24 Burst results for "christos"

Interview With Ibrahim Moustafa, Author Of 'Count'

Best Comics Ever

04:43 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Ibrahim Moustafa, Author Of 'Count'

"Today i am joined by ibrahim mustafa the writer and artist of graphic novel. Count which is coming out from humanoids as you're listening to this. I'm gonna try to release it. The episode right about the time that the graphic novel is officially available in stores Ever thanks so much for joining today. I really appreciate you taking the time or we're going to count as well as some of your other works before we You know in here. I wanted to talk to you about Like how how did the inspiration for this particular graphic novel. It's an interesting. I found an interesting adaptation. Because it's it's very much your own work. It's very much yours. Despite having you know it's not it's not a literal county monte cristo adaptation right like it's you doing your take your riff on that on the themes of that in the ideas in that story What was the inspiration for that. And did you want to reference that source material. Yeah well i i you know. It's i appreciate you making that distinction. Because i think it does kind of get lost in the translation of the the pr materials thus far like an adaptation so people might think well. This doesn't have anything to do with the so i. This guy's name is totally different right. Inspired by may have been like the better tagline. In retrospect but yeah. I just i'm a big fan of revenge stories. And kinda christo is kind of the granddaddy of them. All and i was just kind of in a head space. I guess thinking about different stories. I enjoy think john waco just come out. And i've loved watching that and and and then i just thought well you know. Wouldn't it be cool if this story. Which is you know in the public domain and everyone is aware of it on some level. I think culturally. What if this took place in a different setting and had action and the original novel is very soap operatic. There's not a lot of. I mean there's really i think there's a sword drawn in the whole book and it's a twelve hundred page book right so i'll just wild. Yeah you definitely expect to be more. Yeah and the two thousand two film adaptation of it with jim caviezel and guy pearce definitely added a couple of sword fights a little bit more accurate to it and action is a big thing that i enjoy in media and so i thought i would try to play to my what i feel are my strengthen and really inject some of that into the story so from there i just sat out to to start crafting a pitch document i did in between worked for higher stuff's i would kinda take some time in the evening or a weekend on the rare occasions that actually got those and Would start chipping away character designs and just kind of building it in my head and then once i was able to pitch it to humanoids and they said okay. We like this. We wanna see more before we give it a yes or no That gave me an opportunity to really. Just start kinda down. On the details of it. In really kind of hone it into what it became. Cool cool no. that makes a lot of sense You you've mentioned in. I've listened to some other years including the one you did on the humorless podcast with marc weighed in the team. There you mentioned Wishbone like the terror as a as a touch base. So those was because that's definitely was my introduction to a lot of classic literature as well. I think kind of my christos funny in that regard in that. I like you said i think everyone has familiarity with it. But the percentage of people that maybe have actually read the alexandre dumas is probably pretty low. I know in my case definitely was like it was one that i actually impact for this interview. I was like like check out the audiobook. Like listen to it on a few runs. I've never even though. I feel like another story. I've never actually experienced it. Which would geographic than i didn't have. I didn't have the burden or those expectations of you know somebody who's like. Oh it. does this do the original justice. which is freeing i think. Potentially you know it's it's interesting because there are a lot of adaptations that we don't even realize adaptations of it right Old boy is kinda count of monte cristo. Style at guys put in a prison. Eventually escapes takes event right right. It's it's been done in various mediums. I think in ways that really transform it And i and i was actually thinking about it. It would be interesting to see what would have happened if we didn't say anything about the kind of monte cristo You know and just kind of put it out there to see people. But i felt like because i was paying a mosh to a lot of it and i was really taking the broad strokes of the original. It would have been like this kind of microsoft like so. It was necessary to kind of put that out there. That's what it was

Ibrahim Mustafa John Waco Christo Jim Caviezel Guy Pearce Alexandre Dumas Marc Microsoft
Porzingis helps Doncic-less Mavs to 87-78 win over Thunder

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Porzingis helps Doncic-less Mavs to 87-78 win over Thunder

"Christos forcing his had nineteen points and thirteen rebounds for the Mavericks in an eighty seven seventy eight stifling of the thunder don't force anything who I know will get on the ball is going to come back to me yeah and then it just just keep planning on some easy shots easy easy once came to me and us I shot them for what for us is important at the ball and and everybody feels involved Tim Hardaway junior also had nineteen points for the mavs who were without all star guard Luka di church due to a back issue coach Rick Carlisle said he expects Dodge each to play in Sunday's all star game in Atlanta J. gill just Alexander scored fifteen points for Oklahoma City which shot thirty three percent in its lowest scoring output this season I'm Dave Ferrie

Christos Mavericks Luka Di Church Thunder Tim Hardaway Mavs Rick Carlisle J. Gill Dodge Atlanta Alexander Oklahoma City Dave Ferrie
"christos" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

04:02 min | 5 months ago

"christos" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

"Does it if someone had an old security system yet pre identity or coming from another system or something like that there a way to migrate that security the the records in the database and whatnot over to an open. Id connect compatible system and maybe even hook it up with the azure active directory. And all that show for thinking about as radio obviously goes. This is the example here and there are ways to allow you to use. Api's that we provide you to do much migrating and we've done it for a lot of customers right. Nick come from active directory. On on prem never use is rabi to sink obsolete federation between the two systems clean slate we want all our our lawyers to be migrated to the cloud awesome. Let's do that. We have customers from competitors when they're they have anthony sixty five and azure and they already have free assery ready for a subscription like we'll pay for two systems help us migrate so there are lots of ways to help you migrated. Those can automate that. We can do the exports imports at without losing any information but there is a little bit of a change the mindset on obviously once you migrate get the data unitewd teens the front end and you also need to change your security requirements around these things because these kind of changes tend to follow things were migrating the cloud and we're taking all our apps with us. And what do we need to be aware of so suddenly leaves the nice comfort and security of your internet if you can call it secure. But let's assume that you have super duper network secured proper. Bring us security have enthused addiction that you want some the go the cloud where everything's my web apps are open. My database are open. They have public end points. What do i do. so there's There's not just the back end. But he also knew toward about how the front and needs to be secured whether it's an internet top or next up and allow people to actually from everywhere without compromising security. you're asking. These do have a system that we need to talk about. At at work we we created our own. Authentication system produce j. wbz's but we have you know all of our internal users and all of our external Users managed by the system. Right it has its own custom claims when he don't like we have to do the With the right the off provider At least on the server side we've had to write the off provider to pull the correct claims and populate the identity right And it would be so much simpler. If everything was because i eat like i'm trying to write blazer apps and with blazer it's super simple to point the authentication at open. Id connect in points however we don't have an open. Id in point organized. Id connect point. And i i was trying. I had the open. Id connect docs open..

Nick two systems Api anthony sixty five
"christos" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

03:06 min | 5 months ago

"christos" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

"So what are you working on now right now. Working developer advocate for microlending. Shall we have developer advocacy team within. Mexico will try to educate company's developer's a anyone in fact about identity and how they should dude rights and what they should avoid and why no one's want to make news for you know for the batteries that <hes>. We see company after company making the news every week identity is all about authorization and authentication than does that were looking to to say we know who you are and here are the things that you can do exactly. I mean there are a few facades when it comes to working with much of india especially with microsoft and if you're looking in the wider side of things like deploying code and running azure than there are somebody benefits about a one of the things we'd like to talk about as any platform language anywhere you want right you can do identity on. Aws with lambda and then still have or api's you can sit around <hes>. Google cloud and cubanacan the security using metro of the whole point is we don't want developers to write their own identity providers if they want to have their business about its valuated heart to get it right so what we try to advise people while we try to take people down the right pot as first and foremost avoid riding their own identity providers and secondly if they are going to use the provided the us hours over everybody else because added benefits. Let's say a company has written. There may be the company that i work for has our own a security authentication system. Sure is there. Is there a way to properly integrate. That with the identity system method is connected with dot net up. Yeah obsolete i mean as long as you have followed open. Id connecting all standards than this. Nothing helping you for pointing to our points and then authenticating guests azure ad or see so. Obviously we don't want people to report their old codes as long as it's all. Idc compliance than a simple <hes>. -cational pointing to new tenants setting up operated inside is radio b. c. and off you go but however if your code is ten years old obviously you're not compliant so there are that's somebody benefits in my migrating your code especially if you're dot net today since we've simplified all the boilerplate codes and we hit away the complexities but we want you to come you are we have a very nice slide usually with nirvana singing cameras you are and that's the slide because we don't want you to use our libraries don't want you to use our guidelines if you already have a connect complain libraries or if you want to use a community in one then you can integrate with no problem

john calloway london fifteen years ago john glasgow christos first job microsoft Smith today outlook halifa university Nash clayton hunt Two thousand clinton each sources crystal five
Educating Companies on Microsoft Identity with Christos Matskas

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

03:06 min | 5 months ago

Educating Companies on Microsoft Identity with Christos Matskas

"So what are you working on now right now. Working developer advocate for microlending. Shall we have developer advocacy team within. Mexico will try to educate company's developer's a anyone in fact about identity and how they should dude rights and what they should avoid and why no one's want to make news for you know for the batteries that We see company after company making the news every week identity is all about authorization and authentication than does that were looking to to say we know who you are and here are the things that you can do exactly. I mean there are a few facades when it comes to working with much of india especially with microsoft and if you're looking in the wider side of things like deploying code and running azure than there are somebody benefits about a one of the things we'd like to talk about as any platform language anywhere you want right you can do identity on. Aws with lambda and then still have or api's you can sit around Google cloud and cubanacan the security using metro of the whole point is we don't want developers to write their own identity providers if they want to have their business about its valuated heart to get it right so what we try to advise people while we try to take people down the right pot as first and foremost avoid riding their own identity providers and secondly if they are going to use the provided the us hours over everybody else because added benefits. Let's say a company has written. There may be the company that i work for has our own a security authentication system. Sure is there. Is there a way to properly integrate. That with the identity system method is connected with dot net up. Yeah obsolete i mean as long as you have followed open. Id connecting all standards than this. Nothing helping you for pointing to our points and then authenticating guests azure ad or see so. Obviously we don't want people to report their old codes as long as it's all. Idc compliance than a simple -cational pointing to new tenants setting up operated inside is radio b. c. and off you go but however if your code is ten years old obviously you're not compliant so there are that's somebody benefits in my migrating your code especially if you're dot net today since we've simplified all the boilerplate codes and we hit away the complexities but we want you to come you are we have a very nice slide usually with nirvana singing cameras you are and that's the slide because we don't want you to use our libraries don't want you to use our guidelines if you already have a connect complain libraries or if you want to use a community in one then you can integrate with no problem

Mexico Microsoft India Google IDC United States
"christos" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

04:24 min | 5 months ago

"christos" Discussed on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

"I'm john calloway. I'm clayton hunt and john. Nash with us today is crystal. Smith's is developer speaker writer and microsoft program manager for microsoft identity doing advocacy at scale. Welcome christos hey nice to be here for me so before we jump into the media things. Why don't you tell us how you got started in the industry and maybe what. You're working on these days while taking down that trip down memory lane right but i started fifteen years ago. Fresh halifa university Whenever you want to call it had just finished my master's degree in advanced computer networking and i was looking at my next step and daschle were pulled me back so i i degree wasn't sulfur engineering. And i thought myself know what it's get by with software. It was much did with networking. And if you've been in about everything is based centralized show companies would South light offices in each sources from their main office in london and glasgow. I wasn't thinking about moving. so eventually i I decide to go back and shelter and my first job. Was mike gatting a very old access. Much access system into a veto cnet's modern system. So i was very new. Two thousand five by clinton's lawyer was not super established and we we've found some third party components replicated outlook the whole outlook look and feel into the new system and were writing a module show where they can melges from access put them into a bb. It was it was a fun jolt to get my feet wet. I dot done a ton of mistakes seriously. When i look back. You're like we'll have a wholesale on all the failures of the my first job I even did some cold fusion just to see how body with. And then i left an. I found my next job. I into more serious for engineering. Did some desktop support as well and then into consultancy and then into microsoft. So what are you working on now right now. Working developer advocate for microlending. Shall we have developer advocacy team within..

john calloway london fifteen years ago john glasgow christos first job microsoft Smith today outlook halifa university Nash clayton hunt Two thousand clinton each sources crystal five
"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

07:17 min | 11 months ago

"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"It's a lie. We already recorded seventeen hundred because you know order is complicated while we had six guests coming on seventeen hundred and getting six people plus us onto scheduled thing not trivial. You know it's really funny as. It occurred to me that show seventeen hundred is the first one that we've really done is a livestream by ourselves. We did one through and DC. Of course, he's done a few things like that. But yeah. But this marks the beginning of live streaming dot net rock shows for our patrons patrons. Patrons Patriotic. Say their patrons on Patriae on. I. Think you're probably right that sounds good to me. So if you are not a patron on Patriae on, that's another reason to to chip off five bucks a month or whatever. You can to support us in these trying times I sound pitiful Enough Marietta in these trying times. Anyway. On Dot dot net rocks, dot com, and become a member and get to hang out with us live you. Yeah. It's definitely a sausage being made experience. Yeah. Because we don't we don't pay the plumbing they're working right we a we lease the recorded show that sounds great finish show but there's stuff that happens in between. Yeah. All right man let's get a role in with better no framework roll him. Well every time I. Think. I'm. Going dry on the better know framework department. I just go over to the APP Phoenix Slack Channel. In I see that guys like Joel Human Brian McKay and those guys have have posted. You know, hey, have you seen this and this came up Joel sent this in. It's a slack theme for Visual Studio Code Know. That much of a slack fan. The you want everything to be slack -I through just call it. The hipster theme is that what we should do. Slack. There you go. So it's individuals studio marketplace just search for slack theme and I'm sure you'll find it. That makes you happy. You know it's your it's your desktop. It's your editor environment like make it look however you want I've seen look at it screen shots here. Okay. Yeah. It really does look like. It really does. The thing that would drive me nuts though is I would know what Hap- is this take I mean at our age, you have to do a double take. Is this you not wrong about that just so many windows thing right? Like we were I'm starting to tailor my windows terminal for exactly that too I empower show. Or is this a bash? More. So true. Anyway that's what I got Richard. WHO's talking to us today grabbed a comment of show sixteen, Seventy six, which we did back in February of twenty twenty i. think we recorded in DC London so it was actually January you know back when the world existed. And this is show we did Christine's even talk about multi factor authentication and so the comet is from Gary Ray Kay who said I'm listening in and hearing about various factors with indication and at see is generally three categories with education the security world there's what you know passwords and pins what you have a ubt or smartcard phone. And what you are biometrics face ID Brits back kind of thing any combination of these can make it multi factor and I'm not sure about the other but I like Microsoft's. Later. It has two additional factors to my log in I know my password to log in and get prompted to cater second I have to have my phone which has authenticate or on it, and finally I use face ID to confirm that it's me. So with dot combination, you have all three factors of today's modern world. All. Right. Yeah. I go back and forth on the whole face ID thing thumbprints are necessarily better do my ub key though. Yeah in terms of giving something something physical to secure shelf with. I got one right here on my desk. As well. I haven't installed it yet though yeah, you know what it takes time to fuss around. By biggest thing that I do with you Mayo makes me the happiest is it secures last pass. Right right. So that may have pastor manager and you to have the house I have it set up properly with get hub to which is great. You know same thing it's easy to authenticate to get up protects those things but I haven't tried to do is tied into windows because either problems and be if you screw that up that machine is done. Thanks for playing. A little hesitancy. Yeah. So you know. You trade carefully, but I have gotten comfortable. Maybe he's and become a pretty good advocate of them well. Yeah. So Gary Thank you so much for your comedy copy of Kobe's on its way to you. If you'd like a copy music co by that comment on the website at Iraq's dot com or on the social media because we publish every show to facebook, and if you comment there and I really show. Copy. Music and definitely follow us on twitter. He's at rich Campbell. I'm at Carl, Franklin send us a tweet and as with everything timing is key. Okay you know at the secret to comedy is Richard What's the secret to have you ever asked? Have you ever asked me that you had asked me have we ever done that been on? Yes. Yes we have this. Timing. and. toasted. Carl Passi Carl Reiner one of the best comedians ever existed man. They're all. There are people that are funny and there are people that make other people. Funny. All right. A lot of people funny and that was his joke wasn't it? It was either his or Mel Brooks you know, I think it's it's him or Brooks, and of course, those two were inseparable right? That Steve Martin wrote a great piece about Carl. Reiner that that really got to me. You Know Win Steve. Martin. Says that's the funniest nicest guy ever meet is like okay ash. Can't argue with that there was a great photo that somebody showed of Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner and their spouses or family around with them. They're all wearing masks. And They had t shirts that said where a mask or something like. It's good through. Good good. All right. Well, let's get this party started I would like to introduce two very special guests, Christos Months Gus who has been on the show before and John Patrick Danielson or JP p.. So let me read his bio. JP has been building software for awhile in late two, thousand ten, he started working with Azure in quickly realized it's great potential for developers, his head, many exciting roles. But since joining Microsoft, he's had the privilege of working closely with many high profile customers and building some truly exciting solutions. JP currently works as a PM for the Microsoft Identity Advocacy Team?.

Carl Passi Carl Reiner Microsoft Patriae Mel Brooks Gary Ray Kay Richard What Joel Steve Martin Mayo editor twitter Hap rich Campbell London Christine facebook Iraq Christos Months
"christos" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

13:42 min | 1 year ago

"christos" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"What same back then. I don't think that now irreconcilable thing between sexuality and and religious five but I I am could fife into a political audiology Info and because of my family street was Mama moms families left wing Communist in grace so it was their eighth. If you like so I became a Communist. I mean I I you know in that serious white. I thought that this was GonNa Bring Nevada on earth and then in my early twenty s. I am traveling for Europe. Coming through grace and then decided to travel through. Eastern Europe because communism had just fallen off. This is an astonishing time to be in this part of world and invest time and in those conversations and in that true understanding of what horace had been enacted in the name of Communism and socialism. I just had the same abandoning of five. That happened when when I left God behind and I I wore as me. I mean dead. Europe was difficult to write because it is about trying to express. What would it be like to live in a world? That is completely abandoned five. Yeah Yeah and and of course as you say the speaks almost directly to to Damascus. Let's talk about the slap. It came out in two thousand and native shortlisted for the man Booker. It did incredibly well as we've talked about. It's been on television. I'm sure almost everyone's read it but if they haven't apparent at a barbecue in suburban Melbourne sucks a child. That isn't his this shock. There's outrage you hear the voices of the different characters but reveals what happens next and it really is about. I suppose what's happening. The undercurrents of of Australian Society Man. That had a huge impact in it. Surprising about this Lapham is that you know dead. Europe took me six seven years to write. It was a real effort and then I thought I'm just going to do something. That is fun for me as a writer. I mean that isn't a did think of it. I thought seriously. Because you know I've talked about this. This is where the slap emerges from right is my country. Australia is the richest that's ever is the most fortunate survey at the end of the ninety s and the early two thousands and it's also becoming the cruelest everybody and the most kind of in my lifetime. The most xenophobic menaul violent. Exactly and so for me. I wanted to explore that. What is the underside of this material? Success the other thing too is I was really conscious of this and this is an may as crystals chocolates. This is a conversation. I was having lots of friends whose heritage is on the Middle East this heritage West Africa. His heritage is Latin America. Southeast Asia there was particular generation a middle-class emerging that looked like us how spike luck us wasn't necessarily connected anymore to the Anglo Celtic history that had for a long time defined Australian letters and that that when I think back to riding the slept that really exciting to actually say to write about this class. That was merging. It's only with hindsight looking back clearly. I'm asking very similar question to what I'm asking in. Most of my work is how do you be good in this world and I think it was a really. I'm in politics. Throughout the globe. At the moment is such a treacherous experience but it was. It was quite ugly. The that period we went through Australia and and are going through and I think the slap is a morality tile about that. It's interesting because it's had the success and have been fortunate to go to different parts of the world and talk about it and I. I remember being in Scandinavian city and people were talking about it and then talking about what they were watching on television. And what and I just thought Almighty God. The middle class are the same throughout the glide right but watching the same things. We're reading the same things. The differences residing in working class and and your culture and I wanted to bring that into the discussion about Barracuda. Because that was your next book which was a. I want about sport but sports certainly had a big role in it. Well exactly and I was saying to you earlier as Zimbabwe. I can absolutely identify with that. And there. Is this kind of this macho culture in these kind of colonial societies. If you like where. If you're not good at sport you are nothing. That's right and it's funny. How that goes across the world I mean you you you just look at the histories of colonial states there savage. You know whether so in mine notion it's built on a lie that he's still existing about the fact that there was tearing Elias. You know which is a. It was built on a savage denial of sixty year old history and cultures and language soon. Racism right at the heart of the corneal experienced but at the same time it was a convict society there was violence in what happened to those people who were brought up from from the UK from Scotland. From from Arlen. What I had to enjoy. So of course is kind of violence inherent in the culture and it's expressed through particularly in masculinity from a real physicality sports becomes. He's obsessive in those places because that's one of the few arenas where you can kinda assume some power assume some some status and the other thing that was for a long time and I don't know if it's Simon in in Zimbabwe but a sense of cultural cringe a that's really for longtime played a massive role in Australian art that the notion that the real work real art real literature comes from London. Yeah and maybe New York. It can't come from Hollywood hustler exactly that and that's part of the client experience. I think what's interesting? We've margin Russian and that's connected to migrants because London is isn't the center of our will we come from different histories. That's begun to shift. But I grew up in Australia where authorities to make as a young queer boy. Actually love fully Haka Love Football. But I thought you can't actually be a raider and a a lover of sport. It was. It was when I look back on it. It's really hard to describe to my nieces nephews. You the young people in my life. Just how stoltifying those roles were around gender. I don't want to rush you but we've got to leave some sort of sorts. Larry Wonderful Book excited so I just knocked the title. It's the most extraordinary book. It's savage it rips apart religion really but it also rips apart the reader in a way that I found really disturbing. How would you describe the book Serbia Mascot for people who are listening and I hope this makes sense? I think it's a heretical book Christianity. But it's not blasphemous. I came out of a really a is a hub that is clearing the rating of it. Really Good Fife. I wanted to explore woods and believes that have been central to my life now for five decades and that is the particularly the message of the Gospels but as I said right at the beginning of the interview on. I'm someone who felt like I couldn't be part of God's love because of my sexuality and that kind from a particular. There's a passage in Corinthians Paul's letter to the Corinthians one where I homosexuality we toll denies you God's grace and God's love so that's what I you know that's sort of been battling. We've I want my walk away from the Church but then I came. There was a period in my life of real. I don't actually fell into prayer and I hadn't pride for a long time and I read Paul again and I found something completely different actually found someone saying you can be loved and this book is part of a long struggle for made make sense of what he's Mark Christian heritage and what is my what is it that are out to the gospels. Because I think there is. We've all the savagery that is in the novel. I do think that getting to that radical insight that the love you are. The Stranger is equal to the love. You or your family thaddeus understanding in two thousand twenty let alone two thousand years ago. The fact that the first will be last in the last will be first that cautioned that he's in the gospels still a radical inside the fact that God or a notion of God head where does that God resort it resides on the person on the cross. Who is the person on the cross? This crosses the runaway slave person on the cross is the person most hated by the Roman state so they devised a torture that was Kinda unique to destroy that body to violate that body to shame that body and then this is strange sect coming out of the Judean world saying now that's where resorts and that's still the best way. I can explain to these to really hear that. Understand that to to look up at the Cross and think about what that meaning is. That is the next time you walk out of the studio and Cross a homeless person. She will in London. That's God so what do you owe that person that's is? I still think the most profound moment of Christianity in terms of the two things just really quickly I knox rant on but about the. I spent a year researching and what fell in love. You know it was. It was wonderful to be immersed in ancient Greek Roman entered in writing. But what I realized was that this was a slave society. And we hear almost nothing about the experience of the slide when we read ancient history in fact one of the few places that we hear in the Mediterranean world the Voice of the slicing the Gospel. That became really central to the way. I imagined writing this book. I wanted us to use a raider to open that book and imagine what it would be locked to be that person in the ancient world and you absolutely together. I mean even from the opening pages. You've got this woman being stoned to death and you can smell what it's like. She's inside this hood and it's instantly. Your heart is beating your. You're feeling that. Damascus went through quite a lot of drafts. You know took me a long. The first draft so so often just because I think always trying to prove my research you know so but what has remained. Consistent is that a wanted the That opening in that's a that's a homage to affect three great teachers in my life and one of them was a little boy in primary school. Co Ms Lindemann. We'll never forget her name. And this was the seventies largely Margaret School and such was the time that there was a a young girl. She hopes Heritage was from Yugoslavia and mom and dad are divorced and these boys were calling him a slot because that was the world back then and this teacher took us. Little kids put circle and told us the story of Jesus coming across the woman about to be signed for adultery and she was a beautiful storyteller. So maybe I've got story from her as well and she made us feel what? I've tried to doing the book what it would be locked to be these fraud and young woman. We've a group of men about Tutu to throw your rocks. But she also what she gave me. Georgina was a moral education. And that's not that. That's a so invaluable too. You know so whatever of walked away. I have four against. I've battled Christianity for a long time. But it has you know. Even though I'm no longer a Christian it is pod of Christmas Chaka's moral education but I also think it's part of our world's moral education wherever we come from and so that that wrestling is in the novel but I hope as I said that it's you understand that just also coming from good five. This isn't putting the boot in. This may really trying to understand an incredible radical vision. And it's a way of US connecting with humanity. You know that's the thing you know. We've Paul He wrote you know people accused him of that. Misogyny comes from Paul's Letters. That homophobia comes from Paul's letters but he's also the man who wrote and Galicians. We are not master. We're not slide. We're not woman when men were not Jewish Greek. We are one in Christ. Jesus which I think. He's one of those again. Use the would astonishing moments in world. History Universal comes into our into bang. And why don't we concentrate on that? Paul why is it that that the church to I think it's detriment has concentrated on that other poor so many many things to explore and I would urge all our listeners to pick up a copy of Damascus? It's by Chris Chocolate and it's published by Atlantic Christos. Thank you so much pleasure. Thank you even listening to meet the writers. Thanks to the production team of Noor Whole Charlie. German Mary Hilditch and Louis Allen. You can download this show and previous episodes from our website or APP from soundcloud mixed cloud or jeans. I'm Georgina Godwin thank you..

Paul Europe Damascus Australia London Zimbabwe writer Georgina Godwin horace Australian Society Man Melbourne Southeast Asia Middle East Hollywood New York Lapham Latin America Football Chaka UK
"christos" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"christos" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Hello I'm Georgina Godwin. And this is meet. The Reuters likes today's and Australian. He was born to Greek immigrant. Parents as a writer he confronts themes ranging from social and cultural tensions of modern Australia to faith sexuality class race and the blacks of communism in practice his breakthrough novel. The slut was long listed for the Booker in two thousand and ten. He's one just about every prize. Going the age fiction prize the Melbourne Best Writing Award the overall best book in the Commonwealth Writers Prize. He was shortlisted for the miles. Franklin Literary Award He's won the Australian Literary Society Gold Medal and Author Announces The Australian Booksellers Association and Australian Book Industry Awards Book of the year. Basically there isn't a bigger writer in Australia. Loving our terrific strain. We form a good group together lately. Well we ought to introduce you. He is Christopher Steele cuss. Have is that correct chagas. It's it's an interesting name because eight Greek Clearly but my father's family were WLAC and the WLAC were great speakers who were in eastern Europe during the Ottoman Empire. So there's A Slavic infliction to to the name and in fact the I is the original Slavic spelling so all of forty eight first cousins in grace that both mom and dad came from large families. But the chocolate is they. Don't have the off. So because that was the kind of a re vision of that history. They went back to the original Greek spelling so my cousins always complain. That they say oh. We have this cousin in Australia. And he's he's he's a bit of a famous writer and everyone says now. You're not related different time. How did your parents end up in Australia? Look part of why the That's the subject in my writing. What is similarities? My father was born in nineteen twenty nine. He passed away years ago so he was a very young boy with the beginning of World War Two. And so there was the occupation and even harsher growing up in a in a rural community was the the civil war. One of Four hundred children eleven. Who survived. His brother was killed in the civil war so my father bang. The next eldest felt he was the responsible. One was atomic extreme suffering and poverty. So he made the decision that a lot of people need to migrate say came out to Ustralia nine fifty five. My mother similar background. She grew up in a rural village. She's a triplet which I'm still so very close to her to my aunt in Athens but being the youngest girls gray steel had the dairy system back then and she felt that there were no opportunities really for her to remain grace. And she she i. I can't quite imagine it nitrogen when I think back. She had no English to to to make a decision at in her early. Twenty S. She was working in a textile factory in Athens knew that her parents wanted her to marry. There wasn't any money in the family. The way she puts it is. I was going to marry the village idiot. And she made the choice to basically sale across the world. It was a time when Australia was developing industry so taking migrants from southern and Eastern Europe. And it's almost impossible to describe to people now that what had happened in Australia won the first when it became a nation in nine. I one was the water strider policy and so racist which this policy that white meant bicycling northern European. And the I kind of didn't in that policy was they 'cause they just needed people on the ground to develop the industry's he's I started accepting people from southern Europe and so you have growing up in Melbourne. A really is a great community. Now is third fourth generation anesthesiologist. Third-largest greek-speaking city outside of Greece itself. But I guess then. There was this stigma attached to being Greek in Australia or most. Certainly I think because I remember getting in trouble here when I came over with the slap because people were asking that very question and you know the designation week you know. I'm a little boy and you're hearing you're saying it to you but my mom and dad have been called Dago Ref. Oh wog kind of want you speak English? There's a cruelty that I think anyone from immigrant or refugee experience will understand absolutely be oh but was loaded which in fact. I mean incredibly. Well 'cause we talk about your breakthroughs being the slap but back in one thousand nine hundred five loaded won the golden bear. How did you get to that point? Tell me about your your writing progression. I was always a raider. I don't think you can talk about being a writer without talking about paying a rate of I I've just laid out a history of where parents came from an I. I always say this. This is really important. I think this is something that it doesn't matter which part of the globe come from if you're the child of immigrants there's a certain sense of responsibility that can be really tough to deal with because you know. My parents didn't have an education. My parents never had the opportunities that my brother-in-law had because of their sacrifice. And you know sacrifices are very talking about it with friends the other day. That would use a lot now but that I think my parents knew sacrifice The story I tell because it's lovely and true and indicate something about how fortunate I was dead every Thursday. Which was payday back in. You know when I was a little boy and he loved that I could read and he loved that I loved books so dead. Would he would get on Thursday afternoons pay package from from the factory and he would pass by this little news agency bookshop in Richmond Inner City Melbourne. And Buy me a book. And he bought me a still remember this just because I fell in love with David Copperfield and are referred to it in Aladdin overland in Barracuda but her imported that was making me a Rada and then Rutta and he would get me Harold Robbins. Get me just things. Probably that I shouldn't have been ready. But what it did was encouraged made a raid even win rating was difficult and to realize that rating is an only full kind of immediate pleasure. That actually some of the best joy and astonishment he get from rating comes from doing the hard work and being patient some. I'm sorry grateful for that. I think all some many of us have that imposter syndrome. George Herbert buying a write up on. You wanted to be a writer from really really really young. I would feel feel excise books. We've ideas for books and actually ideas for films too but to get to the point of saying `i Emirati was a bit of a struggle. I was fortunate I went to university. I did politics and history which I think was a good grounding. Really thank That that I. It made me read widely in made me read a lot of nonfiction and then. I had found a job after leaving. Unique a film. I call them because I love cinema. It was in a way the perfect job but I wasn't happy because I had this each to write been writing short stories and my partner. Wine Sword understood that unhappiness. I said Abe. He just offered me this opportunity. He said Look Unit to run. This is what you WANNA do. So lets make our life possible to To facilitate your writing so which means I. Do you think this is important thing to express to to young people anyone who wants to start writing. It's a vacation right. It might mean that you can't live in the in the Sabi leaving or the neighborhood you WanNa live at my main that there are certain things you're going to have to forego but if you really want to do this it's worth the sacrifice that your parents. I don't remember giving us to win. Let's give it five years and see how it goes. I already had started a short story with a voice that are liked and that was the main character in loaded. I mean you know the that period was so exciting when I look back on it now because you know it can never come again. That first novel right. You don't know if you can do it so you always working part time. I might add. Might a timetable. These days and these were the hours I was GONNA work. I'm writing furiously and I have a novel and I was absolutely exhilerated. You know at the end of the process strangely enough. I'd always ashamed that it would be because the felicitous Who Don't know my work loaded ease ridden. It's an Availa really in the voice of a nineteen year old Greg Australian choirboy called Ari so in many ways it has that strong element of autobiography and it takes place over twenty four hours and I just assumed that it would go to what was then called again lesbian press and and I did. I knew someone who worked in that collective and I gave him the manuscript and they wrote me back a litter. It read something like you know. I'm paraphrasing we really like the writing but we find it. Homophobe and rice in and the reason. I thought that I think this is so long ago. But it's interesting because I think sometimes as politics come back and forth was that they were. They were nervous of the of the riding. That I- Ari isn't a straightforwardly accepting gay young men. He's locked in a struggle with identity we've ethnicity with masculinity as well is a six year old and I wanted to convey something about that struggle in a language that he's hush and these people I'm I'm not. They were good people but that harshness scared them. And I thought I'll will know is going to publish this. But there was social data of who has sadly passed away but was a bit of a mentor to me a rush Australian writer. He knew someone in Random House Australia and gave her the manuscript. And I remember being in a shared household getting a phone call from John Paul. From and who is still now my publisher saying we'd like to publish your book. I just let out the biggest great and I couldn't believe it and I don't think it was an accident that it was someone like Jain. You know there is. I don't get me wrong. I I've worked for this for a long time and a high on conveying that that that work began from quite a young age but there is also a do maybe this is the Orthodox heritage. There is something about fight right all. There was also a moment in the early ninety s where in Australian publishing a generation of all the men were giving whites generation of younger women. Who weren't scared of the kind of writing that is in loaded? And I think that was a golden moment. Not Cheney People. Jain wanted to publish books light loaded. I think five years ago that might not have been possible because people were reading in a different way. I think it's really interesting that you say you're still with the same publisher and I just wanted to talk a little bit about that relationship between writer and publisher writer and editor and loyalty. Because of course a lot of people do switch and sometimes it changes changes their voice. I know how lucky I am to have someone like a giant publisher for over twenty four. He's now kinda credible to say right and she. She's still was working as an editor on the latest novel. Awesome really wise advice when so the slap is really been most successful novel and it was made into a terrific miniseries and that was on. Abc on the same plot. Here on on BBC four. I think Antoni is who was one of the producers and one of the directors on two of the episodes. Who's a stunning filmmaker? He he said. Just be very careful about fine because you have a success and then you have the laws you know and what you need to concentrate on other people who are loyal to you and that demands you express an equal loyalty to them and I think that is. That's really good advice of tried to adhere to that in my in my working life but in the way I go through the I think it is It also means that you know maybe you could go to another publisher and they could st you in a direction and you would maybe have maybe it will become vessel up but it also means that they might not accept the hard work of doing a novel. What my latest novel? Damascus which is not in a giant and only publishes have given the freedom to say. Well if this is what you WanNa do then go go for whom you the. Tom In the spice. Damascus is an extraordinary book. And I want to talk about that in some detail by way very quickly of dead Europe which really I suppose looks to to to your ancestral past. I do think about but domestic. I think Damascus indeed Europe relied because they both novels about five. And you can't write a novel about five of writing a novel that he's about that. Did you. Came out of that? Took a long time because it was. You know it came out of I I was once I've been in the notion of God which did at fifteen because I couldn't reconcile Gino's sexuality and wonderful interview with you to really talk a lot about when king and I would I would I would would be you know 'cause you're you're thirteen fourteen. Fifteen right would be the wanking and then I would literally slash body with my Niles to eliminate. That's how I thought about it as this young kid the evil win me and thank God. Thank God but I did. I did have to walk away from religious faith.

writer Australia Europe publisher Australian Booksellers Associa Reuters Melbourne Best WLAC Australian Literary Society Go Damascus Jain Athens Georgina Godwin Booker Christopher Steele Greece George Herbert Melbourne Ottoman Empire
"christos" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"christos" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Seven Christos posing as has twenty six Lonzo ball has twenty two wizards and Blazers in Portland this one belongs to the Blazers eighty seven sixty eight still have seven minutes to play in the third component that is twenty Bradley Beal as twenty three Timberwolves beat the bulls won fifty one away believe Beasley had twenty four for Minnesota the jazz beat the Knicks one twelve one old for William Bogdanovich with twenty three how about this stat line from Terrence Ross in the heat magic game by the way he beat the magic one sixty one thirteen Ross led all scorers with thirty five but did not have an assist did not have a rebound did not have a steel and did not have a block just thirty five that was it Duncan Robinson a twenty seven Grizzlies beat that's one eighteen seventy nine thunder over the pistons one fourteen one oh seven Yanis twenty nine twelve and six Bucks beat the Pacers one nineteen one hundred the Celtics get thirty two from Jensen Tatum Collin Sexton at forty one for Cleveland Celtics beat the cavs one twelve one oh six right to the college game number one Kansas beat TCU seventy five sixty six number eleven Craig over Georgetown ninety one seventy six number seven Florida state hangs on the beat Notre Dame seventy three seventy one forty right that would overtake celebrate Seton hall seventy nine seventy seven third right now twenty two they beat Rhode Island eighty four fifty seven on the ice third period ducks lead the avalanche three two second period coyotes lead the Canucks one nothing flyers five two of the capital's flames beat the blue jackets in overtime three two I'm J. Berman Hey guys DA here tomorrow morning Kevin Millar joins us from spring training the DA show six eastern CBSSports radio.

Celtics DA J. Berman Canucks Florida Craig TCU Kansas Pacers Kevin Millar Rhode Island Seton hall cavs Cleveland Celtics Jensen Tatum Collin Sexton Portland Bucks pistons Grizzlies Duncan Robinson
Walker scores 32 to lead Celtics past Mavericks 109-103

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Walker scores 32 to lead Celtics past Mavericks 109-103

"Campbell Walker scored thirty two with the Boston Celtics snapped a two game losing streak with a one oh nine one oh three win over the Dallas Mavericks so the Celtics who played without the injured Gordon Hayward a market smart improved eighteen and seven while the local this man's dropped eighteen and nine so looks rallied from a nine point deficit in the third took control with a fourteen five run in the fourth then held on the rest of the way Kemba Walker led the Celts with the game I thirty two Jaylen brown at twenty six Jayson Tatum twenty four while Christos posing as lead the mass with twenty three Bob Stevens Dallas

Campbell Walker Boston Celtics Dallas Mavericks Gordon Hayward Jaylen Brown Jayson Tatum Christos Bob Stevens Dallas
"christos" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"christos" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"Is a three CR podcast and this is published or not. I'm going to start with my own story IDA garage sale in January. I found a course. It it was boned lacey. And in all Toba I had great delight in seeing get worn on stage as a costume by a bar girl in missile gone. I do like a garage sale. So what has the the story got to do with my order today. Well welcome Robin. Just use share an interest in secondhand clothes. Oh Yeah Secondhand. Anything and you'll book. Your book has the title nothing new and the subtitle a history streep secondhand right. Sartre secondhand means different things to different people. We get what yes sure it. Does I mean to to make you know it It it likes me up but Lots of people. It's anathema some such a stigma associated with it for many people either because of their own unexperienced when younger of having to rely on second hand and new not being a possibility for them. Or if they're the concept people who don't like dust and and and and germs Yep It seems to be something that they not comfortable with. So does am between those two. Those two polls is a fast spectrum. I always think we've got five op shops in the town. I live in but I always think of them. As you know. Two thousand shops they represent a different thing to every every person who walks in the door. They they kind of antenna achieved to something different every single person. And you just watch what people make a beeline for what they bring up to Canada. Because I work in the shop occasionally and it's just you know people look for in fine completely and use in different ways things that I just would never have off. AWW Book starts with the history of clause and I was surprised just how difficult it was for people to get close now. This is it kind of like a three hundred four hundred years ago. That truly difficult. Yeah there was a limited pool of stuff when you consider. Everything had to be handmade and the cost. That would've entitled other in time or getting tries person to do that. You can imagine why for most people Close what secondhand. Naturally the second hand the Dow might have been the second third fourth honor of that particular couch or whatever that had been either handed down class Walleyes and sold down or had been the Dan and remade for successive sizes of person from a woman's full-size dress and as it went under the uh-huh and so on It would be down to To suit a smaller person so yeah. Secondhand was the natural way of things when there was a limited pool of stuff it didn't own many close the not and so there was a business dealing in close off huge business so by by the nineteenth century secondhand clothes was a was a vast business. You look at somewhere like London and they had. The son had a stock exchange and a fruit and vegetable exchange an only a call exchange for these big commodities. There was a second hand Exchange as well where people the people basically the Reagan bind men but that will call L. climbing. Who would go crying illustrates Clo Clo? Wanting to buy your own club. I would bring back there of an afternoon. I bring back there banshee and sell it from an old clothes exchange they will. They were occupations that I've never heard of a club era by and the translator. That's right and h those each of those three branches of the the remaking and re purposing try that came out of the exchange would be either Mending as they were or remaking or the Club era was That was sort of illogic. Guile overhaul on cluber and love clobbering win onto she. Someone asked me the other night actually where the Australian Word Club for closed could have come from the clobber Elbruz. And I never thought of that. But I guess whom yeah maybe and even when close couldn't be one anymore. What will ray rags useful? All all those. Yeah the RAG man so Principally pipe cotton the cotton wool and silk. So cotton was mainly collected to Mike pipe before Piper was remade as paper before technology existed wall was shredded up to my new Wilson was shredded up by these big two machines call devils cried alone. Dust called devil's us. which would be used to make flock wallpaper as well as to line? The lungs of the work is work plans but that the would be ground up and mixed with a small amount of new woollen fi but to make cheaper quality wall which was very cheap purpose made clothing lots of people flocked to it and it was called shoddy and hints. That's where the words Sean he came. I'm from gives away the quality of the clothing. The the guys who had the uniforms shotty during the American civil war used to say that they would melt during A Jury Sheriff Ryan that would just return to the pulp whence they came so that was those an silk couldn't really be re remind. There was no way of recycling that fabric for anything apart from They use it a bit in not to make decorations on handkerchiefs. And things like this. But that's why at a costume collections and green costume collections. So full of grand so frocks because those were the things survived. Everything else was kind of shredded and pulped and ended up when all other use was Was Gone ended up his manure on the Broccoli fields or Some other sort of berries loved they called hold land rigs and the rags would end up there and be distributed across the fields. Now I'm GonNa get Robin near to read a little bit from one of her books from her book. This is nothing new because I. This was a bit of history that I didn't know and this is once again to do with all close. Okay it's from fifteen called mending versus ending in Paris Chris. During the First World War the British army had vast salvage depot served by a railway siding into which would roll wagonloads of soiled blood stained signed and tattered uniforms at the depot. Hundreds of French civilians most of them women were employed in sort sorting cleaning disinfecting and repairing the uniforms sending sending as many as possible back to the Max sudden soldiers at the front Uniforms arriving the depot side blood-stained or shredded. This to be passed repair was shipped off his rags to the shoddy mill. Still running Jews bring the elites in England the rest would be returned to a condition almost as good as new besides garments of wool and cotton the salvage workers had to revive coats lined with for or sheepskin and leather Jerkins and the long rubber boots worn in the trenches of the latter. Two thousand doesn't pay washed and dried dighly any that were too far gone. We used to patch the wrist. Many of the female salvage workers adopted as they work year. You All British army jackets complete with the stripes. Denoting rank look and we go on to find out in World War Two Collection of fat and Hair curlers Silk Stockings off immunizations. Now that we're going to have to jump quickly through this because it's just fascinating the whole business. We were looking at change. Greatly in in nineteen sixty s with new youth culture decided to dress differently and Mick Jagger wore uniform fancy dresses street with so we get this new hall thing about this opportunity shops tuning into people suddenly started collecting being anti vintage retro and And it just will have the opportunity show. It's the opportunity shop started not far from You'll fitzroy studio In Ninety two thousand five Simpson's hospital was Rising rising money to build a new wing and they had an empty building which John Rin had solved them very cheaply. It was circular. Had Been An all boxing in stadium and before that had been a place where pre movies had been shine And they had this building and one of the people on the fundraising committee whose name was lighting Milly. Milly tell us a former stage star had just come from monitoring holiday of Europe and the US. Yes with her husband and they had seen these bargains shops charitable bag and shops. And she thought we can do something like that. Not just a two day. Not just a two day jumble sale but a long lasting affair so They had a and she. Let's call it an opportunity shop. She the the shop she'd seen. In France recalled magazine Daca Xiang and Ocasio apparently can may not just bogging but also opportunity so she very very cleverly had a marketing brain and called them opportunity shops which is to my mind such a great improvement on the charity shops of the UK or the What do they call them? Thrift shops in the US. So both of those have a kind of a moral under time to them whereas opportunity just kind of sparkle's doesn't it just trolls you. In an in the first three hours opening it made three hundred pound. That's right yeah twenty five and and I just I would just sell out like that and other shop that I've been early on in the thirties near here Run by the Brotherhood of Saint Lawrence Uneven once or twice a month in a tiny little shop and a tiny little shop and the police used to have to attend those openings because so few people could fit inside and and so I mean I wanted to get in there that the crack cat crowd control was necessary. Look it's just not close spoken about in this nothing new. It's atom markets at. What did Henry Ford learn about? The desire for new car seemed goodall. Henry Ford. He had such I guess guess nineteenth century way of seeing the world that he thought people what people want would want in a car would be something that would last. I didn't even have to buy one Chi and it will. He took took pride in this. That's how we marketed. These these team or Ford will be the only kind you ever need to buy. Well rival comic comic as soon got the message that people were attracted kind of new blink in a better model and there was this kind of thing at work. Consumerism was really gaining signing steam during the nineteen especially the nineteen twenties and Indian. Even Henry Ford had to come around to creating new models. That might just have a few extra bells and whistles bats. what he learned of course was that as people bought. New Cars was second hand cars and he had not foreseen that Second hand cars rivaled new cars in popularity and He he actually proposed starting a plan or getting the government to start an operation way by all second hand cars head to head to be junked pulled apart and made into new disassembly. Lie this assembly line exactly so they would not rival the new ones but of course. Ah The used car market either took new market and yet you know this master businessman had not Had no I o industrial not for saying that look we go onto. Things is like Things that sold through the lost property or found object area stories of weird findings just fascinating. Hey to starve finding the diamond among the dross. Let's everyone's dream isn't it. Yeah absolutely I'd just as as we started with you and I Loving a garage sale. Hopefully it doesn't come to what happens in USA that you have to have a seventy five dollar permit Horrible so this is nothing new. It traces the history of secondhand the stigmas attached to it and the business that it continues is to be so..

USA Henry Ford Clo Clo streep Canada Ford London Mick Jagger Sartre Paris front Uniforms British army Reagan Robin Sean Europe Australian Word Club
"christos" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

14:47 min | 1 year ago

"christos" Discussed on Conversations

"That God's my life and you are reminding me that I actually did love the gospels as well I did I did find ethics WCHS I in my life because straight school. We don't philosophy. We don't do a history very well so the first ideas of how to be ethical in the world come from that engagement we've Christianity or did for me the the moment of the first time for me but happening primary school at North Richmond. Primary where I win. It was take a who she told the story what happened was there was a girl in my class. Who is from what was then known as Yugoslavia and her parents had divorced and a couple of kids? Were calling her mother a slut. Because it was the early seventies it was a time of really rigid ideas of Kehinde. You were and what the rules were for men and women and this amazing teacher like she's talking to nine. Maybe ten year old. She sits down and tells us a story. Worry about Jesus coming across a woman who's about to be started for adultery and saying if you how about seen rational stone-hurling throw it and she made us feel what it was like to be that woman that terror and that lesson has never ever gone away. You know I don't think I don't know if I've ever ver- I've always been faithful tour but it is to make one of the foundational moral principles that that guides my life and I I think I think that what it is is that I knew that I was going to be in that circle. That always going to be that that woman. Even though I was only a little boy and I didn't know sexuality. Well I didn't know what homosexuals I think. I had this kind of premonition or an inkling that something was gonNA happen. My life was going to make me an outcast and by these times would be throwing and that idea might save your life. Yes exactly if that sounds to some PIPPA as ridiculous incredible We'll go back to that. You know we are both conscious and spirit and we are also flesh embodying that desires or feelings or just emotions or instincts. That were already making me announced solder by the by the ten years old. What was the point where you thought you would have to leave that? Evangelical Group in terms of Let's call it scripture or ideas. Da Philosophy. It was Corinthians one where Paul writes. You know if you're an adulterer if you're a lawyer for mcadoo if you're a homosexual you do not God's love love you can never enter the Kingdom of Heaven and I couldn't that that a bog in played it and I tried to make sense of how I could be Christian and I I Kept filing that sea turtle struggle. I also have to say there was a moment. Richard Webb Bloody Hill. They I'll say I've loved music from really young as well and this church. I was going to created this pamphlet that they gave us about the devil being everywhere in the devil begging music and it had a list of music. You were not allowed to really list was led Zeppelin. I don't think they will call enough to even know about uh-huh Elton. John was on the list on Queen was on the lease what they knew in their bones guy in rock and roll before anyone else did by this things. If Yeah I would say Zeppelin have to say that there is there is something in that moment the ridiculousness at that moment that that I think Brooke and I just very soon after I just got up from one of the Bible groups Ratings believing in. God I'm leaving just as come. Is it a road to Damascus moment. It just happened discredit Damascus. And Win I don't believe in anymore and when you said that and you walk down did you. Did you turn behind you to see the looks on hips faces. When you say didn't turn to look around because it was I I make it sound quite cavalier? I believe I was terrified. Because this was my group and were you full of shame in that moment or you feeling the feeling of actually. I'm on fine. There was in that moment try. I'm trying to go back to it. There was an absolute relief. Richard it felt like had done something to remove this burden. It felt quite impossible because I was really tearing myself up about what happened in. This is not good. What happened very soon? After is that I just became angry. I'm I became angry about what felt like a a really unloving on kind not compassionate Feith and I became really really angry at religion. I became one of those atheists that cannot better even hear the the name of God which is not a good place to be just going back to that. Do you think it might have been other people get guy young people in that in that study. I'm in in my light chains and a Melbourne had a really fantastic live music scene and I am in a place called the ballroom in Saint Kilda listening to music music and a woman I was in the Bible Group with and would just lie because the last connection we have of each other is paying. You know praying together start talking and she of course is lesbian and she has a similar story to tell. And what did you said when you looked at each other as you burst out laughing we did. We did we just went. Oh my God I mean she s she also taught you know she they actually performed tried to perform an exorcism on. So this is a really early Agley aspect of what religion and fanaticism can do but we survived at West the glare and there was actual GLI insane. Each Other. was that we survive. They're we become friends again and I suspect it's because there was an underlying shame we felt at having had that experience than of started university by this point like a really entering the bourgeois world. Econo- sense that it was suspect all Shameful so I've had anything to do with this kind of religion or have had this religious experience so you can't mouth shut about it and I think she was feeling doing something similar and it's not only it's not only the University of Bourgeois do think that Australians are not gripe talking about religion no even. If we've I've got a religious prime minister he's not really talking about religion either so for a while in university you said you put your faith in politics instead for wiling Arleen can lift wing politics to some degree and socialism. And then you kind of lost your faith in that to some point make you just go God. I was such a cliche really because it happened even before the university it was almost. We've that moment of standing up and going don't believe this anymore. I'd always had the mum's family in particular but dead was a unionist You know a proud working class men and my mom is a proud working class woman you know when I was talking before about the icon that you have that every Orthodox House has there was a period where there was a picture of lyrics to. So you're trying to go on as well so the his head on a polite which is exactly right so that the the left or that kind of thinking was around me all the time. I think that's another thing that I'm thankful for about growing up in the Greek world. I did because we're not scared of politics and mom's family were were were communist Ingram. Dad's was anticommunist and so the house particularly before the big move out to the BURBS was full of people arguing all the time and sometimes you know what the politics of this contemporary moment. Lock where we just everyone's shouting at each other at. It's likely if you do not agree a hundred percent we've every position take whether it's about Identity or whatever it is then I will not speak to you. I'm so glad that I've grown up in another world where I know that you can actually communicate and argue we in good five hundred as long as you can good five so it was. There are joint people for Nuclear Disarmament in high school and then continued that will always at university city. I joined a great communist group as well a a youth group fat had become five. I think are replaced. God with the Left. You're such a morally this young guy. I winch really quite honest by the Senate things especially if you leave a lasting darkness just on the border of your personality when you little. Maybe that's what makes you say more organised Aghanistan but it doesn't end the danger of that is it can also make you because You not because it comes from fear and Shaima. Novo's things news that there's a that earnestness can become righteousness which can become self righteousness. And that's really dangerous. I think a saving grace. He's had an absolutely a Fradin family may be You know that that they were confused about lot of of who I was but they never stopped loving me so I had that safety net. I also had my. I've talked about music. I had books from childhood fell in love rating and I fell fell in love with cinema. And so you have BARF in the fundamentalism of church the fundamentalism religious. Actually have these other voices and that's what great art can do is he's saying. No no things are not black and white so some US might have been. What was the drew you back inside a church? One day I I came to a point in my life where I was making really terrible rebel choices and that was you know. I'll be honest with you. Richard actually do do what you do on the show so I I haven't kind of you you know just to I don't want to over indulge because I worry about that but a bus crews having a problem with drugs problem with addiction and I tried ways to deliver. We're GONNA come back and forth and and not really succeeding and I was deeply unhappy and across the road from where I was working in Melbourne. Those Those Little Protestant Church and one lunchtime. I'll go over there and fall into pray Eh. That's the best way I just. I fall into the act of prayer which I hadn't done since I was fifteen so in my late twenties now oh and it was such a relief like I just saw. I'm not even trying to a God I really I'm just doing something that I think. I think he's instinctually human giving over and signed I feel wretched and I think that is what I don't understand about what religion can give you. All the sense of the sacred can give you is to actually go. You're not aligning this wretchedness And it was a risk it was yeah it was a return not to the church. I haven't it wasn't that I became a Christian or a believer. It was just that suddenly that anger I had about religion the left I just remembered what was powerful and potent and that in those kind of spices and there are fewer and few you of those kinds of spices in the world that you can find some some sense of pace. That's what happened and I'm not saying this was a moment where my addiction was cured but it was the beginning of a way of choosing a new new policy. Go down to. I think what it also prepared me for. That moment was in my early twenties. Gone to Eastern Europe after going to to grace. I went there in straight off the velvet revolution in Czechoslovakia and I had to confront a really terrible history that was done. In the name of communism there's incredible beliefs of equality of redistribution of wealth. The most vile things done to people in the name of these supposedly supposedly universal human human dignity. Exactly yeah all t and all those things but what. It might be have to really think through through ease. Does that mean all these ideas of being left and socialist that I'll have to throw them away the the same way I did weave the idea of God in religion had fifty nine right if this is what these ideas laid to then other of no value at all and I don't think but that might be have have to think maybe it isn't the ethics in Christianity. Little is in Christianity. That's the problem is what institutions have done those ideas. It's what humans on those ideas. All all of this happened now longtime ago. But I think these novel. Damascus began at that moment. So what would you back to Saint Paul again. In those letters he'd written in that Church that at the walked into the Church and and pride again I picked up the new testament that was lying there and I started raiding. I actually think I was ready to hear Paul. Now when I think about it Richard I think ready for the first time in my life to hear him and what I found was not the saint and not the judge but what I found was a man struggling with the meaning of what it was to believe to believe against the odds to to believe that God awed is to be found in the most Richard to find not division and not exclusion an exile. which is what I I read when when I couldn't hear his voice but actually it's a fine love and grace and sacrifice and understanding and I still believe is that about poll even though I am also still critical about Paul and I think you can do both I think i? That's another thing. We've we've forgotten that you can buy love something and be critical of it. That's not an impossibility climate. Actually actually how else. How else do we podcast more cost and online. You're listening to conversations with Richard filer on ABC radio you can subscribe to the conversations podcast to find out who just head to ABC dot net dot edu slash conversations. What.

Richard Damascus Paul Melbourne Richard Webb North Richmond Kehinde Yugoslavia mcadoo Evangelical Group University of Bourgeois Saint Paul Richard filer Elton US Brooke Czechoslovakia Feith John
Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

"In mind for just a few seconds? These bits are stored in something called working memory. And Earl Miller of the Massachusetts Institute of technology says this type of memory affects just about everything the brain does working memory is the sketch out of your mind. It's the contents of your conscious thoughts. It's how you hold thoughts in mind. Are you deliberate over thoughts? How you choose when the act or not act and Christos constantinidis from Wake Forest university says that's not all working memory is a core component of higher cognitive functions like planning or language or intelligence, the two scientists agree about the importance of working memory. But they disagree about how it works at the society for neuroscience meeting each was presenting research that supports their position constantinidis backs. What he calls the standard model which has been around for decades. It says that when we need to remember a phone number neurons in the front of the brain start firing and keep firing. And it is this persistent activity of neurons in the prefrontal cortex that allows you to maintain this information in memory. So if those neurons were to stop firing that that number would go way precisely but Earl Miller says it's not that simple. His team used the latest technology to study clusters of neurons in working memory. And they found that instead of firing all the time. Most of these neurons were firing in brief coordinated bursts. This doesn't sound like a big difference, but actually has huge functional vacations. One is that the brain must have some way of retaining the bits of information in working memory between bursts Miller explanation is that the neurons are communicating with other parts of the brain, including networks involved in long term memory. This allows information from working memory to be stored in a late and for much the way long memories are Miller says that would explain how we can hold onto a phone number. Even if we get distracted momentarily, if you drop your coffee in on the way to the phone, you activity, rain switches to the dropping of the coffee, but then because these memories are stored in late and form, they can be reactivated Miller says if working memory really does communicate with other parts of the brain it could explain one of the great mysteries of neuroscience. We'll opens up is the most difficult, but the most exciting question by working Mary volition, how you gain control of your own thoughts. Christos constantinidis says Miller is correct that working memory neurons do produce rhythmic bursts of activity, but he says the rest is speculation theory is very attractive on theoretical grounds. The problem with the theory is that so far there has been no experimental evidence. Linking these critical variable with behavior. Constantinidis says changes in the amount of rhythmic firing don't seem to have much effect on working memory, and he says Miller's contention that working memory is linked to long term memory. Just doesn't hold up. We have clinical cases of patients for whom working memory is profoundly impaired. And yet, they're long term memory is intact. So for the moment constantinidis is standing by the standard model, and he says during the neuroscience meeting he'll be taking a skeptical. Look at the research coming from Miller's lab as scientists. That's what we do. We tried to poke holes in its others theories. And this debate I think that's what makes science fun. John Hamilton, NPR news. This is NPR news.

Earl Miller Christos Constantinidis NPR Massachusetts Institute Of Tec Wake Forest University John Hamilton Mary
Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

All Things Considered

03:39 min | 2 years ago

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

"Stored in something called working memory. And Earl Miller of the Massachusetts Institute of technology says this type of memory affects just about everything the brain does working memory is the sketch Pat of your mind, it's the contents of your conscious thoughts. It's how you hold thoughts in mind. Are you deliberate over thoughts? How you choose when to act or not act and Christos constantinidis from Wake Forest university says that's not all working memory is a core component of higher cognitive functions like planning or language or in the two scientists agree about the importance of working memory. But they disagree about how it works at the society for neuroscience meeting each presenting research that supports their position constantinidis backs. What he calls the standard model which has been around for decades. It says that when we need to remember a phone number neurons in the front of the brain start firing and keep firing. And it is this persistent activity of neurons in the prefrontal cortex that allows you to maintain this information in memory. So if those neurons were to stop firing that that number would go way precisely but Earl Miller says it's not that simple. His team used the latest technology to study clusters of neurons in working memory. And they found that instead of firing all the time. Most of these neurons were firing in brief coordinated bursts. This doesn't sound like a big difference. But actually has huge vacations. One is that the brain must have some way of retaining the bits of information in working memory between bursts Miller explanation is that the neurons are communicating with other parts of the brain, including networks involved in long term memory. This allows information from working memory to be stored in a latent form much the way long term memories are Miller says that would explain how we can hold onto a phone number. Even if we get distracted momentarily, if you drop your coffee in on the way to the phone, you activity, rain switches to the dropping of the coffee, but then because these memories are stored in late and form, they can be reactivated Miller says if working memory really does communicate with other parts of the brain it could explain one of the great mysteries of neuroscience. Well, what would it opens up is the most difficult, but the most exciting question about working, Mary, which is volition how you gain control of your own thoughts. Christos constantinidis says Miller is correct that working memory neurons do produce rhythmic bursts of activity, but he says the rest is speculation there. There is very attractive on theoretical grounds. The problem with the theory is that so far. There has been no experimental evidence. Linking these critical variable with behavior constantinidis says changes in the amount of rhythmic firing don't seem to have much effect on working memory, and he says Miller's contention that working memory is linked to long term memory. Just doesn't hold up. We have clinical cases of patients for whom working memory is profoundly impaired. And yet, they're long term memory is intact. So for the moment constantinidis is standing by the standard model, and he says during the neuroscience meeting he'll be taking a skeptical. Look at the research coming from Miller's lab as scientists. That's what we do. We tried to poke holes in each other's theories. And this debate I think that's what makes science fun. Jon hamm. Hilton NPR news.

Earl Miller Christos Constantinidis Massachusetts Institute Of Tec Jon Hamm Wake Forest University NPR Mary
‘Birds of Prey': Jurnee Smollett-Bell, Mary Elizabeth Winstead Cast as Black Canary and Huntress

/Film Daily

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

‘Birds of Prey': Jurnee Smollett-Bell, Mary Elizabeth Winstead Cast as Black Canary and Huntress

"Big bit of comic book, casting news, and that is that birds of prey have cast to new actresses for the film Christos, but it, yes. So you know a few days ago, we wrote up a story about how bunch of actresses where we're reading for various parts in the film, and now to have been kissed, Mary Elizabeth Winstead is going to play Huntress and journey smell at bell is going to play black canary in the film. And of course, Margot Robbie is starring in the film as Harley Quinn. And this is going to be Warner Brothers, big DC female driven team film, which is set to open in February of twenty twenty.

Mary Elizabeth Winstead Margot Robbie Twenty Twenty Harley Quinn Warner Brothers Christos
"christos" Discussed on Dude Soup

Dude Soup

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on Dude Soup

"There was oh good there were there were times where it wasn't additive like oh this is cool but it doesn't doesn't mean much but there are other sequences where it's it's fucking great or they do really cool things with it and that's when it it's important of eighty it was interesting to see them like basically see how they do the consistent camera plus still squeezing and loading screens when they need to yeah so it's it's like christos has to hold open a door erred so heavy in than tree squeaks on through and like the rooms very dark and then you come in and then all the lighting comes out our travel to this realm and right on a circle quick i was gonna say there's there are some places where it's not hidden as well i appreciate the effort i just put my controller down guard by the door outdoor fear out there and it was just appear in front of it this way then they they give you such a sparkling light show like when when you're basically trying to bridges and stuff yeah i also like to james point but the north north miss neurology i volume of norse mythology like what does the american gods was like such a cool show how they like sort of re like when they did the retelling of like all the the vikings at like poke their own eye out and stuff like i just the nordic art style is awesome it's just it's it's an it's really well done in this game it's weird it's like sort of how marvel's been influenced by like their their style of how they've they've done as guardian sort of world i feel like is it's not exactly like that in god of war but they're sort of that astral sort of like influence there and i i'm actually really glad that they made it feel like their own interpretation of north mythology north northeast thalji it is weird though because the world is so devoid of life like it's like here all these gods but they don't have like gods generally are bickering and using humans as.

christos marvel thalji
"christos" Discussed on Top Down Perspective

Top Down Perspective

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on Top Down Perspective

"Makes is very cool i think the witches so she's awesome i think a lot of the characters you meet i just met another one that i can't talk about it all that is very cool and what what happens with this character is is really cool so i'm like in that quite a bit and it's to the point i like them so much that it's like i know eventually like we're not gonna be rocking to see this guy too often but it's like i just want you to be like in our party the whole time this is great yeah and ones that i can't talk about the two dwarf the blacksmiths of blacksmiths yeah both of them i like quite a bit yeah i really like rock brock's i like he's pretty good i'd like sinje sandy whatever it is cindy for him to just yeah just the fact that he's like a germaphobe yes he's pretty good there's a there's all the characters are are are a lot of fun to be around yeah i like bronx attitude like when you come back and he's just like looks at your acts and he's just like my brother touch this or whatever and he just like hits it with a hammer and it's like christos azam what did you do it's better and just gives it back to you fixed it yeah yeah no you're going to there's there's pretty good brock lines coming up after where you're at so keep an eye on that for sure yeah they're great the done the the fast travel like the weird portal stuff at any point yeah.

cindy christos azam brock
"christos" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Christos is very distracting okay this is something that your constituents of you concerns about this because i lived in much in the bj about how the big the big google's the facebooks would have on actually doing enough think we know they could just they make money out of us a one or two emails on it but i think you're right most parents just don't understand the risks that their children are running was forty before i get a mobile forty minutes are all diane i don't understand it huchon sleep from a mortar he did yeah well i thank you very much fitzpatrick are before a away from a russia another brief into sport with ben fletcher he's here to tell us what's been going on and you'll going with anderson you won't get with football so he's gonna talk about basic challenge cup cup today is the most saipem one for many many years i've not had a particularly good week at cheltenham so i'm trying to justify it's not so much how much i've lost this wife filed turkey muli normally this i'm actually up in recent years by not being down if that makes sense the fact that i'm on my if i hadn't gambling addicts defending if i hadn't bothered to be pretty much where i am now then you won't be taking these these exactly restore half the absence of a secure pension scam and that kind of thing is charleston go cap day must've dan and cheltenham mister brazil is back on socks this morning he wishes everybody his thanks for recovering from a throat infection action it's going to be really great donald gong ling helps with us straight infections gokul with a bit of not sport sport sport is in the new sports but football is because gav southgate is given plays an interesting choice.

Christos google facebooks russia ben fletcher football brazil donald gong ling gav southgate anderson saipem forty minutes
"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Right and then after a couple of months i collapsed it was another instant with another customer of ours where what happened is the the air condition failed on the data center they hate went up really high and then the firearm wendell catering shawny boom and why ping out old this on their for sector the fire alarm created a sonic boom so they had a fire alarm in a data center that did they know that if it went off it would destroy everything they had no idea so there was no damage on the interior of the data center and we were called in as an immense she not me personally but the personal was months in the account and was very weird because it walk in expecting everything to the flames obviously hit by heat wave as they opened the doors but everything was spending all the lights were up in the service were on and he was working however there was no data whatsoever again we're kind of migration show i on other few weeks to get them up and running surprising enough that did not renew our account later on the internal politics by the had nothing to do support us take your backups offline hey christos hold that thought for just a minute we're gonna take a pause for this very important message we've all come to expect that distributed databases can't be both globally consistent and scalable but what if he didn't have to make trade offs what if you could have a fully managed database service that's consistent scales horizontally across data centers and speak sequel introducing cloud spanner a mission critical relational data.

"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Welcome christos so shall i say welcome back hey guys nice to be back you know i i'm sure i said this last iran which was a year or so ago the pf the premier field engineers are like my bread and butter over on run as radio because they're the guys out in the field working with the biggest customers solving the hardest problem frontline except for christos of course i mean the sidelines just you know giving instructions about what needs to be done us lunch warming will always show naked never mention their customers by name so it's like i was working with this customer that had two hundred and fifty thousand users in an azure or a an active directory structure with one oh you go on and on with that you know don't let this happen to you kind of thing it's it's always a good story says neat to have someone out in the from the field working on some challenging problems i'm sure you've got some great stories christos lodge challenges every single day it's always fun they wouldn't call you if everything was going well right yeah well you'll be surprised that all is not just the shelby problems where fasted advisors so our team is usually trying to get proactively to customers to paint them up and run them up on upcoming technologies and things like nicole or several s and outer unfortunately sometimes we're called in when things have gone their own way and it's always fun to try to solve problems while were tied to educate our customers on how to do things that i'd wait not that actual way is always actual way that way but in most cases we try to talk about best practices and they come into practice from the industry and and that brings us to our topic here as your success stories i i gotta start with mine though it's you know every story that i have on azure as a success story i haven't had one really negative experience but of course the stuff that we do is you know small 'tatoes compared to some of the stories that you're going to be telling.

iran nicole
"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Instrumentation and logging i've only been using event good for the wild but i absolutely love it so far which school very cool it's really neat to we do a show talking to dan i think it was literally going to ship between the time we recorded the show and when they publish they going to go g a on it yeah and here's is it just few months ago jump straight in did some tinkering around and made some work awesome so isaac thank you so much your comment here's a place to drink a little coffee while you play with your event grid so we're going to send a don at roxburgh the you if you'd like dot net rocks mug radha comment on the website at iraq's dot com or any of our social media's we publish every show to facebook and google plus and become at their read on the show will send you mug and definitely follow us on twitter i'm at carl franklin he's at rich campbell send us a tweet we do not mind them for bitcoin sanitized for your protection all right let's bring christos back on the show christos moscow's is a software developer blogger speaker and all around geek he currently works at microsoft as an azure engineer pf e empowering developers and teams to do mazing things with technology before joining microsoft he's a successful entrepreneur in successfully collaborated with companies such as mark it lockheed martin and barclays he's been building software for over thirteen years he's passionate about open source and is an advocate for os he contributes regularly to numerous projects and works closely with the community to make sure the software development space gets bigger and bigger.

roxburgh iraq carl franklin microsoft dan facebook google christos moscow software developer engineer lockheed martin thirteen years
"christos" Discussed on Self Made Man

Self Made Man

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on Self Made Man

"Hi my name is mike dillard of this is a selfmade man at the podcast for those who want to leave their mark on the world and create a legacy of honor integrity and achievement in every aspect of your life i'm glad you're here and once again it is time to forge it your destiny have you ever thought about creating your own mobile maybe you've got a unique idea that you want to develop what may be thought about creating an app for your existing business and customers while either way a mobile customer experiences something that can no longer be ignored because the phone is now the primary way that your prospects and customers access the internet as a 2017 seventy one percent of all time spent on line in the united states takes place on a mobile device american spin an average of eighty seven hours per month on their phones and ninety percent of that time is consumed with an individual apps like facebook instagram and snapchat well this trend will only continue to increase which means that you need to become a mobile first company if you wanna stay relevant and continue to grow into the future the opportunities are obviously substantial but so are the number of pitfalls how do you develop an app how much should it cost how do you get your target audience to actually downloaded and engage with it and how do you drive revenue in convergence within that ecosystem while to help you navigate this world that today we are joined by christos sheppard so christos is a seasoned entrepreneur with a heck of a resume when you consider that he actually founded in airline with he was in his twenty's pool he is also the founder of a campfirefm a revolutionary mobile app that allows anyone in the world to submit questions to their favorite experts in celebrities and get paid in the process we'll today he's gonna give us a crash course when it comes to creating a funding launching and growing a mobile app for your business this is a must listen episode for every entrepreneur out there so please help me welcome christos sheppard christos shepherd welcome to selfmade man it's pleasure out of here thanks so much for having me mike it's it's great to be here abc's mad at the share thank thank you very much for.

mike dillard united states founder mobile device facebook christos sheppard selfmade abc 2017 seventy one percent eighty seven hours ninety percent
"christos" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"christos" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"That was a spot the next found themselves in as they were role by the rockets one seven 102 had to go with that christos porzingis and and as kanter both deal with back injuries makes actually built up to twenty two point lead just couldn't sustain we got a a good eating nature young gone around forty of its who has a unique personality globe victory but i newly redesigned is wellknown doesn't brown while from michael beazley on msg was a surprise start he hasn't really been part of the rotation this season recording thirty rockets knocked down eighteen shots were behind the arc led by seven points from james harden dropped the next on one in six on the road got to build on woman i've got to create their own atmosphere would within us within the fifteen guys if we have in which fifteen of us against twenty thousand we are understand what that means and how mistakefree we actually play in order to motor w jared jack on msg carlo quinn 20 points 15 rebounds mix for ten and nine nice win by the devil's little three one third period lead slipped what they came back for a four three overtime victory of the redwings maju game winner now he sheer brian boil taylor all the other tallies while keeping kate stopped thirty one shots founders what's the dissenters to one yugoslav heloc with a big night he kicked out thirty once shots it was nice that we played well in front of euro for most of the night tonight than when he had to make saves you made saves and we've been talking well maybe trying to get a two one win their instead of a 541 so i was nice one first doug weight an amnesty plus jordan ever lien anders lee with the goals is one six seven thousand football number one alabama unbeaten no more bell the iron bowl 26 fourteen to six ranked auburn clemson routed south carolina 34 ten oklahoma puts west virginia fifty nine.

kanter michael beazley kate alabama south carolina west virginia christos porzingis james harden doug anders lee football auburn