine Conference CR- Apollo and he's in the side of reviser board designs for health and consults with diagnostic solutions lab. And he's very active. He's skis kayaks hikes. campsie golf's he loves the BERKSHIRES. And Yeah he's just been extraordinary addition to our center so welcome Dr Todd Levin thank you mark thank you okay so You start off your career Working as a resident at a VA hospital. Yes and that's the best learning learning experience ever. You're pretty much everything everything and you get to do everything exactly even there. Well I have and I had this patient. WHO has problem that? gives a lot of insight into functional medicine which is called the paddock encephalopathy. which in English means that? When in your liver fails you can't detoxify and all your normal metabolic toxins makes you delirious and can even put you in a coma and gives you all these brain in symptoms? So what happened when you treated him with the typical treatment it tells us that is because it's kind of an unusual treatment for a brain problem biting right exactly exactly so yes so the story is I was a resident and I was you know wet. Find Yours and I the patient the V. A. and a lot of patients the awesome have alcohol tobacco abuse and he had liver failure and he came in in a coma with Paddock's by the way just to decide their it used used to be the most common source of liver. Failure was alcohol. Yeah now it's sugar yup right Russia's a big reason for liver transplants. I makes going rationale. Yeah so anyway so he comes in it completely. mccomb you could stick a pin on me would move and So we worked up and I had to learn about what about Because they didn't know what it was and so we treated him and you know I found out that it was related to his liver not being able to detoxify any. He also had a high protein meal intake in the protein gets digested by the GUT. Bacteria in all the blood from the liver goes are all the blood from the GUT has to get filtered through deliver deliver Beagle before it goes into the systemic circulation. So what we did with him as we basically treated him with a nothing by mouth We gave him Antibiotics nobody Alex have believed was neomycin. And you stop feeding the backup. Yeah we just we just missing the top exactly so we just we. We basically cleaned out the food for the bad bacteria in the gut. We sorta gave his gut arrest gave him antibiotics intravenously. Also give them laxatives specifically lactose at the time. If you've actually orally though don't you orally We actually we. I'm trying I might have been or it might have been early. It might be actually. It might have been orally right. It could very the only so we gave him lack and we also actually believe it or not gave him probiotics and within twenty four hours. This guy was in a complete coma completely woke up just like the proverbial Lazarus and it was like it was amazing to me. I look at it and I'm saying that'll wake you up. That'll wake you up and I said you know this guy came you know woke up from the dead and I was like it actually left an indelible impression on my experience as a physician saying there is a huge connection between the gut and the brain and that's has led me on the quest that have gone on For All these years and seeing the connection how our internal ecosystem the microbiome and the food that we eat in the food that we feed the bugs affects our health in good ways or bad ways. Yeah so it's so true and I remember learning about the disease and I was like how come doctors don't connect the dots with the gut and everything gallison goes wrong in the body right because the treatment for this coma that's caused by liver. Failure is essentially giving. Antibiotics aren't absorbed. You kill all the bugs in the gut that are producing these toxins that make them crazy or make them in a coma so and then you give them a lot laxatives to make them poop everything out and that's just kind of a miracle happens right. It was a wake him exactly. And then led you to kind of understand the interconnectedness of every right and then when we see patients all the time a lot of patients come in was to say doc. I've got brain fog. That is low grade. You Know Palma Alma by this Zombie. Zombie here's what you're living day. You're walking around but you're not really there. Your brain is being affected by some of these chemicals and there's a lot of different chemicals that are produced by bacteria. Some of them are pure scene and cadaver rain cadaver in this. You know you don't a lot of cadaver unless record ever right right. Oh sound like terrible things. Pure seen cadaver in those are the toxic released from bad digestion. Right yeah and that will even one of the one of the compounds. It is that we measure now in the office office. Here is Tma Oh trimethyl. Ami Oxides is the same guy type of bacteria bacterial byproduct of metabolism of certain food products. So certain bacteria will eat certain foods and produce these compounds which have psychoactive properties or anti Xia Inflammatory Properties 'cause TMA OH is one of the risk factors actress for heart disease So what are the central ideas of functional medicine. Is you start with the gut. Yeah it's almost what you start with with anybody who's got anything which is kind of a weird the thing because he's like how can you just read everything with one thing but it actually is. A foundation of our health on our microbiome is out of balance. It leads to a whole host of problems right absolutely absolutely and in the big thing that that you know. I don't treat children with autism but the biggest thing I think that is affecting this country is the microbiome that were not inheriting ring from our mothers because what happens so often now is that when mothers go into the hospital. They're getting antibiotics beforehand. Half of them forty percent fifty percent are getting see section so we are destroying breastfeed. Don't breastfeed exactly never give me any kids. Anybody give antibiotics and vaccinations on day one. You know for hepatitis. A B and this microbiome that we have literally inherited from generation to generation. Because it's something that's really passed down from the mothers to the authors autres to the granddaughters is being lost in the law specifically of bifida bacterium in Fantas. It's actually been. I think it was in the New York Times that is talking about this loss of this was one of many beneficial bacteria that we are losing in as part of the human species and it's affecting our whole health so let let's like backup up a little bit and talk about this. Whole thing of the micro because we started with functional medicine? There wasn't the word microbiome but we still focused on normalizing the gut function. We talked about the four our program which is a restoration. Asian program for the GUT and how that can help so many different diseases. But what is the microbiome. Why is it important? What is it do? I mean we thought it was just poop and now now it's like basically the holy grail for figuring out. Yeah so it's it's gold is gold and actually you know in Brown goal is brown fat. Ha Ha so so so down in Boston You know so. The microbiome is the sum total of all the organisms that we have care around inside of us in that also can include a Viruses it can also include fungi and It's not necessarily call it good and bad but it depends on the situation because like for example all of us care around C. Difficile Bacteria C. difficile bacteria. When you take an antibiotic it will wipe out some of the good bacteria and then the bad guys if you will sort of start to over grow Oh and then they can produce toxins and died from it exactly exactly and the treatment of choice for that is if you have really bad case the treatment? The choice is a stool transplant. which is an organ transplant and The interesting thing is at one of the companies that does this is opened by him in Boston. I think you're aware of and they use For a freeze dried Stool and that is one of the Cures literally for A really messed up gut microbiome. Oh by on because if you're doing good pu pills now who pills at crap capsules craps. So I've never heard that. Ah Right and and so so and and what it is is my. I always make analogies because that's how patients understand and things it's sort of like you know the ecosystem of the microbiome inside the body is like a rainforest and at some point. Some people's ecosystems are so disturbed so messed up this like napalm hit your rainforest that's like a corn mono-crop yet and so you what you need to do is you need to repopulate the MIC. And we're GONNA get a little punchy our repopulate the microbiome and you can't do that just with probiotics that we use probiotics museum prebiotics and use those together. We Kulm Sin -biotics and those are oftentimes very helpful but for the really sick people who have things like Refractory C. Diff Stool transplant spun. Is the number one treatment. Yeah then shooting so you've got this whole ecosystem. Bacteria been disturbed by all these reasons. You talked about C.. Sections anybody accused used lack of breastfeeding and so on and our diet also plays a huge role in the growth of good or bad bacteria. So you can feed it certain things and it makes it worse things than it makes it better to talk about that. Yes so so. I always tell patients that when you're eating food you WANNA be choosing your food not just just for you. What you like your your things? That are pleasurable for you but you also want to be feeding the good bacteria we talked earlier about the Ackerman tsia missing affiliate. That's a specific bacteria bacteria that is in the body that you WANNA have on high levels and when we do the testing we can actually determine. Do you have high levels of it or do you have low levels or do you have. No levels are very low levels and there are certain foods which you can incorporate into your diet. Things like pomegranate and Baca and A case the case if I were cranberries cranberries and things like that. These are foods which are basically pre pre prebiotics. And when you incorporate them into your diet you it's like praying miracle grow and garden they they start to flourish. They start to take over and they help balance out the whole ecosystem. Yeah I think is one of the biggest advances in our thinking about probiotics. And that'll fix it. But you know you're forgiving like fifty billion a lot right but you have a true hundred trillion bacteria so it's like a drop in the ocean exactly and one of the begins. I was actually from an experience. I had last year where I developed Colitis so long story but I had been sick for mold and told that story and I had a recurrence Of My gut. Because I had the C. Diff and that was kind of really messed me up and I check my stool and had really levels of this ackerman. SIA which has been linked to autoimmune autoimmune disease billing to poor response to therapy for cancer it's billing two Cardi metabolic disease and diabetes. And I'm like WHOA. This is not good so so I started to research it and created cocktail of cranberry pomegranate. Green Tea Keisha fiber some products other products. And I took it and literally. Within three weeks I went from full blown cloudiness to completely normal perfect. Yeah and it was sort of a wakeup call for me. which was you can't just get probiotics? You've got a feed the whole inner garden and would have liked is certain foods and likes all polyphenols. Yes in the polyphenyls colorful dark rainbow colored chemicals that are or in plant foods. Yarn certain plants have more like the berries and so absolutely the polyphenols are our goal and that to me. I think that's actually probably one of the things that plays his role with the French. Paradox is the polyphenyls that are found in red wine. Yeah I think that's definitely what you're doing is you're actually feeding the Patients love me because the two things things that I always prescribe to my patients chocolate red wine and enter high wind drinking..

GUT coma Dr Todd Levin Institute for Functional Medic Dr Mark Hyman Disease Ultra Wellness Center US Ultra Center Dr Toddler Doctors Pharmacy Kenya golf Boston New York Times autoimmune disease C. Diff Stool metabolic disease
"chronic disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Patient or millions of dollars a year per patient. And if we look at certain Kartini therapies happy's. We're talking over a million dollars a year for single treatment and it's a single treatment solution. These are extremely expensive solutions and they offer unbelievable benefit. The people and I love at that suffering has been eliminated and I commend the scientists. That have made all those those amazing breakthroughs. My goal is for every single person on the planet to be able to afford this. My goal US forever single government on the planet to be able to afford this. The goal here is that we can. We can absolutely treat at scale for what is going to amount two dollars a dose so not hundreds of thousands of dollars a dose but dollars dose and. I believe that we can do this in a way that. That's what I mean by democratizing resing health. Every single person should have access to the best health. And I think that when you when you look at it it's immoral prerogative but something thing that we have to do and when I think about you know when my when my son asks me why does one person have two hundred thousand dollar car and another person lives on three hundred dollars a day and I say it's because we're liars and we're in the day tune it on I was Mark Aguirre and it's And because I was a real situation where this friend of ours was was we were in a in a very specific location and a friend was their average income was about about a dollar a day. And and their close friends bear had the the the brilliance of youth to ask he said Dad. Why is it that that you just I bought two thousand dollar? Ukulele lay and our friend lives on three hundred dollars a year. And I said because we're liars and hypocrite son and that's what it is you know we sit here and we say that everybody's equal and all people are equal all genders are equal. But you know what. There's a lot of people that are dying buying and suffering from chronic illness that are only suffering because of lack of access to the best medicine and to me my obligation Gatien to my my son and my daughter and everyone that I know is is to make that feeling of having having it really be for everyone a reality because I don't I don't WanNa see a differentiation and access to health health span based on income I wanNA see humankind and the power of humanity unleashed across socio-economic scales and across location Russian. And I want them all to be able to live. The best possible lives and you can only do that. When you're healthy stress makes people make bad decisions bad short-term decisions as has as individuals human beings but really bad decisions as leaders And even as societies and so just this this chronic stress thing is a problem album. And if you're not healthy you'll have chronic stress by definition it when you're sick you're stressed so I feel like we can make a lot better decisions in the world if we can solve some of this aging some of this healthcare problem and I'm also sort of tormented by the lack of accessibility in and superhuman the new book. I write about. Okay here's the cheap thing or free thing you can do now. Here's the very affordable thing that's going to move the needle for this one in metric of aging in. Here's what the crazy millionaires are are doing right now. That's GONNA come out there in the slope of the curve for what you're doing with united neuroscience. How fast is the cost GONNA drop so it goes from crazy millionaires? Who Start when it first comes out the gate? To average American is doing it to average Cambodian is doing it. Biotech is an interesting industry because a lot of times in order to access the overall market you have to partner with companies that are marketing and distribution oriented and that have a lot of infrastructure and a lot of countries so that you can access and distribute in in those partnerships. It's potentially you know out of my personal control. Exactly the way that the launch cycle happens I can how you that any products that we bring to market which is absolutely our goal and that we're marketing in that we're responsible for will be accessible civil to everyone when they're available period. There isn't that we don't we're not GONNA do the sliding scale where first millionaires and billionaires get the play and then we slide down the United States gets to play and then we slide down and Cambodia gets. That's not the game. The game here is that everybody gets to play. It's a fair. Playing field starts as a fair playing field. And and that's you know. Have you ever met a disease that said. I'm not going to get this rich guy. Diseases don't discriminate. It's totally and medicine. Can't discriminate the best thing that can can never happen. Is You have a billionaire. Who either their family member or they get some disease? Because they're like you. What all the yachts? What's and all the other cool stuff ahead? I thought mattered. None of it matters because I'm going to die and then they will directed their wealth to that Yup and using this with Google founders like. Oh we're at higher risk of Alzheimer's Let us draw a bill on that. It's pretty crazy. But one of the the benefits and there are many downsides adds to that almost stupid concentration of wealth. It's happening right now is that it is allowing people to to go after some of the causes of aging and diseases that would never get pharmaceutical company support because there's a business model. There's just a I'm going to die and I have a lot of resources so I'm just going to throw them all at it hundred not everything but the side impact on society of that kind of behavior might actually be really good because if you hack it for one person yeah might hack it for everybody. Well there's a person I admire a lot Mike Milkin okay and he created faster cures And I think he's a A real living example of of someone who did exactly that and and the end result has been Significant improvement for humanity. I I think that that. That's that's a real. It's a real thing. Yeah all right. I'm feeling more hopeful about what the future is going to look like in terms of aging chronic disease. And I think that you're on a good path breath for this stuff. What what's your number? How long are you gonNA live my final question for you given all this stuff you know you know? I love those questions. Listen I think about it all the time and my my I have two answers. One of them is. I'm GonNa live forever because we are the stuff of stars I love. That the reincarnation thing no I think that I don't even necessarily need to be reincarnated. I believe that we are energy and to energy we shall return learn so it's all the same and I think we're all connected and I really believe that. So that's the first answer now for a number because number is is a useful for metric. Yeah and and as soon as commercially available or if you just don't tell anyone you're going to be able to shoot yourself up with all sorts of custom stuff that knows about this is so true I I actually. I think that some form of immortality is absolutely on the on the the offing right. Now if you if you talk with with Peter Dimond as sore if you talk with with a lot of these other brilliant future thinkers these futurists in these in these innovators. The pace of innovation is so breakneck right now and the pace and generation and storage of information is so amazing that I believe that it least Dr Consciousness will survive whether or not that means that our physical bodies will be there. I'm unclear on. I think our physical bodies have every chance chance of living to one hundred fifty or two hundred years old and in this lifespan. I think that right now. This is the age of unlocking. I think it's the time where we have an opportunity to reverse aging. I think that we have an opportunity to actually and my friend Martin said this the other day Martine Roth plot. WHO's the CEO of United Therapeutic cortines? Great it's It's biotechnology is technology and I used to say we put the tech and biotech. They're very similar thoughts. The bottom line is that this is the revolution this is the innovation. This is the future this is the opportunity to really unlock health span. Health span is such a weasel word. Screw that noise what would you call it health span. It'd be healthy for as long as until I die now screw. That knows how to be healthy for way longer than and I'm supposed to live exactly it's been such a such a cop out. Oh No I don't think so for me what I mean is. I don't want to be a one hundred fifty and have Alzheimer's let me there. You Go. I wonder about fully functional but most people say health span. They're saying I don't think I can actually live longer so I just want to be healthy for as long as I live. Stop it values. We longer in be healthy the whole time and screw that noise. That's that's what I mean extending health span and extending lifespan so that the health span Mars the extended lifespan. So that what we're doing is we're I mean. Think about it. What would be worse than living to one hundred and eighty eighty and have an Alzheimer's for ninety years of it? Nothing so what I'd like to do is make sure that we live much longer and healthy. That's a a good deal Lewis United Neuroscience. Do you have your l.. Where can people go to find out more about what you do? WWW dot united neuroscience dot com. Did you just stated yourself who says. WWW in front of a url. Right now I don't know. Are you like one hundred. Seven was Adel. Maybe look how well the toll just giving you crap crap. Eric as if you just are saying Dave you just talked about vaccines and you didn't shut on them. Actually that is totally true. Because you know I'm not for or against vaccines I'm not against drugs. I'm not against liquid diets. I just like to know wet. Liquid diets made out of because the gasoline diet probably is a bad idea so like use your head us. You're thinking and ah protein is not good or bad for you fats. Good about for your water is not good or bad for you. An error is not good for you. It's all about the dose. The timing what's actually in there and that's how you control your biology gene and this is an example of the kind of cool stuff that's coming down the pipeline that is actually going to change the future in ways you even thought of. Hopefully you enjoy the show if you did leave review and if you don't have a copy of superhuman yet you WanNa know what's happening right now read superhuman it is literally the roadmap for a living longer than mother. Nature wants you to have a great day..

"chronic disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

11:45 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Because if they're not they have industry on and it makes them it's called boar taint and it makes the meat unpalatable to two male consumption. Basically because because only only men have adverse reaction to the industrial but it makes it inaudible So one of the things that we've been second my pigs aren't castrated. I have eight pigs. I mean we butcher them you know after probably they're less than a year old But but maybe that's why but the you can't tell the difference in a male female big on but if you let them grow tusks and mature than you have to cut out glands and do all sorts of weird stuff at and how to do Oh yes okay so but for commercial farming. You don't want you don't want bores to grow tusks input all their energy into that sub and it does create a stronger flavor especially if they're highly crowded and stressed which my aren't so which makes them better. I mean you're happy. Pigs are better able. It's actually unethical to crop pigs away. They do so i. I'm I'm not a fan of industrial as me but the idea that you could use antibiotics which will kill the planet if we keep doing it that way including lifezette say but just just antibiotic resistance is destroying our soil our waters ecosystems our gut bacteria. So if you can do a vaccine instead of heavy duty fifteen animals. Instead of heavy duty antibiotics I would choose the vaccine every time unless it means the meat does something where Human Immune Systems and he studies on that he has studied studied extensively in order to do any of these things particularly in feedstock Anything that's going to be consumed their extensive Tests around that in terms of the Eh the transmission of any toxins to to potential consumers or anyone who would eat it. And you do those in both animals and you also do And you the extensive testing around it. So you're you're giving huge quantities of these things that you make sure that they're safe in an effort back to your own use of your own company's products. Yeah so what I like about. That is that that gave us tremendous confidence in going after a broader group of targets. The reason I mentioned them pigs in the first place is because that was the first ever platform that was licensed against an endogenous target and humans or animals and the reason was that it was safe and it did the job and it did the job. In a way that was disruptive for farmers and disruptive disruptive for the pigs because one of the worst things to see. If you've ever been inside of a commercial farm is when they castrate the pigs. All the other pigs are biting them and letting them in in the wound. Zor are unbelievably detrimental to feed conversion ratio and the health the pig meaning that they don't add as much weight thereafter. 'cause they're stressed wait a minute. We all know as calories in calories out. Aw there could be no such thing as a feed conversion ratio. What are you talking about well? It's it's one of them things and the farmers are very specific about it now. Now that's the key metric and what I find. Humans are different because with US colors and colors that both every other animal different exactly humans for special. So if you listen to this going. What's Dave talking about like ranchers and farmers know damn well that if you feed certain drugs or do certain things animals they get fat on way less or way more calories humans the same way and anyone who tells you it's about count? Your calories is completely ignorant of biology there. All right keep going couldn't agree more. Yeah so so it's It's really an interesting time. I couldn't be happier. Be Alive right now when you when you wake up and you look at the level of innovation and change and promise An understanding that we have of the body and the fact that these things are becoming more and more clear. Now we're still looking through a fog right. Nothing's one hundred percent. Nobody we know everything about the body. Mysteries are unlocked on a daily basis. Thank you dave and one of the things that we're looking at is you know that's a future with with less suffering offering and that's a future where the greater health greater spent I'm totally downfall that stuff and I'm still fascinated with this idea. Now you gotTa tell me if you can't just tell me that if he's doing company stuff because you have you wanna get life insurance or there's some regulatory reasons I can't answer that question but otherwise you're going to have to tell me why you haven't used your your company's products on yourself. Well okay. I'll tell you truth. I have absolutely been adamant with my head of regulatory that I would like to okay. Okay one of the issues that I have is that it's a big responsibility to try to save or help or eliminate suffering for the entire planet as best. I can and one of the things I can't can't do as messed that up so I can't do anything that would lead to me not being able to help other people and so by me you at this at this exact moment That's the reason why I haven't strictly based on the regulatory reality but no no no well today hey they would be sneaky little sample out jab it in your ass art. Is it well. It would absolutely be that easy and not as something that I had threatened repeatedly with to my head of our now. We're getting somewhere and so so. That's exactly what I'm what I'm What the answer is? I'm absolutely willing and able to take this vaccine. In any of these drugs any of the products make their one hundred percent safe. Personally I'm one hundred percent behind it. There's nothing that I believe in more. And the reality of the regulatory thresholds and hurdles around that and allowing that to happen without a potential impact the FDA or the or any of the other regulatory bodies. That's the only risk that makes me a not want to do it is that I want to make sure that these people so everyone's turned that if it stage of the drug development. Thanks you go. And you used your own. Company's drugs eggs off label that regulatory agency within come in and say you didn't follow them appropriate. Investigatory things you weren't reser clinical trial exact. Why don't you just register yourself in when your clinical trials? So that's a great question and absolutely something that I've also pitched regulatory I've I've been pushing this really hard. If if you've ever talked to Lee shock he'll let election now and this is something that I that I am. I am adamantly on board with the issue which is amazing is that we have very specific criteria for these trials. So you have to be a certain age which I'm not you have to be You have to have a certain set of diagnostic backgrounds depending thing on it which I don't so it's very difficult because again I don't want to jeopardize what I'm doing. Get it could hurt billions of okay. So so you're you're first in online I am I am I. Will you commit that. When this is a commercial shipping shipping each of these commercials that you'll be the first person to inject and the commercial shipping does absolutely agnes legal? All right. That's a pretty big commitment. Okay I'm on I mean this is this. Is something where you know. We're not doing this for any other reason. Reason than to do our part and eliminating the areas that we think are the largest areas of human suffering. Now you have kids. I do too amazing kids. How old five and eight? They're going to get it Absolutely the depending on these absolutely they will Depending on their age and win it would be appropriate appropriate to utilize these these medicines. You know in other words where the risk factors come in. Yeah absolutely okay. I'm one hundred percent. Yeah what's the age that you think we should start using these signaling molecules for anti-aging. I think that preventing problems is easier than solving IMEN- men. I think that Einstein had a great quote around this. He said Smart People solve problems in geniuses prevent them. Unfortunately I'm not a genius but I still believe that. Our team is filled with geniuses. And I think that we can solve these problems and I think that we can solve them by prevention. Not by doing it. After the fact you know not by seeing how much damage can be done. I and so my answer is as early as possible and so for something like the PCs PCs canine treatment. You know it's my belief that those targets are things that in theory and after appropriate regulatory hurdles and everything else that would be necessary or things that can be administered extremely early if you look at Um there was a study that recently came out that showed that at the age of ten than the average American child is already showing signs of the hardening of their arteries so at the age of ten based on the typical diet diet in the West. Yummy children are seeing actual signs of Atherosclerosis. Hardening of these. You've clearly seen the kid's menu at most restaurants aunts. Jesus eight so unacceptable and my my son just two days ago said Daddy was the thing and they gave me the the menu all they God was like these weird chicken fried things. Everything's fried He said I. I'm not gonNA eat those because I know I don't feel good when he eat that. And so you said there was some fruit so I ate a piece of fruit and it's one of the bars. Believe calls him bars of his own choice. He could've eaten the fried stuff is like my tummy hurts when I eat. I don't want it but if you imagine what most kids are eating because you save two dollars at the restaurant No wonder they're doing that. But here's the concern. Let's say that that we go. This is great right and we inject ten million kids with the stuff. That's going to make them live longer. And then we start finding twenty years later that if they have the immune molecules created by your technology that increases. I'm making this up but increases the tumor risk or some other bad thing. Is there a counter agent to turn off that. Do make another of such a great question David so glad you asked that okay. So so. What's interesting about? This is the reason I say it's it's a long acting. Biologic is because it's reversible okay. This is super important if we if we screw it up we can unscrewed up okay. I didn't know what you're going to say to that. Yeah but what. What's the deal? There the body will screw it up by itself. How does that work so if you look at antibody levels In in our trials are Dr in our animal studies what we see is that people return towards baseline towards their normal level within a year. So you're going after safe if targets. You're going after targets that you aren't worried about safety associated with those targets and you return back to normal and ear so the the and sometimes faster actually and so the idea is that The the risk factor is is is unbelievably medicated indicated. Okay so it's going to sort of wear off after exactly yes. Have you stopped doing your quote booster shots when it happened all right. That's it touched talk to me about accessibility. So you're saying these are cheaper than the ineffective drugs like statins and blood pressure medications. Potentially that are just out there. All over the place How cheap is cheap? Like put on your your. What when they launch general price ranges? And where do you think it's going to be ten years from now. Yes so This isn't a promise by the way they haven't launched and I'm sure you have a lot of manufacturing stuff. Just Gimme ranges thoughts. Yeah this is the way that I think about it. If you look at the most cutting edge therapies in the world we're talking hundreds of thousands of dollars a year per.

"chronic disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

14:32 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Using this technology technology platform by unlocking the body's own power? You can democratize these drugs. That people can't get can't afford you know it's it's it's a matter of It's a matter of really helping doing our very best to eliminate this this little area of suffering I would say flat statins are bad for ninety nine percent of people who take them because they destroy mitochondrial function. Evidence is pretty clear there to the point that some of the drug companies have patents on putting cones Q.. Ten with the Statin statin drugs because they know it's causing harm but they don't actually sell that but it is patented so I've looked at this for years. STATINS are a bunch of garbage and people with low testosterone. Talk about at low quality of life. But when you're talking about as saying you're not going to give someone low cholesterol you're going to turn off the formation. These turned down the formation of certain types of this by having the immune system system do something absolutely game now people might say hold on that. That's a vaccine. But I'm GonNa tell you something weird that I've done that's gonNA drive people nuts. There's a form of allergy therapy in had allergies especially young. I saw some food allergies but I turned him down. Pretty dramatically some of the mold allergies and you guys remember something gross i. I know that you probably aren't medical. So there's a guy who figured figure this out about twenty years ago you can collect the immune signaling molecules from your urine after an exposure. So we've all heard of this This Indian thing where you drink your urine. I'm very familiar with. My father was a practice of that. Oh yeah no kidding. You had those antibodies. Are you a practiser of that. And it depends on the situation but yes I will admit I tried it. I read the book years ago. It was like all right anything that's going to make me performed better like I said if I could live on. Gravel exclude those beacons. They're eating vegetables. That's mean gravel by the way gravel doesn't work but neither neither does a Vegan Diet. Just be really clear But anyway if you you if you go down that that whole path I'm going to try this so I tried it and it was not as horrible as you think but certainly not pleasant at all didn't senior results so I found found the school that are chilled. It's better chilled. I found if I blended with ice. Okay I didn't ever do that. That's disgusting but what I did find out those. You can eat something. You're allergic a two or you're rolling. Cat dander whatever legit to wait for hours and collector urine. And it'll be full of I g molecules and then you take sterile darrelle sample and injected intramuscularly and when those proteins are injected intramuscularly. Your body's like there's a foreign protein in my muscle it's an invader later. Let me make antibodies to my own. Antibodies which is beautiful hack and you know what it actually works it reduced my sensitivity. And so I did this at a doctor's office and then like this is too much work so I ordered the little filters that you put on the Syringe And I just did it at home for awhile. Yes I self injected my own your head and how how is that all right. I haven't done the self injecting of the urine out yet. But I'm I'm now very interested. It's not too late to start so but this is just an example and I'm sharing this pro because it's like what the heck but also the idea of using your immune system to tell of your body to behave is something that is cool now. What you're doing though when you talk about vaccines K.? Teams have developed in negative rap. Absolutely Louis why. Why is this so vaccines term is misunderstood and categorized across a broad odd variety of things? No one has ever successfully vaccinated. There's no no single product in animal or man approved with the exception of our platform technology against an endogenous target indigenous. Meaning just its meaning already onboard. Something that the body generates versus them from outside it'd be like an infectious disease and those guys we call them exodus. These are big words that I have to use a lot. Yes otherwise these folks you know everybody. Everybody always wants them to be those because to yeah. It's those enemies outside or those enemies and the enemies inside. It's real hard to get the immune system to WANNA do this. And the reason is that by definition getting the body to attack things. Antibodies create. Antibodies against things inside by definition or theoretically in an unchecked manner. That is absolutely autoimmune response. That's the definition of an autoimmune response. So what you don't want is an autoimmune response that isn't directed towards something think toxic. So if you can create which we've been able to do successfully in in every patient that's been vaccinated if you can generate antibodies against hi Lee specific toxic targets. That are inside. You basically have made your own body a drug factory against the toxic forms of of proteins floating around in your body so you could conceivably say what. Here's what the anti thyroid Antibodies look like like people have Hashimoto's and you could then say body. Make antibodies for your anti thyroid. Antibodies and you could cancel out absolutely an autoimmune theory. Yes absolutely so. The the the technology platform you're working on could allow us to figure out what things are causing autumn unity and go through and selectively turn off out immunity ready to a bunch of things absolutely okay so that could be kind of cool because a huge number of the things that cause aging are tied to immunity because long term chronic inflammation nation will cause at least three of the seven pillars of aging that I talked about and superhuman and has a very good example brilliant brilliant link there. Because that's exactly exactly what's what one of the other Kind of areas of focus that we have are on certain targets hormone specifically that are related to exactly chronic inflammation inflammation and so if you can target certain interleukin receptors. We have a belief that you would be able to You would be able to actually fight. Elements of chronic chronic inflammation. If that was a mouthful there are certain inflammatory. Cytokines are compounds of inflammation that are created by eating bad fats by chronic inflammation chronic stress having bad bacteria in your gut making lipopolysaccharide. There's a long list of things lime disease. Toxic mold probably Lee some types of electromagnetic frequencies anytime there's inflammation there will be one of a handful of inflammatory compounds and I do a lot nutritionally with herbals else and fish oils all sorts of stuff to manage my inflammatory response because I have one hell of an inflammatory response because I have a history of autumn unity history of obesity sufferings. My family. I have genetic stuff's I set up for inflammatory failure and like I'm not going down that path so you're saying there may be day down the road where we can figure out witch inflammatory. CYTOKINES are the problems for me until my body. Could you stop that shit and it's actually going to be an injection or an oral supplement or something. I can take this going to do that. It would be an. Im injection and it would be one of the hallmarks of our long acting. Biologic platforms that You only really need to get these. I am injections once a year once every six months after the initial prime and boost on paradigm And so these are extremely convenient as convenient or more convenient than any flu vaccine And in the future and these are moderately near-term realities. What what I would like to see Is this is about distributing and democratizing health eighty percent of the people on the planet receive some form of an occupations Shinzo that have increased health span dramatically if you have an opportunity to think of that many people talking six point eight billion people if you can target all of those people with an existing infrastructure. That's as simple as a shot. You can really do. A huge which part of a limited in chronic illness and back to the specifics with with these cya clients is absolutely. You know what we're going to find is that certain people have have different levels of side responsible all their e true and when we do one of the great things about the long acting biologic platform is that we can combine targets and we can do it without cross reactivity meaning without harmful side effects or any consequences commune system or the body and we can have the body go after multiple targets that would be specific to issue with inflation or specific to lose issue with inflammation and I think that that specificity that personalization of of the paradigm I am of Medicine and health is is is an amazing thing to witness right now. Sent some big stuff democratization the future. Am I going to get like a free dose of assault or aluminum or any other real yummy advocates. With this kind of stuff you know the everyone uses a different agitate right and so that at the moment is for people who aren't atrovent is like the the extra stuff they shove it the thing so that it it mixes in terms like what I thought. That was the most fair. That was something that was more to trigger an immune response in excess of what the the compound would do. It's to be honest. It's both right so you're using both and but it's it's heavily utilized for for for the compounding purpose right okay. So so one of the realities of achievements is some of them absolutely agile fossils and example have been shown to increase in response and and they're very few however that are approved and so one of the things. That's that I think is actually necessary in the space and one of the things that we're working on as well is increasing the breadth of things is that are approved as advocates. Because I think that's going to be critical so that we can get past the agitators days into water and oil immerse emotions for example. So you're saying one of the problems is that you'd like to use things that might be safer but you're not allowed from a regulatory perspective. You have to follow up a very tight regulatory pathway in terms of what age of utilizing and which ones are approved. Otherwise you're actually getting an average of an approved first and then a drug that would be helpful K.. Just make the drug without the IT depends. I mean you can get a free vaccines of like I think I got a tetanus one awhile back actually got tennis released. Lockjaw you go to the hospital. They better give you the immunoglobulin things or you die sort of thing. Wow well that's that's that must have been tough on the podcast the joys of living on a farm and stepping on a rusty nail and then getting on an airplane or many. Oh my gosh how. How long does it take to happen? You know it took about four or five days and thought. Oh I'll just I. The nail didn't go in very far. I'll just wipe it with some iodine. I'm fine if I had more time. I would hit it with ozone which probably would have prevented the problem and then this little infected. In two days later I started getting the tingling and my wife was in the doctor's like you're going to the hospital calling them and telling them to fly the stuff ahead of time like this is actually wait another six hours you could die. Got Got a cut line even look healthy. Well I'm glad that I'm really glad that that worked out. I mean they did send in the the tetanus vaccine that didn't have the Senate because I have a history of of responsiveness to say history and I started a medical lab testing company company in the mid two thousand that was doing radioactive cell counting of white blood cell proliferation in response to different environmental toxicants. So you could actually actually test white blood cell proliferation. Response to methylmercury metallic Mercury Worth Amir assault and in my blood. We found that I responded very heavily from an immune immune perspective to that advent. Wow but it wasn't antibody mediated. It was something else so I just want him saying. I have some concerns about all the other crap. That's in vaccines. But I also really like that. You have telling my buddy. Hey I would like you to follow these immune rules and if we don't solve this problem and just get all the emotional reactivity on either side of that debate and just say look like how do we get a signal into the body that says. Hey eat up this thing that will kill you. It seems important. Or like I'm GonNa pull all the blood out the body and run it through this giant machine and Kalin iron lung in Web Nanno bots. That all seems like more work than just programming. The system better so I'm kind of excited about what you're doing but I I want to know you're not gonNA shoot some other stuff enemy that I don't really want. Yeah so the way that the way that we We we have designed this long acting. Biologic platform is that the so far. And you know you always gotta do You always have to think about the future but in every person that we've give us this platform. It's been unbelievably safe. How many people were talking about? So there's been over hundred people or right around one hundred people that have gone through different trials with us and one of the think of any of your own injections have you taken. Oh look there's no one answer so I can. I can tell you that that that we have used a US. This long acting Biologic Platform Against Dodge targets and pigs which are remarkably similar to humans and we don't delicious delicious. I Love Bacon and nothing's nothing's better than Bacon and and it's remarkable because what we've seen is that those five billion pigs vaccinated twenty five percent of the pigs in the whole world. Not Not we united neurosciences but humans those big one of our one of our WANNA a company that uses that is affiliated sister company that is is only for animals that uses this platform technology and and that company for example of his vaccinated over five billion pigs for what for L.. HR H. and for foot and mouth disease depending on on the incidence. Now what's interesting about. This is that there's been contrary to any safety concerns it's actually taken significant. -nificant percentage of market share from other companies. That were using what I would consider to be losing seizing antibiotics right. Yeah they're using. Well they use xenobiotics they use vaccines from from major pharmaceutical companies. They use a variety of things to maintain these these pigs in one of the things that that's an l.. Hr h you know that's an immuno castration. That's allowing your body to castrate itself. And the reason that we have to do that with pigs nobody knows about pigs but all male pigs are castrated castrated..

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"And you know it but it's not of course just about bodyweight it's sleep deprivation is is affects every system of our body and it's connected with every modern chronic disease that we know about and it has a particularly it's particularly important for kids in and we know that teenagers now are getting about two hours less sleep than they should be when we're starting to see a lot more attention on how electronic devices like smartphones are interfering with sleep and what the harmful effects of that are so you know with sleep it's it's the the number one the first thing is just how much are you getting you know how many hours you spending in bed for most people that should be seventy eight hours there's only a very small number of people who are outliers who can get by with little less or her need a little bit more but most people who think they're in that group aren't and they're just fooling themselves which is again unfortunate given how many things it's associated with but it's not just staying in bed like if you're in bed for seventy eight hours but you're sleeping with your phone next year head and you're waking up at two in the morning because your phone is beeping in somebody liked your picture on instagram that's going to have you know that's not quality sleep that's gonna lead to fragmented sleep in it's it's going to cause problems even the even if you're not checking things throughout the night each the small amount of light it's emitted from a phone is enough to interfere with melatonin production and cause a lot of health problems in that's particularly true for kids because their retinas are much more sensitive to light than adults are so you know that turns out there's a lot more to the sleep story than even just getting the right amount of sleep we have to make sure that we're getting high quality sleep in where we're getting.

melatonin seventy eight hours two hours
"chronic disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"chronic disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Chronic disease and that we have good evidence based treatment including medication assisted treatment available for individuals with a warm hand off right from the overdose we can't have someone overdose and then send them out onto the streets at two am because they're going to run right back into the hands of the local drug dealer the national public health advisory was the first issued from the surgeon general's office in thirteen years the centers for disease control and prevention says opioids were involved in more than forty two thousand deaths in two thousand sixteen and that overdose deaths were five times higher that year the one thousand nine hundred nine and according to nih in two thousand sixteen west virginia have the highest rate of opioid related deaths in the nation this hour president trump is making his fourth visit to the state since his election but not to talk about opioid abuses npr's san we're keith reports trump's attempting to sell the republican tax cut that was passed late last year president trump is set to lead a roundtable discussion with ceo's and employees of companies in west virginia that white house press secretary sarah sanders says have given raises or other benefits as a result of the tax law also participating in the round table will be families who have more money in their pockets as a result of this new law trump one west virginia in a landslide and the state's democratic senator joe manchin is up for reelection this year the tax cuts will be a big part of the gop pitched voters in congressional races all over the country but recent polls the tax law is still unpopular and the majority of americans don't know whether it has helped their bottom lines tamra keith.

Chronic disease trump ceo west virginia sarah sanders senator joe manchin gop nih president npr keith white house press secretary thirteen years