35 Burst results for "christianson"

"christianson" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

07:30 min | Last month

"christianson" Discussed on Ologies

"You all off at once. Very quickly kevin brown. Doug potential future fire or colleges ronin. Jackie crisper. Who're kimberly hoffman ellen. Skelton thomas and windham brianna freeman justin. Roberts anthony willis donal o'neill alexandra casual and because our time chatting was cut short again. We're so honored lucky to feature relevant clips from a conversation with the good fire. Podcast host amy christianson co host. Matt kristof okay. Here amy is talking to matt about fears of fire. Even in our indigenous communities like lots of people are now worried about fire and scared of fire. And i think so for me. When i come across people like you know that kind of that tendency to think of fire as bad i always say you know. Well there's good fire and that's you know the name of from the podcast so you know when we're doing these kind of good fires it's basically it's not a wildfire. It's totally different. most conditions. People wanna bring back burning right and bring back that cultural practice to their landscape because Most elders when they look at the forest the first thing they say is that it's unhealthy and that it needs cleaning up. When i first started working a bunch of elders. I always hear this cleaning up phrase cleaning up and you know it took a while 'til i realized that you know that meant fire that they want it because you know you don't normally think of that you think like oh go out with a rake. Donald trump thinks that we're doing but you know it was actually wanted to use fire to kind of clean up all that that dead litter on the forest floor so they just want to do that again in their territory but they also realize that because of the fire suppression that we've had over the last. You know fifty to three hundred years depending where you are in canada that it's not that easy just to bring back our burning practices right because We burn on intervals so depending on where you were. You know if you were burning a meadow you might burn the meadow every three years. If you're burning like you know an old growth forest on you might burn every twenty years like you know. It just depended on What she were burning. Or what objective you're trying to achieve so you know we and now we've excluded fire so i mean the litter and the the build up fuel is crazy so i think like now most elders. I talked to. They say like if we went and tried to do this now. Like we basically burn down the forest. Because we'd be china start low intensity burned but there's just too much fuel on the floor so it would immediately like escalate. So how'd you indigenous fire. Scientists in wildland firefighters approach these really different schools of thought. Amy explained that we call it like to. I'd so that's kind of the new concept that's come up. So that's like you know whereas indigenous people even as non-indigenous like you know you're looking at the world through one i through western perspective right because we're all chained in that you know like there's not. There's very few people that you know are born and raised in the bush and how that kind of only subsistence lifestyle but then out of the other. I you know you can see with your indigenous. I right so you can see know how you know where things could be better. I think for me. That's where fire management comes in. Because you know. I'm trained from the western perspective. But i think you know from Like culture that had like you know there's things that indigenous people do are no better and you know for me. Part of my job is advocating for that. And so you know. It's not saying like drop. Paul western science around fire right. We need that. We need that too. But then indigenous people in our cultures also no ways for making the forest healthy so to me. If you bring those two together makes like you know what i mean. Then you have like an incredible knowledge base that you're coming from The firefighter stories. I promised you one example is like talking to firefighter. So there's this one guy who is a non Like a non-indigenous verify so it's kind of funny up on that you know the fire crews there lots of that. There's like thirty or forty year indigenous firefighters that have been on the fire line long time and they say you know. These new kids like university. Grads come up and start telling them what to do so this one guy was actually telling me that he you know he started out of university has kind of a fire boss and went up on the the one line and he had these native crews and he said he was the thought they were the laziest people in the world. Because he's like they would get up in the morning and work a little bit but then he's like then they nap all day and then like in the in the bush and then he's like but then you know they would get up and kinda work all night and then he's like then i started like really looking and watching what they were doing and he said that then one of the guys came up and told him like we fight the fire when it's the weakest because we see fire as a living being and why would you fight something at the height of its day. You know like at two. Pm on a really sunny hot day with high winds right like why would you do anything right like the fire can just jumper you know but if you you know fight it in the morning when it's the weakest or or in the evening or overnight when humidity is high and the temperature and so they activities decrease in every well i should say generally now with climate change who knows but generally fire activity decreases at night right so sunny's but that these guys have got that not from textbooks but from years of being out in watching fires so i think and so he was like to me like this not on non-indigenous kid a that. It was just amazing to see that because he didn't learn any of that in school and so for him. He said he learned more that summer. Working with the native cruise about fire then going to school basically and not to say you know. Don't stay in school kids but like that's important to you but you know there's other ways in other things to to learn as well about about fire. Lots of the indigenous fire guys always told me one of the funniest things is like the. When the fire season i starts in like in incre- the word for white boy or whatever mooney out so they say like oh. It's so funny when like the mooney outcome on the fair. Because he's like they're all just doing self with the fire in the background and he's like and we're actually working and he's like in you look all the just lined up way away from the fire and then it was fighting because then i started seeing on facebook like a lot of people on instagram. But i think that that's just maybe a bit of. It's kind of more of like because for indigenous peoples more of a lifestyle right so there they they've been doing that that so it's it's a great career for indigenous people because they can go out in the summer make money beyond the land and then in the winter they can go and run their chop lines or hunt be with their families and participate in their culture. So i think that that's why it's become like kind of a an a nice lifestyle For certain people you know for sure. So how'd agencies and nations work together. How can ecologist and fire keepers spark those collaborations people always say. Oh you need to engage with the indigenous communities and then we'll like to me. That's a nice concept. I know that lots of non-indigenous people or companies get frustrated. Because you know they go to these communities and try to engage in. Nobody turns up or you know they can't get hold of anybody. Nobody returns their calls. And so i think for me like the thing to remember with that. Is you know for people to remember that For like first. Nations are under the indian. Act right so basically all their resource and and you know how their capital for how they're run all basically as decided in in ottawa. Almost you know and how much money comes down to them so most of the times you know. Even though the communities have high capacity You know for forestry your other things..

kimberly hoffman ellen Skelton thomas windham brianna freeman justin Roberts anthony willis neill alexandra amy christianson Matt kristof kevin brown Donald trump Jackie Doug amy bush matt Amy mooney canada china Paul facebook
"christianson" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

07:11 min | Last month

"christianson" Discussed on Ologies

"Like the timber companies love and obviously this is something that is a family issue for you to having you know being married to someone. Who is myra fighter at. What point did you decide to spread the word about good fire and the term. Good fire to something. That i'm kind of just learned to but can you. Can you talk about what good fire is. Sure so good fair. I think comes just from the idea that you know. It's very obvious that we can have good fires on the landscape. You know the fire is something that is helpful to the environment and to people and so i think indigenous people lots of times see fire almost an dichotomy. So kind of you know these bad fires and then the good fire that we can use as a tools. But before colonization indigenous people would use fire on the landscape in good ways but then also we did have lightning fires obviously back then right but they would come across the landscape and kind of enter into this mosaic landscape that these indigenous burns and other lightning caused fires Will like and so as they would enter them. Then the fire behavior would change so as you know and entered a meadow the the fire intensity might decrease and then it would go back into the force maybe increase in an hit like a deciduous stand of trees and go down again. And so this mosaic. Or patchwork on the landscape was actually really helpful for fire to kind of decrease the intensity of these fire events. But what we're seeing right now is because we've been suppressing those firemen's there's just so much fuel in the forest that we're seeing these bad fire so even like i'm thinking like the dixie fire in california right now or we have like multiple fires in canada at the moment to that are bad fires like lots of empty. No we look at and say oh fires natural. There's good ecological benefits but for me. There's nothing good about these current fires happening right now. So at this point are facetime. Call cut out because of spotty internet so amy recorded a clip answering a few more questions because she is the best and knew that we only had a few days until this one up and she's once again the best. I also just wanted to mention the importance of indigenous people in fire on in canada but also in other countries you know we often think about indigenous people and fire management is something that happened in the past but we have a lot of amazing indigenous firefighters in canada indigenous fire managers and other people who are really you know on the front lines trying to bring back good fire and indigenous fire stewardship and really Out there every summer kind of protecting our communities from these bad fires and especially in canada lots of hymns there. We don't get enough attention. I think to those indigenous firefighters lots of times. They're kept kind of from progressing in their careers because they might not have the appropriate western education levels. You know a degree or a diploma or something but they have you know might have twenty thirty forty years experience of being on the fire so knowledgeable and incredible and i think you know lots of times. We need to look at wear western signs as well. Got some of its ideas like. I've spoken to many elders. Who told me about drip torches and how they would use tree lambs and south to create their own drip torches. That's what their ancestors did in how they would spread fire across. The landscape was in doing that. So now you know. It's a mental canister with fuel in it but it's kind of the same idea that indigenous peoples had about how they used fire properly on the land and just this incredible knowledge base and people in the communities. You know had roles in canada. Some nations actually had families that were fire keepers. There were many people who knew about fire and had knowledge about fire activity after the break. You'll hear a clip from good fire. Podcast podcasts amy. Christianson and matt christoph talking about indigenous firefighters experience on the fire line. And i admit i found this discussion hilarious. But before that remember henry louis hank the anthropologist who wrote a time for burning and made that fires of springfield so the retro sixteen millimeter aesthetics are far from the coolest thing about his fireworks. One of the coolest things i think from henry. Lewis's work was when he was being to woodland cree. Danny elders about how they would use fire to melt the frost in the ground. And i've seen actually a few kind of western science studies lately on that but that's actually an older technique that the communities us so you get kind of all the dry grass on top of a meadow or something and they would go and burn that in the early spring because that's the most important thing about indigenous burning is the time to burn when it safe to do a good fire and they would that would then turn that level that grass into you know black and so the blackwood absorb the heat of the sun and then start to melt the frost out of the ground in the early spring. And that would give you much like earlier. Green shoots and green grass coming up that then moose deer other things could come in and eat for in that area so it would make your hunting or other things a lot easier to do. That's geez see. I think that that's those are things you know that. There's probably so much more out there that we don't even know That communities used and and how they would use fire in a good way. And i mean if people are interested as well you know frank lake. I think is probably one of the first kind of fire call. Just who also is an indigenous man who you know saw very early. The importance of indigenous fire knowledge and bringing in. He's written some really great publications. That i think for people are i opening. You know about how we can use fire in a good way on the landscape and to hear an ear load of other incredible indigenous voices and fire ecology. You want to subscribe to good fire. It's a podcast series by aimee and matt and we are featuring audio from a discussion as they launched. Good fire in two thousand eighteen. They were gracious enough to let us steal some clips to round out the conversation amid our tech issues this week and as it turned out amy and i had further trouble connecting because those three fires that she mentioned around her family cabin got bigger and they were forced to evacuate from their vacation so yes. Her work is timely and personal. And she literally wrote the book on this of volume titled first nations wildfire. Evacuations a guide for communities and external agencies alongside tara mcgee and first nations wildfire evacuation partnership. So i'm gonna linked to that initial as well now in her name. Were donating this week to a cause of her choosing and she acid goto indigenous residential school survivors. That's i r s s s dot ca. For over twenty years. They've assisted first nation peoples in british columbia to recognize and be holistically..

canada myra matt christoph henry louis hank amy Christianson california frank lake springfield Danny Lewis henry aimee tara mcgee matt british columbia
"christianson" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

08:21 min | Last month

"christianson" Discussed on Ologies

"Enhancing knowledge exchange mechanisms to improve the ways in which wildland fire science and technology are shared understood and implemented so amy's team had been working on that and for the curious. I will link to the full. Pdf on my website. Now as far as the increasing evacuations that issue gets more personal as this episode unfolds even more personal than my parents in an hourly motel in right now and this is something i think. A lot of people have trouble wrapping their brain around and maybe there is no good answer but is it's climate. Change is a human ignition carelessness. Is it not letting the forest burners at naturally would How'd you scientists come up with plans to tackle this issue. If it's kind of like a trifold problem yeah. I agree with you. It's a such a complex issue. I mean there's also the fact that people are just building more in areas that are of higher risk to fire you know as communities get larger and kind of expand out into what some people call the wildland urban interface. It's really increasing fire risk. I think that that's the hard thing too is that there's no like magic bullet solution right like even with cultural burning like you know. I'm such a strong proponent of getting that back on the ground but that doesn't at all tackle how vulnerable some homes and other things are to fire at the moment climate change she said is also a pretty big fricken deal but the one thing you know that i think locally like you know in our towns and that we can control is the fuels that are available to burn. And so. that's why you know. I think that cultural burning or landscape level fuel management as well as the community welfare mitigation is so important to in combination lately too. I've been seeing. I don't know if you are seeing in the states as much but in canada there's a bit of a movement to just kind of you know fireproof communities. Are you know keep at homes or you know structures safe from fire but to me. That's really missing the point of like the landscape around your home like for me. I don't wanna be living. You know if my home is standing in the middle of you know of blocking landscaping and candidate can take a long time for the forest to regenerate. Sometimes you know twenty thirty forty years and even then they're finding up north the boreal forest. The burns are just so hot that they're basically kind of killing the soil in any vegetation around so. Yeah it's quite a complex issue. But i think when i think as an indigenous person look at the forest. I don't just see it as trees timber values or other things. You see it as like part of who you are right like your relations so you want to be able to. You know stewart and protect that area as much as you. Do you know your own home or or structure and can you describe a little bit about prescribed. Fires and indigenous fire stewardship versus cultural burns. I think a lot of people may be one of lump them together. But can you describe a little bit about how they work or what they are. Yes so there's a bit of a danger of that this whole thing now where we're seeing prescribed fire and just kind of throwing cultural burning into that So prescribed fire. Is you know generally what agencies do so were there setting fire on the landscape but in many cases they're setting you know high severity fires burning fast and they want to burn a lot of land in a little bit of time so we see like lots of aerial ignition of fires. We see them using. You know basically like helicopter ignition and in canada like lots of times. People put that together as being a crown fire being these big bad kind of out of control fires. That are burning up. You know mountainsides. That's generally the media that we see in canada about prescribed fire but it really differs from cultural burning because cultural burning his more about up shaving a cultural objective around the forest. Around where you live so you don't really want to have these big large stand replacing fires that go through an incan. Kill everything in a prescribed fire event. That sometimes is what happens in canada. Yeah so for cultural fire to the thing is that most fires are actually pretty low intensity in australia. They call them like slow burns or cool burns and they generally move through the under story and they're done at certain times of year where the potential fire behavior is is very low risk. So you know where you're not getting you know potential of khanfar. There's lots of natural fuel brakes around the fire in canada. That's usually snow still on the ground for indigenous people cultural burning to his like a family a community activities. Like when i'm doing burns and things. Like i my my daughters. My mom was on the last one that we did. There's a great photo that's run in a few news articles about amy's work and she's standing in a golden grassy field. It's hazy with smoke as a cultural burn grass fire. She's overseeing lurches behind her and there's a husky wolf a dog sitting to her right staring off amy's wearing black leggings anna red flannel shirt and his pregnant with what would be her second daughter so the mood is very calm. Unlike what most people's experience of land on fire might be lots of times you know. We don't wear personal protective equipment. You know like the kind of nomex. They usually see firefighters wearing because usually the fires are honestly just so slow and most people fi find them. I think a bit boring to you because it can take a really long time to burn a really small piece of land and so for agencies. That doesn't really work. well right. Because that for them means more staffing dollars and other things to achieve like you know a smaller area burned. Yeah when it comes to how much fuel is in some of the forest now that would be too much for say a prescribed burn may be to tackle. I'm reading like there's so much you know. Dead timber and fallen timber because we've suppressed fire for so long like where does fire management even begin to kind of tackle that issue. Yeah it's it is a big issue. And i think people often get overwhelmed like i just hear you know all the time. Oh it's so complex. There's so many things in so many people's competing values. But i think we often lose the focus on like local communities so In canada are first nations have reserves. And so if you go onto a reserve many times like when you speak to the elders and other people like they know what needs to be done in their area like they know if certain areas or to fuel loaded and you know they want to go in there and kind of mechanically treat treat the forest so you know by using machines and labor to go in and do thinning and other things before they can burn to kind of keep the the fuel low low in those areas. So i think for me. That's the biggest thing is that we really need to go back to kind of these local solutions to fire. And that's really kind of what our research is showing that you know. Local people want to be involved. So you know. I talked mostly about indigenous peoples but you know ranchers farmers other people who you know. Use the landscape for their livelihood. They also you know really want to have a healthy forest and environment around them and they know the areas to even forestry companies like the one. Nice thing about cultural burning. Is that because we're doing kind of these low under story burns like we don't wanna burn the nice big healthy trees right because those are so important for cultural activities and for other of like our relations other animals. It's actually a really nicely works together because you kind of can get cultural burns going through and and really removing some of that debt fall in promoting those healthy big tree growth.

canada amy khanfar boreal forest anna red stewart australia
Using the 'Jobs to Be Done' Framework to Understand Your Customers More

Marketing for Consultants

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Using the 'Jobs to Be Done' Framework to Understand Your Customers More

"Start with jobs to be done. If and can you just give us a quick overview of of the jobs be done framework and how that could apply. Yeah so jobs to be done. Why something that kind of was discovered around the early mid nineties clayton. Christianson is one of the founders. There's quite a few there. I think i'm reading a book right now by jim called awkward says there are five different types of jobs to be done framework people who have founded this idea and really said these are the best ways to approach it. So when i talk about it. I like to use the clayton christianson type model for what we're really trying to discover is at the core. What is the very basic simple thing. Your customers are doing with your product or service. So when i'm coming into my speedy sast clients and at we're trying to understand. What are people doing. What's the one thing that they have hired this product to do for them. And then in my own business i try to think of. What's the one simple like pain point job thing that the b. two b. company needs to accomplish to in order for me to be a success. What is the job that they've tried to hire. On and a lot of times trying to explain to customers or clients. It gets a little confused or foggy with like use cases or tactics. It really is one simple line like this is what they're trying to do. They want to know their audience. They want to get more leads. They want to expand their network. It's a very simple one line job. They've hired the product or service to do but then it can inform and create so much more value so once we know that very specific job than we know. What are the benefits that they receive when they've accomplished that. How do they feel with when they've accomplished that. What are the side effects. What what is the process that they need to take to achieve that job so understanding the one little job. There's a whole lot than can inform and basically evolve off of knowing that information

Clayton Christianson Christianson Clayton Jobs JIM
When Anthropology Meets Audio Storytelling

HowSound

02:17 min | 3 months ago

When Anthropology Meets Audio Storytelling

"The only audio storyteller i think of that takes their cues from. Anthropology is nanna hauge christianson. She's in denmark and she has a phd in the subject. How would you say your radio. Production as an anthropologist is different than a reporter seeking the same story. What makes your work different. Do you think. I dislike very much. Then the field week pat of this. Yeah this pat where you go into it you go to place an environment and you hang out and spend time with people and maybe in a way. That's very like explorative approach in that that it's not always i'm sure of what i am seeking. Just they're kind of trying to be open and listening to what is happening. And then follow that. What you're describing sounds to me like a documentarian. How would a documentarian which i think of his journalism I guess i'm just trying to parse out when you walk into a room with a microphone. What are you doing. That's different than maybe what i would do. Yeah i think. I need to know what you are doing to answer that. A a good point i think for me i wanna know. Generally that there's going to be a story there. Probably before i go in. It's true that i might see something interesting. And just see what happens but more often than not. I'm on the hunt for a story from the get go and then i might spend a good deal of time in that space and just seeing what unfolds. But i wonder if it has to do with what i'm looking for in the first place which is story Yeah yeah. I think. I'm maybe not us occupied with the story to begin with. I think maybe that's a big difference. Yeah it's more interest in an environment or in a theme more broadly.

Nanna Hauge Christianson Denmark
"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

The Ultimate Health Podcast

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

"Got mostly better or we don't know they didn't try this last point. I forgot to mention they'd had thyroid disease for an average of four years. So we've been going on for some time. I'm just curious somebody who maybe they didn't have severe thyroid disease. And they went on a protocol like your thyroid reset diet and they got things back to normal range in the thyroiditis was working optimally. Do they always have a susceptibility. Compared to somebody who didn't have thyroid disease or skew that way like are they always going to be more susceptible to having thyroid issues or once. They he'll that are they back in maintenance phase with the quote unquote regular people. They are back in maintenance phase. They are more susceptible than general population. I think about whatever our window of item tolerances and for most of us just not known if someone knows they have thyroid disease. They know it's rather narrow and if they know they were able to correct that by in their idea and then at that point it it's somewhat broader and yeah then the maintenance phase is a great fit for them. All right allan. i think we've covered what we have covered a ton here. Unless you have anything else you think. We need to cover before we part ways other than listeners. Getting the thyroid reset diet. How can they connect with you after the show. Yeah dr christianson dot com. Dr christianson s. o. N. that's the center bat and the book is just wherever you get. Books are most us amazon these days but if you had a local bookstore you can give some love to. That's always great all right. I'm going to link it all up in the show. It's a pleasure tatting again. And i'm sure we'll do this again down the line. Thank you thank you so much jesse. This was awesome interview really good questions. Thank you round..

amazon four years jesse allan dot com christianson Dr dr
"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

The Ultimate Health Podcast

05:13 min | 4 months ago

"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

"These if your thyroid's having troubles yes so big context. Our food gives us macronutrients or proteins. Or carbs gives us the micronutrients vitamins minerals. We often talk about fido nutrients. There's more awareness about people. Think about superfoodsrx lot of fighter nutrients. The honest concept is that fighter nutrients are fido toxicants plant makes to protect themselves their insecticides herbicides pesticides. They're naturally occurring pesticides by luck of evolutionary time together when we consume those in the amounts we would typically find in foods and in the context of normal diet. Those poisons are just the right amount to make us better. In like one of the most common goal trajan is a thing called glueck assimilate and that's in cruciferous vegetables and when we eat broccoli we get some glucose emily that hits our liber and if there was some twisted way by which someone could isolate that and take a massive quantity and had actually reached their liber. There are few things it'd be more point more poisonous. It's just deadly but in the amount we get in the context of food it hits her liver and liver says. Wow tough world out there. I better beef up. I better get myself ready for action you know and so you better liver function from that. So yeah there's a whole category of these fido toxicants. That can actually be helpful. Now some of them can also change. I dine absorption so in those historical contexts when there were cultures that were marginal and there is fine status. These things could make just a little bit worse. If that was a big part of the diet so that had endemic goiter in the sixties and if their diet was high in you know millet or something that rate of neck and large integrator might go from a baseline of twenty percent up to a baseline of twenty four percent on a high goiter. Genyk diet so no relevance modern world at practice for twenty five years. I've seen a lot of stuff. And i saw one. Young boy who his diet for about six months was almost exclusively rockley like pounds and pounds a day in the blender. I'm not exaggerating. That was like ninety five or more percent of his whole food intake and he got away from that. His dad brought him into see me and i saw his lab has nakisa is reports. The whole remedy was just to knock it off. You know eat eat good food but eat a lot of food and different food categories and he got better so i wouldn't say that it's not possible to overdo quite foods but if you have more than that in your diet not only. Is it not an issue but the very things that make those foods categorizes greater. Jack are things that make those foods good for us in other reasons coming back to the story but that kid in the broccoli. Why was he doing that. was he. Trying to treat a health condition or did he just like broccoli. I can't imagine that would taste very good if you can think about what you and i might have been like her late teens early. Adulthood oftentimes young guys are impressionable. And pretty you take things to run with it. Go all the way with something good idea or bad and so he saw a motivational speaker. A pretty famous one. Who at the time was pushing for a diet. Mostly rob edibles and talking about some vegetables being better than others and this could hurt that he goes. Oh well if that's the best and broccolis about eight broccoli and he. You mentioned the fact that it was raw that pops into my head. The thought of you know there's different ways. We can also prepare these veggies. That are gonna genetic like we can ferment them. We could steam them. We could stir fry them..

twenty percent twenty five years twenty four percent about six months Jack ninety five or more sixties one pounds a day pounds Genyk eight
"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

The Ultimate Health Podcast

02:47 min | 4 months ago

"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

"Our googling and you'll find the same twelve foods on four or five websites and that's about it you won't see it on nutrient facts or chronometer or anything else like that. So i dug hard and pulled a lot of data from usda reports. And i finally got about six hundred foods each with about fifty samples and so i- averaged and showed some analysis of bell curve distribution and there were some foods that were generally low but every now and then had like a pig outlier. So when i put together the list and a diet i said hey look even the things that were normally okay but sometimes could be way off the charts. I encourage people to avoid those during that stage wins to trying to really help thyroid get better and since this is coming from the top down in the milk itself. I'm assuming we have to avoid things like cheese and yogurt in products made from that milk. Yeah and the way that up is doubt. There's two ways to use the the diet. There's trying to actively improve upon things and that's what i call the whole reset stage. That's where someone's got disease They've got some symptoms. They want to get better. They want to lower the symptoms. That's done for a set period of time. It could be one to nine months kind of walk through the process of that in the book. And during that. You just do green light foods. It's super easy. I just broke down our throats into green light. Yellow light red light and the cool thing is that there's tons of options in every food category in green light rain. So you've got a lot of stuff to pick from one. Someone has achieved their goals and is wish to stabilize or someone just coming into it. Wanting to not trigger thyroid disease. Same thing green light cruiser grade. It can also out in one to two servings of yellow light foods per day so a lot of dairy things i put in that yellow light list where they're pretty consistent pretty predictable and at a reasonable serving size. It's enough to where it wouldn't push you over the edge okay. So we want pretty deep into the dairy there. Let's talk fortified foods. What foods. These days in western culture being fortified with john so deliberately fortified dairy roundabout because of the costa off. We covered that. So then. We've got salt so it's deliberately added into salt and some salt. Has it naturally occurring some salt. Has it put in on purpose. There are so many different kinds of salt. They're out there these days. What are you using together. Different options for people that want to avoid iodine wing consuming salt or a salt. Something we just have to minimize or avoid altogether. You know. this is a great example of a pretty painless subsitution. There's wonderful culinary salts that have negligible amounts of iodine. And it's funny. I did a pretty went through a evolutionary process of this way back. When i was a huge fan of sea salt for the assumption that i was getting some useful minerals from that besides sodium chloride us back i started seeing assays of mineral content and sea salt and yeah every minute you can think of their some of out in sea salt but doses matter..

four five websites nine months two servings twelve foods one about fifty samples about six hundred foods two ways each tons of options sodium chloride some foods light john costa
"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

The Ultimate Health Podcast

04:24 min | 4 months ago

"christianson" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

"Slash youtube be sure and subscribing hit that bow while you're there also if you love this conversation i really appreciate it. Helps spread the good word. Share it with somebody in your life and help spread this message. Thank you so much without further ado here. We go with dr allen christianson. Alan welcome back to the podcast. How you doing just the. I'm doing good glad to be with you. Excited to chat about thyroid today. And you ever really unique perspective on how to treat the thyroid. I half to say 'cause a lot of functional medicine practitioners new. You talk about this in the new book. Actually use high dose iodine when treating thyroid dysfunction. So your approach is on the other. End of the spectrum lessening or iodine intake. So talk about first of all. How did you first come across this. You know funny thing. I guess aric of my understanding If you go back enough it would have been not really a whole lot of doubt. Just the basic knowledge in biochemistry. The thyroid needs some to work not allowed past that. Then i guess just the awareness of it being used in medicine in various ways skin antiseptic or whatnot in somewhere around late nineties. Early two thousands. I became aware of a small. But growing fatty abusing megadose iodine and learn about it. Because i had patients who were developing thyroid disease from attempting these things people that wouldn't have otherwise and so i got a little more into it and i realized that yeah we need some good thing at a certain point but way too much can be harmful for quite a while. That's about where it was and in the recent years some new study showed that you know all those things are true but the level that's harmful was lower than we thought and then also that for some there may be an opportunity to reverse disease by lowering it so that's kind of how that all unfolded. So where does somebody start. Say they have a thyroid disease right now and they've had it chronically for a period of time..

Alan youtube dr allen christianson today around late nineties Early two thousands first
His business is building ice castles. Will that get harder in a warming world?

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 7 months ago

His business is building ice castles. Will that get harder in a warming world?

"In the movie frozen queen elsa magically creates a palace maid of sparkling ice for brent christianson making an ice palace is harder but the results are still enchanting. We tried to create. What feels like a other worldly experience. Christensen is the founder of ice castles. His company builds elaborate structures that tower up to forty feet high. They start by making thousands of icicles. Which the fuse together. And then spray repeatedly with water so given a month of good cold weather we can create some pretty massive structures. Low temperatures are good for building but visitors dislike extreme cold so the company's sites in utah. Colorado new hampshire and wisconsin are in areas that often hover near thirty two degrees some years. It's really cold some years. It's not and we just gotta hold our breath and work with what we have last year. The wisconsin locations opening was delayed because the ice was melting and climate. Change is bringing more warm days. Long-term definitely if i were to pass this down generation generation. We'd be moving further north. I'm sure but for now. Christianson is coping with the uncertainty and this year his team was able to build. Ice castles fit for queen elsa

Elsa Magically Brent Christianson Ice Palace Christensen Wisconsin New Hampshire Utah Colorado Christianson Queen Elsa
"christianson" Discussed on Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

06:12 min | 8 months ago

"christianson" Discussed on Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

"What did you do. What was the process. What was that fresh set of eyes. And then we're we're the real sort of small levers that you were able to press on here to increase conversions. Well the biggest thing that we probably discovered is experiment that we run for clients and companies. Is we wanna learn something. We want to answer the question. why like. Why did we change that button color. Not that orange was better than green. Was it that it added contrast her. or what. Have you going down the path of figuring out what the visitors want. Obviously the male market generally younger audience and we wanted to really figure out what made him tick and the biggest question that we really uncovered was. I don't know what to choose. You have so many great options. What are we choose so it was really came down to that and social proof so those two things to give you context is the what we exploited. It's just how could we make it easier for them to engage in that shopping experience to find the products that they're looking for and then helped to make a selection on that product. If you go to their site you'll see some sub now below that the hero image on the homepage that here's the different category breakdown of the different products in very intuitive and very descriptive and helps lead them. Engage them that was completely done and designed by us based on the experimentation that we had done leading up to that. It's like okay. We figured out that they really need hell. And then we just helped push them through to that next step throughout the the step of it and then highlighting and emphasizing. How many great reviews and customers and testimonials than kind of community that they had around their products rather than that. Hey we beard oil because they did. They built big. They built an amazing brand supportive community behind it and this was even before we came on and did some work the stories that those guys have to tell about how the cool things that have happened with inside that. That group is pretty incredible. But we just did that. And then basically took the risk. They've got a lifetime warranty on their products to guarantee at the stand behind it. How can we lift that up and using things like icons because we know that that market isn't going to generally read. I mean it's it's just the truth of it. I mean you look at men versus women market you. You guys both laughed. But just insulted our entire. Look you look at your own personal shopping. Shopping behavior totally. I sure as hell don't read a bunch of. I don't read a bunch of staff about that. Look cool okay. Well then price okay. I hear whereas the female market generally a research compare. It's just psychology of it. I mean it's when you do this for living uncover little things like that. That's why we went instead of the long reviews. And all of the things as you go throughout the site you'll see we've sprinkled testimonials very quick and concise in nature to really emphasize that. Hey we are who we say we are. We stand behind it. We've got happy customers. Do all of those things and one of the biggest things that we really found was helped going back to the help me choose aspect if you go onto their product pages for like their beard oils and stuff that require assent for you to choose an option. The number one complaint that we saw from people in our polling of the audience was they said they did not know which sent to choose even though the sent guide was on the page. They weren't seeing it so all we simply did was going back to adding something to remove friction. we added. Smells like to the option list. Smells like cedar. Smells like whatever ended. A product selection box tested a bunch of different variations of how we can position that place that and that's the winner. That's that's all on the site right now. It's been going strong for a while like gunslinger sweet. Baco and cedar is bumped conversi- like something like thirty three or thirty five percent. I can't remember we stats but it was. It was up there just but all the information was on the page. They thought they were answering the question but they weren't answering the question in the way that the audience was responding to the most so we just took that information and made it easier to digest and they were able to help move them along the journey. So how did you get that specific feedback. I'm interested in that in particular exit polling exit polling. Okay yeah a simple thing i mean. Obviously this is very unique to live bearded. But it's a small thing and this is the kind of stuff that you'll sort of see us data in order to determine that i'm a simple person by nature and sometimes you just gotta ask the hard questions like. Why didn't you buy from us today. And why didn't you. What questions did we answer for you today. And those simple questions will often reveal the simple answers. I'm doing a very in depth qualitative analysis of a very large company. Right now they just based on our experimentation rebranded like completely. We're talking thousands of pages on this website. Completely redesigned the whole thing so yearlong effort finally launched it. Now we're going back in doing the evaluation again on that journey of the visitor versus the tactical stuff. They're very good about pushing visitors to buy right now when they're ready but it's the people that fall off that were not the best at over. We're getting there. I'm asking the question right now and it's off the homepage on earth. Like two part questions like did you find everything you're looking for today. What didn't you find and now glaring answer literally. My ex person just messaged me yesterday afternoon. Saying they're asking for this specific thing that isn't there and it's located nowhere but it's a very big piece that it was just completely overlooked so we've got three or four different test ideas and experimentation to go into that's going to probably really helps solidify the missing pieces that go into that

Melania justin christianson boston twenty years justin austin two sides massachusetts today million dollars first time two conversions over twenty years boston downtown boston com
How Live Bearded Exploded Their Online Conversions with Justin Christianson

Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

06:12 min | 8 months ago

How Live Bearded Exploded Their Online Conversions with Justin Christianson

"What did you do. What was the process. What was that fresh set of eyes. And then we're we're the real sort of small levers that you were able to press on here to increase conversions. Well the biggest thing that we probably discovered is experiment that we run for clients and companies. Is we wanna learn something. We want to answer the question. why like. Why did we change that button color. Not that orange was better than green. Was it that it added contrast her. or what. Have you going down the path of figuring out what the visitors want. Obviously the male market generally younger audience and we wanted to really figure out what made him tick and the biggest question that we really uncovered was. I don't know what to choose. You have so many great options. What are we choose so it was really came down to that and social proof so those two things to give you context is the what we exploited. It's just how could we make it easier for them to engage in that shopping experience to find the products that they're looking for and then helped to make a selection on that product. If you go to their site you'll see some sub now below that the hero image on the homepage that here's the different category breakdown of the different products in very intuitive and very descriptive and helps lead them. Engage them that was completely done and designed by us based on the experimentation that we had done leading up to that. It's like okay. We figured out that they really need hell. And then we just helped push them through to that next step throughout the the step of it and then highlighting and emphasizing. How many great reviews and customers and testimonials than kind of community that they had around their products rather than that. Hey we beard oil because they did. They built big. They built an amazing brand supportive community behind it and this was even before we came on and did some work the stories that those guys have to tell about how the cool things that have happened with inside that. That group is pretty incredible. But we just did that. And then basically took the risk. They've got a lifetime warranty on their products to guarantee at the stand behind it. How can we lift that up and using things like icons because we know that that market isn't going to generally read. I mean it's it's just the truth of it. I mean you look at men versus women market you. You guys both laughed. But just insulted our entire. Look you look at your own personal shopping. Shopping behavior totally. I sure as hell don't read a bunch of. I don't read a bunch of staff about that. Look cool okay. Well then price okay. I hear whereas the female market generally a research compare. It's just psychology of it. I mean it's when you do this for living uncover little things like that. That's why we went instead of the long reviews. And all of the things as you go throughout the site you'll see we've sprinkled testimonials very quick and concise in nature to really emphasize that. Hey we are who we say we are. We stand behind it. We've got happy customers. Do all of those things and one of the biggest things that we really found was helped going back to the help me choose aspect if you go onto their product pages for like their beard oils and stuff that require assent for you to choose an option. The number one complaint that we saw from people in our polling of the audience was they said they did not know which sent to choose even though the sent guide was on the page. They weren't seeing it so all we simply did was going back to adding something to remove friction. we added. Smells like to the option list. Smells like cedar. Smells like whatever ended. A product selection box tested a bunch of different variations of how we can position that place that and that's the winner. That's that's all on the site right now. It's been going strong for a while like gunslinger sweet. Baco and cedar is bumped conversi- like something like thirty three or thirty five percent. I can't remember we stats but it was. It was up there just but all the information was on the page. They thought they were answering the question but they weren't answering the question in the way that the audience was responding to the most so we just took that information and made it easier to digest and they were able to help move them along the journey. So how did you get that specific feedback. I'm interested in that in particular exit polling exit polling. Okay yeah a simple thing i mean. Obviously this is very unique to live bearded. But it's a small thing and this is the kind of stuff that you'll sort of see us data in order to determine that i'm a simple person by nature and sometimes you just gotta ask the hard questions like. Why didn't you buy from us today. And why didn't you. What questions did we answer for you today. And those simple questions will often reveal the simple answers. I'm doing a very in depth qualitative analysis of a very large company. Right now they just based on our experimentation rebranded like completely. We're talking thousands of pages on this website. Completely redesigned the whole thing so yearlong effort finally launched it. Now we're going back in doing the evaluation again on that journey of the visitor versus the tactical stuff. They're very good about pushing visitors to buy right now when they're ready but it's the people that fall off that were not the best at over. We're getting there. I'm asking the question right now and it's off the homepage on earth. Like two part questions like did you find everything you're looking for today. What didn't you find and now glaring answer literally. My ex person just messaged me yesterday afternoon. Saying they're asking for this specific thing that isn't there and it's located nowhere but it's a very big piece that it was just completely overlooked so we've got three or four different test ideas and experimentation to go into that's going to probably really helps solidify the missing pieces that go into that

"christianson" Discussed on The Fat-Burning Man Show

The Fat-Burning Man Show

03:32 min | 8 months ago

"christianson" Discussed on The Fat-Burning Man Show

"Usually about twenty plus percent as well as you entered into our challenges and giveaways as part of that so check out subscribe and save. We also have three and six pack bundles. If you want to really a stock up and save a bunch of money at the same time so head on over to wild superfoods dot com. Can't wait to see you there. All right on this show with dr allen christianson. We're talking about hidden sources of mine. That could drive your levels dangerously high. What ideal levels of dietary don should look like. Why eating tons of seaweed. Snacks is probably not a good idea. Which salts could compromise thyroid health and which choices our best and much much more. Let's go hang out with dr christianson. Welcome back folks returning to the show. Today is dr allen christianson aboard certified naturopathic endocrinologist who specializes in thyroid care and a new york times bestselling author whose recent titles include the thyroid reset diet and the metabolism reset diet. Dr christianson has been featured on countless media. Including the dr oz. Show the doctors and the today show and many more. He's also a father an avid outdoorsmen and in fact a surprisingly talented offroad unicyclists..

new york Today six pack three today dr allen christianson christianson about twenty plus percent dr oz. Show the doctors tons of seaweed Dr a bunch of money dr christianson dot com
"christianson" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

07:57 min | 8 months ago

"christianson" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"I am here today with the first person who really helped me on my roach recovery from thyroid disease and i can now say. I am in full remission. From hashimoto's i'm here with dr allen christianson who is most recently the author of the thyroid reset diet which we talk about today and especially some very specific things that are extremely vital for getting the thyroid actually heal itself. He makes a very strong case for the facts about thyroid. Disease often does not have to be lifelong but much of the conventional advice that we are given about diarrhea. Disease can actually be counterproductive to long-term healing. If you aren't familiar dr christianson. He is a naturopathic endocrinologist. Who specializes in thyroid. Disease specifically hashimoto's hypothyroidism and graves disease. He's also my specialist when it comes to thi- worried Specific problems although. I don't have any current thyroid visit problems. And he was the first one who was able to accurately diagnose motos and helped me figure out what my path to recovery would look like. I'm always so happy to share him with you guys and i think a lot of the new information he presents in his episode is really really helpful for anyone with thyroid struggles and his new book. The thyroid reset diet is also very important. So if you have any kind of thyroid related issues a highly recommended on the link to it will be in the show notes along with links to many of the things we talk about in this episode. I think you'll learn a lot. And especially like i said some very important points that are often presented incorrectly even by other thyroid experts. So i know that you'll learn a lot in without further ado. Let's jump in dr chris. Welcome back hey katie. Happy to be with you. It is always such a pleasure to talk to you. I have so much personal gratitude for you helped me. In my own journey with overcoming thyroid disease. You're the first one who really first of all recognized. It helped me get a diagnosis and then start on recovery so will be forever forever grateful to you for that. And i know that you've helped. Many thousands of people do the same thing and i love to have you back on a substantial amount of listeners. Have some form of thyroid disease. Hashimoto's being very common one. And i know that you are one of the foremost experts in the world on this and so it's always such a joy to get to share you on this podcast and that you have been working on a really comprehensive new book that i think is really really important for anybody with any kind of thyroid struggles. But especially hashimoto's and i wanna go deep on some of the things you talk about today But distort broad. I think it's also important to make sure we have kind of a definition of terms and also understanding of where we're going when we have conversations like this because i didn't have this experience because i worked with you but i've heard from many listeners. Who are when. They're diagnosed told that their condition will not improve. It will likely get worse and that it's lifelong So i'd love to start there and talk about thyroid disease from the perspective of what is going on in the body and can we support the body in undoing. That your thank you so much. Great great points to frame this generally. There's two big things. There's the thyroid's their glands inability to make enough hormone and the body not properly responding to doubt hormone so those things go together and up until the recent past medicine did think that this was progressive. This was persistent and this was just not reversible but the new evidence said i'm sharing is that this can get better For many people that means that they will respond differently to thyroid hormones. They can have their symptoms clear up in ways that they had not before and for some that will mean that they will no longer need ongoing thyroid treatment. Their gland can literally grow back new cells and start to produce hormone more effectively again. That's the exciting part. That is really encouraging. Especially because like. I said that's not necessarily presented as common information. Why do you think that isn't really known in the standard of care right now. Are there parts of the approach that were missing or that just the conventional treatment would maybe missed. That makes that not possible. Yeah so the thing that has come out. That's made the perspective apparent is is new information. It's from the last last several years. And there's always just a big lag between data being made and then data being delivered being used in influencing practice so this is just the time for that to start coming out but these are new discoveries that any doctors in several years ago. Wow okay so walk us through some of those. Because i know from working with you that things like that word hormone can be helpful and even necessary especially in the early heart of it But what does that. Kind of arc of recovery look like. And how would someone know for instance if that was going to be possible for them. That's a good question. And it's not always clear in terms of whether someone will grow back their own cells but anyone can predict that they can do better in terms of responding to the hormone so arca recovery being that people typically can have diagnosis at the were some. It can be delayed. Some it can be a decade more out and some are not yet on their medication. And there's those that are better still still suffering and still into matic and so with this new approach. They can have their system take-up hormones better when you're when you take a hormone it still has to be metabolize and absorbed by the cells and responded to properly by the mitochondria and those are all parts that can be weak links in the chain and reasons why was who are on treatment. Don't feel like they are there. They're still having the same symptoms they had going into it but those those things can change and they can change order of between one one two three months for those who are diagnosed and had the disease for four years or fewer and are not yet on treatment did got a pretty good chance of having their cells. Just be normal again and take over their own punks by themselves and not needing to go on treatment and that change can take between about three to six months so fascinating and so against what a lot of the recommendations are. What's going on physiologically with that happening. Because certainly the advice. I know i got early on with iraq. Diagnosis was obviously not from you. But before that was that if you have lower you need to take more iodine. Yeah and that's something. That's tricky at a really superficial level of understanding. It could seem logical. The thyroid needs to work. So you could think well if it's not working must eat more and i've thought about the way that nutrients can work like the way. The keys could work to a car. You know if you don't have your keys. The car won't budge but there's countless problems with the car that won't be remedied by more keys. And you could even imagine that if you poured you know twenty thousand keys inside of the passenger compartment in the driver's seat you couldn't even drive properly so this is how it works. Iodine is something to wear. The thyroid needs the tiniest amounts and there's only small amounts normally in circulation. So does is that it pumps. It had concentrates it inside of itself. The thyroid pumps in iodine now because the amounts neither so small. If you ever get too much the thyroid shuts itself off and it does that because thyroid hormones. They're dangerous when there's too much of them they can. They can damage the heart. it can cause bone thinning. They can cause brain damage and our bodies have a sense about this. So rather than. Make too much hormone. They simply shut off a thyroid so too little. I can be a problem then so can too much and part of the big new insight. Is that the gap between two little in too much is much narrower than we thought.

katie today twenty thousand keys four years chris first one dr six months first person several years ago first two big things about three allen christianson iraq two little three months one thousands of people years
Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles photographed holding hands amid reports they're dating

Comments By Celebs

04:30 min | 9 months ago

Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles photographed holding hands amid reports they're dating

"This episode ready to go ready to publish and then about thirty minutes ago this news about olivia wilde and harry styles dating broke and we had to kind of. Just come on and talk about it. So we're going to go through a full detailed breakdown of everything we know. And then get into a discussion. But julie do wanna just give it immediate reaction. Yeah i mean whole he should know the skeptic in me isn't one hundred percent convinced yet but let's go through it okay so first off age wise just because everybody's wondering olivia is thirty six in harry's twenty six let's also keep in mind that olivia wilde. Jason seditious announced their split in november. They were never technically married. They were engaged for seven years. I remember at the time we did a pretty lengthy discussion on that. And when you go through their history you find out you know. She a pretty interesting dating history. Previously they have two kids and according to sources they had broken up at the beginning of the pandemic. It's been really amicable. They had great co-parenting and kind of the general consensus was like. There's really no drama here. I also think just as a total side note. I remember when it came out of the time. Everybody was shocked that they weren't married. Because i guess we just forgotten that you know he yeah. I also think the time line here are so important that they split the beginning of the urine. We only found out in november. Yes that is crucial. Also keep in mind olivia's currently directing and also starring the film. Don't worry darling. Harry's in florence was in it so we can kind of that. That is where they've gotten close if this is true but the reason that all this is circulating today is because they were seen holding hands at jeffrey as offs wedding. Jeffrey as off is harry's manager and he's also the son of irving shelley's off that is kim kardashian. Best friend's parents stadler kris jenner. Best friends and jeffries marrying glenn christianson. She is the global head of music partnerships at apple. Are you initiating this wedding and it was super small. There were sixteen people because of covid. And harry brought olivia as his plus one so they were seen holding hands. I'm sure you saw. He looked so handsome. She looked so beautiful she was in this kind of floral maxi dress gown type of thing. They were then seen after the wedding arriving at his house a source told people quote. They weren't montecito california this weekend for wedding. They were affectionate around their friends held hands and look very happy. They've dated for a few weeks. I've so more things to read. But i like. Can we just freak out about this for a second. Yes we can. We can freak out about it really. I have to tell you. This is the last thing i ever saw coming. And i actually remember when we had kind of just hypothesize about what we thought was going to happen. I remember for some reason. We had thought that zach braff and florence few broke up and i think it was said. Yeah you know. I could totally see florence and harry dating not in my wildest dreams. Did i envision a libyan harry. Well at the time the she was still adjacent stake as we had no reason to And even with the knowledge of them breaking up. I don't think i necessarily saw this coming. Although harry's track record liking older women does make sense here not that olivia's old by any means. I just mean older than him But the reason that. I really do believe this. I mean the skeptic in me is obviously like i said before. It's still a little bit hesitant to say. It's fully true because i think holding hands isn't the most incriminating evidence but when you think about a small wedding only sixteen people harry's officiating the wedding to bring a plus one it kind of feels like a big deal may first of all i agree. Second of all it makes sense. You know what. I mean. When i i wasn't i wouldn't have necessarily seen it coming but as i'm looking at him i'm like okay. I could see that she everything we've ever heard about her is that she's so great. He's very mature for his age. Also another reason that points me to believe that this is true is because you can't forget her break up with. Jason apparently was at the beginning of the year. So it's not like this has been one month since this big break up and also it's. He was officiating. The wedding and this was his manager. It's not like he's going to some you know random wedding where he didn't know anyone that's very in my opinion kind of like sacred thing to bring someone do so i i may be wrong and i'm totally fine if i'm wrong but i'm going to put my cards in here. In my official vote on the record is going to say this is actually happening.

Harry Olivia Wilde Olivia Jason Seditious Irving Shelley Glenn Christianson Kris Jenner Julie Jeffries Kim Kardashian Florence Jeffrey Zach Braff Apple California Jason
Everything we know about Marvel’s Disney+ series

Doug Stephan

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Everything we know about Marvel’s Disney+ series

"Disney dropped a treasure trove of news. They will really so much new content across their marvel Star Wars in Pixar brands. I gotta break it up over two of these segments. Driving the most excitement are the 10 New Star Wars Syriza coming to Disney Plus, including spinoffs from the Man DeLorean, Clone Wars and Rogue one A. Lando, Cal Rizzi in series and the Shocker while we've known about the Obi Wan Kenobi thing for some time, What we didn't know is that Hayden Christianson is returning to play Darth Vader. Wow, Also the next Star Wars movie will be directed by Patty Jenkins called Rogue Squadron and it arrives in 2023.

Disney Plus A. Lando Cal Rizzi Pixar Disney Hayden Christianson Darth Vader Patty Jenkins
Montana joins Missing and Murdered project, Indigenous Women Task Force, and Navajo COVID surge

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 10 months ago

Montana joins Missing and Murdered project, Indigenous Women Task Force, and Navajo COVID surge

"This is national native antonio gonzalez the confederated sailfish and kootenai tribes. In north west montana are participating in the national pilot project to improve coordination between agencies investigating missing and murdered indigenous persons cases yellowstone. Public radio's caitlyn. Nicholas reports the us department of justice recently developed protocols for federal tribal and state law enforcement to work together more efficiently which the k- kt will adapt into a tribal community response. Plan that specific to the flathead. Craig couture the cs kt. Police chief says this plan will help. When investigations cross jurisdictional lines gives us each a piece of this puzzle to put together or we have input on how. We're going to do this. So when we come together is going to be seamless for the hand off on who's going to be the lead jurisdiction if it goes into multiple jurisdiction who follows up on that it gives us a better opportunity to solve these cases and to bring some of these people home. See chairwoman shelly. Says the tribal council met with federal state and tribal agencies on tuesday to start adapting the doj's protocols to fit the community find says the cs kt were motivated to participate. After one of their own. Germain charro went missing in two thousand eighteen and has yet to be found so very excited to roll up our sleeves next week can start working on these guides in these guys are designed to be versatile enough to fit into each individual tribal community after working with the cs. Kt in the coming weeks the doj plans to go through the same process with other montana. Tribes i'm caitlyn nicholas wisconsin's missing murdered indigenous women's task force met virtually for its first meeting friday to begin work. The task forces seeking to address abduction homicide violence and trafficking of indigenous women. The group's identifying solutions and gathering data tribal representatives elders law enforcement. Judges and state leaders are among members of the task. Force there will also be opportunities for public. Participation through workgroups updated public health. Emergency orders go into effect. Monday on the navajo nation as the try abc's a surge in covid nineteen cases. Stay at home. Orders are extended fifty-seven our weekend lockdowns are being re implemented and essential businesses will only be open on weekdays from seven to seven the updated orders. Come days after navajo. Indian health service medical and healthcare providers say the tribes now in the major health care crisis during a virtual forum last week. Health officials pleaded with the public to stay home and take precautions to help reduce the surge in new covid. Nineteen cases and hospitalizations doctor. Loretta christianson chief medical officer for the navajo area. Ihs says hospital resources are stretched thin. Sure you that we will provide the best quality care possible but if we all don't stop coverted we will run out of beds. We will run out of nurses and we will run out of supplies. So we're asking each and every one of you today to help us. Please don't travel please. Don't gather or attend any events we he's wear your masks in this includes with your family you need to continuously wash your hands or use hand sanitizer and you need to socially distance everywhere. You go as of sunday. The number of positive covid nineteen cases reached seventeen thousand nine hundred m15 the navajo area. Ihs has reported. Nearly all icu. Beds are at full capacity. And they have limited resources including medical staff and few options to transport patients to regional hospitals because they're also near capacity navajo health professionals and tribal leaders say the second wave of covid. Nineteen is more severe than what the tribe saw in april. And may i'm antonia gonzalez.

Antonio Gonzalez Craig Couture Chairwoman Shelly Germain Charro DOJ Montana Caitlyn Nicholas Caitlyn KT Yellowstone Nicholas Loretta Christianson West Wisconsin ABC IHS ICU Antonia Gonzalez
Trump campaign transfers $3 million to Wisconsin for recount

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:41 min | 10 months ago

Trump campaign transfers $3 million to Wisconsin for recount

"After the two thousand sixteen presidential election green party candidate. Jill stein spent three point five million dollars on a statewide recount in wisconsin which then increased donald trump's total by one hundred thirty one votes. Donald trump called that recount a scam and called on voters to accept the results of the election today. The trump campaign wired three million dollars to the wisconsin election commission to pay for a recount of ballots. In just two of the state's counties the two most democratic counties milwaukee county and dane county joe biden beat donald trump in those two counties by a total of three hundred sixty four thousand two hundred ninety eight votes and joe biden. Beat donald trump in the state of wisconsin by twenty thousand five hundred sixty five votes today. George christianson and scott mcdonnell the clerks for milwaukee and dane counties. Said this about recounts. I'm not surprised that they selected dean and counties they certainly didn't select them for a regularities they sunk to them because they're democratic strongholds. Of course a so frustrating. You know we were trained georgia and i trained for a year and a half or more for this kind of this information from the kremlin That's what we were trying to figure out. We're gonna try to mitigate that information on it out a lot of these bo- never thought it would be coming from from ourselves from from within the united states joining us. Now is wisconsin attorney general. Josh kaul general call. Can you tell us what you expect. In this recount process and whether it will lead to any possible of election litigation trying to overturn the results. Well i the recount itself is virtually certain to confirm what we know. Which is that. Joe biden scott's by about twenty thousand votes as you mentioned before we have recount for years ago and the change in net votes for the candidates about one hundred and thirty one votes. We haven't after twenty eleven states court races. Well and kind. Statewide recounts are in the hundreds. Nothing even approaching twenty thousand boats and the trump campaign does seem to be a little confused about how this process works because in re competition they raised a variety of legal claims but the time for legal claims relating to lose the election is well before the election. There's even a doctrine that says you can't our plans to close to election because you need to have certainty about rules are now bring those arguments. After voting. his happened after ballots have been cast after about twenty thousand more. Wisconsin voted for. Joe biden voted for donald trump. It's too late for those kinds of challenges. So will this delay the certification of results in wisconsin. It shouldn't recount needs to be done by december first and that's the deadline for certifying results. So absence some sort of order or something else that interferes with process moving forward certification will have to happen on december first so it sounds like the trump campaign believes that this is not just counting votes. But it's some kind of evidentiary discovery of some sort in which they might at the end of the process. End up with a legal claim. Is that even possible. If all we're doing is counting votes. That's what they're suggesting you know. But that's not how the rejoin process works as you said a recount is about recounting the votes. It's about confirming that. The numbers were accurate. They may very well. File a legal challenge as the recounts going on or at the end of it but any kind of like that is certain to fail. We've seen the trump campaign's success in court post-election and they keep losing case after case in the reason is because their claims have no merit and if they were challenging staunton I'm confident that it would be swiftly rejected courts so attorney general. Call knowing everything you know about this The vote count as it is the recount process as it will work. Wisconsin's history with recounts the likely on numerical changes as a result of recount Would you say tonight that. We know who the winner of the state of wisconsin is. Yeah there's no question about who's won the state of wisconsin. Donald trump is basically the equivalent position. Somebody who bought lottery tickets but he's Ticket after the lottery has happened. It's it's over and we know who has won this election.

Donald Trump Joe Biden Wisconsin Jill Stein Wisconsin Election Commission George Christianson Scott Mcdonnell Josh Kaul Milwaukee County Dane County Green Party Dane Milwaukee Georgia Scott United States Staunton
Trevor Noah condemns Trump's COVID-19 Response

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Trevor Noah condemns Trump's COVID-19 Response

"Back to the daily social distancing show and yes, we are still social distancing pretty soon the top of my head is going to be six feet away from my forehead. That's the plan. That's how I'm going to measure my distance from people hey, what's going on becks they s see you know the reason we still social distancing is because the coronavirus is still spreading, and this is thanks partly to people not taking it seriously. So let's catch up in another installment of our ongoing segments the pandemic. I our pandemic coverage, Hicks off in Utah State in desperate need of the l shaped tetris piece. We now know that one of the easiest ways to stop the spread of coronavirus is just to have everybody where a mosque unfortunately telling everyone to wear a mosque is also one of the easiest ways to spread idiocy after more than one weeks in schools have reopened in Washington County Liberty, action coalition hosted a rally in front of the school district building. This morning up to a thousand people showed up saying the children being forced to wear masks in classrooms is illegal and even unconstitutional. Now have gathered here in front of the Washington County. Administration building calling for. The end of a mouse mandate. If we want to wear a mask, that's fine we can take care of ourselves when George Floyd was saying I can't breathe and then he died and We're wearing a mask and we say I can't breathe but we're for story anyway I'll tell you another reason I'd hate mass most child molesters love them God. Damn. These people were crazy. In fact, you know what they should have. Let them storm the school building because maybe they would have accidentally learn something like I'm still trying to process everything that was going on at that rally no matter how many times I watched that video i. still find new things to process. Like that video is the closest thing I've seen to facebook comments happening in real life I like individual freedom wipe people are the real George Floyd. Happy. Birthday Martha Mask wearing was invented by Jeffrey Epstein. Oh and here's another reason it's hard for Americans. To get the pandemic under control even places do have rules for social distancing. This is how some people follow them growing concerns over Cova clusters especially on college campuses in Ohio police cited several people in a house near Miami University during the Labor Day weekend body camera footage captured a stunning exchange between an officer and a student or there's So, you probably know where I wanNA talk to too many people but you know the the ordinances ten people. Yeah. How many people are in the house? Twenty twenty people inside. You Might WanNa start clearing off the I've never seen this before there's an input on the computer that you tested positive for covid. When was this was? A week ago are you supposed to be quarantining? That's why I'm on my house do you have other people here and you? You're positive for Kovin? We WanNA, keep the site open. That's why. We're so screwed. The main part of quarantine isn't about being at your house, my friend. It's about being away from other people so that you don't spread the disease I'm scheduled. Know where this guy puts a condom on his buddy at this point I'm glad it's just corona virus. Can you imagine this dude handling Ebola wait so I'm not supposed to eat a monkey. Because I got to tell you there was some confusion there. Oh and just by the way. Watching this police officers body cam footage was like virtual reality game called white privilege because this kid was clearly breaking the law but the cups tone of voice sounds like he was telling him today specials Hieaux could I interest you and not breaking the law today? Get a few minutes to think it over and I'll come back so. Some people are misinformed some people a crazy and some people are both. People. Like Donald jaundiced trump president of the United States and one man super spreader overnight at a packed indoor rally president trump breaking Nevada's covid restrictions to court voters. In the key battleground state, we're going to win to that speaking to a throng of mostly mask Liz supporters, his first indoor rally nearly three months. The state prohibits gatherings of more than fifty people but trump defiant of the governor comes after you which you shouldn't be doing. I'll be with you all the while those behind the president and in front of the cameras wore masks, most of the crowd did not. But that didn't bother supporters like meal. Christianson who camped out overnight I'm not wearing a mask that's a shows that I trust my president. Okay look. I. Get why trump fan would have trusted trump before. But how do you still trust this off the he admitted that he's been downplaying the coronavirus this whole time I don't get it. I really don't get what do you mean you trust and this is like believing the Nigerian e mail scam off the he tells you that he's a Nigerian email scam although I'm a small time criminal pretending to be a wealthy prince. Will Send me some money. You know what? I liked this guy's honesty I will send him fifty thousand dollars and as for trump. How you call yourself the presence of law and order when you openly flouting the law and not even for a noble reason. No, it's just so that he can spend nineteen minutes ranting about how vegetables invented by the deep state and Hillary. Clinton and this isn't just about breaking the law. What Donald Trump is doing here is actually dangerous. The last time trump held an indoor rally. He lost twenty five percent of his black friends. So there you have it. Everyone from college students to grandma's to the president himself is helping this virus continue spreading. But I guess. That's the genius of America's Corona Virus Response. Unlike other countries that are preparing for the second wave America realized you don't have to deal with the second wave. If you never get over the first.

Donald Trump President Trump Washington County George Floyd Martha Mask America Facebook Hicks Utah State Jeffrey Epstein Miami University Ohio United States LIZ Christianson Hillary Nevada
Fires In California And Colorado Cover The West With Smoke

Environment: NPR

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Fires In California And Colorado Cover The West With Smoke

"There are nearly a hundred uncontrolled large fires burning across the western US right now in California Colorado Oregon and other states the fires have forced tens of thousands of people to flee their homes and the smoke is affecting millions as NPR's Nathan. Ross reports that is especially worrisome during this pandemic. Stephanie Christianson is a pulmonologist or a lung doctor as she puts it who's already on the frontlines of covid nineteen. She's an assistant professor at the University of California San Francisco and over the last few days and week as fires exploded around the bay area filling the air with acrid smoke sheet and some of her colleagues started asking each other. Every apocalypse packers now is it feels kind of like we're. Doctors it wasn't exactly what to expect. Going into this, the smoke from California's fires and others is blanketing most of the western US blurring skylines and creating haze from the west coast to as far east as Kansas and in that smoke is something that Christians, and says is definitely not good to be breathing particularly during a respiratory pandemic an air pollutant called PM two point five. It's this particulate matter which is really really tiny thirty times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. So it's really really small and that means that it can lodge deep into your lungs where Christians says, it can cause A. Whole host of problems that can increase the risk of as exacerbating COPD exacerbations, heart disease issues, and she says potentially cove in nineteen the viruses new enough that most of the research into links between it, an air pollution like smoke are preliminary but Christian says they do know enough to speculate that smoke inhalation could make the virus worse and it's worrying health officials and researchers all across the western US I was initially really worried about wildland firefighters Luke Montrose is an assistant professor of community and Environmental Health at a very smoky Boise State University, and served transition my thought now. To today's the first day of school at Boise State and the first day of classes for a lot of schools K. through twelve in the West in normal times. MONTROSS says during Smoky Fire Seasons schools can keep windows shut but in a year like this closed the windows and potentially increase the concentration of virus that could be spreading around the school because you're trying to reduce the amount of toxic wildfire smoke a situation he says where there's really no good choice. Out NPR news.

United States Assistant Professor Smoke Inhalation California Boise State NPR Stephanie Christianson Ross Boise State University University Of California San Francisco Nathan Montross Oregon Professor Of Community And Env Luke Montrose Colorado Kansas
Dallas - A’s Coach Apologizes For Raising Arm In What Looked Like Nazi Salute After Win Against Rangers

Mason & Ireland

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas - A’s Coach Apologizes For Raising Arm In What Looked Like Nazi Salute After Win Against Rangers

"All Right Oakland as bench coach. Ryan Christians in apologized Thursday for unintentionally making a gesture resembling a Nazi salute following the as win over the Texas Rangers Christianson was seen on camera extending his right arm in the air as the team was making its way off the field engaging in Elba celebrations with coaches when one player said no put that down it doesn't look good Christianson. Did it again After the game he issued this statement quote. I made a mistake and will not deny it today in the dugout greeted players with a gesture that was offensive. The world today of Covid I adapted are elbow bump, which we do after Winston create some distance with the players. My gesture unintentionally resulted in a racist and horrible slow God I do not believe in what I did is unacceptable and I deeply apologize and quote

Christianson Ryan Christians Texas Rangers Elba Oakland Winston
Where to Go and When

This Week in Travel

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Where to Go and When

"Love Buddy and welcome to another episode of this week in travel name is. Gary Aren't coming to you from quasi quarantine here in. EXCITING MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA. With me is usual that laughter you can hear in. The background is Mr Chris Christianson. How're you doing Sir I'm doing well? Living in a much less exciting city and I'm okay with that. But you are keeping busy. Oh Yeah Travel. Lot Of? Zip because twice within the last nine days. It's pretty good I do that on a daily basis just because I'm walking distance from like the next ZIP code. They say much also from Sunny California gentlemen. Are we doing jen? Guys happy to reconnect with you and I've been doing travel daydreaming and excitedly looking forward to a day trip to L. A. This weekend. Wow, so that'll get on the horse. That'll take you about a day to get there I assume and then exactly exactly. And what are you GonNa? Do in La we are going to have a distance barbecue with my husband's cousin. which is more exciting every day that we're still saying? In between Minnesota and California, is our guest Sherry coming from Denver Colorado? How're you doing sheriff? I am great. Thanks for having me. You've been on the show before right. A long three or four times, but yeah, it's like. Himself or so? But, it's been a while actual as in say. The last time I saw when I moved to Denver, so that was three years ago. Well. There's so much travel stuff going on now. people are just leaving their houses and going to places. We. We do have a couple of stories This one. I thought was great and I was kicking myself after reading it because. I hadn't thought of IT I. there is a woman in China who made. Over a half, a million dollars buying travel insurance on flights she predicted would get delayed. And then cashing in on it. and. You know this I. There was I. think it was windy. Perrin was like last year or the year before she made like ten thousand dollars when her family was going to go on a trip and she was in new. York and the flights got cancelled like she had a flight cancelled. Then the next flight got canceled. Whatever whatever like storm went through? And I? Wish I'd kind of put it together like if you know like a big storms, coming or a hurricane or something like that, just by like one hundred tickets get them all canceled, and then like have the airline reimburse you or something? I think you could do that. I don't know if it would actually work. But. I guess the Insurance Company that are the company's. She had different accounts that she used to to not draw attention to herself. Closed loop hole, so you can't really do it anymore. Well. That's in China I. Don't know. Maybe you could still get away with with abandoned in the US. But I know that like the Happens a lot. We have these overbooked flights and they'll you know they'll? They'll say. I'll give x number of hundreds of dollars in a travel voucher. And I also know from friends who work in the airline industry that are sites where you can look to see because they do like a non ref flights disea- If a flight is booked, so part of me always wonders if you couldn't book such a flight and then just. You know arrange it such that. You could then get the. Flight Coupon. Canceled A ticket. Get your money back and just keep doing that.

Minnesota Denver Mr Chris Christianson California China Gary Perrin Minneapolis LA JEN Sherry York United States Colorado
Travel to Saudi Arabia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Saudi Arabia

"Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Christianson. Let's talk about Saudi Arabia. I'd like to welcome to the show flow meter. Who's come to us from Munich Germany but come to talk to us about Saudi Arabia flow? Welcome to the show. Thank you Chris. Happy to be here. Saudi Arabia is not a place that well actually. It's a place that a lot of people have gone on Hosh. It's one of the most popular travel destinations in the world but for people who are not Muslims. It is a relatively new destination very true yet. Open up its tourist visa in the end of September so everything is very new. There and for me was the interesting part of really yet. Go to a country where tourism really hasn't been a part of the history in the last year. I guess that answers the question of why you went to Saudi Arabia. Was there more to the story than just it opened up. The opportunity was available. I mean Saudi Arabia. There's so much so much to talk about. I mean first of all landscape. I think we always think about at least to me. It was okay. Saudi Arabia desert oil encampments. That's the first words that came to remind but the landscape boys. There is so much more to see. I mean the Sea of the mountains zero than history wise. I mean a lot of ancient kingdoms coming from there the history of Islam being from there but for me it was one of the biggest reasons why a went to Saudi. Arabia was the hospitality of the people. I heard such amazing things about that. I've been around in the Middle East and I wanted to experience it for myself and as soon as I heard. They opened up the doors for tourists. I said okay. I'm going to jump on that wagon and I want to see for myself to really see how it is. And what kind of an itinerary? Are you going to recommend for us when you look at the map? Saudi Arabia is a huge country. So I always say it's better to have more time than less. But if you have about eight to ten days that should give you a good idea overview over the country so I did it. I'd recommend always starting in Ria. That's the capital on the east side. And then making your way for the West stow after that a Lula which is a beautiful beautiful historic site than to Medina which is super interesting because Muslims go there as well now and then to Jeddah and then from Jeddah head back to Fly Back from Jeddah which options whatever works best for you excellent before we get into that in more detail one place. You didn't name and I WANNA talk about why you didn't name. It is a place that other people might be interested in going. And that's Mecca and there's a reason why you didn't name Mecca and we OUGHTA address the elephant in the room as it were so if he would want to go to Mecca. I'll give you the picture you'll drive on the road and then you see a big sign which says non Muslims go right and Muslims go straight celebrate as a non Muslim. You're not allowed to go to Mecca. And that of course has to be respected now of course if you are Muslim than that's entirely different and you in fact are encouraged or required depending on how one looks at that to make a trip to Mecca at least once in your life if you have the means to do so. So but we're not gonNA address Mecca in this particular episode. We're not going to address going on Hajj because most of the show can't do that so excellent you started us in Riyadh exactly so the beauty of Saudi Arabia is that everything is pretty new so I mean arriving day you arrive at a Super Bowl Airport. I first of all said okay. I'm GonNa take the metro into town so followed the metro signs only to find out that not. That's not billed yet. So that's how earlier wasn't the country so back out of the airport into Uber and into town. We think we always have this idea that Saudi Arabia is a very rich country but maybe a bit old school. That definitely didn't find that the case Uber which works fantastic they have all the amenities modern buildings amazing and paired with all the history that comes with it and there was amazing for me on firsthand arrived in the country. I get into Uber. You drive into town takes about forty five minutes because traffic is crazy and we start talking and suddenly he stops and he gets out of the car and he comes back into the car with a box of oranges. And I'm super perplexingly. Okay what would you know? He's giving me this box of oranges and I was like okay. Maybe we did the picked it up for his wife or his family and he's like no no no. This is for you and this was the first time really experienced hands on Saudi hospitality. Which is insane. I mean I've been to a lot of places but never ever did uber. Taxi driver gave me a present for just arriving in the country. And that would be a new one for me as well. It's really insane. And this was not a one time I arrived in is expensive. There's a lot of hotels but they are quite expensive when expensive sixty seventy USD. For I would say the the cheapest room.

Saudi Arabia Chris Christianson Mecca Jeddah Munich Germany Middle East Super Bowl Airport West Stow Riyadh Hosh Medina Chris
Stranded in India (#3)

This Week in Travel

09:45 min | 1 year ago

Stranded in India (#3)

"Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of this week at home. The weekly show. That really doesn't talk about much anymore. Because the entire travel industry has started just disappeared. But that's okay. We have some decent stories and stuff to talk about money. Miscarry aren't I am coming to you? From Chile Minneapolis Minnesota. Where believe it or not it? Actually we had a snowstorm here in April If you've ever heard the song sometimes it snows in April by Prince. That's pretty much what it's like with us as usual also at home Mr Chris Christianson. How're you doing sir? I'm doing well. I'm actually thinking of doing some travelling this afternoon. I may go to the back yard. I wish I had a backyard to get outside. I gotta go. Mingle with the masses very unsafe. Also with US coming from a slightly different part of California. Jen Leo. Are we doing jen? I'm doing great also at home have yard and last last week we had a rain storm unusual for southern California yet. Oh my goodness and in how is it having your daughter at home with you fulltime? I I have the luxury of getting to hang out with her and also She's been self schooling so I have not had any homeschooling woes. Her her caseload is pretty light. So we've been sort of exploring other opportunities and having fun with it. You have a perfect child. I'm not GonNa say that if you Chris so schooling just sounds like a fancy way of saying you're lazy self self telling fancy way of saying. I don't really have to do anything I think. It's the opposite child who you didn't have to tell them to get their homework done. And the other one who was only vaguely aware that maybe there was homework assigned was at the. Second Child. Chris no that was the first show really. Wow from another part of California. Mr Spud Hilton. How you doing Sir? Doing Great Hanging out here at weight for home where I've put a different bottle of alcohol in each room and so I can go bar hopping later and our guests this week. She is an emmy nominated television. News reporter she is the author of the book one hundred things to do in Columbus Ohio before you die and just recently got back from the United States after being stuck in India for. I don't know as close to a month. I think these neutra hamper thank you. It's a wonderful to actually be in my home so I know people talk about being stuck in board. I thought Gosh you know. At least you're in your home I was stuck in a fishing camp for For many weeks during the lockdown. So happy to be here. Thank you for inviting me. We will be getting to your story soon. But let's start to talk about some of the things that have have really only one news story. Still I mean there's travel The new story is lonely. Planet shutdown several their offices. I don't know if you saw this. But they have shut down their Melbourne office which was originally the the homebase for lonely planet. They've shut down there one office leaving. Only I think an office in Ireland and Tennessee. They've also shut down several of their business divisions and they've also shutdown the thorn tree forum. Which was there really popular Online forum do you think there's a future for lonely planet an for Expect to see other publications making such announcements soon. Yes to the second one and no for the first one. I think one of the things about lonely plant. That's different than Some places is that they've got such a huge collection Of Resources that can be repurpose down the line. So theoretically they might shutdown putting out the actual physical books which would make certain about sense. Being fewer and fewer people are actually using them but they also have a photo collection in an age win. Almost everybody wants to be able to use photos tea or you know. Put on their website or things like that and so they have assets that they could probably live off of greatly reduced for a while or sell off in a big way Either way I don't think we'll be seeing the return of the physical books but they still have a lot of assets That that they can continue to put out there and update fairly cheaply. I agree with you. Spend I also think because of the large amount of collateral that they have. It's an incredible opportunity to get really creative with it. Right like think about their churches all their photos but they're armchair division of books right although stuff all those books that Don George Edited. What if they started doing virtual online shows with readings and combined that with photos or started doing special photo event streaming? I don't know I mean the. The opportunities are endless. But I think there is a there is a an opening to get creative. And maybe it's not going to run the whole business but is a way to sort of keep their brand in front of mind while people are at home and looking and learn yearning for any kind of connection and travel dreaming right. I mean you look at National Geographic. And you can't swing a dead cat without hitting another Coffee Table Book or a National Geographic. Sound found some really niche way to repurpose all these photos. They have and throw it into a new into a new book to put out there and I think for while while people aren't traveling people are GonNa want some my what my boss used to call wanderlust porn. Which is you know. It's they WanNa look at the pictures of the places that they can't go right now A lot of that. They'll do online and that maybe that's where Those coffee table books will end up migrating more but But I think you're right National Geographic's done it and lonely plants already done some of that but I think the opportunity to just to continue and sort of. Forget the guidebooks. I think we're gonNA find as you usually find. Any sort of downturns is that companies that have good cash reserves companies. That have you know. In some cases better management will make it where other companies that. You may look at it and say. I can't believe that they couldn't make it. A just won't because of their you know their cash reserves or how they're overhead is or all sorts of things so they'll definitely be winners and losers after this sort of thing and that's true with the companies Veteran publishing that's true with airlines tour companies. In the in the business I think is that there will be some some fallout there. We've already seen that in the local restaurants. I don't know how many of you have already heard that one of your local restaurants has gone out of business but we've had one perennial favorite here. I suspect that they were thinking about retiring. And you know it just got way too hard. So they closed and that's not going to be the last one by any means. Yeah I think we may have mentioned this last episode but I was talking to somebody who is an insider with Houston tourism. And know they they. There's a belief there at least this there was at least a week a week or two ago. There was a belief that they may lose as many as forty of their current restaurants. And they're you know it begs the question Places like New Orleans. The food scene actually got better after their disaster it got better because their food scene had stagnated it was all either legacy stuff like Gallo. Twas Antoine's and you know thing Brennan's and stuff like that or it was the other end. Which was the crappy tourist food and there wasn't a lot in between at least not in the major areas that people go and basically Katrina wiped out a lot of places but it also created opportunities in the in the coming years for a lot of places and so they suddenly got a lot of very cool kind of gastro pubs and boutique like places and things that they really didn't have much before and that became better now here. I don't know that that's going to be the case. Because it's more about money thing My belief that if San Francisco loses like say thirty percent of their restaurants. What I'm worried about is that that thirty percent will be the ones with character. They will be the mom and pop places they will be the small pocket places. Which is what Chris is talking about is there will be places that on a in an industry that has very not a great margin to begin with You know a lot of these places are GONNA go out. That are the places with character or the family or local owned places. And we'RE GONNA get stuck with a whole bunch more arby's and chipotle's so that's what I'm worried about.

Mr Chris Christianson California Jen Leo National Geographic Minnesota Mr Spud Hilton Chile Minneapolis Don George Katrina Arby Melbourne Gallo New Orleans Tennessee Reporter Antoine United States
U.S. Has Reportedly Deployed New, Small Nukes On Submarine

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. Has Reportedly Deployed New, Small Nukes On Submarine

"US as reportedly deployed a new small nuclear weapon on a submarine as NPR's Jeff Bromfield explains that his arm control experts concerned. The new nuclear weapon has just a fraction of the explosive power of those currently carried on submarines its main job is to deter Russia which the trump administration believes has small nukes of tone. We're somewhat back in the sort of Cold War Tit for tat here. Hans Christianson is with the Federation of American scientists a watchdog group that reported on the nuke nuke he worries that these smaller weapons might see more usable by both sides in a conflict that could lead to escalating. Yeah once you start popping nukes folks. The bets are off and the possibility of full-scale nuclear war becomes more likely the Pentagon declined to comment on the report Jeff Brumfield. NPR News as

Jeff Bromfield Hans Christianson Jeff Brumfield NPR Npr News Russia Pentagon Federation Of American
Conrad Truman acquitted in second murder trial

Dateline NBC

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Conrad Truman acquitted in second murder trial

"Conrad Truman had been convicted of murder sentenced to life and had already served more more than three years now. The revelation of those flawed police measurements had led to Conrad. Truman's new trial. That stunned everyone the Utah County. Da's office especially the man responsible for comrades conviction prosecutor. Craig Johnson. This is something that really took us by. Surprise is the defense. Says you know that's their take and they're doing their job to zealously represent their client. I can tell you categorically that. That's not correct. Just as stunned was the man whose team took the measurements lead. Detective Tom Wallace. What went wrong? How did that happen in the process of if Transposing numbers from actual measurements of the same to the crime scene program numbers just transposed wrong wallis admits the error are but says it was minor that Conrad Truman did not deserve a new trial. It's not that significant as they made it out to be. Did those incorrectly entered word measurements. Change your opinion of Conrad Truman's guilt should they change anyone's opinion. They didn't change my opinion. Nor did it change the opinion of the deputy district attorney Tim Taylor who decided to take on the task himself of prosecuting comrade. Once again thank Craig had been into the case for a long time so I wanted to fresh eyes go. I went through all the evidence and even with the medical examiner changing his opinion. I still felt that there was enough to go forward but we knew that going into it was going to be tough at trial. The prosecution's case was familiar. Starting with the officers who testified about Conrad's rambling often incoherent a description of what had happened that night the core of our case or his inconsistent statements. The story was hard to follow. He was jumping around all over It wasn't making sense to me so it was hard to follow. Those officers. Also told the jury about Conrad's threats He. He was telling us that we were going to slow and we need to hurry up where he was going to kill us. I'll kill you if you don't say my wife if you're making these violent threats to people who were there trying to help your wife. How are you treating your wife when it's only you and her long Taylor? Then tackle the theory of suicide by calling like witnesses to testify. Heidi was not suicidal in your experiences. Hide he's mother Was Shia sad or depressed person. No Oh I didn't see her. That way did Heidi's not knowing her father or not really knowing who he was that made her depressed or say no. The prosecutor pointed out comrades story evolved over time immediately following the shooting on the way to the hospital. Conrad insisted Heidi would never ever commit suicide. I think something shot or a casino never suit ourselves. He'd never suit yourself. Taylor argued that it was only later after suspicion against Conrad had mounted that he changed his tune up as for the gunshot residue. On Heidi's right hand Taylor called an. That's birth to say nothing. Nobody can identify shooter based on the results of this test. That is the major limitation of this test. Defense attorney Mark Moffatt answered by telling the jury that before being allowed to wash his hands that night. Conrad had pleaded with police to confirm. He had no residue residue on them cash on the edge has A. Did you wash your hands before saying absolutely not never washed my hands until they said go. Wash your hands. Comrades attorneys were working hard to establish reasonable doubt and the state medical examiner's shifting opinion on Heidi's eighties manner of death. Only help them. That's your case right there. I mean if he has reasonable doubt to argue a jury should exactly the medical examiner told the jury that in the final analysis. He didn't know the manner of Heidi. Truman's death by finalized allies the autopsy report with the cause of death as a gunshot wound and the manner of death could not be determined the emmy also testified how in his his experience a contact wound light. Heidi's is rare in homicide cases With the contact gunshot wound it would be consistent with a wound. That's often after fifteen days of testimony. The jury began deliberations. So you felt pretty good lead up verdict. There is enough there there. You're beyond a reasonable doubt. Conrad was having a much harder time. It was really difficult. Because why would things work out. If it didn't work out the first time you know what I mean. Eight hours later the verdict hole up your hands handcuffs no cuffs. You're not in custody. That's right this time. Conrad Truman got the verdict. He won't it not guilty just kept saying did they say not this. Grab my arm and he goes. Are you sure in the courtroom. Conrad's family shared tears of joy. I was giggling and crying crying at the same time. It was weird on the other side of the courtroom mile. Were tears of a different kind. I don't know my heart sank. Think and I was in shock. I couldn't believe there was a situation situation where that longshot happened. where he would be freed? Juror Brian Christianson said he and his fellow jurors had no choice but but to set. Conrad free believe that. We all pretty much felt that he probably did it. But you voted to quit because uh reasonable doubt. We had reasonable doubt whether you believe Mr. Truman is innocent or not those measurements either. Put an innocent man in prison or let a guilty man go free well. So you're right. The my opinion hasn't changed. Do I think he got away with murder. Yeah I do. What's it like your work? Call it a question like that in a way that ends up freeing the guy that you helped convict it's frustrating to know that a measurement that was inconsequential actually ended ended up Freeing him what's life been like for your family since though we're trying to put the pieces together for hiding righties family that is easier said than done. I miss the things that we had together. I miss the simple conversations. I Miss Surp- Sassine as I miss our wonderful personality she lives on forever in our hearts is left looking both backward and forward. I mean I do anything to take another day another walk with her. I loved her and I do love her. Still still you got a lot of life left a lot how you gonna live to the best of my abilities. There are jurors who think he might have done it but I had reasonable doubt. I couldn't vote to convict. God God bless them but there's a lot of people that do believe in me. He's made his own peace with with a simple truth. The very thing that freedom reasonable doubt could also shadow conrad treatment for the rest of his life.

Conrad Truman Heidi Tim Taylor Craig Johnson Prosecutor Murder Utah County Miss Surp- Sassine Tom Wallace Deputy District Attorney Emmy Wallis Attorney Brian Christianson A. Mark Moffatt
Bill Hader and Rachel Bilson Are Apparently Dating

Celeb News Ride Home

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Bill Hader and Rachel Bilson Are Apparently Dating

"Where were you when you found out bill? Hader and Rachel bill sin. We're in a serious relationship. Personally I was home in my kitchen pouring myself a cup of coffee checking twitter then. The mug crashed to the floor. Coffee sprayed everywhere chunks of ceramic landed around my feet. But I didn't care because Rachel Belsen was spotted getting coffee with bill hater in his hometown of Tulsa Oklahoma. And that's all that mattered. It's all that matters. The a couple got coffee at starbucks. Like I said they held hands. They were photographed. Bill Haters family. was there TMZ reported it. I mean Rachel. Bilton went went home with Bill Hater for the holidays. I love this. I would watch a hallmark channel Christmas movie about this happening. I just in fact it is. It's the movie to me. This piece of news is a movie. And it's my favorite movie L. Dot Com covered. This outing and gave some background on Rachel and bills history together. They wrote quote rumors about the couple date back to early November when hater was photographed on a date with bill sin according to US weekly the pair. In fact have history. Together they appeared in two thousand thirteen's the to do list which was directed by haters Mao. Ex Wife Maggie Carey and had a sexy together. Both Bilton and hater are two years out from. I'm divorce. She separated from husband. Hayden Christianson in September twenty seventeen and the two share a five year old daughter. Briar Rose Hater and Kerry split let in July two thousand seventeen and have three daughters together and quote. Listen the holidays. They're a stressful time. Everyone's a mess right now. We really needed needed. This good news. Why is it good news? I don't I don't know it just feels good you know. This is a piece of celebrity news. That's it's safe. It's warm it's wholesome. It's the holidays are all about Rachel. Bilton and Bill Hader invented Christmas to me. That's just my personal religious beliefs.

Bill Hater Bilton Bill Hader Rachel Rachel Bill Bill Haters Rachel Belsen Starbucks Hayden Christianson Maggie Carey Tulsa Oklahoma United States Kerry
How Lego Took Over the Toy World

Retropod

05:30 min | 2 years ago

How Lego Took Over the Toy World

"In a year then goodyear here's a clue those tires well you'll never see them in traffic it here's another it's notorious for causing theme two souls of bare feet all over the world still guessing it's Lego accompanied that started as a tiny manufacturer of wooden toys that built itself into an empire of plastic locks that have provided kids with millions of hours of fun though why is it that adults are always the ones to step up anyway. The story of legos starts in the nineteen thirties in Denmark with a master carpenter named Ole Kirk Christianson with the Great Depression in full swing Christianson desperately needed a way to earn money so he used his skill with would to start a company that made all sorts of things step ladders ironing boards and an entirely new line of wooden toys yoyos trucks duck on wheels Christians and called his company Lego a Portmanteau of the Danish words for play and well according to David C Robinson author of a history of the lego company Christianson ran the business all on his own while raising four sons survived the Great Depression it survived the German invasion of Denmark in even survived fire that destroyed its factory including all of the blueprints for new toys in the one thousand nine hundred he's Lego began producing what it called automatic binding bricks from wood but plastic completely new idea a British inventor already developed the stackable plastic cubes with studs on top but Christianson modified the concept by sharpening the edges and in the one thousand nine hundred fifty s keep them the formal name Lego bricks the six were a hard sell they weren't sturdy they didn't stick together in the hollow plastic cubes just did not sell then in one thousand nine hundred fifty eight got a patent for an idea the company had been working on for years a new study and to design that let the bricks snap together without coming apart Christianson died the same year leaving his son to take over the company so he never had the chance to see what happened next eight total revolution in children's toys after watching children play with the bricks oh executives realized their future success was not about the brick itself but about the world's it could help create and so began expanding its offerings with the brick as the cornerstone in the one thousand nine hundred sixties the company's Brick Smith's invented go we'll around brick with a rubber tire in the nineteen seventies they were miniature figures to populate the Lego towns then castles with nights kings and Queens astronauts came soon after by this time toymakers around the world were trying to replicate goes success when the last of legos patents for its bricks expired in the late nineteen eighty s the company tried to fight back against imposters and failed but it hardly mattered lego experienced double digit growth in sales with control of over eighty percent of the toy instruction and then in the nineteen ninety s Lego found another way to solidify its place the imaginations of kids and their parents Lucasfilm was about to release its first Prequel to the original star wars gives their wanted to license a set of Star Wars toys to come out at the same time at first like executives were wary they value it their companies independence and worried about aligning themselves with a franchise that contained violence but the company surveyed parents and they didn't mind the partnership so the result was the phantom menace Lego line then someone else came along Harry Potter the company's path has always been upwards though in the early two thousands After expanding rapidly into other businesses like those sales sank and they were forced to shut down several theme parks and kill off poor performing product lines. Lego went back to basics those lovable stackable bricks just recently they released a new set

Lego Denmark Goodyear Eighty Percent
"christianson" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"christianson" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Chief Vicki christianson, said, most of these projects have broad support, and there needlessly stalling out, than we'd, we'd take more. Or time than. Down important work to protect communities. And the resources the proposed rule changes would expand so-called categorical exclusions. It's a wonky sounding term for something that's hugely controversial. That's because these exclusions allow land managers to bypass full blown environmental studies. If they've already shown, there wouldn't be a severe impact to forests John Gale's with the conservation group backcountry hunters and anglers. He says if applied carefully and narrowly to certain projects the exclusions could help lower the wildfire risk, but he skeptical because the administration recently rolled back protections for clean water and wildlife habitat. We also don't want to see this become part of a Trojan horse for unchecked resource extraction. The forest service insists this is not about ramping up commercial logging in public forests, chief Christians in pointed out that it took five hundred and thirty days just to approve a project and overgrown forests near lake. Tahoe if the rules are changed she predicts planning time for work like that could be cut in half. Where proposing more efficiency, not short, cutting any of our responsibilities for good environmental assessment and stewardship on the land. Not short, cutting and fact enhancing where we can public involvement federal agencies complain of analysis paralysis in politicians, have long blasted what they call frivolous lawsuits that stall forest work, but another culprit, slowing down the workout on the land is budget. Cuts paradoxically in the forest service money has been taken away from these wildfire prevention programs to pay for fighting wildfires. The forest service's proposed rule. Changes are.

Vicki christianson John Gale thirty days
"christianson" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"christianson" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

"Through the floor of Apple's stock price. I'm gonna tell you why Apple's stock price is just tumbling. I mean, it is fallen like crazy. I don't know if you guys pay attention to it. It's dropped almost forty percent in value in the last three months four t poor cents. So I'll talk about that. And then we're gonna wrap up. The show well wrap it up. It's going to be almost the entire show. I recorded a very good conversation with Adam christianson ak- Matt cast cast podcast. We did all of our favorite MAC in Iowa saps. And it was a great episode. Let me just tell you. I wasn't sure what to expect going into. I was kind of concerned that we're going to have the same picks because we both came into the episode with our own lists of stuff. And I thought we were just going to be naming the same stuff. Well, that's not how churned out at all because Adams, he's highly professional and the guy prepares and prepares and he came in with with apps. I've never even heard of and I left. Yep. Assode? I learned a ton of stuff, and it came away with a bunch of apps that I really wanted to try, and if you try apps, I think you're gonna enjoy this conversation as well. And it's not just cheesy dumb IOS apps. These are useful things that you'll use our regular basis on both MAC. And so stay tuned for that. Let's see here. Oh, yes. We have a very special announcement. It's kind of weird to be doing this announcement by myself because well it has to do with the Colt cast and the entire crew. But there's no one here busters getting Frist and checked into prison right now. Oleanders probably out a serpent day. Say the capterra door Serbian tests, but address and Louis on vacation do so I'm going to make the announcement. And I'm very excited. This is a very special announcement do that into sec before we dive into the show. They'll let me say thank you to squarespace for supporting this episode, squarespace dot com. Forward slash cast still not have a website, or maybe you just started a business..

Apple squarespace Louis Adams Adam christianson Oleanders Iowa forty percent three months
"christianson" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"christianson" Discussed on No Agenda

"Aaron christianson in Frankfurt. Three six three six three from Deutschland. Thank you in the morning Jensen. I'm continuing my March towards euro knighthood with my second donation of three hundred three three thirty three eurodollars this because today, November the second is the two thousand and eighteenth year of our Lord, and I am thirty three years and three hundred thirty three days old by some strange, stroke of luck is also to be pleasing Pailin Drome in US dollars today to donation will bring me to a total of six six six six six euros. And I don't know how much that is in your fake money. I wanted to mention that I was specifically on the show to specifically onto the show by the unit filter podcast, which John was previously griping about. It was definitely a less entertaining. No agenda clone in many ways, but they did especially excellent deconstruction of cyber news with the host being former and current dude's name, Ben respectively, their cyber segment is deeply missed dig stopped. Which I could've kept it going. Anyway, John would be delighted to learn that Yuna filter is now defunct I'm not happy about it. Because according to Chris UNIFIL to was a fulltime job onto its you know, what they were. They were they were filter not Yuna filter unfiltered on filter. On filter. Sorry Yuna filter a fulltime job. This is what I noticed that. They were is one of the when I talk to people, but podcasting. I always mentioned that we try to do everything. Kind of concisely. So we it's done. It's done. You'll do a lot of post. You mean, we're too lazy to do anything? We record in real time. We're just that professional. This. Okay. Found founded on got a friend of show. Okay. He does at least four other shows. And it wasn't bring in enough money. We now know he's also in negotiation to be acquired by Lynn academy, which may or may not have been related to his decision to end the show. I wouldn't fault them for that. Show is good. Unfiltered was a good show. I listed a number of times. I've always found they they. It was hard to produce. It was just hard to produce a lot of lot of video when it was not necessary. I mean, there was a lot of complaints. You could have about, you know, if if there were part of our network, which we don't have we would have told him to do things differently anyway. No jingles. No karma. Thank you very much. Appreciate it. Anonymous in Berg, Pennsylvania. Well, by the way, that three thirty three euros three six three six three which still kind of jazzy anonymous in Pittsburgh three three three three three in our funny money. Love the show jobs. Karma, really works. This year. I questioned jobs Carmen landed. A good job of an opportunity for my a stencil dream job. So I'd like to humbly ask for another round of jobs karma. I also have a collective garri. Also had like collective karma for the city of Pittsburgh. It's surreal feeling to see location you walk past every day for five years and the national news for such a horrific incident has for jingles I'd like a numbers station to the head drone again. At the end of the show is a possible for me to hear it and not sing along multiple times. It's impossible. Sorry. It's impossible for me to hear it would sing. Anyway. Steve. Thirty three..

Pittsburgh John Deutschland Pailin Drome Aaron christianson Frankfurt Jensen US Chris UNIFIL Lynn academy Ben Steve Carmen Berg Pennsylvania three hundred thirty three day thirty three years five years
"christianson" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"christianson" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

"I thought we would talk about this a little bit earlier is like if all hell breaks loose you're going to get. I'm like, have you looked at our season. Oh, hell is broken loose. We got a guy who's just playing on the Bronx bombers starting quarterback this wicked. He's just go take some fucking stand. They're not as easy as it seems. No, it's not. I did it for my first three years every single week with the original dream, so it kind of got it. So I go in there and make the backup center in. It's me Chuck CLYDE christianson out there and CLYDE was my quarterback coach way back with Frank Reich at the beginning. Right? So we're only people on the practice field and I could see Chuck a sweating because he thinks he's getting fired. Anyways. He's got two quarterbacks that having completed a pass all week, and if those both get hurt, I'm going in. So obviously the first one, I'm like, psycho take the thing and I hand it back to them. And then all of a sudden Chuck's why she's like good. Good, good. Clydes Pat. Right, right, right, right. And that's how he talks. He's like, coach, talk to, you sounds like an auctioneer. So I'm under center center for the next one and I pull the. Drop back into shotgun, drop back in the shotgun apple app. I started looking over. I'm like, hey, we're. We're in trucks like wanting to be shut your fucking. You put me in just know that there's gonna be some schoolyard bullshit. That's definitely going to take place and I got a couple. I mean, that's genius, because if you go in there and you act like, you know what's going on and everything defense is going to be like, what the way what? Yes, what he knows things. Yes, I agree completely. All right. Team. Closure ice, wait,.

Chuck CLYDE christianson Frank Reich Clydes Pat apple three years
"christianson" Discussed on This Week in Travel

This Week in Travel

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"christianson" Discussed on This Week in Travel

"This week and travel show the talks to some of the most interesting notable travelers in the world is well as providing useful tips and actionable information now your your hosts uriarte chris christianson in gen leo remember every travel everyone and welcome to another episode of this weekend travel my name is gary aren't and i'm coming to you from an excellent lutely beautiful minneapolis minnesota winter has leaped summer is now here is kind of like game of thrones just in terms of the length of the season but it's now good relieves on the trees and i'm joined once again by my cohost mr chris christianson how are we doing sir i'm doing very well i'm home and that is unusual for me this month i'm only home for four days good thing we were able to time it when you were here where are you going after this i w with you i'm actually driving there okay i'm not going with you we'll meet you there i'm either gonna take a route through south dakota north dakota haven't figured out quite yet but that is the plan but now i wish i was because i haven't been to north dakota you know i i have noticed this with a lot of people if they've like have been to like forty nine the last one is either alaska north dakota it it's uncanny how often that happens also with of course is the wonderful jen lille how are we doing jen hey guys i'm doing great and for once i am out of california i'm actually in new york or the second i saw that on facebook you're at like some bitcoin conference or something i am it's very big crypto conference called consensus so i rushed home in the rain on a lift read to get here and i'm super excited to talk to you guys aren't against.

mr chris christianson north dakota jen lille california new york facebook chris christianson gary minneapolis minnesota south dakota alaska four days
"christianson" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

Lights, Camera, Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"christianson" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

"A poster for a movie that is coming out when is it coming out with 'em robertson hading christianson called little italy and i don't know much about a kendrick you did a little bit of deep dive right yeah it took a little bit of a look into it it looks very interesting it's a sort of romeo and juliet type tail between two children of pizzeria owners and apparently it's connected to the mystic pizza universe in more than one way from everything we've seen about it the foster the same it's the same logo also it's jill remember arts and julia roberts and i don't know it looks interesting i'm motored the fuck up on this and we're starting i believe the oscar watcher it and the most annoying thing i think about this tire saga of us finding little italy movie is that we are the first ones to report it and then everyone else took it over and made a moment out of it in weeding involves like we didn't get mentioned fucked up internet i'm not sure if we're the ones who discovered it because i i found it on twitter and i just don't remember who i saved a picture from but i don't think it was a viral tweet at i mean it is it is pretty ridiculous in it's more so just like the two thousand and five styling and posing on the front of the poster for hayden christianson who is wearing the lightest wash bluejeans ever imaginable his hair is styled like he just fucking stepped out of two thousand and six like thinking that no mortgage crisis was even coming and he just has a stupid little smirk on his face emma robbers looks fine but the whole concept is preposterous just hostels i think the best thing about it is that in order to like the the studio headset on there.

hading christianson italy kendrick romeo twitter hayden christianson juliet julia roberts emma
"christianson" Discussed on Stick to Football

Stick to Football

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"christianson" Discussed on Stick to Football

"Right so we try to stay out of the grey area none of these people i dislike because of what i would call off ill concerns yeah they might have them but that's not here fail to combine drug test so i'm going to hop in with you at my number five hayden christianson waiter ruined star wars yeah he was i don't remember what was the name was his name anna walker which turned into spoiler alert if you've not seen star wars hit fifteen seconds he's darth vader okay now you're back from the spoiler alert hayden christianson is awful he actually cannot act no some little day like boy band looking guy to raid with dr leaders like come off well we already did it but we told people you only had to say at once no we to skip spoiler alert you can just say it after okay yeah it's a mulligan that did sucks he did movie he doesn't one big movie and it was star wars those three it up technically but spoiler using that property your either that's okay i'll go on with a guy that i feel like everybody else likes i don't know how you feel i can't stand tracy morgan thank you so annoying the best character he's ever played his a moron yeah he plays a dumb got his voice drives me nuts i won't even try to impersonate because i don't want to hear it worst character and thirty rock and i barely even while he was the worst saturday night live he's the worst character in his life that's hard to argue okay number four for me and i sometimes wish this podcast were a video so people could see 'cause i'm going to number four for me is kristen stewart and here's her one acting move.

anna walker darth vader hayden christianson tracy morgan kristen stewart fifteen seconds