35 Burst results for "chris smith"

What Level of Antibody Is Needed for Protection Against COVID-19?

The Naked Scientists

01:59 min | 2 months ago

What Level of Antibody Is Needed for Protection Against COVID-19?

"Takover i on recently the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation outlined plans for an autumn booster program to top up the immunity of everyone over fifty against covert nineteen. But one thing that hasn't been clear so far is how much do we need in order to be protected where some people despite vaccination still able to catch corona virus infection but not become on. Well now we have a bit more clarity. Because as robert cedar explained to chris smith. He's done some catholic experiments on monkeys which developed covert nineteen infections in a similar way to humans. This has revealed the level of antibody. That's needed to protect both against severe lung disease and also against just catching and say potentially passing on the infection. The to turn out to be different and this means we now have a benchmark to aim for when or indeed if we embark on a programme of booster doses this autumn when you give the vaccine trying to measure the type of immune response in the blood that would tell you that you would be protected in the lungs or in the nose. You wanna protect people. I in the long so they don't get severe disease and you liked to protect people in the upper airway so it might prevent them from getting symptoms of a cold and then you would not be able to give it to somebody else. Was this not known already given that we have put billions of doses of vaccines into the world's population. So far there had been a couple of studies that showed that the higher levels of antibodies. You had in the blood measure of the immune. Response the better off. You were for protection. So our study in animals provided greater specificity to really define kind of exactly what the level of antibody response in the blood was to mediate protection in either the long or the

Joint Committee On Vaccination Robert Cedar Chris Smith Lung Disease Cold
UK Government Confirms Plan to Lift Lockdown Measures in England

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:24 min | 3 months ago

UK Government Confirms Plan to Lift Lockdown Measures in England

"At the start of next week the uk government will drop nearly all of the measures that were introduced to help stop the spread of cova nineteen across england. Prime minister boris. Johnson's big bang reopening is being keenly watched around the world and its success or otherwise is likely to determine whether other major nations will follow suit while monica's health and science correspondent. Dr chris. smith. Told reese james what we should expect a nineteen fifty lies of course the that the government had deferred the big opening up so called freedom day. Which was deferred. 'cause the original day the twenty first of june was judged to be too high risk because we had grubbing rights of iris. We had the delta variants which is the indian sub type two which is spreading more than the government had anticipated and there were not enough people it was judged who had received both doses of vaccine which we another critical to head off the delta veterans who had been vaccinated which meant we were risk of a much greater search if numbers so the case was made let's defer to the nineteenth to july. This will give more time for more people to have more days vaccine in other words. We'll we'll get more. People double jabbed and that should make the opening up a bit safer than it otherwise would be because they'll be more people who've had those critical to digest magazine and therefore low risk. Were they to actually run into to environment infection.

Prime Minister Boris Dr Chris Reese James Monica Johnson England UK Smith Iris
Global COVID Vaccine Inequality 'Becoming More Grotesque'

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:06 min | 4 months ago

Global COVID Vaccine Inequality 'Becoming More Grotesque'

"World. Health organization has warned that glaring covid nineteen vaccine inequality has created a two track pandemic with western countries protected and poor nations still exposed. The warning came as the leading charity. Unicef said that millions of coronavirus vaccine could be wasted if wealthy nations send large amounts of left overdoses to the developing world. In one go. Well let's get the latest on this now with monocle. Twenty four health and science correspondent dr. chris smith chris is also a consultant virologist at cambridge university. Good afternoon to you chris. Good to have you on the program as always and let's start with that issue about. I guess western countries being undone by their own largest this problem with flooding these needy markets in one go. There just isn't infrastructure to cope with that. It's a tricky one isn't it. We've never been down this path before. We've never tried to do what we're attempting to do. Which is vaccinating entire planet. An entire planet with eight billion people on it. We think there's probably in the region of seven billion people who are not immune because one billion have either had the infection recovered and become immune or they've had vaccine so far

Chris Smith Chris Health Organization Unicef Cambridge University Chris
Biden Tells Intelligence Agencies to Probe COVID-19's Origins

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:46 min | 5 months ago

Biden Tells Intelligence Agencies to Probe COVID-19's Origins

"Us president joe biden has called on intelligence in the country to redouble their efforts to investigate the origins of the covid nineteen pandemic. The president's ordered a report to be issued within ninety days amid growing pressure from republicans and the broader scientific community which owning us now is more nichols health science correspondent. Dr chris smith also on the line is louis lukens format. Us diplomat now. Senior partner at cigna global advisors. Thank you both for joining us on the program today and lukens actually start with you on this political pressure. I guess that joe biden is perhaps reacting to can you characterize what what. What is that pressure i can. Who are the main players. The main actors here who are low to offer these tough questions. Well martha sure. I would describe it as pressure on joe biden from from other parties to to carry out this investigation i think he genuinely and and his top scientists agreed that they that we need to have a better understanding of where this virus originated and how it originated. He asked president biden s the intelligence community to do an initial report which he was briefed on recently and he was unhappy with the results of that because the intelligence community was split some of the agencies felt that it was a lab accident and others felt that it was more likely animal to human contact and so he is now asked intelligence community to redouble their efforts as you said an in ninety days produce a report i think he recognizes that they may not have a final answer. He he he wants to say. He says he wants to bring us closer to definitive conclusion. He doesn't say bring us to a conclusion. But i think he feels is important that we have a better understanding in order to prevent future pandemics.

Joe Biden Dr Chris Smith Louis Lukens Cigna Global Advisors Lukens President Biden United States Martha
"chris smith" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

03:08 min | 5 months ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"And even Disarms you know. And i think the last time i either worked with them the beginning of this year or late last year. I cannot remember which 'cause it was. It was recent was pretty recent. it was Yeah definitely i would say inside of seven months so overall the teaching that you've done with us Was there ever any time that You encourage us or you. Saw any other instructor encouraged the use of putting a knee onto someone's neck. Was that ever part of our curriculum. No never never once never once never once. What are your thoughts about this ridiculous fool out there in Minnesota did just that. You know so and and i i think that if i say this but i'm going to say it anyway It might upset some people. And i'm not saying i'm right but you know they. They threw race into it. And i personally don't think that that guy Is a racist. I think he might be more sociopath and can diagnose somebody. But i think he. He's i think. I think he would have done that to a woman. I think that he would have done it to whoever i think you just my own personal my own personal my own personal Woman she said. Why are you thinking what. Why do you think he would do it to a woman to do you. Not think that. Why would you say that. Because so when i worked with the waterbury police department. Everything was always about Let's you know you. You prepare a suspect for handcuffing. Once they're handcuffed it's done in a and and george floyd he was handcuffed he was handcuffed. He's belly down. I mean again. I'm not a police officer. But from what i've i know from working with police officers in different ellios it was over. You know what i mean. I'm i you know what i mean like. Put them in the car. Bring them to lock up. You know what i mean or or whatever processing. I don't see what else was to be gained from that. You know allston to figure that out. Don i don't i don't get it. I don't know what the hold it was. I mean there for eight minutes forty six seconds neons neck. I'm thinking the whole time. What are you waiting what. What is the problem. I mean were they waiting for transport. I don't understand. I am completely baffled by what happened..

Minnesota eight minutes late last year forty six seconds beginning of this year waterbury police department george floyd allston seven months ellios once
Sage Calls Emergency Meeting Over Rapid Spread of Indian Variant

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:40 min | 5 months ago

Sage Calls Emergency Meeting Over Rapid Spread of Indian Variant

"Who we begin today's program here in the united kingdom where leading scientists are holding an emergency meeting in a bid to tackle a surge of the highly transmissible indian covid nineteen variant comes as prime minister. Boris johnson warns that new strains of virus could cause even greater suffering next winter. Then the lost if they're allowed to take hold well. Let's get the latest on this with monica health and science correspondent dr chris smith. Chris is a consultant for logistic cambridge university. Good often not always great to have you on the program Just about this Indian variant and the specific threat that we are beginning to understand. It might post. Initially we thought there was just one variant and it got dubbed. Be one six one seven and it's been documented for a few months in fact since last year but then we realized that in fact there are multiple subtypes of this variant. So they're now get designated as a subtype one subtype two subtype three and the one. We're most concerned is the subtype to and in this country in the uk depending on who you talk to and how the data compiled more than a thousand cases or about five hundred cases now. That's because some analyses do include returning travellers that have been picked up and then isolated others are therefore including Everybody so depends on which of those metrics you use. The one to be most concerned about is what is happening in the community because what we are concerned about with any kind of variant of the corona virus including this one now dubbed by the who as a variant of concern meaning it has destructive or disruptive potential

Monica Health And Science Dr Chris Smith Logistic Cambridge University Boris Johnson United Kingdom Chris
WHO releases coronavirus origins report

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:28 min | 7 months ago

WHO releases coronavirus origins report

"Than a year after the coronavirus pandemic i swept the globe. The world health organization report into the virus has finally been released although it doesn't give a definite origin for the disease the w. h. o. Says it's likely that it was transmitted from a bat to humans via an unidentified intermediate animal species virologists and monocle. Twenty four health and science correspondent. Dr chris. smith joins me to discuss this now. chris. Thanks for coming on firstly. Why was this report so long in coming and there are a number of reasons but one of them was that the chinese were not terribly supportive. If you record just a few months back. The investigators were held up getting visas. Getting into china they were just stuck in singapore rages and then once they got there. It was very much. The staged managed thing and this is not happen for the first time in so many times before the they've been number of obstacles pushing the way which meant that. That was difficult for a start. And just doing this kind of work is really tricky. You're saying where is the smoking gun that caused a pandemic in a city that has millions of people living in it into country with a billion plus people living in an is a big country such try and track all these different moving parts down and pin them down on one mechanism is really really tough. Which is why this report has a number of different possible reasons to account for what they think might have gone on. It has also taken a very long time

Dr Chris World Health Organization Smith Chris Singapore China
Seattle barge floats away, strikes 3 waterfront homes in Gig Harbor

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:22 sec | 7 months ago

Seattle barge floats away, strikes 3 waterfront homes in Gig Harbor

"At a dock yesterday morning and gig Harbor. Chris Smith's home was one of those damages just veered off to the right. So it's a front right corner of the barge. The gravel barge that hit us. You saw the tugboat coming toward their home and tried yelling at the tugboat operator. Later, the operator admitted he'd fallen asleep at the helm. Coast Guard is investigating that incident. A new study finds it eight and 10 Americans think the

Gig Harbor Chris Smith Coast Guard
One year on: What have we learned about viruses since news of COVID-19

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:12 min | 7 months ago

One year on: What have we learned about viruses since news of COVID-19

"Is a year since the world. Health organization declared a global pandemic and the world's began to adopt the lockdown status. That we are now so familiar with and according to the. Who also face the prospect of the pandemic staying with us until at least the start of next year. So what have we learned or dr. chris. Smith is multiple twenty-first health and science correspondent and a regular voice on one twenty four. Good morning chris. Well i remember this time last year. We were having a very similar conversation about the world going into lockdown. And he said we've got a book on bird flame. We're having a meeting. I think we might be all right. How how things out for you. In what respect. Because i if you look at different aspects of of how my life has played out then busy would be the best definition. But but i have a career which is a media career and providing science and medical commentary on things like pandemics at the same time. I have a medical career. Which is vera gist. So it's a bit like someone took. Ill musk's big effing rocket and place like no one on each leg and just ignited the same time i appreciate i. I've been very busy and in some respects. It's been an exhilarating terrifying right for others. It's obviously been devastating in terminal respect as well as in a sort of economic respect. So i think everyone is fed very differently. But maybe that wasn't what you were asking. Well let's focus on the variety section of it there. Is this sense of trying to be prepared. I think there's a feeling that many people had this time last year that we didn't know what was around the corner but the everybody was doing their absolute utmost to make sure that they could be as ready as they could be. What was it that we learned about viruses and how to deal with them within in the last year. We'll know not the golden rule book for anything night this because every situation is different every viruses different. And we'd never had a situation like this. We'd had similar situations. We've had flu outbreaks before and we'd had saws marquand the ancestor. That came in two thousand eighteen. Two thousand and three off of saul's sauce covey too but we hadn't seen anything quite like this as a result the there is no golden rule. Book says when this happens. This is how you handed of course. Also every country's different every population is different than makeup of those countries is different the way in which people work how they live what they do as a country how they respond as country. The letter prepared misses. The country is different. The amount of travel that goes on between countries is different. So it's really tricky. When you've got that extremely heterogeneous makeup of the world which makes a great place. of course. it's very difficult to then say. Well this is how you control something because there is no evidence to fall back on apart from things they'll related but not the same and when you've got that difference and it's a fluid situation where it's always a moving target because as we might one step forward things change the then mean. The virus takes a step foot. We've seen that with the various example. It's been tricky all the while it's been a massive learning process at every stage to work out how we can best out this challenge and we are not there yet. I mean my my mistake. My biggest mistake. I think was anticipating that we would have solved this problem by now. I honestly thought that by now We we would have been on the road closer to home for

Vera Gist Chris Smith Saul FLU
Oxford University To Begin Trial On Mixed Vaccines

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:29 min | 9 months ago

Oxford University To Begin Trial On Mixed Vaccines

"The university of oxford is to start to trial combining vaccines made by astrazeneca. And it's an order to introduce more flexibility and speed in vaccinating the world but it comes to switzerland has said it needs more data before it approves the oxford astor's annika job despite both the uk and the eu not only approving it but fighting last week over. Getting hold of enough doses. Let's hear from dr chris smith monocle twenty health and science correspondent. Good morning chris. Good to have you back. How does this work then when you combine to actions well this technique is good hetero lagos vaccination quantum mouthful. But what it basically means. Is you give persons one jab of one time and then a bit later on after three four weeks twelve weeks you give them a totally different vaccine. But also on the designed to program the immune system against coronavirus. We've been doing this thing fractured decades for different kinds of infections. And it works really well and the reason. It probably works very well. Is that when you go to school and you learn your lessons you then learn how much you've learned when you sit in the exam whole basically it's knowledge but it's being applied tested and stressed in a different way and it sort of similar with how the immune response works to Seeing one kind of stimulus decry navarre's than another one. And you make them much more. Resilient and robust response that way or at least not as the theory that's the outstanding knowledge. We haven't tried it with krona var so to make sure that what we assume is happening. That's why the government is putting forward this seven million initiative to find

Oxford Astor's Annika Dr Chris Smith University Of Oxford Astrazeneca Switzerland EU Chris UK Government
New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:15 min | 9 months ago

New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

"Now anybody who has had any experience of life on this earth the last year or so. We'll be firmly of the belief that one strain of covid nineteen is more than enough as it spreads itself around the world however new variations keep being detected including one in the uk which appeared more readily transmissible a south african one which might be might be rather somewhat resistant to vaccines and brazilian one. Ditto small numbers of both of the latter have already been identified in the uk and dot dallas present elsewhere or on route. One joined with more. By dr chris smith monocle twenty fours health and correspondent also a virologist at cambridge university. Chris as we have discussed many times before all viruses mutate. What they do. Is this one doing so unusually quickly an door. Dramatically hello andrew. We don't think so in some respects. This is to be expected for the reason. You've outlined that the that all viruses mutate and change this one's no exception and therefore we're going to see a gentle drift or evolution of the virus specifically. We're going to see that happening. Most often. in parts of the world where the prevalence of the disease is highest in other words. Where you've got lots of people being infected. I'm passing the virus to lots of other people. That's loss of the roles of the genetic dice that the virus can take in order to accrue changes and optimize itself because at the end of the day viruses optimize themselves in order to spread most efficiently in their particular host and this is a new infection humans therefore it was pretty well adapted to us but not perfect. There's some room to maneuver and that's what the virus is doing. Its adjusting its behavior and its biology. A bit in order to spread most optimally among us. Humans the different variations though in different places those responses by the virus to local conditions. I guess whether it's it's climate or something else yes. Any kind of organism on earth is going to adapt itself in response to selective pressure applied by the environment in which it lives. These corona is a living in a human environment and therefore all behavior to a certain extent affects the behavior of the virus as we apply more selective pressure to it by making his job harder to spread between us for instance by social distancing through various other public health measures and spread control infection control. You'll going to select for viruses that all reproductive fitter in other words. They're better at doing what they do. And and in that way you'll get something that is usually more transmissible. That's what we saw the slight surprise here. Is this question about whether it is causing more severe illness or not now. Obviously the jury is a little bit out on this. At the moment we do have some directional data than that may be the case but it is early days of only just begun to take this trend. So we're not entirely sure whether this is a statistical artifact just a product to the fact there are lots of numbers and so the viruses is producing lots of infections. So we're seeing more severe infections or whether the genuine is evidence for higher talapity rate in each of the cases. So that figure we've been given by the uk government that suggests that the uk variant might be thirty percent More deadly which is an alarming sounding figure. Is it possible that figure is either less alarming than it sounds or actually not entirely accurate. Will the government put this across a downing street. Press briefing country balance-sheet presenting numbers in terms of deaths per thousand. And he said if you look at say a sixty year old man the risk with the parent strain of corona virus of that person passing away. If you had ten people with a thousand people with krona vars you might get ten people with die with this new variant that ten rises to thirteen or fourteen hence a forty or thirty percent increase in the mortality rate so they are nevertheless odds to emphasize the case fatality rate remains very low so in other words we haven't got something that's killing thirty percent people what we've got something that appears to based on the data that initially have been analyzed. Be a little bit more lethal as in not for the person. Obviously if you die but it's on average killing slightly more people than before but we don't know for sure if that's the case i mean. We have got a number of studies that present this london school hygiene tropical medicine of showing that the the risk ratio is about one point three five times greater with the new variant than the over one point three five. That's a thirty five percent increase. Imperial college of donna. Study then numbers range somewhere between high twenties to mid thirties. In terms of percentage increase in risk ecstasy university They did a smaller study. One point nine one was there multiple in other words. It's ninety percent worse. A public health england cited figure one and a half or so so therefore all of them seem to be centering on there being an increase in risk. But we don't know exactly how big that risk is but we think there is one but we need to reassure ourselves. This is real finding. it's not just a product of the fat. We're seeing lots of infections with this new air. It might be that. We're there foreseeing because of the disguise of the the problem more people who are at risk of having a severe infection. Cropping up with this very factional. They are trying to control for that so it doesn't like it might be real

Dr Chris Smith UK Cambridge University Dallas Andrew Chris Imperial College Of Donna London England
London And Surrounding Areas Restarting Lockdowns Due To Coronavirus Mutating

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:45 min | 11 months ago

London And Surrounding Areas Restarting Lockdowns Due To Coronavirus Mutating

"And parts of essex and hot fanfare are hours away from returning to the highest level of covid nineteen restrictions following an alarming spike of cases in the capital pubs restaurants and other indoor entertainment. Venues will close once more. The latest surge has been ascribed to a new variant of the corona virus which appears to be growing more rapidly than previously for the moment however the uk's government says it has no plans to review the curious christmas truce. It appears to think it has negotiated with the virus. While i'm joined with more on this boy monocle. Twenty four health and science correspondent dr. Chris smith also a virologist at cambridge university chris. This the idea that there's a new strain of covid nineteen sounds like the very definition of the absolute last thing. We want to hear at this point. How grim news is this to be quite honest with you. I'm not alarmed. I'm not surprised. And i'm actually quite reassured and explain all those things ovar mutate because they're based on the same genetic code is running in pretty much will life on earth then the same mechanisms that lead to life evolving and changing apply viruses. And so as they go through their hosts they would evolve and change and corona virus is no exception. That's exactly what's happened to you. Therefore we would anticipate that we would see different strains and different emerging and indeed. This is not the first time it has happened. We've seen happened early. On in the pandemic in china we've seen it happen and disclosed various different forms of the viruses spread across the world and in europe they documented some of the same changes are now being seen in this new variant in the south east of england. So this is not altogether new in terms of concept and is not altogether new in terms of variant. This being disclosed. We're reassured by matt. Hancock saying yesterday house commons the the. Don't think although they are confirming that this will lead to the virus sidestepping the effects of a vaccine. We don't think it makes people who catch it for ill. It just may be transmits a bit better. Although that speculation on airpods that they're they're saying it might be linked to an increasing cases in the southeast england in terms of course load but don't know for sure if we're going to try to be exceptionally optimistic about this. Is there any possibility that the reason the viruses having to mutate to survive is there an indication that perhaps that means we've got it on the run will certainly when you apply pressure to a virus and by pressure. I mean for instance putting a vaccine into a population so you create an immune barrier or you put in place public health measures. You are forcing the virus to change to optimize to those new conditions. Because that's why things evolve in the first place. They're responding to selective pressure from their environment. And we know we do this to the flu. We know this happens with hiv. When we give people hiv drugs for example then the virus that grows in them is the only one that can bypass the blockade of drug. And that's why we use multiple drugs at wants to minimize the chance. The happening so the concept is common. Well understood so yes. It is. Theoretical possibility that by applying pressure to the virus. We are forcing it to become more infectious so that despite robbing it of opportunities to transmit it can still continue to transmit given the does appear to have become more infectious in the capital. However does it make the proposed relaxation of restrictions around christmas. Look even more. Ill advised than they might have. Well we don't know it has become more infectious in the capital. We know we've got more cases same in the east and southeast of england essex positive of cheer kent. They've seen big increases in numbers of the trend is in an upward direction. Which is why caution. Reproach has been taken in the uk by moving. Probably the best part of eleven million people who live in those territories into a so-called tier three situation to apply more pressure to the virus. The idea i think is this is anticipating the trend is going upwards where we are today is not where we're going to be tomorrow and so by bearing down on ahead of christmas when there's going to be this loosening effect where we got five days of reveling and Enhanced mixing the there are going to be more cases so if we start molo point and already have more control at the virus to start with them. We're going to end up finishing the low point than we otherwise would is or anything that the rest of the world should have learned from the united states. Experience we've thanksgiving because that was sort of a test run of what happens if all of a sudden millions of people travel by aircraft and by train and spend at least today in close quarters with households other than their own well. This is exactly what happened with chinese new year and when millions of people were mobilized to crush china to get together for the chinese new year this probably spawned even more cases because people traveled internationally for that event to so yes. History is full of examples of peop- of of Repeating itself and this is no exception. We are anticipating that. The mixing that goes on over christmas will lead to more cases. The question is how many more cases and how are we going to cope with them. So is there a good reason at least scientifically good reason. Why not just this government. But any government wouldn't just say to its people look seriously. Christmas is basically cancelled We are just going to have to suck this up for a few more months. We do have a vaccine to look forward to. We do have a restoration of normality to look forward to. We might maybe think about throwing in an extra couple of bank holidays around. June but christmas is basically not going to happen. Will the president of the royal college of emergency medicine was asked this very question on bbc. Radio four's pm program. Yesterday an her answer was. Are you asking me. This is a doctor or as you asking me this as human and actually you get a very different also because the doctor slash the infection control person is going to say which just council everything we should imprison. Everybody break the chain of transmission bear down on the virus but the human element of this is people need something to look forward to. Morale is incredibly important. And if you rob people away of the one thing. They've looked forward to in. What is the end of a very dismal year than this will probably translate into poor compliance in the long term. it will probably therefore translate into in the long-term more cases more headaches more problems and ultimately more casualties from are so. I think the government have of compromise. Here the trying to go for a controlled christmas. Where if you allow people some flexibility you know that most people will be responsible. You hope that they are. You're willing to tolerate some degree of of letting your hair down because you know that in a noncompliant christmas where you'd said don't do this and if on breaks the rules anyway he's probably going to be a higher price to pay in the long term. I think that's really the equation that they've done. Well let's look finally at the progress of that vaccine which is now being rolled out in united kingdom and again it's a question of government messaging. Does it strike you. As a missed opportunity that there is a website with a rolling hourly update of how many people have now been vaccinated. Well the numbers are not that high yet You see numbers like yesterday. They did three hundred people or four hundred people in this hospital and that hospital. And when you see that there's this peak of mount everest which is sixty eight million people in the uk high eight billion people on earth. Hide one what. You wanna do When you knock a few hundred off that is not much. And so. I think maybe that's coming may be there. There is that opportunity in the future but for now. It probably wouldn't be a big demonstrable difference

Chris Smith Southeast England Cambridge University UK Essex England Hancock China South East Chris Royal College Of Emergency Med Matt FLU Europe United States BBC ROB Headaches
Covid-19 vaccine: First person receives Pfizer jab in UK

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:12 min | 11 months ago

Covid-19 vaccine: First person receives Pfizer jab in UK

"Well. Biontech and pfizer's landmark coronavirus vaccine has been given to the first person in the uk as part of a mass immunization program. The uk's vaccine roll it is being watched keenly across the rest of the world has other countries begin. Prepare to vaccinate their own populations for the latest on this. Let's talk to our health and science correspondent. Dr chris smith. Chris is also consultant for all the gist at cambridge university. I good afternoon. Chris tyler so i guess So far so good at least we have. We have a soundbite already. We had at the top of the program from this ninety year old woman. Who's been there the first to be to vaccinated chris last week. We saw a little bit of Chest thumping on the part of some politicians the uk saying look. This is great The uk is steaming ahead. How eagerly he would you say not. Just the immediate neighbors across this side of the channel but around the world are going to be watching. What are they going to watching. Forty you think over the coming days and weeks as this rolls out well think it will be a confidence boost to those other countries because no one likes to be i they unless it's a shorty. A dead cert. There's always some risk with any kind of intervention. And this is no different. So having a regulator a regulator that's world renowned the jewelry the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency. Which is the. Uk's regulator which prior to just having jurisdiction over the uk walls prior to the brexit transition kicking providing that service for the whole of europe. Now europe does that through the ama it. It gives a precedent that other countries can look to and say right. Okay one fairly ferry. Big actor has gone ahead with this nathan. It's good therefore we're happy to Gives us some confidence too. So i think that there's always that aspect to it and it's coming good for the uk in the sense that it saying here we are. We've had a pretty rough time with this. But now some some fantastic triumph of sciences kicked in and we're about to start deploying this across the country and we're gonna we're gonna protect our outpatients. We have this type of approval from a respected Player how much do agencies elsewhere of course within the eu and obviously similar bodies all over the world. how much does it short circuit For them as you said. It establishes a precedent And does that mean that you have you know days or weeks then knocked off the process. Of course he. I'm sitting here in switzerland. Obviously a lot of talk as well about of course is also on the uk as well so does it actually then really prevent And and and and you do you have a moment where you have a real series of time locked off. They'd process well. The europeans are considering this through the jurisdiction of the ems the european medicines agency but the uk is still subject to a you know and in the uk is used one particular rule which is a regulation one seven four which is a specification for in public health crisis. Or emergency you can. Emergency approved something for use in your particular jurisdiction so the nhra has used that to approve this for the uk. Any other country in europe could've done the same thing so it's quite interesting that they've actually decided to white on a broad overarching decision from the a. But it doesn't matter. Who your regulator is they have to meet the same checks and balances. Because at the end of the day they all the gateway between a manufactured product and the public who going to receive it and it's on their neck that the decision rests so then going to say a will. They did it so we'll kind of ignore with this stuff would just sign it off. They are going to apply wherever they are in the world the same rigorous checks that they would apply whether or not someone else regulated something but it does help to give them confidence and he gives them a bit more political impetus when they see that. Another major regulator has taken a product which is also going to be wheeled out in that particular country and said well you know what's good enough is enough the ganda over the past few weeks. Of course astrazeneca moderna in this case. Biontech visor they. They've all been popping up in the headlines. Chris and of course various speeds that of course these approval processes have been working at now. We have three vaccines. We're we're now told her that there might also now be a fourth which is very much in play might be getting closer to approval. How different are all of these in terms of effectiveness and and do they all function largely the same way or do you. Also because obviously many countries that are hedging their purchasing all of them. Am i going to be particularly concerned. In a couple of weeks. If if i choose to get the moderna vaccine versus the astrazeneca versus the by pfizer one. In fact i think the uk has go options in on seven different vaccines and yes. You're right three of them are nearing the finishing nine in the uk but there are many others waiting in the wings around the world. There are ten different types of vaccine the work in ten different types of ways or being generated a more than forty and now in advanced stages of clinical trials. So pretty soon. We're going to have more vaccines than we can shake a stick at up to a point. That's a good thing and it's a good thing because not vaccines are going to be suitable for all people not vaccines are going to be available to all people not vaccines are going to work in all territories and what i mean by. That is if we take the fiso vaccine as an example. This needs to be kept at minus seventy degrees until five days or so before you're going to use all nine hundred and seventy five doses that are in batch and i've just seen a letter go from medical director saying can we make sure that we we use all nine hundred seventy five days in a within the five days so that we don't waste any of this very precious vaccine. Now that's going to be no use whatsoever in some countries where they don't even have a stable. Electricity supply let alone a stable minus eighty degrees freezer. So therefore having lots of options is a powerful thing also We don't know what the long term outcomes with these vaccines against be. We know that they provide pretty high level of protection but short after the vaccination program is finished in other words in in the weeks to a month or so. The person's completed the vaccine course. They're protected with the fis vaccine to the level of about nine hundred ninety five percent. But what happens in five months. What happens in a year. we don't know. And it may well be that other products that come along are able to confer a longer term protection. They might confer a big boost if you give one of those on top of one of the other products. This is a learning process. We're going to be sort of going through this process as time goes on an. It's always good to have more options. Where this sort of things concerned. If if your project yourselves twelve months twenty four months out do you think we also end up in a place because of because of cost because of stability many other things that they're only going to be potentially to vaccines. Is that the way things often go. The other ones might be effective but they might be too expensive as you said they might be too volatile and they fall by the wayside. I so i guess what i'm getting at. Will there sort of a clear winner in all of this in terms of one of the players and obviously the concoction that that ends up within the syringe. Well it's hard to say. I mean you know it's like niels bohr. Who is the forefather of quantum mechanics. Said prediction is very difficult especially when it concerns the future. But it's it's going to be very hard to know because we don't know what the long term outcome with these agencies. They are expensive. These genetic vaccines that pfizer. Madonna offering all pricey the astra zeneca vaccine. Which is still sitting with the regulator here in the uk. At the moment that one will be much cheaper and is also much easier to deploy and store so that there are pros and cons of all these things and it may not come down to simply a case if this one does this and this one does this therefore two horse race. I think we will definitely be a market for a few of these products whether or not. That market's going to be sufficient to sustain all forty plus of the clinical trials that are going on now but but certainly while the world is rushing to get this stuff in sufficient volume. Because that's the issue at the moment the companies just can't push it out the door fast enough the moment it's any partner storm so people are desperate to access whatever vaccine they can as fast as they can and just before we go chris any sense. When you're maybe discussing with your medica- medical call leaks. What the uptake is is going to be. I was talking to a doctor at the university hospital here in zurich the other day his defense was that you know probably just within the hospital owned probably fifty percent of the staff. You know would not be interested in taking the vaccine. Is that sort of a a pretty good gauge. In terms of how the public will look at this. Or if you're not in the medical trenches all day maybe you're going to be keener to take it any any house view from your side. I'm sensing quite a degree of what we dub vaccine hesitancy based on the questions that are coming into various radio programs on participating in basic enquiries from members of the general public and if you look at the day to this come out of the pew research center in america have been running a number of population surveys in the states and originally that was very alarming showed that fifty percent of people would reject a vaccine offered one at that point in time. They recently repeated that survey found that in fact the uptake had risen to fifty from fifty to sixty percents so in other words forty percent. Turn it down. But that's still forty percent. Turn down right now in the uk. We think it's probably going to be Less than that but at the same time still a significant proportion of people are uncertain citing rapid production very rapid approval. As a reason for concern. I do think this is largely going to take care of itself though because what will happen is that because of the way in which these vaccines are being rolled out to high priority high risk groups. I with a trickle down into the younger echo lonzo society over time by the time many of the people who live in countering who is saying. I'm nervous about this. Come to be offered a vaccine. It will have actually been through a very significant proportion of other people and that may well have in still quite a bit confidence into people are safe track record by then so i think it may be one of those short term problems. The actually takes care of itself. That's what i'm hoping anyway. Chris thanks very much for that. That was monocled health and science. Dr chris smith.

UK Biontech Dr Chris Smith Chris Tyler Pfizer Europe Astrazeneca Moderna Chris Astrazeneca Cambridge University European Medicines Agency AMA Nhra
"chris smith" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

02:51 min | 11 months ago

"chris smith" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"<hes>. So maybe we should just back up just for a couple of minutes in sort of talks. Like taxonomy away you know. What's a collared <hes>. They're in the same genus and species as cabbage kale brussels sprouts kohlrabi cauliflower brassica. And yet there's like so many groups within that it's just tax comically. This is one. That's stumps me all the time and i can't keep it straight because there's like these groups cultivar groups within that sort of a species and the collards are in one of the groups along with kale. I think i think they're the most closely related to cal anyway. So what are they and they have a lot of cousins in the cabbage family. Right whenever i teach on seed saving this is the species that i use as an example of kind of like the models of domestic crops. Because that you know bresca elleray ca has as a species best all these different offshoots that you've just listed some of them but to walk into the supermarket and see your cabbage had and then you're kale and then you brussels sprouts. You wouldn't necessarily put them all into the same species but through the you know the active like selective seat saving and really developing specific traits within that species. We we see this crazy diversity of food crops broccoli and cauliflower included in that so that's that's kind of fun to explore <unk>. Specifically within that definitely very close. Takeo is interesting. One thing i noticed when i was working at searchers small seed company down here was in. We started carrying portuguese kale. But it turns out that put kale looks just like a college leaf and i was like hang on. What's what's going on here. And it turns out in portugal. They don't really have a way to differentiate the two so they really are very closely related on that level and and collards adjust they do reasonably well with the heat's even though they taste better after a frost and they tend to have a little barba a broader leaf. But as you'll save if you check out some of these college that will working with even within what we call college. There's this huge diversity and we have some cabbage college. That fall a little bit more of a head like cabbage even though the cabbage has gone all the way to tighthead. You have these like heading college which <hes> again kind of maybe think about like heading lettuce versus loose leaf lettuce so there's a lot of differences within colleges well a lot of diversity to explore which

ellen college ira wallis okra Kristen Chris florida oregon youtube
Chris Smith on Collard Greens

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

02:51 min | 11 months ago

Chris Smith on Collard Greens

"So maybe we should just back up just for a couple of minutes in sort of talks. Like taxonomy away you know. What's a collared They're in the same genus and species as cabbage kale brussels sprouts kohlrabi cauliflower brassica. And yet there's like so many groups within that it's just tax comically. This is one. That's stumps me all the time and i can't keep it straight because there's like these groups cultivar groups within that sort of a species and the collards are in one of the groups along with kale. I think i think they're the most closely related to cal anyway. So what are they and they have a lot of cousins in the cabbage family. Right whenever i teach on seed saving this is the species that i use as an example of kind of like the models of domestic crops. Because that you know bresca elleray ca has as a species best all these different offshoots that you've just listed some of them but to walk into the supermarket and see your cabbage had and then you're kale and then you brussels sprouts. You wouldn't necessarily put them all into the same species but through the you know the active like selective seat saving and really developing specific traits within that species. We we see this crazy diversity of food crops broccoli and cauliflower included in that so that's that's kind of fun to explore Specifically within that definitely very close. Takeo is interesting. One thing i noticed when i was working at searchers small seed company down here was in. We started carrying portuguese kale. But it turns out that put kale looks just like a college leaf and i was like hang on. What's what's going on here. And it turns out in portugal. They don't really have a way to differentiate the two so they really are very closely related on that level and and collards adjust they do reasonably well with the heat's even though they taste better after a frost and they tend to have a little barba a broader leaf. But as you'll save if you check out some of these college that will working with even within what we call college. There's this huge diversity and we have some cabbage college. That fall a little bit more of a head like cabbage even though the cabbage has gone all the way to tighthead. You have these like heading college which again kind of maybe think about like heading lettuce versus loose leaf lettuce so there's a lot of differences within colleges well a lot of diversity to explore which

Takeo Kale Portugal
No. 25 La-Lafayette wins Sun Belt West, beats South Alabama

AP News Radio

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

No. 25 La-Lafayette wins Sun Belt West, beats South Alabama

"Number twenty five Louisiana Lafayette was the thirty eight ten winner over south Alabama as Levi Lewis passed for two hundred fifty two yards and three touchdowns the raging Cajuns gained two hundred and fifty four yards rushing in wrapping up their third straight Sun Belt conference west division crown Chris Smith finished with ninety nine yards rushing to go with a ten yard reception for the Cajuns Louisiana Lafayette has won four straight since its only loss on a last second field goal by number fifteen coastal Carolina I'm the ferry

Levi Lewis South Alabama Louisiana Lafayette Cajuns Chris Smith Carolina
Coronavirus in France: Curfews to come into force in several cities

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus in France: Curfews to come into force in several cities

"Let's begin here in Europe as cases of Corona virus continue to rise across the continent governments have been doling out new restrictions from a citywide curfew in Paris in seven other French cities to right here in London, which will move into high alert level on the traffic light system. That's already looking like a speed bump to progress a few short days after it was implemented earlier this week we. Heard from Mongols Health and science correspondent nets. Dr To Chris Smith and he explained why lockdowns may cub infection rates but are really in some sense just delaying the inevitable. I am skeptical and the reason I'm skeptical I think is an information deficit. I haven't actually seen the case made for. If we do this, this happens if we do this, this happens and this is how certain we are behind these numbers. Remember it's only a while ago. That someone said we're going to shop pubs at ten o'clock at night, and this is going to reduce cases. This is going to reduce transmission. Yes. It will reduce transmission in the pub but what models and maths equations don't foresee is the predictable unpredictability of people, which is they then go out of the pub in the street mass transmission out there are back to someone else's place mentality with a whole bunch of of takeout and far more. Transmissions in that setting. So I think on the one hand if you just the question would lockdown translate into fewer cases on say, yes. If you then the questions about differently, what are the long term repercussions of this does this actually translate into a long term difference in the trajectory difference in outcome well, more people die later, just not today those are the sorts of questions we need to see set out so that we can all be. In the decision making because at the moment is coming across as a bit of some some people with big brains of said this, and this is what we're gonNA do based on some other input from some economists and I don't think he's transparent enough and I think is now is critical more than ever to take the public along for the journey to because that is missing at the moment morale is falling support is wavering, and if we're GonNa make these things, work evidence proves to us we have to have everyone on board onside an all acting together decisively otherwise, we would just fiddling while Rome Burns.

Chris Smith Europe Paris Rome Burns London Lockdowns
WHO: Letting virus spread to reach herd immunity is "unethical"

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:25 min | 1 year ago

WHO: Letting virus spread to reach herd immunity is "unethical"

"As the covid nineteen pandemic has been sucked ever further. into. The deeply tedious culture wars polarizing many Western democracies they gathering climate has been made on behalf of so called herd immunity. This is the fairy which holds that if nature is permitted to take its course, within reason, sufficient antibodies will be distributed among the populace to reduce the viruses spread to a manageable kroll. The World Health Organization has now sat emphatically upon this view who chief Ted, Ross Cabrera's calling herd immunity scientifically, and ethically problematic one joined with more by Dr. Chris Smith. Our Health and science correspondent also virologist Cambridge University. Chris, he calls it scientifically and ethically problematic I. Think the ethical problem is pretty easy to spot, which is that you know a great many people would need to die. What's the actual scientific problem here if you would just taking a brutally utilitarian approach? Well I think really it's a lack of knowledge the moment we think that about ten percent of the world's population. So perhaps even as many as a billion people rounds bit more than ten percent have had the infection, but we don't know, and the reason we don't know is because in order to work out with people have had it or not we have to do antibody tests and antibodies. And you can think of this as the analogy is a bit like footprints left in the snow when you've had an infection, a person who has had it and cleared it no longer has any virus detect, but the footprints of the vars having been there all the antibodies left in your immune response. If you take those antibodies, that's a sure fire marker, you must have encountered whatever the infection is that you're interested in the problem is that it's not clear to us that when we test people for antibodies, all we rarely detecting all the people that have really been infected or have. We missed some have we missed. A few are more people responding in ways where they might antibodies the we're looking for. We just don't know at the moment. So scientifically, we don't really know what we're tackling here. We don't know what the long term consequences of coronavirus infection are. They may be trivial. They may not at least for proportion of people there is this phenomenon dubbed. Long Cove where people have post infection, inflammatory syndromes and symptoms that can go on for months. Now, we don't know what fraction of the population get that or whether certain people are more susceptible to that younger people older people we don't know. So scientifically, medically, there are issues here. If we understood the thing completely you'd say, well, we know exactly what we're getting into. Sign. On the dotted line or not whereas with this, it's a black box. We don't know what's inside on the subject of understanding things completely where are you on the UK's most recent? Of restrictions lay his TIA's and levels. The U. K. seeking to make things clearer because they've been criticisms levelled at the government for having rules that people not even prime minister. An Very Scottish MP's can remember, and as a result, this is leading to confusion transgressions and that's translating into more spread of the virus. So in order to gain a tighter grip on the virus, the outbreaks in various parts of the country, this tiered system has been introduced to on tier two tier three also dubbed medium high, very high risk and the idea is that everybody across. The country has a baseline of medium risk and so anybody who's not in special restrictions at the moment is medium but in other parts of the country where there are special measures needed, you have this way of escalating up to high risk and the threshold is said to be one hundred per hundred thousand people in the population who are affected in order to trigger that escalation and I think part of this is not just that the people everywhere know where they stand they know how prepare for if they're area becomes. A higher risk area local planners can put in place policies but also means that more control can be potentially devolved to local authorities and local actors because there, there's a lot of knowledge on the ground are very skilled people in public health and so on who could work more strategically locally and I think some of these measures do open the door to more of that kind of thing. But again, it's it's produced the usual anticipated reaction of people. As I'm away confused today blame them people are confused there's lots of. Uncertainty and no one likes this sort of change when you've just got used to work in one way and then morals come in and people are obviously trying to to make sense of how exactly this is or isn't going to work the thing that would of course stops or savers from having to try and understand what the government is telling. US would be a vaccine in has been bad news I guess on that front, which is Johnson and Johnson suspending trials of their vaccine. Do we know why that happened? Nobody's worth bearing in mind that this happens all the time. When we're developing drugs, foams, companies go into the drug development vaccine manufacturing process expecting to fail ninety percent of the time not because they're not good at what they do. It's because they're very good at what they do that they succeed ten percent of the time, but it's a very tough. Challenge with very rigorous standards and west safety is an absolute priorities of red line that you can't cross safety and ethics. So as soon as you have a trial running if there's anything untoward, the the safe thing to do that point is you hope the trial you investigate and you appoint somebody independent of the trial who is an independent observer who will Come, in they would appraise the situation and then they'll cite note we can. We can say this is not because of the drug this is because of natural occurrences something you can resume your trial but on safety grounds, you always hope thing investigate and then make a decision and this happens a lot to happen to Astra Zeneca a couple of months ago. A month or so ago with with their co vaccine and investigators came end, they found that there were cases reported. There was a new case of a of a condition transverse lightest, which is an inflammatory condition of the central nervous system. They were able to say, well, because this happened sporadically in the population, there's no reason to suspect that this was caused. By the vaccine in this case. So we'll resume the trial. It may be that this the same will happen for. Johnson. And Johnson's vaccine trial. So is there any consensus really among you and your fellow boffins about likely timeframe for vaccine will I've asked a couple of people this one person who is working on behalf of one of the regulators to keep. Tabs on one of the vaccine projects. Another person who's actually in the finance sector has been having conversations with the pharmaceutical companies at the front runner in this and both interestingly guy very similar time windows suggesting that about of next year was the most likely time by which we would have data assuming that the data that is provided are provided shows. The vaccines work I mean. Let's assume that because that's a big. If an it's necessary if assuming everything works, then you've got to go through various checks and balances and take a lot of boxes from a safety point of view which takes time and so that's why they're saying probably midway through next year, and then there's the whole issue of WHO's going. To get vaccinated because in a report in the Financial Times last week Kate. Bingham who's the vaccine taskforce lead said an acknowledged that about thirty million people are front runners for receiving vaccines. But where does that leave the other thirty five, million not? No, no information has been provided. Yes. On on what the government strategy is going to be.

Johnson Government Dr. Chris Smith Cambridge University World Health Organization Astra Zeneca UK Long Cove Financial Times TED Ross Cabrera Bingham Prime Minister Kate
Donald Trump and Melania Trump both test positive for COVID-19

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:26 min | 1 year ago

Donald Trump and Melania Trump both test positive for COVID-19

"The October surprise is a cherished part of US presidential election mythology the late breaking game changer with engineer contrivance or priests of. Two Thousand and twenty s octo surprise seems to have come early. President, DONALD TRUMP and first lady melania trump have both tested positive for covid nineteen and will now be self isolating. It is just thirty two days until the presidential election joining me with more on this Dr Chris Smith Monocle two, thousand, four, hundred and science correspondent and Scott Lucas professor of US Politics University of Birmingham Chris First of all would it possibly actually have been more of an October surprise if none of the key figures in this election came down with the illness I think. So I'm pretty surprised actually the. They've oh, taken. So long to catch it if you wind your mind back to SORTA March April time, Prince Charles was one of the first people note in the UK when the first high profile people who meet a lot of people to catch it. Then thankfully recover on therefore slightly surprised that Donald Trump and other people who are on the presidential campaign trail have encountered court and demonstrates this before maybe they have maybe that time they didn't know maybe this time they do maybe this time they're saying something about it. Scott Lucas. DC will just right now be waking up to this news and trying to understand how it is going to affect the last month of campaigning What do you think obviously debates again to have to be remote if they going to be held at old trump won't be able to hold anymore rallies and presumably the bulletin team will now all have to be tested and may have to isolate as will. Probably, what Chris said, we're shocked that this had come out before that the by campaign team probably had gained for this type of possibility. They will have been testing regularly, and of course, Joe Biden is in the middle of a train stopped tour of key swing states such as Ohio, and Pennsylvania. So they'll go ahead as much as you can be normal in the next month while offering hopes for the recovery of Donald Trump along as well as trump's close aide. Hope Hicks. I think it's the trump campaign that'll be in disarray today trying to figure out what to do Let me just say for a couple reasons why I? As we've noted trump no longer has his primary outlet of campaign rallies, large gatherings without mass without social distancing where he just rambled for sixty ninety minutes and try to grab headlines. Secondly, a, you're in a position where corona virus goes back to being the number one issue in the campaign and the trump campaign hoping to bury it or push it to the side. Let's talk about Supreme Court. Let's talk about trump's cultural war against that extremist anarchist. Let's not talk about two, hundred, ten, thousand Americans who are dead closing seven and a half million cases, and then thirdly, this actually I think undermines disinformation the trump campaign had put out about Joe Biden being physically mentally unfit indeed remember. If you remember, he goes back that far enough that they mopped Biden for supposedly being in the basement for observing coronavirus restrictions and not coming out and campaigning publicly before the start of June. It looks Joe Biden's white wise right. Now while the questions over judgment physical health, we'll be about Donald trump and four years ago. Of course, President Trump mocked, Hillary Clinton for becoming ill with what looked like pneumonia during the campaign, Chris. Is it possible that this might make a difference, one way or the other to how seriously Americans take this I mean, might hopefully make it clear to trump's base that this virus is real and it is dangerous but alternatively should trump not appear to too badly affected and should he recover quickly that might rather dangerously amplify his narrative that it's not that big a deal Martin did it could go either way couldn't it and indeed? He has the odds in his favor even in a person's eighties that chance of making a recovery in other words not succumbing to grove infection as well north of ninety percent. So it's not to give him that just because someone who is his age mid seventies who has other pre existing health conditions? He he does have obesity they will increase risk. It's not a given though that he'll come off worse for this he make. A complete recovery probably most people do and the other thing to bear in mind is, is this genuinely the first time? He's had it because it may well be he has become reinfected and this time perhaps I'm speculating wildly here and I might be completely wipe them up but wouldn't it be wonderful if he ends up I've got this of course it but then bounces back incredibly fast and demonstrates how powerful he really is. you can see that working well for him. You can also see this for the reason, Scott that you mentioned it playing badly for him in that it does amplify covid nineteen as an issue in the in the minds of most voters but. What are the actual practical considerations here? I. Mean You mentioned the Supreme, court nomination to fill that vacancy left by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. CanNot actually go ahead and I guess the big question is there any doubt whatsoever about the actual election at this point? Assuming that. Kony Barrett did not get corona virus donald trump when she made a public appearance alongside him six days ago. Yeah. This can go ahead because you're talking about the hearings that take place. In the Senate. which will be socially distanced I'm sure. So Mitch McConnell push that through the problem for the trump campaign, they can no longer make that the headline event and try to galvanize their supporters around given these circumstances. Secondly, on the delay of the election is extremely difficult to delay the election you have to amend. Through Congress an act from eighteen forty, five, i. think the practicalities of that are very, very difficult and I think it's a huge gamble for Republican senators, some of whom are facing difficult reelection battles to do that because the Democrats will say, they're just trying to use a pretext to push this this back because remember, we've been facing a donald trump who has been saying if I don't like the election result, I don't have to observant I can stay in the White House that I think undercuts the effort that could be made to say look there's A legitimate reason given the pandemic to push the date back. Scott. Lucas Christmas thank you both very much for joining

Donald Trump Scott Lucas Joe Biden Dr Chris Smith President Trump United States Us Politics University Of Birm Chris First Mitch Mcconnell Ruth Bader Ginsburg DC Supreme Court Lucas Christmas Engineer Obesity UK Prince Charles Professor
"chris smith" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"chris smith" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"Or Jackson Heights from September twenty fourth through September. Twenty eight Good Morning America. This is the cats roundtable chunk catching Kiedis here Sunday morning well, forty days or just about maybe a little less election with us. This morning is new. Jersey. Congressman Chris Smith and Christmas brings us up to date New Jersey what's going on and were And what concerns you. Well thank. Everyone else. Having this terrific virus. Trying to make sure that people are safe but also that we opened in a way that is. More. Likely to lead to job gains so it it's a real. And working to get. A A vaccine all the rest So I never were chase work individuals asking me for help in my entire career the last six months or so so and we met every need we've worked seven days a week now there is no day off anymore. and. That's fine. because challenges are so great John In this election running on my record which I think is You know I I've written many many laws on three laws looking in putting our landmark laws on it particularly on the research side. And in a couple of weeks. We will celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the Larva that I wrote called the trafficking victims protection. act. It's our whole of government landmark historic law to combat sex trafficking in the United, states and everywhere else in the world. And it has made an enormous difference helping women protecting. Prosecution. Of the traffickers and protested women's women. The three pieces we call it and and I. Took a couple of years to get past and it's being very faithfully aggressively prevented by the administration so. This is things We got a lot of. our area either working on Lions Nineteen Ninety two we got a major breakthrough with enactment of tick act. I was the house sponsor of that we put into a lark bill and l. all worn research you know trying to get to the bottom of again finding a timber and. Hopefully initiating a major effort prevention of lyme disease and other tick borne diseases. But I've led that for almost thirty years and we finally last couple of Moosehead age breakers. That's a that's just stuff. You know because we we kinda make breakthroughs and we to go forward and it seems like everybody's busy fighting with each other instead of going. And Working together for the best of America tell us about New Jersey. What's going on all the New Jersey racism. In general. Well. They're allowed competitive reasons mostly. Some of the first timers at a running, you know in New Jersey we we had four seats that Republican that were lost in the last election when there was that blue waves and there was a blue wave and they're very competitive each and every one of them and so. There's Jersey is a battleground, but it's supposed to be a battleground in certain congressional districts. So that's worth watching my racist going. Back poll and it couldn't have been better I run like a behind every time I run. I take nothing for granted. I ask people respectfully for their voting Please consider. never taken for granted and feeling it has to be earned and I hope already I think I am. Who which ways New Jersey leaning towards trump towards. Well I the polls that indicate towards fighting Almost. Good parental registered Democrats to Republicans, and that's a lot of differential like the ticket splitters the unaffiliated far out. everyone else I mean it's a phenomenon of the independent New Jersey voter So it's anyone's guess how might go we had A Republican governor that long ago and Chris Christie So it does show that the state can embrace a Republican you know if. So inclined. So I think the polls are pretty much Trending. But that's contains you know as you said about forty days to go, that's a You know we were in a situation where you know just about anything can happen. we've got debates coming up at the president and. And you know that could have an impact. But. Frankly I think people really you know the good things that have happened you know the covid nineteen efforts. Have presently or by the president. Extraordinary I mean I know the key players from Deborah burks to to black? and sometimes appears to be fixing there but I think it's more. You want a diversity of voices at that in those meetings things what about this shouldn't be doing that and that works speed initiative taking. Star Trek I guess you know the you know to really slowly events. And also. to deal with this Is is unprecedented and I. You know the way the private public partnership has been crafted. You know when? President. Trump and that he has. We're getting all the pharmaceutical companies to work at speed, but at a time but Christmas congressman, thank you so much for calling in and thank you for everything you do for our country and people keep working hard. Thank you. Thank you very much south at the end. This is the catch on table we write back..

New Jersey Congressman Chris Smith president Trump Kiedis lyme disease Lions Chris Christie congressman America Deborah burks United
Out of Chicago  IN-DEPTH!

This Week in Photo

05:46 min | 1 year ago

Out of Chicago IN-DEPTH!

"Able to the back to another episode of this week in photo. I. Am your host Frederik van Johnson today. I'm sitting down with my friend and fellow Chicagoan Mr Chris Smith Chris and I. Talk about the latest out of Chicago Conference and how that win is pivot virtual all that stuff, and then how how he's planning to move forward in the future amidst this whole sort of sea change in the conference space. Chris. Math. Welcome to the show man how you doing. I'm great. Thank you Frederick great to be here. Thank you very much. Is Good to have you on man I'm excited to chat with you for a lot of reasons, some of which will become clear during this conversation but Yeah, that's a cliffhanger. So. Say to chat with you so. For the folks that may not have heard of out of Chicago the conference, what is out of Chicago give us the quick. Elevator Pitch Origin Story of that conference. Sure. So out of Chicago originally was my blog like I think has been like eleven or twelve years now but eventually, we started doing conferences in Chicago. This would have been the seventh annual get together conference downtown Chicago where was this eighth year I don't know but but that was what we did for a long time and then. You know we've. Seen over the years that coming in person all the way to Chicago because people would come from around the country around the world to it that we found that it's better to go. To the destinations where people want to shoot. So we've started now our conferences are around the country we're going to MOAB and Acadia National Park this year and Death Valley next year. So all sorts of different places and really have gotten a little bit away from doing the downtown out of Chicago Conference. But this year we did it online instead and it was fabulous and basically the response we got from everybody was don't go back to how you did it before this is awesome that we can do it. In our pajamas from home, and then you know just just get to see all the general things because because originally the conference was kind of all different. Genres I mean you've been an instructor in the past and we would have portrait people Lindsay Adler, we would have people you know doing landscape we had kind of everything lots of street photography, and now instead it's like, okay, we're GonNa go to the botanic. Garden. And we're just GONNA do flower and garden photography or we're going to like I said, Acadia National Park and when we're doing. Landscapes in creative nature photography. So so that's kind of how we've changed. But yeah, everything's totally different for everyone now right. So yeah. So everything's really changed the last couple of months. Yeah, and it's sort of it's a I. think that change was coming anyway you and I've had offline conversations sort about the state of the of the photo conference in Education Online Education Industry and how that's converging and The old school conferences are the attendance was going to getting lower and lower, and now after this latest adventure with co vid Can't conferences are getting getting canceled and moving online much like yours did yours was able to pivot a lot easier than some of those bigger conferences in my from my external opinion. And you correct me if I'm wrong largely because you'd already built sort of this next generation conference that wasn't, Hey, come check out these massive array of boats that that people spend gazillions of dollars on. Downstairs go to the education. You're kind of flip that on its head. Can you talk about that a little bit sure. So I mean when we decided to run our first photography conference, we were running it and I had never been to a photography conference before I'm like, I don't know what would you do it a photography conference well, you'd go out and shoot. You'd get to hang out. With the you know all these people that you follow online, it's like a really great networking opportunity and yeah, we'll teach them classes too but it was really different especially like a set like eight years ago most places like you come you watch one lecture then stay in watch another lecturer then watch more and go home or whatever, and then go to the trade show or whatever. So What we built was really based around shooting, and so we did a lot of the street photography and the downtown architecture photography in Chicago but. But by switching it that way, it made it a whole lot easier to go virtual. Well, that's kind of ironic because we're doing the shooting but it we didn't have this huge big infrastructure behind. We're just a very small company. I have a few people to help me run it and they're awesome by the way and. Is. A great team that I have and and we were able to it was unbelievable when this all hit and we didn't cancel another conference. We weren't planning on doing this normal out of Chicago conference. We were going to do something that was just architecture. which we weren't able to do of course but. But instead. We said. We've got all these instructors. We had seventy instructors at the thing I said I've got a list of. All these people we could email them immediately, we can ask, Hey, do you WanNa do this while in the best part of it was that they were all stuck at home and so they're like, yeah, I got nothing better to do. So all these years. Yeah. All were like excited about it and I mean it was really it was really meant as something that we wanted to do. But it was also a benefit foot benefit for our instructors who had to cancel all of their workshops I mean, that's I mean that's their livelihood is going around the world teaching, and so we did this instead to help you know cover some of those costs for them that they that they're

Chicago Acadia National Park Chicagoan Mr Chris Smith Frederik Van Johnson Instructor Education Online Education Ind Lindsay Adler Frederick Death Valley Lecturer
"chris smith" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"chris smith" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Obliterating confusion, amplifying truth on pursuing clarity. It's Kevin McCullough radio. Well, I think it's outrageous, and it's a further manifestation of the bullying of Xi Jingping, the maximum dictator of China. No, I work human rights issues in China for the entirety of my career. Well, in fact, in this man's career. In fact, when I moved to the tri State area number of years ago, there were there were two names in the New Jersey delegation that I knew I could count on their vote on almost every issue that would come before them. Chris Smith and Scott Garrett. We lost Garrett a couple of election cycles ago. But Chris Smith is still beaten, proud down in the fourth Congressional district, fighting for the good of New Jersey every single day and doing the right thing by way of the American people, and I am honored to have Congressman Chris Smith join us once again. Chris has been a long time since you've been on Kevin McCullough radio, but thanks for coming back Kevin. Thank you so much. Thank you for your faithfulness and speaking truth, particularly in this prevailing wind where there's so much this information and that is that is really so much well, in that little sound by that we were hearing there. You were responding to the fact that China has blacklisted you and you're not in bad company Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz. Some other folks are all on this list. I don't think a lot of people have heard about what happened. Tell us Tell us why you ended up in this elite company. Sure. Well, you know, for decades, Kevin Ivan Raising human rights have gone to China. Any human exhibition center? I think. Ah, blacklisted before Ah, so they could get a visa. My computers in my office were already hijacked Hack. Abided attorneys government that was back in 2006. Thea other was after before the during the 2008 Olympics wasn't ever the Olympics came before they were rounding up all the parents just believers, the pastors and increase on putting him out of Contact so they couldn't talk to the press about the horrific in their rights abuse, religious persecution in particular, that they were suffering s O. I was blacklisted then as well, But this is more. Um, I think you know that the FBI did brief me, they said, you know, there's a AA lot of things that they could be doing in quoting bribe surprise of other people. To influence you social media. I mean, we continually have, like Twitter accounts made in my name. We try to get them down a cz quickly as we came. One time I had the house counsel. You know, the General Council wouldn't take it down. It was hung with lies, and it looked just like mine. So we don't know that things are just people who disagree with me on issues in the district of the country, but it has become more well. They don't want things for certain congressman. They don't like They don't like it when people tell them that they don't treat their people well, and this has been something that they've had to deal with for a number of years, and I think it's gotten Even more attention. Now that the president has taken, you know, a fairly tough as well. The prison had been very faithful Hey, is implementing. Both were Human Rights Policy Act and I was the house that and the Hong Kong have been arrived. The Democracy Act, which I first introduced in 2014. It's finally got passed in in early September, Miss September and legislation. The president has his name people. Typically, just last week, he named people who are Up using the Muslims weaker ZZZZ. They call them. That's right. Just abuse you put it in concentration camps is genocide and what they're doing to the home Congress to the Catholic Church, the Christian turkeys. The following gun All faith is to eradicate or to have them all subservient to cheesing..

Congressman Chris Smith China Kevin McCullough New Jersey president Scott Garrett Olympics Xi Jingping Kevin Ivan FBI Twitter Kevin Marco Rubio congressman tri State Hong Kong Ted Cruz
"chris smith" Discussed on Red Sox Beat

Red Sox Beat

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Red Sox Beat

"Red Sox beat. This is Josh Lewin your host from the other coast sitting out a year and Salona Beach California where things are starting to quiet down. What a crazy weekend! Awful weekend! Maybe, this'll be archive, and you're listening to this and twenty twenty three for all I. Know A boy. Wouldn't it be nice, but it was twenty twenty three right now, but the weekend just for archival purposes that just happened in America was eye-opening, scary chaotic. Horrible. Race riots and Protests gone wrong and there's some good things the I'm sure can come out of it I. Sure Hope So. It's scary. TIMES CORONA viruses. According is the number two thing that everybody's talking about. Twenty Twenty Sucks Just to biblical proportions. I'M NOT GONNA. Wear you out with that. You're here to get away from it and I'm here to provide so. We're GONNA. Try to get to in this episode. A little bit of prediction in terms of when we might see some baseball when we might see the red sox out there at fenway wasn't a great week or weekend for the socks either. We're GONNA talk to Chris Smith momentarily from mass live. He's going to break down the red sox kind of caving towards what a lot of teams are doing right now. Which is saying look? We're you know we're losing money, so you're gonNA, lose money. We're going to start having some salaries here releasing minor leaguers and As always I hope he has. Total red. SOX Honk I give the red sox of the doubt all the time, because I think that that they the giants the phillies. Maybe there's very few teams. It seemed to do almost everything right. All the time and the Red Sox are usually right at the head of that list. I just don't think they. They had a very good Friday. With News Dump that showed that they're gonNA start cutting salaries and. The structure of how they did it. We'll get into that with Chris and a little bit, but I want to try to keep it somewhat. I don't WanNa say positive because again. Nothing super positive right now, but just. As of June first the latest that you need to know the players proposal finally came back. They want one hundred fourteen game season would start at the end of June would go to the end of October. That's probably not going to happen for a variety of reasons, but at least it seems like there's some some talk now some back and forth and. Expanded Playoffs for a couple years I dig that that's fine. They're talking about a salary advance of one hundred million split among the players during Spring Training two point Oh. Still talking about enhancing the season with microphones on the players and other broadcast enhancements. All of that would be fantastic and. Holding some other events like off season all, Star Games. Plural home run derbies. I mean there's so many cool ways you can be generating goodwill and additional money, so they need to find a way right I mean. The nuclear option is not an option that they gotta understand. How if you don't play, it might take years if not decades for some fans to forget all of this squabbling, the millionaires versus billionaires. And other sports are starting to come back or at least show that they know what they're doing in terms of coming back, so it's time to..

Red Sox Sox Chris Smith Twenty Twenty Josh Lewin Salona Beach California fenway baseball America phillies giants
"chris smith" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

Scale The Podcast

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

"Grow and scale business today. I've got a special guest chris smith chris. This is the first time we've ever done one of these together so i'm super pumped to have you. Thanks for being here today. Go thanks for having me. I've watched lost a few of your other shows and pump to be on your great interviewer and you've got a great community. Yeah yeah man. We're so excited. Okay so let's start out. I mean you're obviously either one of the co founders of curator that's kind of put your love and heart and soul into but you've got a back story so let's start this interview outright. Let's let's hear you said something about quicken loans man. Let's talk about the early days. Who's chris smith yeah so it's funny. It's there's four bs. He's right is to billionaires billion dollar company and then you know a billion dollar experience. Let's call us so. I started working in boiler rooms. Actually was cold. Caller calling leads for lou pearlman yeah lou pearlman is the person who invented boy bands like sadly he did so he discovered britney eddie spears 'n sync and backstreet boys right here and beautiful orlando were yes. Oh my first job was actually calling people around the country that wanted to become famous and this was like pre internet so a lot of the leads. Were like you know how you go to the mall and there's like a lady that says your kids. Excuse me a clipboard like that was my lead source or things like radio ads would fill our funnel so i got really really good at like dirty. Sleazy eighties boiler room wolf of wall street tactics by working for lou pearlman who went to jail who died in in jail who did a ponzi scheme. My sales coach was in jail in the eighties for telemarketing fraud. I work there in the early two thousands so these guys we're legends but billionaires but for the wrong races and so i was taking notes i was studying the tactics but i've always been a moral and ethical guy raise his christian raised as the person that definitely tries to obey the golden role and stuff and so i knew i couldn't stay there long and so it ended up working at quicken loans next which was kind of like the legal legit same concept. You're in a boiler room. You're getting lead. You're calling leads but now you've got a product. It's alone you got a name brand like quicken you know which was affiliated with quickbooks and turbo tax and that's when i really started making money that's when i got really really good because of the volume one hundred calls a day five credit polls to loans written one loan closes. That's where i made my first six figures my first ten thousand dollar check and all of that i stop and so working for a billionaire lieu pearlman and then a billionaire like dan gilbert who owns quicken loans the owns the cavs this guy's billy's yeah it. It was just like wow they have sales people. They have scripts right. They have systems that aren't just marketing and networking and hope but what i learned from those first two places you have to treat sales as important or more than the tech in the marketing. They have the tech in the marketing but you don't also the boiler room. That's what i saw. 'cause i lived in it. I love it man and guys. If you're listening today this is this is going to be a sneak peek into that guy's brain right so let's give him some love. If you're here in the chat just say hello give us where you're from and just just say hello to chris. Is that cool yeah. I hope they do. I love to chat back but ultimately that led me to realtor dot com dot loop and now curator and what i learned through that process dan was basically if you understand the science of sales yep and you have a good marketing funnel yep. You're going to be successful. Swale now the other pieces of good products that i can't always teach a realtor to be good right but i can teach you how to build a beautiful beautiful funnel and i teach you how to get on the phone with those peoples and create opportunity..

chris smith lou pearlman dan gilbert cavs orlando telemarketing fraud Swale quickbooks ponzi scheme billy billion dollar ten thousand dollar
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"You can go there especially. If you've got influenced to sell them you can say i've got a similar products what you already doing you. You know. Let's let's work together because i people lock their ideas and be people probably have a global marketing plan to they're trying to follow or overarching marketing plan at the same time that book is brilliant and actually i think i'm reading the moment the art of thinking clearly clearly and what you dislike about this reminds me of the locking bias but there was another cognitive needed blast that benjamin franklin used to speak about a lot of where you would ask a favor of someone that you wanted to like you and i think he's example emba was there was a a something very specific that they like so he knew a guy who he wanted to become friends with both the guy apparently apparently hated him and he asked to board this really nice book of his like really rare book about a specific topic and the guy is like taken aback gave it to him and from that moment on which they were very very good friends and they it's sort of the the the indirect process of asking for a gift yeah that makes the people like you in some way and there was a gun name of the bias but it was on denman hot who have had on the show he did a whole episode about on in <hes> not real big things but <hes> he's podcast just blanked on the night any i will will link. It is a fastening episode. I love that sorta shit is learning about human psychology is is super fast and the interesting thing for me really was moving. I guess from audible mainly to podcasts so used to listen to books quite a lot <hes> in you know dot com your latest ship by <unk> winkle fantastic and he's all the books to <hes> <hes> and you know how you know how to stop worrying you. You know all these kind of books that have not had a sub wearing start living yeah yeah yeah and these kind of books have fantastic before me. I ended up pushing towards podcast a lot and it was the joker podcast that really he got me into it but i think i started listening when he was at like episode <hes> probably two hundred and twenty or something like that went from number one chocolate a one point five times spayed eight and everyday driving to and from work opportunity. I've got a my is listening through that period of time and i got so much transfer of knowledge over that period of time that it's really converted me a to do. I want to listen to a book or i want to listen to an experienced person who's doing something. I'd like to do telling me that over and over again and it's been really interesting. It's experience appearance is a good point because like the we used to. We do read books to gain gain information from people who have the experience but now we'd podcast is so much more more relevant to this day that you can you can sit there and listen to that and gather that information i can. I can totally say that yeah yeah. It's sup- inch that and <hes> you the startup podcast <unk> here in the peach by gimblett major as well. Those three casa been yeah the guy. That's one of the original series this startup bike monday. He's an amazing series. Yes listen that thing back to front in like three days easily. Remember how many seasons but it's such an easy and still going have you heard of nevada all files series <hes> he's amazing that guy he got an avowal on juror against podcast one of the best episodes you ever listened to after that you listen listen to podcasts and it diligently one minute episodes <hes> and they just i have and i realized i followed him already on twitter with that understanding who he was yeah yea i followed him on twitter and i was like these tweets are interesting. But who is this person. A company is this. Is this a pseudo name. Who is this vigil because he doesn't have photos of himself. Yeah yeah yeah. He's an amazing display for kind of like a mannequin esque does yeah but he's i swear he's episode. Joe rogan would have been one of the best what would easily be top three episodes..

twitter Joe rogan benjamin franklin denman nevada one minute three days
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"Look where do you you j._j. At noble park really on the muscle you 'cause i went to absolute emma. Mayo's there for wall but i felt felt like comes in. It's pretty good but i felt like there was so much going on there. I want to find just a b. j. j. yore ah you know practice. I understand that it's tough at the moment because we're looking at moving down to the buy side and the knicks he is. I'm trying to strategically pick a pay place. That's not going to be a pain in the ass. Come the next year yeah. I know there's one in south melbourne but <hes> it's definitely getting more and more popular than i'll at super. Super is part of that judah joe rogan unite part of that shoe to joke. I willing coalition to previously quite a lot not so much these days you being evangelist. He's is the reason. I started doing jujitsu so he's amazing. The u._f._c. is well that that is really made a bill yeah yeah yeah and but both ways right all right and gypsy made the u._s._a. Popular news as manager so even more popular exactly all right last question for you. If you had to gift one book to the audience for christmas this year or an audio book what would it be and why probably <hes> say the standard to how to win friends and influence people. I think partly because a lot of the lessons taught me. I don't remember what they are but i remember them being profound in the fact that <hes> it's an interesting conversation with my girlfriends sometimes when she'll tell me something that's happening with her family and i simply don't remember and it's because the startup founder you've got so many things going on all the time. You've got the information coming to your head and i feel like you push out. These thoughts quite a lot for example birthdays. I'm terrible. I don't remember when my mom's birth dad's oh my girlfriend's birthday and i also don't remember how all lanes without <hes> with with their oscar my birthday but often have to open up the calculator and it makes me sound like a have some sort of condition but i can promise you. I don't think i i do but for me. It's it's about i guess funneling through that information and how can you put it into your day today and the why do things and not have to think about it from then on one one thing i do remember from that is researching the people that you'll talking to before you go to find common ground and the example i think they used in the book was about someone someone was trying to get a politician on their side found at the politician loved boats so they researched a whole bunch about boats and they went there and i talked about that all the time petitional this person's never been on a boat wow wow so it's about understanding the commonality the common ground and what i tell people that even happens in marketing if you're going to pitch mercedes for marketing and you notice that mercedes ladies have worked with a whole bunch of influences and they've never done anything on tv. You can go there especially. If you've got influenced to sell them you can say i've got a similar products what you already doing you. You know. Let's let's work together because i people lock their ideas and be people probably.

mercedes noble park knicks Mayo melbourne founder
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"The sort of sporting sporting organizations have to expand his era. Yes as a matter of time yeah exactly and i think if you're looking in schools one of the questions i always ask because it sport versus as sport not generally say no. It's the supplementary can participate in both at the same time. I guess the same way a lot of the time it's not necessarily fell versus soccer. You know the the two different sports that attract two different types of people yeah. I'm looking at the time. I think we're going to jump into some shortfalls questions. Show <hes> what is your morning owning. Retain look like morning. Retain <hes> currently because there's a lot of what going on it's lazy than i'd like to be <hes> but generally up by about six six six thirty yeah take the dog for stroh and yes straight off into work. I usually ate breakfast at look so i tried to get out the door pretty fast and evening retain. What is that look look like. How do you decompress evening. Retain is i know phones spain something that have been trying to push definitely nice scrolling through instagram or twitter facebook or anything like that whatsoever walker and it's generally try to just lay in bed and talk with the girlfriend for a little bit and just collect my thoughts. What's going to happen for the next day yeah. I've i've started this thing racist anyway. I've completely -pletely removed. My fire not even from the office and not even from the bedroom is downstairs in a place that's enough. I found that the less time i am you spend on you. Find the better off. You are with procrastinating mental clarity everything it's sort of obvious with do you read books like deep work and that stuff is obvious but until you've really integrated it's very very hot very very news resolution of mine last last year to not read public comments on facebook and twitter and things like that which is going quite well and then this year. It's really not a squirrel not to scroll yeah <hes> <hes> what's in the fridge at home. What's the frigid high will go vegetarian side. There's a bit of tofu this quite a few prepackaged meals. Try to prepackaged much of the can't tend to purchase less and a lot of sources. Go friends big fan of codenamed so these thirty different types of mayonnaise. It feels like not not not not seriously with at this point four different. I can see that my sister's vegetarian so <hes> i can see lots of different sources and what not to give it to you that cake yes <hes> best purchase under two hundred dollars rest purchase under two hundred dollars. That's a good question <hes>. I think i'm quite i've gone through through the minimalism phase i guess pretty recently and that was part of our emails leading up to this asked if i could maybe not wear a black shirt instead of literally only way blackshirts <hes> i would say best purchase insurance would be a pair of an m._d.'s at s._n._l. Days so. I purchased those originally in the u._s. over there for work ray sell in australia. That's when that were ray here and you you know with a whole lot more and that was so comfortable that <hes> bought another pair secondhand and they've lasted me threes two pairs of shoes. They're super comfortable fantastic nick and the stylish enough to wear pure time. When did you come to the decision to like your wardrobe. Let's see the sign pez pants and shirts and that's it pretty much. I've got i've got probably eight pairs of oh eight black shirts and then i've got <hes> two different pairs of black. Jane's one's a little bit skinnier than the other pair and besides that i've got some like a digit so i've got a couple of i've got a gay and i've got a couple of rash guards in two different pairs of black shorts and such but it's pretty streamlined. There's a few kind out of dress up shirts and suits and stuff that still have that i wear but pretty much every single dime. I'm wearing a black shirt black jeans. You know the same watching one or two days every time. Look where do you you j._j. At noble park really on the muscle you 'cause i went to absolute emma..

facebook twitter soccer stroh noble park spain Jane australia ray instagram walker two hundred dollars two days
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"They all have a sports teams yeah so as an adult as well that didn't i just suddenly stay. Yes s. o. In two thousand sixteen i think it was at alight purchase. Any sports team called legacy. Kellyanne conway capsulated in there and as far as australia goes the brisbane broncos just announced their. I four hundred eighty sports. They're doing some four tournaments essendon bombers in the n._f._l. Diana illegal agents team also the new zealand warriors overseas in new new zealand. I own a team and also the sky city breakers the n._b._a. Team for new zealand they also have you spoken to many of those organizations yet or do you think like someone like an essendon has just really far head yen spoken to them a lot. Yeah it's really interesting to see why they got involved in that space and to drill down into understanding so most you know most of people will ask me from outside the industry you know why why would listen bein a sports team implying forty and there's a few answers to that number one could be selling more memberships cbs so the essendon bombers they purchased the team called abyss and renamed into bombers and they functioned in one game which is legal agents so you could say that selling a membership for the legal agents tame name also knits your membership filtering increases brand recognition in a new market and increases brand recognition with a young audience who aren't currently participating in the n._f._l. According according to the research so that could be a play what could be a play for the adelaide crows as they purchased a ten called legacy but they remained being called legacy so what you could argue there. Here is that could be applied to sell memberships through referral of the companies being involved in h._r. It could be a new revenue play. It could be trying to bring in new brands or even to upsell sell the current brands that they're working with to pay more <hes> which they have done across buys the teams done that or it could be a capital play where there could be building up the team. They could sell it in five years and turn a profit. That's super interesting. 'cause i back in kyoto. I cannot see them selling <hes>. We can't even get a. I felt of women same yet. Let alone a nice foot same yeah but i can see a future. You think about got ready. Ply one the movie that have have recently and you look at the world like no you're not big on via but you can sort of say an enduring i spoke about this like ion how games becoming more and more permeated in the world that we live in like a same less kids play sport the night or applying less sport than they they do a sports yeah <hes> in comparison to decades going so you can see how to remain relevant..

brisbane broncos essendon Kellyanne conway adelaide kyoto australia five years
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"At one stage two weekly it was the right decision and the listeners and demand demand of listens differently come with that and that's something that i've heard in the past from the entrepreneur and fire guy and <hes> amy comer last night and some others that kind of work in that generation poku business there ultimate advice. Try to increase the frequency <hes> yes so it's been it's been a great experience and i've also been in a lot out of being able to talk to people who are very senior within the industry. You have a lot more experience than me and you know a lot of the time. It's may leaning on the other side of the microphone. Yeah it's definitely multifaceted. I think in the lost so you're like forty episodes now think i was looking up forty one yeah i think i think i just did forty five. Yes numbers sky me. Some some are in the forties so so yeah i think once you hit about like eighty to a hundred episodes you start to realize the network effect. <hes> does your office thing like downloads. It's when people are constantly hitting you up and you know that they know all these things about you and they they they've bored into what you're doing. Adding that is is just invaluable and it's hard because we pitch a little clients doing podcasts and it's hard to tell them like you know. You've got to stick with his full five seasons since <hes> it is invaluable the like you said before with linked in publishing it as well on linked in as become if you're in that sort of beta a a space. It's it's amazing to see what it can do. Yeah i agree <hes> now just back on the point of influences or advertising. You know you've spoken before bow. We spoke in the kitchen about brands that are endemic are like a red bull or corsair. A highly relevant to the industry three is the the brands that may not be a strongly connected but have the potential to sort of move into this space as a nation nations for millennials show. I think i it's it's anyone that's looking for that into twenty four year old a market that used to be engaged in sports but aren't according to the research now the average gulf fan. I think it is fifty five years old in average a._f._l. Fan is getting older into its thirties and and so many other sports as similar as well so if you look into that a young market that's great but specific kind of sections of the market automotive has been the lightest player into the space so fast moving chima goods. <hes> you know everything from postino is will totino's who do frozen pizza you know they are in in the u._s. To call to red bull <hes> dr pepper and some alcohol brands coming in now to you know doritos rita's mountain jew etc 'cause we're one of the most recent ones so he had <hes> audi was kind of the first one really in with a sports team <hes> that were over in the nordics and then after that we saw massive catalysts so now we've got toyota mercedes b._m._w. Honda are all in guay yes yes i remember learning this recently <hes> because i was looking up sri marcus son because i'm a big enough one and chemicals all the different teams and then i looked into the teams. I'm like wow like audi. He has because they're talking about. Who's going to take over the williams license because williams is no good fun and even talking about ashley and then on notice like wow like audi mercedes and ferrari..

audi williams Honda mercedes ferrari postino toyota ashley totino fifty five years twenty four year
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"Align sponsorship ad revenue etc etc so a lot of the pitch for me a lot of what i'm trying to push people towards any sports is using influences that can convert and using these effective influences to help push the market to grow but also to sustain yourself as a business while a sports cars is over that period of time and while we figure out had unlock that fan audience you really enjoy. I know it's a bit left field for your podcast is focus on a a sports even if you were to meet with her and we would linke guys genevieve day she runs die management which is sort of <hes> probably the most professional channel influence and management firm here in australia okay and she manages the majority of those big influences he that aren't managing themselves <hes> she's. She's very smart. When it comes to this and although they've you know it's clearly that she she has people that are in like fashion and makeup and stuff by that. There's definitely principles that can be applied to this a sports spice and brands that would consider working with them as well i think yeah and like i was saying before the influence of thing it's very similar. Still it's the same platform a lot of the time still youtube. It's still instagram twitter facebook as talking about something slightly different then i love that you mentioned makeup youtubers and influences because there for me the absolute best out of any influence whatsoever in monitoring their audience in converting things into dulles there are if you can even take the vanity metric and look how many makeup youtubers are on one hundred scribes at own a house and a luxury cau- are ridiculous. Kill us amount if you look at that within political landscape if you look at that within gaming an ace bought one hundred thousand scrubs on youtube get you much. What's it might get you thirty five thousand dollars as you something like that however the makeup <hes> the makeup people in the industry that they function within granted. He's a high profit margin industry which helps they just so much more enterprising housing in the way they do things and i love a lot of the time tuning into my girlfriend when she watches them because you can say that why is it they monetize in their audience the why's that they co branding and developing products the jose always doing live made upsets to four and paid going on <hes> brand junkets. All the time of a bali brands funded that you know to gain that <hes> exposure is you back from them. Creating videos etc yeah the much more enterprising than pretty much any other industry are saying you know maybe fashion becoming second yeah i think they're they're very ah going and there's also an element of the nitra of my company. I also think because it's slightly. It's not like ice emma but it's like there's an entertaining element for people watching people do make up like it's both educational and entertaining. I think gaming has that as well if you're into a sports like a both educational and fun so i i definitely think there's a lot to learn. I think she she's really smart at at at the way she pitches deals. She's so savvy with that now thinking about the podcast itself you've mentioned that a few times doing doing not i mean it. Put you on the map for me. That's how i learn about you guys. I think he was very very your interview with jerry was actually super handy kamaruddin racer podcast. What have you learnt about creating the podcast in this field a lot look look podcast for us functions as a wife. I meant may to maintain relevance within the industry bay from h._d. People <hes> say you could cite site educate the audience and day to generate leads for us as a business so there's kind of three taught casa paypal it often listen to podcast one influential people outside a sports at listened asked to gather information about the industry bay is the second is the people who are looking for their first opportunity in a sports that are listening to us and then the last portion of those who are working industry. They're looking to scale up all looking guy more information and work more so for us it spain great to meet new people and talk with. Can you people i think as far as the business goes of creating a podcast moving from monthly or even quarterly at.

youtube jose instagram australia spain dulles bali jerry thirty five thousand dollars
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"Because ultimately every company has a runway. Really you know oh every especially ones that are project base. No matter how big you i if you've got ten thousand employees if you look at the current contract you have and then take into mind. Let's just do a thought exercise. Is that all three hundred contracts. We have finished. How much money do we have in the bank. We've got ten thousand employees. You know how long does that last fall ultimately that is that is a form of runway so you trying to extend that runway to a point where its way off in the fall. You don't have to worry about it as much that you can. Stop the innovate and build things to scale yeah unless something i've learnt from jerry when i speak to him about that stuff you know he he often talks about runway. I'm he spoke about that in the interview as well. I'm curious like he. He was one of the thing he and so. I think the fan is play solid so i'd not just cherry <hes> and it was joy. Roger hashem <hes> invested in the business with you. What have you learned from jerry and you'll buy set of the plot officer well yeah. We have a section in the place that office by set of with those guys i think it's that realistic look at the runway and how how you're selling things in the short term to be able to build that kind of legacy in that that lost in business in the long term and there's ultimately think about it like a mini incubator or such you know what really came to light to me interviewing brett from my pocus yesterday and and what i've been reflecting on a lot as a start found is there are so many things you don't know that it's easy easy to have someone in the office like jerry our wick a lot with the c o t j who was employee number six or thereabouts for them and he's a director of sport so at quite close we take j. ebbing having someone on tap to ask those kind of business questions that you don't understand and that you know that's that's kind of what's happening in the whole gaming audience. A lot of time when i work with an influence wants to have to teach them how to get an ibn. I've never done that before really they. Don't know how to send an invoice to give them invoice template and i had this with with quite a lodge of work with recently. He's like i'm no sending voice before so so. I had to send him an invoice template. Send me an i._b._m. Thankfully but he didn't know how to send an invoice. Have you been doing much like influencer management yet. His special yeah a lot yeah yeah and that's part of where shade is look. I think right now <hes> the influences besides the publishers influences the ones that are making a lot of money people like ninja eight people like to philly his making easily million dollars a month. If not more <hes> you know some of these people are making seventy thousand dollars a month from donations from their fan audience all subscriptions descriptions and donations <hes> money coming from their.

jerry director Roger hashem philly officer brett seventy thousand dollars million dollars
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"It's just part of the fun now. You don't have a midfield now. You've just got to try something different. It's not theirs is not controlled. Economy's changed change the rules like that yeah. It's a good it's a really good analogy. I think really explains what this industry is because so many people get confused as to aboard it is all the time. I mean even myself until you explain that to me. I thought <hes> you know four nine was part of the sports spice. Yeah won a definitely is it's yeah it's it's an anomaly different and while some kind of a sports purists don't agree with it ultimately. I say well who cares. There's so many millions of people playing it. There's so many millions of dollars a prize pool that can be that could be what they want ultimately making all the money and they bring in the fans. That's what the fans want. Now before we get into big sports the business and what your principles are there the thing you mentioned before that influences now. This is super interesting. How you founded shied crew yeah. Did you do that alongside be thumb. Jerry causes so essentially it's like cut. It's like a house. It's sort of like it sort of seems like melbourne melbourne team tim but not assholes and <hes> and there's like a strong element of gaming their way did the idea come bowed. Why why create shite i guess in the first place so so the the concept that i'd like to really kinda read right on the concept of this <hes> because i think it can be replicated by different people in different markets on on different levels. The concept really was a lot of traditional papal or every everyone these days. It's a play games right so if you go to at regular n._f._l. Match and you look around everyone within the audience. Most of those people are playing games on some sort of level. They've played off aw currently playing for n._b._a. Two k. or four nine things like that so you're seeing stocks you starting to see these things on earth where <hes> the doll we'll play twelve hours of faith leading up to a tournament because he wants to rest and relax and hit. That's one that's his first request hotel room. When it comes to the open you saying people like nick curiosity <hes> dozens of hours of judy on twitch <hes> as potash as potus shade crew. We had jackson playing with his dad. Sheinwald echoes three different days as a fucking hilarious yeah so really it's it's about bringing that out but also it's about another way of on boarding brands into the space so if you're working with traditional national talent and traditional influences you approach a brand they used to working with his people and less scary if you come to them and say hey..

melbourne Sheinwald nick Jerry jackson judy tim twelve hours Two k
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"She's and the issue is that the what we call the non endemic sponsors which are brands that on any sports just say you know westinghouse appliances kitchen appliances then not maturing into the market as fast as people one or as fast as people have thought they are either. There's not really any broadcast deals in sports to fade that money down and there's not many franchise shaw leagues in a sports either that a funneling that money down from the top asia that a selling the rights and selling the sponsorship and following that money down to the teams too so at the moment the people that are making most of the money the publishes the people who produced the games themselves and they redistributing some of that wealth through their own tournaments they funding people to run tournaments for them or the running their in house tournaments but still that's only funding a small portion of people or you know uplifting a small portion of people to run things for the publisher ultimately the money's going to the the polish so the the bulk of the let's call it like the structure of the industry seems that this publishers of games di- mike money from making taking the games yeah there's a few teams that exist <hes> and it sounds like most of the teams equipment decentral to there's no structured competitions they wipe e competitions run by tweet show someone out there that they have a price pool and really just a way to advertise their product and and maybe let's say with streamers who are professionals in their own right and teams as well as i would like a side hustle for people being patrons until something about getting some sort of inside access. Whatever so do you think that fittest showed that to the next level it has to become more more structured like there needs to be proper lakes in some way at a national level or how do you see that unfolding. Look the major advantage vantage and disadvantages as sports. Is this going on see. You've got third parties lack e._s._l. Or even like the global loot legal face it on manetzky amity m._i._t. Events etc that are running games or tournaments quite consistently around that pot so the intellect stream masters series and i think there's i think there's about six of those around the world one of those in sydney at qudos bank arena which say's fifteen thousand to twenty thousand ticket holders coming over the weekend to watch international teams play same <unk> same arena that justin bieber performed example so you seeing those kind of ones which a fantastic <hes> a lotta the time however they not necessarily funded all <hes> helped by the publisher whatsoever so ultimately that tournament is around a game co counter strike global offensive. That's developed by valve which is pushing interest to the game which is pushing people to download right and play the games freight apply however the in game purchases and such and getting people into this ecosystem but they're not necessarily being renumerated full. Bringing people in valves do supports a major major monetary with cash and things like that which is fantastic towards the prospal to make the beginning success but i would say that..

publisher qudos bank arena justin bieber sydney
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"Biggies at the moment <hes> where really about yeah generating market success in helping to grow the market and that's been a i major challenge for us is we're not you know it's not like it's one hundred million dollar industry in australia and way trying to take five ten fifty percent of the pie too gross. It's that the industry is small so we're trying to grow the industry at the same time as maintaining or growing ship <hes>. How do you define small. <hes> as in dala dala was hey. You know if you if you can what are you comparing it to you comparing to korea the u._s. Yeah or even just other industries within australia. One of the things i grew up in tasmania and one of the things that blew my mind when i moved here is if you got just a deigning here and you drive there so many stores that you would have never heard of you never go in your life life and you can say that industry oh my go- friends she works in lighting and lighting supply and the amount of dollars that they pushed through the amount of stores that media's align has plus the three three other competitors in this space shows you that that industry that you've never heard of you will never engage with whatsoever so gigantic and it's so big in so many industries like that but if you look at e. sports it's not like we have ten thousand plus employees in australia who primarily around a sports. If maybe let's get into the state of the industry sri i think one of the things we spoke about earlier was comparing <hes> gaming or and entertainment around gaming versus a sports what's itself. I think everyone's pretty gerry nice spark about fortnight respect that enjoy think last year in twenty and like ten million dollars or something like that <hes> <hes> how would you describe a sports globally festival and then you know how does it compare likely show say sports. Globally buzz house would come. It's gone from currencies ace books. <hes> it's a little bit similar to the dot com bubble but differences some people. Ask me if it's block that. The main difference is that the dot com bubble is that there was a lot of money invested and paper would building things in the middle in the hope that eases would come if you think about the three sides so the money coming in <hes> the building in the middle to connect uses. They was a lot of things being built in the middle a lot of money coming in and there wasn't many uses whatsoever. The as sports problem is is that there are a lot of users. There's tens of millions of people that are playing games every single day around the world. There's a lot of money interest but there is no efficient way to connect a lot of those. There's a lot of the time so i i look at the average spend per user of an e sports fan. It's something minuscule like eighty cents whereas if you look at the average spend of an n._b._a. Fan dan. It's like eleven dollars over what i think it was a month or something like that period of time right or even if you look at the average spend at <hes> a tournament or something like that too. It's even flipped on. Its head so when you talk to someone like the broncos. Their average fan spent at a tournament is like three dollars but in ninety bucks something ridiculously lodge like that so it's it's about understanding. Where's the value proposition. He how do we actually connect these fans. And what are they looking for and that's a lot of the issue that you get globally where you'll have <hes> <hes> like media companies and this isn't even just as sports now. You've got.

australia dala dala broncos tasmania one hundred million dollar five ten fifty percent ten million dollars eleven dollars three dollars
"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Uncommon

"Them. Help to grow the company anthony it was starting to go down it already been well through its high and it was starting to decline that stage so all saying how can i help this once great company maintain. We'll get back to where it was. Okay pond growing through that i was afforded the opportunity to commentate and also run a thirty thousand dollars counter strike tournament for a new brand that was launching into the space which is sports okay so for me just really into it and did a lot of did a lot of work. Almost got myself fired from my apprenticeship that i was doing at that time. We'll traineeship and assuming an i._t. Train issue department really they didn't like that. I was on m._s._n. Talking about <hes> structuring and tournament while supposed to be fixing computers and updating service and macbooks and whatever whatever else was the time and you know kind of hanging around these different jobs going from thermal tyke to unite doing some news editing ends <hes> you know working as sole trader for a while doing social promotions to you know what have you was made really trying to find my fit within the space and it was maybe you being hyper interested in way too many things in being really interested in building a community like around thermal tight launching any brand and running a sports tournaments and how to build build a community ran a brand being hands on so i would run my own catastrophic tournaments due in talks build my in computers. Take events get hands on with those things to becoming coming generalist you know how do i understand and build had articles better. How do i interface on the opposite side of was a p._r. Person a one-sided to how do i as a journalist more effectively communicate with them to get more <hes> stories out of than get more scripts okay more products to review and then with corsair was kind of you know as studying outing studying social <unk> university during that short period of time in the middle as well for for corsair. It was kind of a head hunter opportunity. It was once again to launch a new brand. You know it was a very established bush brand but that had no local employees in the space of how can i work with the brand that's much high positions whereas thermal take was lawyer use a trust and low cost products folks.

corsair anthony bush thirty thousand dollars