36 Burst results for "chief operating officer"

Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Michael Berry

Michael Berry

00:41 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Michael Berry

"I I had a wonderful father's day, and I hope you did as well as well. My wife plan to hike for the four of us, Me and her and our two boys because she loves to hike. I don't necessarily but their presence was the present I wanted and it was a group activity and I find that spending time with my kids. They're 14 and 15 are that that is that is my favorite pastime. And these moments are precious because they leave soon enough, right? They go from a little bitty and needing you all the time and you want to break from them. Two. They don't need you at all in what seems like an overnight moment Father's day. What a great time. That's what we talked about on Friday and to follow up on that. A new book, The dad Advice Project words of wisdom from guys who love being dads. The man who's wrote it. Who's written it? Who wrote it is Craig Kessler. He's the chief operating officer for top golf. An author of the book. The dad advice Project words of wisdom from guys who love being dance, which is available now, Greg, what made you want to write this? A couple things I wanted to make me right at the first is that while there's so much content out there for moms to help them be better moms, There's not a lot out there for dads, and the stuff that exists comes from just one person's point of view, and I thought I could get advice from a bunch of friends. The second is and this is obvious. But while all of us as dads want to do the best we can. There's really no playbook or manual or set of stories to help us get there. And this was my quest to crowd source of information. And as I understand, understand it. You wrote a letter to some friends. You have three boys. And you said, Hey, give me some advice on being a dad and that was that and you compile that together, and that's how this book got started. You nailed it about 2.5 years ago, I asked a few friends for a letter with some advice. And in the last 2.5 years, this snowballed and We now have over, uh, 40 stories and letters from guys from all walks of life, and it turned into a pretty interesting project. What were some of the themes that came through from from folks from diverse backgrounds and and and careers, But that you noticed came through in terms of being a good dad. It's a great question. I would say there are two types of themes that surface number one are those that came up time and time again in a majority of letters, and those themes include Making sure your kids feel physically and psychologically safe loving your spouse and making sure your kids see it because that's how they'll learn how to have healthy relationships by teaching them. The importance of failure seems like that. And then the second type of themes were really just one off pieces of advice where only one family was doing. It was mostly around traditions and customs. And I found these traditions and customs from some of the authors to be so unique that we have started implementing those in our family. Like what? Yeah, I'll give you a great example. So So, what do you mind named Josh Redstone. He started this tradition. Where once a month they have a, you know. Sit down dinner as a family. They set the table with placemats. Uh, try and do something extra special. And they will take turns as a family, not just the kids, but also the adults. Going around the room where everyone one by one has to stand on his or her chair, introduced themselves by name and tell everyone in the family one thing that they're thankful for. And by the way, this applies at restaurants just to give you the visual not just at home. And as we started doing this, we noticed that when we have this special family time our our boys will almost argue over who gets to go first to tell the family what they're thankful for, and All the research out there shows that showing gratitude leads to long term fulfillment and happiness in life. And because of this project, we found a creative way to bring that to the forefront, and there are In addition to this example other many life hacks that I've just found to be really interesting for our family. Was raised Southern Baptist and we had a, um um, a hymnal that we saying and it went. Count your blessings. Name them one by one. Count your blessings, See what God had done. And I have found over the years that naming blind blessings, counting the things that I am grateful for. You don't have time You squeeze out the negatives when you stop and think about the positives, and when you're really inclusive on that list, I find that that is a very good way to readjust your mindset in your attitude and put you in A very happy place. I love that advice. I love that advice. What were some other things that jumped out at you that maybe you hadn't expected from other dads? Yeah. So you know, it's interesting. Another author Rex Kersey, is he talks about how We try and give our kids exposure to things where we want them to have pattern recognition at an early age, so we take them to swim class. They play sports. They do arts and crafts. But when it comes to business, oftentimes we in the term he uses we closed the door. So if Mommy or daddy need to get on a work call, we closed the door. We ask our kids to be quiet in the background. What's so odd about that is our kids As they grow up, we're going to spend most of their life in the adult world of business or whatever profession they end up going into. And so he says, Look in our family. We opened the door, and if I'm interviewing a candidate, I'll put it on speaker phone and let my kids quietly listen, and then we'll debrief it over dinner or if I'm naming a business or product. I give them a chance to participate in What he's found their two things one and his kids are more engaged in his work. And so it's yet one more place where they can find common ground and the other is he feels like his kids are older. Now I think his oldest is about to graduate college. He's found that he's helped effectively give his kids a leg up because he's giving them exposure to something at a much earlier age, and we've tried to put those practices, albeit very gently into practice with with our voice. I'll tell you that because I'm on the radio. We're in. We've rented a house in Colorado. And so I broadcast out of I always take over the dining room table. And so I'm looking out the window and it's in the kind of the family room of this house. And so my kids come in and out during the show, and I can tell they listen to what I'm talking. If I go to break, I'll ask him. What do you think about that? And I find that to be one of the best ways because in addition to raising our kids to learn to, you know,.

Craig Kessler Josh Redstone Rex Kersey Greg Colorado Two Boys Friday 40 Stories Father's Day Three Boys 14 Four Two Types First TWO Second Second Type 15 2.5 Years Ago
Chris Hunniford and Mark Perkins on Trends in Odors and Air Pollutants

Words on Water

01:41 min | 2 months ago

Chris Hunniford and Mark Perkins on Trends in Odors and Air Pollutants

"Always something interesting to talk about when it comes to odor odors and air pollutants joined by two guests for this topic. I have mark perkins. He is president and owner of perkins engineering consultants mark. Thanks for coming on the podcast view. And have chris hannaford. He is chief operating officer with vienna consulting engineers. Chris appreciate you coming on as well travis. Bigger so i'm i'm interested in talking to you. Guys i want to mention that Has its odors air. Pollutants conference april twentieth twenty seconds and a lot of the things we're going to talk about today are going to be part of that that content so we encourage folks to take a look and hopefully join us. What are some of the issues and trends that you all are see and when it comes to odors air pollutants these days. I'm may start off in the no hand off to prison. We would probably have both quite a few answers to that One thing. I see quite a bit lately is becoming a bigger issue in getting new treatment facilities permitted. You don't necessarily a numeric limits like you for effluent for odors and a lot of places some sites Too but But the general public is better educated cases of closer to where plant sites with the and other much more vocals of voters or more front and center topic are becoming more funds that our topic than than they have in the best at least in a lot of places. So receiving emphasized and getting a lot more scrutiny.

Mark Perkins Perkins Engineering Consultant Chris Hannaford Vienna Travis Chris
US hunger crisis persists, especially for children.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:30 min | 2 months ago

US hunger crisis persists, especially for children.

"America is starting to claw its way out of the economic fallout from the corona virus pandemic but food insecurity persists especially for children and older adults. Food banks around the us continue giving away far more canned packaged fresh provisions than they did before. The virus outbreak tossed millions of people out of work forcing many to seek something to eat for the first time for those who are now back at work. Many are still struggling paying back. Rent or trying to rebuild savings data from feeding america a national network of food banks in the us shows that its members dispensed far more in the last three months of twenty twenty compared with the same period in two thousand. Nineteen katie fitzgerald. Feeding america's chief operating officer said the networks members are still seeing demand above pre pandemic levels although final numbers for this year's first-quarter anti-eta valuable fitzgerald said she expects the food banks will collectively distribute the equivalent of six billion meals this year about the same amounts. They gave away last year and far above the four point. Two billion meals given out in two thousand and nineteen america's yearlong food insecurity crisis has been felt especially sharply by children who lost easy access to free school meals and all adults who struggled to get groceries or meals that senior centers because they are worried about contracting the virus.

America Katie Fitzgerald Fitzgerald
Interview With Dr. Laura Forese, COO, New York Presbyterian

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:33 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Dr. Laura Forese, COO, New York Presbyterian

"Welcome to our women's history month series on skimmed from the couch. Where we're telling you about the women who made history. This past year. Dr laura for east joins us on today's episode. She's the chief operating officer of new york presbyterian one of the largest nonprofit hospitals in the country on her leadership newyork presbyterian has been on the front lines fighting the covid nineteen pandemic since last year. Dr freeze thank you so much for joining us and welcome to skin from the couch so much. It's great to be with you. Your resume is very long as as i think. Doctors and chief operating officers at ten to be wants one job or when experience. You've had that means the most you. I started wanting to be a doctor from the time i was a little girl so it really is about for patients. But i really have shifted. After i was in practice for about ten years. i'm orthopedic surgeon. And i moved to become a fulltime hospital executive. Because i thought i'd be able to have more impact in so now is the chief operating officer of big hospital system. My job is really to make sure that the business runs so that our doctors nurses have everything that they need to do what they do best which is care for our patients so in some ways come full circle from where i thought i was going to be when i was a little girl. How did you know that you wanted to be in medicine when you were a kid. You know carly i have no real good answer for that it just from the time. It was a little girl. I thought that would be a great job. Every kid knows what a doctor is. They're going to help you get better and i was say my parents were always very encouraging. I don't have doctors in my family. But i had that as a little girl and i stuck with it when reading about you. What stood out is that you have one of the things that many that stood out was that early on in your residency twins. And i know everything there to know about med school residencies. Because i've seen grace anatomy. So i am very very educated on your fields. I still watch it. So i feel like i'm right in there but i want you to take us back to to that time. What was that time like for you. Especially at a time when there were very few women in orthopedics. Well let me start with there. Were very few women in medical school class. Unlike today where we have more women medical students than men. It was unusual then and i chose a field that had very few women in it.

Dr Laura East Joins New York Presbyterian Carly
GameStop Appoints New Chief Operating Officer

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

GameStop Appoints New Chief Operating Officer

"Way from Intel, as well, we flip up the board and well we go cross asset, Gamestop. I mentioned it yesterday. Big news after the closing bell yesterday, hitting made missing. I should say that sales and profit but they're bringing in a new C O. A veteran from Amazon and Google, trying to get those digital sales which were 175% up, year over year.

Gamestop Intel Amazon Google
Gautrain's Vision And The Future Of Public Transport

Future Cities Africa

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Gautrain's Vision And The Future Of Public Transport

"Table kobe's my guest to the future cities. Africa is chief operating officer of countering management agency sample. Welcome give us a quick tour of your background. And so major highlights thank. You think it's an thank you for having me on this interview. Tunnel the one thing about me that most people don't know i'm angelina unit. Despite the way you know i and dress and everything else everybody assumes all these things so somebody things. I'm accounting somebody things them in. It and all that are actually a civil engineer qualified. Originally as a as a hydraulics engineer But i went into the as immediately our sponsored by you know the railway companies in my last year my studies i went into the relays immediately being there for the last two years and of discounting the date that the this feb would be lack Two years since. I started my career in the relics. I'll just it out and went into consulting energy and mining Before and also it and technology and everything else in between Probably about six years back. I was called back to come and be part of the longtime expansion of the healthy was yet. I'm one of the very few engineers that we hired on the health rain when it started in two thousand five. I think that's when they prefer. It was announced. I joined the house during dead at the earliest ages. So as they say around. Yeah i know where the bodies buried

Kobe Angelina Africa
Chelsea Joins Call To Baker Administration To Get COVID Vaccine To High-Risk Communities Right Now

Radio Boston

02:50 min | 5 months ago

Chelsea Joins Call To Baker Administration To Get COVID Vaccine To High-Risk Communities Right Now

"Just earlier this week. Over four hundred. Medical professionals sent a letter calling on governor baker to prioritize vaccinations for high risk communities of color communities such as chelsea so today. We're going to hear from two voices on the ground. In chelsea it was actually a community specifically cited in the letter joining us now is denin yearly paulino the chief operating officer of laco lativa also known as the chelsea collaborative. That's a group that works to empower lat next immigrants to enhance their community social and economic health. Also joining us as dr wanda gonzalez. A pediatrician at m. g. h. chelsea healthcare center. Who signed the letter. Welcome to both of you know. Thank you happy to be here. Thank you and listeners. Talk with our neighbors in chelsea we want to hear from you about whether the commonwealth is getting its priorities. In the vaccine rollout right. What phase are you in. Do you think the phases are being established correctly. The governor's made some changes to who's in those phases recently. Are those good decisions. Eight hundred four two three eight two five five. That's one eight hundred four to three talk. So dr gonzales. I will start with you. Why did you decide to sign onto this letter. Well and. I it seems like a no brainer to me to be honest. I Oh quote my husband while we were talking about this. You know I you know. I was happy when i first heard about a huge Distribution center in gillette stadium But just the you know the look it it makes sense to. I think they were talking about incorrect me wrong about five thousand vaccines day. That's the goal. The goal is to go indeed But my concern was its location. You know for You know someone like me and my family the same family. Since i'm a healthcare worker. I get it differently but you know to go to foxborough to receive it. It's it's sort of one of those You know what a drag to have dry there but for my patients and chelsea most a physician for some people in the surrounding communities that is quite a barrier. You know many of them don't have cars Or and they also don't often don't work jobs. They have the flexibility to take off. You know and gortat foxborough to get their vaccine and when i was speaking about this with my husband we you know he said well sort of i'm giving credit him. He said well. We know when there a fire you. Don't you know the fire truck. The fire department comes to fire. You don't take fire. The fire department is one of the things that you're concerned about. Dr gonzales is is even if there is a vaccine available. It's not very practical if you can't get to it. Is that what you're saying. Exactly

Chelsea Governor Baker Laco Lativa Dr Wanda Gonzalez Chelsea Healthcare Center Dr Gonzales Paulino Gillette Stadium Gortat
Transforming Patient Access Through Technology with Emily Tyson

Outcomes Rocket

04:18 min | 5 months ago

Transforming Patient Access Through Technology with Emily Tyson

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket saw marquez here and today i have the outstanding emily tyson joining us as the chief operating officer emily. Tyson drives rakes health's efforts to scale rapidly while building a high performance. Culture committed to improving patient access. Emily joined the company in january of twenty nineteen and from a functional perspective. She leads strategy client experience finance and operations in addition to the ever changing category of other. Say that in air quotes that early stage companies demand prior to join and ratings. Emily served as vice president of product for naveh health recently acquired by optum where she was responsible for the vision and direction of naveh health's product offerings across the health plan and health system businesses. Emily began her career in healthcare technology when she joined a fina health after various roles in the financial services industry in new york and hong kong. Emily holds her business. Administration summa cum laude from washington and lee university and our mba from harvard. Business school. today. We're going to spend a good amount of time talking about this digital front door. And what practices and large-scale health systems could be doing to do a better job of addressing the current area that were in healthcare so Emily such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Great thank you. So i'm looking forward to the conversation. Yeah likewise likewise and so before we dive into rate health and what you guys are doing. Why don't you tell us a little bit more about you. And the things that inspire your work in healthcare. Sure i i would say for me personally. There's there's no debate about whether the health care system is broken and it's really not the patient care itself that's lacking it's it's the back end at the administrative side of healthcare. That's really this nightmare of complex regulations and poorly designed incentives and outdated technology all of which actually negatively impact the cost patient experience and ultimately in many cases the outcomes. You know. I never personally wanted to be a doctor. But i've long been passionate about exciting this side of healthcare trying to make the pipes in the information flow in this pieces work by should really does require reaching beyond just technology alone so this desire instead of my focus on sobbing. The complex administrative challenges can be non-sexist ahead of healthcare but that do impact patient cares. What has led me on my career paths and ultimately now terrific celts of it. Yeah you know. There's there's a ton that needs fixing and optimizing maybe even overhauling in some instances and so having a unique approach that is focused on on on making things better on the back. End of the house is key talked to us about health. What exactly are you guys doing. And how are you. Adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Are we are focused on transforming patient access so Helped mission our mission is to make it easier for patients to see their doctors. It sounds simple but it's much harder in practice on. You know you shouldn't have to know someone who knows someone to know someone to get a quick doctor's appointment and yet that's often how it works in reality today. Deferred care is a really big issue and the industry even setting aside the global pandemic and the dynamics that's created the average. Wait time for someone to see. A provider is almost three weeks in the us at the same time on any given day. Many providers actually have availability in their schedules. So a lot of what we're focused on is how do you bridge that gap and there's a significant amount of complexity underlying yet so it's really idea of improving access. Which is every part of health focused on is about much more than providing digital layer for consumers. That's absolutely part of it. It's also about addressing this underlying operational challenges within a healthcare practice. Your system does that make it hard to manage patient access in the first place so we do both from a market perspective at comes in the form of products around central scheduling work slap locations and self scheduling communication platforms in check in along with best practices for how to think about optimizing patient access in the clinic beyond the technology itself.

Emily Emily Tyson Naveh Health Marquez Lee University Tyson Harvard Hong Kong Washington New York United States
Operation Warp Speed chief says Covid vaccine distribution 'should be better' as U.S. misses goal

Rush Limbaugh

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

Operation Warp Speed chief says Covid vaccine distribution 'should be better' as U.S. misses goal

"The chief operating officer of Operation Warp speed today, defending the vaccine distribution efforts we are really doing well. In my opinion in the distribution over 14 Million doses of vaccine have been distributed today and every day we push more vaccine out Manny States, including ours are not getting as much vaccine or hitting it as quickly as promised, however, and critics, including top health officials, and President elect Biden have called the effort thus far alarmingly slow.

Operation Warp President Elect Biden
After Shopping And Shipping Crush Come Record Returns

Morning Edition

03:39 min | 6 months ago

After Shopping And Shipping Crush Come Record Returns

"Beginning of the year is the traditional time for fresh starts. New resolutions and returning gifts. You didn't want its peak season for online returns in this story. NPR's Alina Cell Yoke introduces us to a word that's new to me. Returns. My getting The end of the year. You think it would be the time when stores and retail companies could finally exhale from the crush of holiday shopping? But for many, it's just the beginning. This is the calm before the storm. From our perspective. Marcus Jenna's chief operating officer at B stock, which helps stores resell the returns, and January is when the big wave of those returns comes crashing in. Right after the big wave of shopping, Shin says, returns in the first place give people confidence to buy stuff. Online sight unseen returns really are highly correlated to sales. But then the more stuff we buy, the more of it is likely to get sent back and this holiday season so record setting sales, causing the 2020 ship McGee, Aiden, overwhelming postal and delivery services. So what comes next is a record setting volume of returns, which Twitter mavens of retail have been trying to call returns. My gettin doesn't really roll off the tongue, right? We're all just trying to figure out a nice way to talk about this stuff. Whatever you call it. The phenomenon is real. This year surveys air, finding the majority of shoppers planning to return at least some of their holiday gift. Nerve are which handles shipping and returns for hundreds of brands, predicts twice as many returns this year compared to last here CEO Amid Sharma and I would estimate just in the shipping cost for retailers. To get those items back. It's going to be over billion dollars over a billion dollars. Sharma says. A few trends feed into the surge of returns, and the first is pretty straightforward during the pandemic. More shoppers are buying online instead of in stores and things we buy without seeing or touching. Get returned Much more frequently in general, is 4 to 5 Times higher returns in online channel was his instruction, especially in the apparel and footwear, clothes and shoes. He says 30 to 40% of them might get returned. And there's one thing in particular that online shoppers have been doing a lot, especially during the pandemic by the same item, either in different size or in different color or style, with an intention off, keeping one and returning the other items. This is expensive for retailers who call it wardrobe being or bracketing. My favorite analogy came from Kerry's ate at warehouse robotics company Locus who says it's modern day Goldilocks. I called the three Bears concept. They're ordering a size up in a size down, but they find the one that's just right and the other two items, then our return. This has been going on for us long as online stores allowed free or relatively cheap returns. But This year in a pandemic with fewer opportunities to check things out in person. Even more shoppers discovered this option. Also, more people have been trying new stores, which means shopping at places that never visited before unsure of sizing and quality. And finally, Sharma from Navarre says they're sorry. Found one more reason. Pandemic weight changes almost 40% off. Customers have mentioned that their sizes have changed during covert time. And hence there buying multiple items making sure they fit very 2020 excuse for shopping like Goldilocks. Alina, Sell you NPR news.

Marcus Jenna B Stock Sharma NPR Shin Aiden Mcgee Twitter Kerry Navarre Alina Npr News
Pinterest Settles Gender Discrimination Suit for $22.5 Million

WBZ Morning News

00:22 sec | 6 months ago

Pinterest Settles Gender Discrimination Suit for $22.5 Million

"Has been ordered to pay more than $22 million in a gender discrimination lawsuit, the company's former chief operating officer claims She was fired for speaking up about mistreatment. A settlement brings to an end, one of the most high profile gender discrimination cases in Silicon Valley in recent memory. It is

Silicon Valley
Pinterest Settles Gender Discrimination Suit for $22.5 Million

Morning Edition

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Pinterest Settles Gender Discrimination Suit for $22.5 Million

"Million to settle a gender discrimination lawsuit brought by a former executive at the Social Media company. NPR's balmy Allen has more Francoise is Broca is a former top executive at Pinterest, the popular online bookmarking sight. She claims she was paid less than her male colleagues that she was given sexist feedback and that she was cut out of important meetings despite being the chief operating officer. It's the latest workplace controversy at Pinterest, whose chief executive, Ben Silverman, has been accused by other former employees of not doing enough to stop race and gender discrimination. Under the terms of Broca's settlement, Pinterest did not admit to any wrongdoing broke over received $20 million.2.5 million dollars will be donated to groups dedicated to supporting women and other underrepresented groups in the tech industry. Bobby Allen, NPR NEWS San Francisco

Broca The Social Media Company Pinterest Francoise NPR Allen Ben Silverman Bobby Allen San Francisco
Pinterest in $22.5m gender discrimination payout

Mornings on Maine Street

00:17 sec | 6 months ago

Pinterest in $22.5m gender discrimination payout

"A half million dollars to settle claims of gender discrimination and retaliation from its former chief operating officer, Francoise Brew over Ruger was fired in April. The company's settled the lawsuit without admitting any liability. That your Fox business

Francoise Brew Ruger FOX
COVID-19 Vaccinations Underway At Methodist Dallas Medical Center

The Dallas Morning News

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

COVID-19 Vaccinations Underway At Methodist Dallas Medical Center

"Our top story is a dallas hospital will be among the first four sites in texas to get shipments of the covid nineteen vaccine today. Methodist dallas medical center will begin immunizations for healthcare workers and other staff members who interact with covid. Nineteen patients wants the shipment arrives said pam stolen president and chief operating officer of methodist health system. She said the team methodist was elated to learn yesterday that its workers would be among the first in the state to get vaccinated more than one hundred twenty physicians clinicians and staff are scheduled to get their vaccines today for the healthcare workers who have spent months caring for patients who are battling virus. The vaccine is a godsend stolen off said

Methodist Dallas Medical Cente Pam Stolen Methodist Health System Dallas Texas
States will start getting COVID-19 vaccine Monday, US says

Scott Sloan

00:27 sec | 6 months ago

States will start getting COVID-19 vaccine Monday, US says

"Ricky. Now we've got a briefing from the military general in charge of President Trump's operation warp speed distribution, he says. The process has begun. We expect 145 sites across all the states. To receive vaccine on Monday another 425 sites on Tuesday and the final 66 sites on Wednesday. It's general Gus Purna, the chief operating officer of Operation Warp

President Trump Ricky Gus Purna Operation Warp
Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:57 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

"John thanks for taking the time to come and chat with us today. How's it. How's it going on doing great man. Thanks for having me. will you give us. I read your bio on your website. But will you give me in the audience of big picture of your background and kind of have to where you are now in. kind of. Give us the backstory. Yeah sir so by education and training or by just sending a lot of tuition money to the university of tennessee. I eventually ended up with a couple of engineering degrees. So i started my career in construction even though that might offend some people when this always used to be an engineer i make fun of engineers used to be one but i got a degree in civil engineering and then a master's in structural engineering and then went out and did the engineering thing for several years and then realized i don't really know how to build anything and i wanted to get out on the job site so transition from i'd say transition from engineering into construction. I really got laid off from the engineering firm. Heart was working for In went and joined project management team for large commercial contractor that. Put me out on large commercial sites Building all sorts of seven are really really like that Did that for a few years than my way. Up working for some architects and then for real estate developer Doing construction management so. I ended up traveling around the country building commercial real estate projects. You know big stores in the out lot developing out lots and all of that kind of stuff in that for several years. And by this time i was married had five kids now so the second kid was on the way my wife was like. I'm glad you're enjoying your job but You gotta stick around mean. I was on the road three or four days a week wherever the projects were so. That was my first business. Started back in. Two thousand five was a construction management and real estate development company. I'm here in knoxville tennessee. So as doing that work here locally then two thousand eight hit and banks were not lending money to real estate developers anymore So i transitioned from there and started a remodeling in general contracting business People these days called a pivot. I didn't realize pivoting at the time. I just time. I had four kids. Three four came back them So put the tool belt on and started a small construction company. Built it up from there and then one of my subcontractors might trim and melwork subcontractor young guy. We went to church together. His business was blowing up because he got into the high end. Trim and melwork work Market here in our area and typical difficult construction business owner great craftsmen horrible business person and he approached me one day and said man. Your i like the way that you run your construction business and everything's always organized I wanna talk to you about how to run a better business. So we met up for lunch and was talking to him about that and giving them some tips and tricks. And and i didn't know he was interviewing me at the time he said. Okay well i think. I need to hire somebody to run my construction business. Much mill work company and He's an acid yeah. I think you should do that. Because you're a horrible business person but you're an awesome. You're awesome craftsmen in great with the guys out in the field and the work was just unbelievable and he just said okay. I want you to do it. And so i thought i was like i got my own thing going on. I'm okay and he's a great salesman and he's like listen. You have a small construction company is gonna take you twenty years to get where you want to be. I'm already in those projects as a subcontractor we've landed some really high end stuff but this business that we just acquired meaning that the projects coming up he said it's gonna put me out of business doing these projects because i don't know what i'm doing and He he so he said I want you to come and run the business. And i thought i bluff bluffing okay. The only way. I'm going to run your business that you let me run the business. You run the field our on the business. But i'm i'm in charge of the business side of it. And he said no problem and he literally pulled out of manila folder with the entire business and it just random paper. Here's the business slid across the table and said you run it and went home talked to my wife and said this is a crazy idea. This is really stupid but my friends gonna suffer and he was right. It was an opportunity to get on some really into high level projects high end projects that i'd already always been wanting to do in such kind of step back and said all right. Maybe we should do this and So bit the bullet went on went. Joined that team as a as the chief operating officer and at the time we had six guys out in the field in within eighteen months we were at twenty two guys in. He was in debt and not making any money. And we kinda turn that around and and that wasn't all me. We had great team a great owner. That had a really good vision and i was just the execute and putting systems in place. Oh did that for about four years and then got another crazy idea saying. Hey what i've done with my businesses and now with this treadmill work business. I think i see the problem here. Within an industry. I can help a lot more business. Owners with systems. All i know construction. It's all i've ever done so after about four years of being the executive there. I left that that job and started writing books and and speaking at industry events and now it's four years later and i've been doing coaching and consulting work strictly for construction business owners since those back in twenty sixteen. So yeah right up for years. We've been doing this Before we move on but are you recommending to your kids. They go to college. You spend a lotta time in college. You said a master's in engineering of some type so talk about that for a second. Are you gonna man. You're gonna make mom hears this. He's gonna get offended. And it. Every time i say but m. i. encouraging my kids to go to college no not specifically i'm encouraging my kids to develop skills in areas that interest them and figuring out how they can make money at it now. Some of those things that some of my kids are interested in now will require them to go to college. But especially as we're seeing in twenty twenty man colleges change. They're still the same tuition rate but they're not allowing you to go on campus and all of the other things that higher said that here's where value is. Now they're saying nope can't come to campus. We're going to do all virtually. So i think the whole world has changed so but to answer your question. No i don't encourage my kids to go to 'cause. I don't discourage them from going to college. The i feel like it's my job as a parent when you're out on your own which i got four boys in a baby girl. I say baby girl. she's five. She's always going to be my baby girl. The boys they're on their own at eighteen. You better figure out how you're gonna make money at eighteen and if that means you're going to college then you know what i took me. I was on the five year plan to get my undergraduate now. Four year plan right but i worked the entire time and paid for most of my most of my college through work. They can do the same thing so And it looked statistically it takes most people at least six years to get an undergraduate degree and only forty percent of incoming freshman even graduate with a degree at all. So yeah do. I encourage them to go that path. Only if it interests them. Only only if that's that's where their future light. Hey you know. One of my kids wants to be a doctor yet. You probably better go to college. I have several of them that are interested in computer stuff in graphic design and other things and got my fourteen year old son this year to start working for a contractor and over the summer and he came home with more money and more cash in his pocket. And said yeah. That's what happens when you go work. And that's what happened with skill so

Melwork University Of Tennessee Knoxville Tennessee John Manila
The curse of knowledge and how to follow better internal communications tactics

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:08 min | 7 months ago

The curse of knowledge and how to follow better internal communications tactics

"Day we wanna talk about internal communication strategies and tactics. So it's interesting to me. Is that we focused so much externally. How do we get more leads. How do we build the brand. How do we get out there. How do we schedule things. How do we automate. Oh my goodness i mean you can just. That's that's all we Spend time focusing on it. Seems like sometimes but internal communications matters as well whether you're small company. Big company whatnot And today's guest trend. Anderson is the chief operating officer pre right dot com and he focuses on growth through storytelling. So he had me right. Right there with that tagline and you may have assumed but what's great about. Trent is i ran across him again on social media. He was sharing something about internal communications. And i thought. I should ask him to come on the show and share his wisdom's with you guys trent. How's it going today. It's going very well christoph. Thanks for having me on today. Awesome Always glad to have experts like you on the show. So let's talk about internal communications. It can't be hard right. Focus on that especially when when we're also gotten hole in the medium sized companies of external communication wide. Why does internal. Why does it matter than what are some tactics. Yeah i think internal communication often gets overlooked like you said because of prioritization is on on external right. How do we get more leads. How do we get more clients. How do we continue to grow. Well it's all fine and well and those are all kind of like leading metrics to look at but the lagging metrics i think is internal comms in the the effects of vision or lack of vision or clarity or lack of clarity with where organization is going. And if you're like me you've probably been in an organization before that was doing everything right externally but internally there were huge huge issues and usually started from top down or Or from a leadership position in wasn't able to communicate internally why we were doing the things that we were doing why we were up. Prioritizing certain Initiatives and all that good stuff so i think a lot of internal communications Really manifest itself through the curse of knowledge and typically when we talk about internal communications. It is driven by leaders. It is usually a top down. Approach and as these leaders are sitting in their war rooms and deliberating strategy in tactics. Really fun corporate buzzwords They usually have the curse of knowledge. And for those that don't know what the curse of knowledge is is Basically they have such intimate knowledge of a given Piece of information that they assume the rest of the organization also understands that and really. It isn't the case so You've probably seen the clip from the office. Where oscar is telling michael what his options are afford utilizing the surplus budget for the year and comes back and says explain it to me. Like i'm eight and oscar tried to do that and then michael comes. Back does now extent like five while the oscars way of explaining what a surplus bunch it was Was the curse of knowledge right. So oscar is an accountant for anybody who doesn't know the office by by the way. Go see that net flex. Because i think there's a lot of business lessons learned their case. Oscar has the curse of knowledge because he is crunching numbers. All day understands how to read a financial report. Michael clearly does not right. So oscar had to simplify his message so much more to get it across and ineffective communication with michael. So i think again drawing this back to the curse of knowledge it really comes down to assumptions that are made about what everybody else understands about the business versus the actual reality.

Christoph Trent Anderson Oscar Michael Oscars
COVID-19 hospitalizations at record high in Seattle, Washington

News, Traffic and Weather

01:14 min | 7 months ago

COVID-19 hospitalizations at record high in Seattle, Washington

"And it seems to be an increase in hospitalizations comes Cole Miller. This time it's the number of hospitalizations due to the virus. 762 people now taking up beds, according to the covert tracking project. I'm very, very worried. About it. Chassie Sour is the CEO of the Washington State Hospital Association in various president State hospitals are beginning to cut back on elective surgeries. We've learned that U W medicine is actively contacting patients to postpone some surgeries, specifically, those that would require a stay of some kind post op over its Swedish. A similar approach is being taken. Just earlier this week, 10 Covert 19 patients were admitted to the First Hill campus in a span of just five hours. Dr. Elizabeth Waco is the chief operating officer. There. We reduced, impatient elective surgeries to allow us to expand our inpatient, urgent and emergent medical beds are teams are tired. They are fatigued, but they are resilient and we will continue to fight Cove it and it's a fight that they cannot wage alone. Your healthcare workers wants you to not get sick and they're so frustrated by people. I feel like people are ignoring the advice and then coming into getting second expecting to be cared for in a high risk situation. More than a million people traveling by

Cole Miller Washington State Hospital Asso Dr. Elizabeth Waco First Hill
UW Medicine postponing some non-urgent procedures amid rising COVID cases in Seattle

News, Traffic and Weather

01:15 min | 7 months ago

UW Medicine postponing some non-urgent procedures amid rising COVID cases in Seattle

"Now plans underway to scale back some non urgent medical procedures of local hospitals right now. And to explain why comb owes Cho Miller this time. It's the number of hospitalizations due to the virus. 762 people now taking up beds, according to the cove, it tracking project. I'm very, very worried about it. Just use our is The CEO of the Washington State Hospital Association in various president state hospitals are beginning to cut back on elective surgeries. We've learned that U W medicine is actively contacting patients to postpone some surgeries, specifically, those that would require a stay of some kind post op over its Swedish. A similar approach is being taken. Just earlier this week, 10 Cove in 19 patients were admitted to the First Hill campus in a span of just five hours. Dr Elizabeth Waco is the chief operating officer. There. We've reduced impatient elective surgeries to allow us to expand our inpatient. Urgent. An emergent medical beds are teams are tired. They are fatigued, but they are resilient and we will continue to fight Cove it and it's a fight that they cannot wage alone. Your healthcare workers wants you to not get sick and they're so frustrated by people. I feel like people are ignoring the advice and incoming into getting second expected to be cared for in a high risk

Cho Miller Washington State Hospital Asso Dr Elizabeth Waco First Hill
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

07:50 min | 11 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

"Meanwhile. You video of your most recent training session on Youtube generates thousands of US tons of comments, and by mistake, you had on the option to include ads on the video so it generates some revenue for you. It's your brand. It's you. But now, you are penalized threatened with losing your eligibility over generating revenue on yourself and for yourself. So everybody else can profit off of you but you can't. Just to clarify with some real numbers, the NCAA generates over a billion dollars yearly injust rights deals the ability to broadcast their events. And the athletes upon who's back this has generated receive a good old fashioned opportunity to gain an education. Not without value but not exactly equal either. This scenario doesn't have to be relegated to the elite One Percent Zion Williamson's and Trevor Lawrence's who end up on video games. Literally, any student athletes should be able to build a brand and monetize it. They have access stories, fan bases, and if they work to cultivate and grow that reach, they should reap the benefits period full stop point made drop the MIC. Is there nuance to my dream scenario that we overlooking sure but stick with the overarching scenario? The Big Bird's eye view is far from equitable for student athletes. Now, it took fifty or so years, but we may finally be reaching a point that makes more sense for everyone without getting too litigious and into the weeds the NCAA for a longtime has forbade athletes from profiting off their name image or likeness forever. They've done this. Now that's an I l. name image and likeness if you hear that and I L. Legislation and I l rules that they're talking about the image and likeness. But California who knows how to party. Signed a law last year saying in our state student athletes can profit off of their name image likeness. It's called the fair pay to play act basically telling the NCAA you don't hold all the power. You don't set all the rules kind of like that push back a little bit myself. So well many college coaches and administrators started clipping their pearls decrying the coming downfall of American civilization if athletes are allowed to. Make money. Thirty. Other states passed the fair pay to play act and that really forced the NCAA's hand. The NCAA is now backed into a corner. You know they're like, oh, very well, if all these states are going to say that they can do it. We don't really have another play here. So they sat back and said, sure sure sure. Yeah, we love that idea. No of course. Yeah. We totally agree we universally and without fail we agree to allow student athletes to profit off their names images likenesses starting in two, thousand, twenty one. Now we can get into the. Details of that decision and the PR spin and some of the ways they've turned this story to be something they have always been in favour of, but we don't really need to stay on topic here. We have a good plan moving forward, which is great. Guy. Put this in perspective again, according to research company. Kicks Influence or marketing is a five to ten, billion, dollar enterprise and growing. Now. Let's put this through the Sports Lens a little bit and break down a little further. fivethirtyeight a wonderful sight gang. They did what they do best a massive data and projection project and put actual names evaluations together to come up with potential annual revenue numbers for athletes, student athletes here, some of the highlights and this list that fivethirtyeight put together, which is really interesting is just based on a combination of twitter and instagram followers with based on their following, but only as it relates to twitter and instagram. So there are other ways to monetize. It aren't even taking into account here. Okay. So let's get into this. Page EUCHRE's uconn women's basketball. Who I believe is still in high school is this is again, this is a projection, her brand yearly annual revenue numbers six, hundred, seventy thousand dollars Trevor Lawrence four hundred fifty four, thousand dollars, Haley crews, who's a University of Oregon softball player one hundred seventeen thousand dollars to see these are annual projected revenue numbers based on their brand name image likeness K., but it's not just these high profile players, right. We can get into the other big names in the world but let's talk about some this morning's to Spencer Leigh Iowa Wrestler could make twenty, six, thousand dollars a year leveraging his following. I did a little research into Spencer leaks. Pique my curiosity five, foot three, hundred, twenty, five pounds of pure muscle like. Do I think I by sixty pounds and he would absolutely kick the crap out of me. Okay. Back on track. Has a little over one hundred and twenty thousand followers. He should be able to monetize what he's created Dana Ricky Wisconsin volleyball. Player could make twelve thousand dollars annually. Again, we're not just talking about the elite of the elite. We're talking every student athlete that builds a brand, put the effort into it could make something of it. The list goes on and on this is just a sampling show. It's not just as who make dollar bills. All athletes who build a brand and create and distribute interesting content to grow a following. So what is this conversation all leading up to? What are we talking about here? Well, the future period. The Future of sports and student athletes up in the air the windsor changing the shift in power has begun and there is one company at the forefront of this change. influencer. NFL. CR WHO needs of right? Can I buy them all Dwayne Avowal apparently not in brand nowadays unless their brand name is I n. f. l. c. are. And their pronunciation is influenced if you couldn't figure that out. influencer is currently working with over five hundred college sports teams to assist the student athletes with curing content managing workflows and following best practices to build their brand and monetize their very existence or as UC, deputy athletic director Paul, Potpourri put it or could be perio-. Perrier spelled like the water but it could be perio- I don't know I didn't get a pronunciation guide with this. His testimony. USC student athletes have incredible stories to tell our partnership with influence or will empower all of our student athletes to share their experiences and give our community of fans and recruits a look behind the scenes at their journeys. As trojans love this these great testimonials I like that they want to empower all of their student athletes. It's fantastic influence worse collectively with the schools and. The athletes to create, win, win scenarios the student athletes monetize or the schools build their reputation and brands concurrently. Win Win. We Love Win Winds K now I don't WanNa, steal all the glory. I'm just trying to wet your appetite for today's guest. So I'll let her explain the rest and it's really good stuff here is chief operating officer for influence or needs to recant. Hi Nita today no one flow. Brian Real I. I'm doing great and I'm really excited to talk to you because it's always fun when we talk to somebody who's in a cutting edge part of the sports tech and the way the world is going rather than where it's always been I. think that's Exciting part of the conversation. So really really appreciate you coming on. Well, thanks. Did start digging in. It's cool. You have a background with the cowboys and with the SPN. So in like connick brands..

NCAA Trevor Lawrence US twitter Zion Williamson basketball Spencer Leigh Iowa Wrestler California NFL chief operating officer USC connick Spencer University of Oregon Brian cowboys Dana Ricky Dwayne Avowal Perrier
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You'd have a case. You know there'd be a medical? Medical device rep you know who would be in that case, and they'd be bringing in some of the tools that were needed for that case it'd go through the surgery with a surgeon and the surgical team, the nurses, etc, and the tax, all kind of working together that patient leaves. Maybe they have a good outcome. Maybe they have a bad outcome. Let's say that they have a negative outcome. And they have to have a revision, or they have a post operative infection, right? How do you understand what the root cause of that was You have today from a from a workflow documentation perspective. We have the electronic medical record, but a lot of that is you know it's the personal recaps of the teams? When they get time to document read, there's a lot of templates in the Mars, nowadays, you know all of my kind of physician colleagues. That's one of the things when I get together with them, but they always talk about his just the amount of documentation burden, and how difficult is to sort of write everything down. Down and do it timely and make sure that it's accurate, and so that would be sort of your pre world. Right as I have a case. Maybe it turns out well. Maybe it doesn't I'm not really sure necessarily, if it turns out poorly, why would I can go back and try to read the documentation, but it's a difficult position. It's A. he said she said in a lot of cases. Or maybe there's documentation translate that into care syntax world, so imagine a hospital equipped with our platform. Where and I'll take it in a post. Kobe landscape. Maybe, the hospital wants to limit the number of people in the operating room because they wanNA, keep infection risk down right so you could have the medical device rap because their company is interoperable with our platform. Maybe they would remote into the case from a command center saw the pre prep would be done because of the scheduling and the Front End Management Rep would know exactly where. Where their cases were, and when they would join the case and remote in through our platform, and still be able to guide the surgeon and the surgical team through that case that that case would now have in addition to the normal, `electronic medical record write. It would be fully documented in video, so we could see any time in a case where there was a challenge. The decision that had to be made right, and you would now complete that case, and let's say on the back end. There was a negative outcome right now. You're equipped to be able to go back in with a pure source of truth and say, let's go review that case right as there's something we did mechanically in the cases or something that we we miss something in the checklist. was there any point in time with the closure of the wound treatment post operative Lee right where we could have done better. it gives you the ability to really understand exactly what happened A. You're mitigating potential risks up front, and then be. If there is a negative outcome, you can go back and really understand at every facet along that surgery. You know what? What could have been done better? Do we use the right products? Was the surgical technique? Good right? Is there anything that we could have done? That would have made that outcome better than you can stack those improvements into future cases, or if you're the medical technology company, you could factor those learnings into improve products right so this again is kind of where you bring. Bring the stakeholder, convergence and to the mix, and then we also, and we're doing a lot of partnerships now with you know with insurance companies well because they have in their vested those top quality outcomes as well so now you get all these stakeholders have the same interest rate which is, how do we learn? And how do we guide the process to? To optimal outcomes why I think that's really neat and being able to have everything live and available post. Op is certainly an asset. Have you ever run into just the maybe like stage fright, you know somebody says Oh, I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa do this on video? Yeah, I think that's I think that's a pretty common common thing and I think. There's a ways that we've handled that one. Is You know in the United States? We are an approved patient safety organization by the Federal Government, so if a if a hospital in the US is using our system. You know all of that. Kind of work, it's done to review and sort of analyze. The case for quality is considered patient safety work product read so you can actually operate that environment and a very sort of safe protected way from a litigation standpoint. That's usually ended the number. One thing that people are worried about is is sort of litigation, but I think you know as we talked to. To surgeons and there's actually see technology and think through how they would use it the the response has been really really positive for us. Over the past I'd say twelve to eighteen months as we start to introduce this broader ecosystem into the market and as you think about other industries I like to use sports as an example or the airline industry. You know it's really the use of data, capture and video analytics that is enabled. You know in the case of aviation for to be extremely safe, you know if you chart aviation, dust versus surgical deaths think you'd be. It's staggering rights. How Safe Aviation is and how dangerous the operating groups and So that's that's I think an easy compared to think about athletics right I. Mean You know you go to put together? Together a good baseball team or a good football team, right and you have you know literally hundreds of hours of video footage on every single player, and these are players at the top of their game right right but these guys are still going everyday day to practice. You know Tom Brady every day still watching film right to looking to see what he can do better and how he can be a better quarterback or how they can run a play better, I think we're seeing that from you know from the top surgeons as they know they're. The top surges, but also recognize that the they still want to see that footage, right? They still WANNA. Know How they can up their game. They still want their patients to have the best outcomes us. I think we've seen a real receptivity to maybe not a hundred percent because it sort. Sort of you know something new to introduce a little better, but I think like any other area where videos being used. We're GONNA see more and more adoption go. That's really great. Tim and I appreciate you mentioning that because it was the elephant in the room right, I mean before wondering it, so I wanted to ask it, and it's really neat rights of the safety piece. Where can't be used for litigation? Right I mean that's that's concern for a lot of physician and providers and and secondly to think of it like a pro level player washes. His Games are her games right and does it to get better. What a cool way to continue working on your craft and getting better and increasing the the quality and the outcomes that you're getting. I mean super super interesting, so as you think about how you guys have improved business or comes a to hear an example from you, yeah! Yeah I'll give you maybe just a couple of examples, so you know new technologies currently any were used in thousands of operating rooms around the world right now about fourteen hundred in the US across the full spectrum of we, we offer so we definitely have you know just a lot of great anecdotes and great data on especially the sort of efficiency and throughput pius ride being able to use technology to you know to schedule more efficiently to drive the surgery more efficiently, so there's. Literally from a business standpoint I mean millions and millions of dollars in benefit to.

United States Kobe landscape Federal Government Safe Aviation Tom Brady Tim baseball Lee athletics football
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in again. I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the senior vice, President and general manager at Sentry Data Systems, and previous to that Managing Director of Supply Chain Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare industry and today. He's GONNA be talking to us more about health technology, and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their. Their work at. Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you, so it's great to be here. I appreciate you having me absolutely so before we get into the work that you guys do. At Care, Syntax Tummy a little bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare? Yeah, happy to so you know for me. It's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in the. Exception to that so My mother is a clinician. She was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very early age. How important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom, both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced, and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And you know I think today. You know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing. Is you? I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare, and I worked in the frontline saw you know I'm not a clinician, but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is, but critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies, and in some ways I think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf read as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf, but you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare. Little bit that same way I think. We tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare, but then you are on the front lines, and you watch how you can save a life writer. Keep a family together or bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think you know there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system, so love it. It's those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And, so I appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care. You graduate you're in healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in healthcare and I and I share that with yeah, and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim and so tell us about care syntax, and what you guys are doing. Add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes, so I, think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects, especially in the US. A little bit is oftentimes I. Don't WanNa say overlooked, but when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years, and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease, management and end of life care in these kinds of things, and we're very focused on surgery which you know. If you take a step back, you know it's a it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes. Comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin in the or You know if those surgeries aren't optimal, so this is where we've chosen to focus, and you know in our vision, as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world. You know to be saved through use of our technology by by those caregivers at the frontline, so that's really really where we're focused and the think you always think about adding value to the ecosystem I like to look at it in a couple of ways, but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know. We've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem, and within that world of of the or and try to look at stakeholder alignment, so you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders and operations and supply chain, and then obviously the patient, so we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the. The same thing around the process side so looking at kind of that and and process of what it takes to deliver a high quality, safe surgery, and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and research and developments that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle, and that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together, and by creating value, not just one small facet, but looking at how can create. Value, I think that's really great. Tim So both clinical insights as well as operational and overall, just just making this high revenue area of care where outcomes are so important. Even more efficient and so tell us a little bit about the areas. You've been able to offer the most value and what makes you guys different than what else is out there? Absolutely so I think are key areas. We have The business had a great evolution. We started out. Really you know seeking to grow a kind of a large footprint in the operating room. you know we believe strongly at our founders are are both come from a legacy healthcare families as well so they had a similar experience to me. It's a bad thing. They always knew they were going to be. Be In healthcare because that's where their their family I guess he was but they believe really strongly that you know in order to affect change in healthcare. You really have to be at the frontline, so the the early days of Care Syntax were about a six year old business was really spent. You know physically being in the operating room, so we have you know part of our platform of products. Products is really geared around. You know workflow management in the or at how to how to capture moments in the or you know from an image perspective from video perspective, and then we've evolved from there into looking at kind of that operating workflow right of of how you sort of manage the throughput of patients through the ecosystem, and then probably most recently for us is really now evolving into that next. Next level over getting into Kennedy Clinical Safety Coaching Training Education, so we have those three components to our platform, and really how we view, this is now the ability to kind of have I. Guess End to end risk management around surgery. So that's tend to how we talk. Internally a lot is about surgical risk management from the time before patient even comes into the or all the way through till the. The patient as you know, is through their surgery and kind of post operative and I think what makes us unique and and sort of differentiated against what's available. Is that end to end management of the surgical ecosystem so to be able to take people from the very beginning all the way through the analytics, the safety and quality and technical improvements on the back end, and it's also that end to end platform structure. Structure that's enabled us to be in a position where we can converge these stakeholders, so I think you know when I look across the industry, a lot of people are working with hospitals in you have pockets of companies that are working with Med tech companies, and you have insure attack We're really unique in that. We actually serve all three of those markets So you know and then those are? Are The people you need all those guys to collaborate in order to really I think effect change on a massive scale in our platforms robust enough where we've been able to bring those those stakeholders together, and that's really great, and you know it's a complex business, and there's a lot of stakeholders like you said to be able to bring them all together and do some of the things that you guys are. Are, doing is impactful. So so I'd love to learn more of some specifics tem of typical routine whether you know whether it be a Heparin, e or a spine, or whatever some emt stuff like talk to us about what a typical workflow could look pre and post care synthetics. Yes, so Let's tweak it. Take a lot of surgical examples, but let's take for example you know. Let's take a total knee. Case kind of an Ortho case and I'll put it. Even sort of you know real context with with what we're seeing in corona virus, so one of the things that you know we're working a lot. On his sort of how our technology is leveraged in a virtual care environment S. we'll kind of do a proposal you think about you know in a in a appre care syntax, and even a pre cova world, right?.

Tim Lance president and Chief Operating Sal Marquez US corona President and general manager Managing Director of Supply Ch Sentry Data Systems Heparin writer administrator
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"A would not they'll be constant. Battles and baseball were not for the union, but the most important is that the union gave export free agents. Free Agency allows teams would judicious use of create to get better and give the fans that are teammates. We don't have you know from nineteen or he? Nineteen sixty four, a team from New York was the world series every year, but I made the money that was in those franchises, and they ability to get players the other than once you ready, Hanser stunk defied sports, nineteen, eighty, four to two thousand will be section of the graves and. All kinds of different teams playing in the world series. Free Agency did that, so the guy who will the council told was just speaking out of that. It had really thought thought. This comes a history of the sport. The two biggest reasons for the Union are one free agency helps this prince, the calms, which is the players and to the honest brokering revenue shooting arrangements. COPS understand out professional revenue-sharing is. You Buy. A, Bass. You anticipate that you made a lot of money on a yearly basis. You saw franchise ten years now. It's going to have tripled in value best. That's batteries and admits bet lately. You know, but you do that on a date when you have certain revenue streets. All of a sudden midstream. A union clubs come all. This central bank will come up and change your revenues. And you don't have the right to say that. G having known this with the club. I thought I was making twenty million, only making seventeen or I didn't know that you're taking my you know. This goes into my repurchasing price. You Know A. Pretty profound attack on on a clubs business. Take money from club and give it to another. And, as a result, tempers flare when it comes to share on the other side yeah. Yeah and we all the honest brokers of that so that that person just doesn't know about. I will be sure to let them know I'll. Call My. Perfectly happy to try to enlighten them. I guess where we are right now. In baseball I tried to ask people this who've been around the game for awhile. And who are have? Different, expertise, in the game. I ask them. What do you feel like? The State of the game is right now. Do you feel like it's better or worse than it was a few years back? Do you feel like we're on a trajectory for good things? Are you worried about where we're going? What's your? What's your perspective on the State of Baseball? As as it stands today, pro as a bad day to ask because we're in the middle of this pandemic, no baseball now. Before before the pandemic, I would have said it's as healthy as..

baseball Union New York
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"I knew that. Might treated the clubs with a little bit. Not Leniency, but I would have treated the clubs with a better respect for how hard it is what they do but but since then I have tried to. I'm not saying gene I wasn't 1887. Let's put it that way when I was A. You know ready to file rightful. It's hard because when you are it, you're in it every day from that perspective where your job was. It's hard not to feel that way because it does get so contentious so quickly, but you're right like I. especially in this moment in time I've been trying to. Trying to tell people and trying to make people understand that baseball games even baseball games without fans in the stands to put them on a really hard thing in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. With all the different concerns that need to be addressed, we have to have patience we have to as a country as baseball fans in his baseball players. We have to have patience and say. There is a way I think there is a way forward here, but. The respect for how difficult it is like you said to put on baseball. CanNot be understated. Also you literally a unique. Belt this hasn't happened in one hundred and two years, so no one has ans- out of intellectual Miltie that you approach these. It isn't like a regular typical negotiation across the table to replace. Net The nineteen ninety seven basic agreement something like that this is a this is a very complicated subject, but and may have strong you're you're entitled strong feelings about? But. You. Can't commit to the species discussions. You know the scene with the same kind of. View of the world. As you as you bring to. The the wreck typical negotiation. At, one of the things the question of How hard you work, behalf of used to laugh about this all the time, but whenever anybody beat me up in the press I'd get calls from place. A g. must be doing something. So I would sell these guys. You don't understand. I kept sent Colt bummer Iraq. Jail you understand this. I get up tomorrow morning. If you write that, I'm going to get a call from you know how whiter he's going to judge..

baseball
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"In the the NBA and the NFL the breaking away from this model now lately, but in the in the beginning. They didn't engage in collective bargaining. They engaged in the settlement of antitrust. Lawyers in the courtroom, negotiating a basic agreement as a settlement would draw the antitrust claims that will be put baseball players because baseball was subject to the antitrust laws for the longest time. Baseball players had actual negotiations. They were in the room. They will negotiate. IT WASN'T A. It wasn't gonNA fear and gene wars, you know. People like that it was the players when negotiating. We would their spokespeople, but they negotiated that lead to a greater feeling of solidarity with the players UK before, and how much time you have about, say a great story about. The nineteen, ninety, four, Nineteen ninety-five strike, and a player to whom. All players all great debt. A player who was up a player who lost yeah really Scott Scott Sanderson. Obviously you know your strike you. Have you know two hundred fifty, two hundred sixty two reaches two hundred thirty eight days. A lot of players to resolve is so good, but not as strong as somebody. That is the beginning you know, etcetera, and then some disaffection, so we call a big meeting in California three hundred players show up room, and you know this this this Oh, that play wants to say a few words about why we might want to consider giving up. This said we're play. Baseball gotTA. GET BACK TO WORK CLUBS Are attending, and they actually do put players in. Saint uniform numbers as the players on strike in Spring Training Games. And we have this big meeting and Scott Sanderson gets up and I'd like to show of hands. I like anyone who believes. That we should give the players who come after US less than we received from the players who went before us. And he heads. Not one hand went up and I turned to lauren rich at the time repeated. Please association I said. Clubs don't have a chance because what Scott was able to do. was He captured full the plays? Really what issues you have certain you you. You have certain benefits. They didn't come to you from like Manna from head. They came to you through the hard work in the solidarity players. Who went before you?.

Scott Scott Sanderson Baseball US NBA NFL UK lauren rich California
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"The big ENCHILADA is the postseason. National Television Package for the Post that they need to play. The clubs feel they cannot lose that if they lose that. They're really going to get hammered. And so the that the principal objective is. How what how many games do we need? To produce teams that we can hold our head up high and say these are the best teams in based in jean-marc used to say, show me hundred game schedule, and I'll tell you the best teams baseball. I don't need to do. One hundred sixty two games I can do it in You'll notice all his newspaper articles lately about the frequency with which the team that's ahead at the end of Ninety Games is the best team at the end of the year. That's all fence public by Major League Baseball. Then there in search of. Their in search of the number of games they must play such that when they played at the end of that, they have a real posts And secondly I think that. They came in with a number lower than. They think is is the maximum other words eighty two game proposal, probably legally. They want the players by guests. This out of the clubs operate no one of the advantages. We always had clubs always thought we were scooping. Up. You know perfectly happy to have made that in my own view again. I could be wrong about this. My own view that the clubs want to play more games. What they want the players to ask for it so that it looks like a get. Okay well all right. If you hundred games will play one hundred games by, you gotTa do something for us on some side. You know trading off something that they were going to give you anyway. You know they. I think they. They left some room there for the players, blue and mob, and may met. The players think that they were getting it. We got the clubs to give us twenty games more when clubs are perfectly happy to give it, and so the issue is going to be what Claes associations willing to pay. And I hope not very much for a proposal would says comes back and says we think we can play on tunes or ninety nine Games whatever the number might be, but that number seems to be a little bit. and. I think, it's low deliberately. They want the players to feel that. They extracted so that they can get some things. I mean there. There are some things clubs their proposal..

Major League Baseball principal Claes
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"Linemen and seven foot, two centers and six hundred five shooting guards. The other sports have become. The growth of species. Spatial! What that leads a lot of fans think. About baseball places that if just playing a game tonight, this Austria that is no artistry in that is to work with more blanche rump alleged told me that he would practice looking at a bad with one I. Just, put one on, so that his left eye to be trained on first base if a guy was on for his base so that he would know how fast they run to second on unattended steel. Towns don't think that happens, but guy training insult to see a game. Y You know it's. It's the the amount of street it goes into playing. Baseball is something that. Doesn't look that wake was not gonNA. They're not superhuman. You know in size dimension. The second thing is fans. No matter how much you tell this the matter. How many classical economists you roll out! Fans continue to believe that play a salaries. Did it take ticket prices when in fact they don't? Ticket prices are function of supply and demand, and they dictate salads every economist that you on both sides of the aisle. We'll tell you. At the driving force? The salaries is revenue principally from local and national television television revenue is the explosion of local revenue cable has contributed mightily to the revenue streams of the coins. They have the money. They WANNA. Spend it on plants and so players. They get paid because somebody has the money. Do you know few give column Cue Sixty million dollars for the next two years. It's not going to affect ticket price. What's GonNa Affect? Ticket? Prices is a sense of supplies, the man and the proof of that the to prove so that I always tell people I good matter of fact that a panel would rob. Them is one the Olympics. Olympics cost a fortune now. The athletes free. Why? Getting any raises..

Olympics Baseball blanche Austria
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"I tell people I live two miles from the Bagel. Opinion New York. Obviously, it's been one time since I been there. I left. I left New York on. We left New York on February nineteenth. With Africa marched I right in the middle of vandamme. Trip was cut short. We got back here on March twenty billion here. So my landlord called me, they asked me for commission to go in the. To drop off all the mail that's been accumulating in the mailroom, so. I gotta get back. I don't know when it's going to be. To New, York Seattle. He'd you need a gallon? To? You can always count on me. That kind of a WHO'd sneak you a file past prison. y'All through the end agree. A.

New York York Africa vandamme Seattle
"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Lightning around questions Ravi. Are you ready? Number One. What after using your phone? That's the most fun. The one I'm most excited about is the one I just downloaded the. If you, go about Tam reading books. Through a shot! Somebody and it's blinking if you're if you're. I love I get just of a book and fifteen minutes and I feel so. So accomplished after eating it because. It would take you I was I was to read a book, but if you can get a of and you can apply it in fifteen minutes I. Find it very exciting and Dan. Once. You cutest about something you've read minutes and you feel A. Actor by the new and actually double down and reading the book itself I love blankets. Food? My favorite food is. I would tie. I love high food. How about do you have a favorite Bagel spot in New York. You know I have I. Have a Tink Coffee Shop, right? Below my building on the on the first floor, I I go there for the cinnamon rolls and bagels which I love. I love it. What do you do for fun? I watch Bollywood movies. Bollywood movies is one of my favorites. I could see why he would movies in in the EMC in on a at time square so I go to the movie halls in what's Bollywood movies Magon. Had this. Exciting debate with the friends on. What the movie is all about I love God. Would is your best advice for a first time, CIO. Foot, a fulltime CEO I would say. Mostly I use across the word of God that actress on. Getting the financial capital for digital transformation. Very. Few have got it right on getting the human capital for visited so my time advice for CIO's would be. Get your human capital right. Everything else will fall in place. What question do you never get asked that? You wish you were asked more often. The cushion. I always want to answer is. His his mind needed ship challenge and the vantage point I am at. I can see things what other country because I meet people from different industries I be six sls. I've made got woman's Cadillac institutions I'm not as did that. I can see teams which others in my team can't see. I'm more worried about. How do I convince them to see what they're not seeing? And that's the single biggest challenge you always have. What? How do you convince teams to see what you're seeing and they the kind of new to go to the with do? Well this has been awesome. Thanks so much for joining Were you know it's been? I feel like we got through about a third of what what we wanted to get through here. So it was just a great time any final thoughts, anything's to plugger things. People should check out. Show, you know I'll be excited to motivations of chapters of this if you think achieved terrified I I hope you've enjoyed talking to me. I really learn this because one of the interesting aspects of doing the interviews as you time to reflect, and you get time to soak on things which you're working on, and the more you saw connected. The more you come, Chapa the next time when you're executing on something so sometimes I do Biz interviews to the flicked on to soak on so that What are we doing you better? Awesome well. Thanks for joining and we'll talk again soon. Thank you so much and.

CIO Bollywood Tink Coffee Shop New York EMC Tam Dan CEO Magon
"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"The United States. which is one of which is our biggest market. and. We have been better on our cells because we train upfront investment dollars. And subsequently, what might potentially happen is? We might lose them. We may lose them even before we want is on it, but that's what you'll bet on your eggs. Board beds of saying you know they will the people who I us. Who get trained because Malaya's Ambi like the word they will do enhanced will hanging with us, so we bet it is a it is a unusual back, but we know in the roots of the company learning education as kind of a deep into it, so it wasn't as difficult to say that it might not work, but the challenge was. We have to invest this upfront even before we can reap the benefits. It's unusual because we we ended up. You know from Norway ad since two thousand, seventeen, being on the largest Kudos to schools and colleges in the US so that's a big shift, but once it started working. It was easy to convince everybody else in my in my organization that what white investment scale everybody knew that it's hard to hire you know the fact that you have four hundred thousand open positions in the US, very few jobs added into the. makes. You know that that isn't enough available to the market Ohio. So, what would you go in trade foot so the only way is debated? And deploy the other big shift we had to make is to go from stem to non stem, and that was a big shift, but you know our clients. Telling us that the technology by itself is important, but applying the technology to business landscape to the big award. And for that, we need a diverse imposed, and that was the shift. We mayor diminish for design schools, because experiences all medicine in the in the disadvantage. And then we made the switch to community colleges, because we believe that the digital backbone jobs as they call, them was a great landing spot for. attacked. We get from community colleges. And then we created this appendice goddess model with you none on and work with us. So, you land on a digital Bhagwan job. One job could be a data operations job at a security operations job as an example, have a we have a roadmap for them to new stackable degrees are stackable certificates, and in a a few years we want them to finish those tackling certifications, and we now have credentials attached to university partnerships so that they would get an undergrad degree somebody as the aspirations to lucile and the London work with as it's a, it's a unique program because. You would have heard in on Bantus programs in Europe for manufacturing. We've kind of digital space. This experiment weekend, really It can be that template to bring talented. The digital word from community colleges, which which potentially serve Lord the under served of sections of the society and therefore cleared the inclusive strategy. Into the divine. This template could mean that it could be. It would be scared. Eight point five million. Students will community colleges in the US, which is thirty five percent of the student population in the. US Super excited about this experiment of digital apprentice where you land on a backbone job, which is the back end you progressively move the front end and moved to the front end. Your equipped so well because you're hired online ability, so you're billing the stackable certifications. You could potentially be this extraordinary professional looking for. It's a phenomenal experiment. We started on and. Super excited about the prospects of the scale at which is cannot change. Detect pipeline for for for digital scales, so we talked the human piece, so if it's human plus gig plus machines, we talked to human piece I. Want to talk Gig Economy, so the GIG economy is something that I think has been both the most psych over hyped, and under hyped thing of of of recent, because obviously you see things like you know lift and Uber and post mates, and all those sorts of things, but the idea that a company can connect with someone anywhere in the world. Find them extremely quickly. is so fascinating to me for for example one of my buddies. WHO's a start founder? He was telling me yesterday that he's been using his his his developer for the past two years. Someone you know he's. He's never met lives overseas. You know pays them. You know fair wage. He's like he's. He's probably my best employs. Not Employees so there's a lot of upside to things like that, but there's also a lot of downsides to things like that and you know the Gig economy can really be something so beneficial to companies, but it can also kind of be a double edged sword that you know potentially has some some negative connotations either down the line currently. How do you view you know the GIG economy me from the company perspective. How should CEO's technology leaders be looking at the GIG economy to supplement their teams? I think it is a very important point. Look at how the economy is kind of represented on. Untrue. You primarily think it is about you know writing applications and. The opposition's attached to advantages. Drivers Connie the delivery companies food delivery companies A. Logistics which used the economy. The perspective I have is festival. It has to be looked better in in conjunction with. A full-time private human capital as called. And the power of this is to amplify. Your potential in times when you need it and Atlanta lamb on as when you need it, and that's what native noticeably bond funds do that ability to ramp-up. A team ramp down. A team is super fascinating, and that's what enterprises are struggling with so by bringing this into the mix of. Machines. you wanNA bring the agility. This Kahlil and the speed at which you could. Deploy human talent. The kind of jobs, I think which will go into the data economy. Variety them which are needed in life cycle off. Tech projects. That you have to a lot of heavy lifting. One of the examples I can think office s Ting of applications as you lapping leap, acid spill structure. How do you make sure that? You have to test occasions. You need to do a lot of heavy lifting and GRANDPA's today. Enterprise use consulting firms like us to scale up and scale down. The way forward would be that enterprises can do it themselves. They can employ the. The GIG economy, or they could use a thumbs emphasis, which can actually you know bringing that that it's not to to the life cycle. And, it are naturally sweet spots like distinctive applications, operations fit specific set of tasks and testing of allegations today I know of companies which have literally no. Onto my S-TESTA. All of what they have is a GIG economy festas. In fact I know fum. which has six hundred thousand wooded Estes, which is supported by hundred which? Full time with them and what the dude that.

US Malaya Ohio United States. Europe Norway Atlanta London founder CEO developer fum. Kahlil Connie A. Logistics
"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Is primarily woke legend to finding problems more than solving problems as mentioned so that would mean you need more people to do. Lizards smokey a background of liberal arts, people with a bag of design and what? If if I may be procured of. A you might actually have more people coming from community colleges into the work. Because no longer degrees I'm going to get you work. What we do work is kills and stackable degrees, because you have on a lifelong learning continuum, so the ability to switch from degrees to skills. I think is a it's a apps time to do that and I would say what would be much democratized and work would be much conducive to go beyond him, and to actually reach out to associate degrees at people who don't have degrees and people who have skills and will have learn ability. You know that's the big thing which. I'm very excited about learning ability as a trade for people at work, we destined much more because you will have a change at rapid pace and liberty will drive how much you can change how much you could unlearn. Really on so these are a bunch of shifts I would say what is going to evolve and expectations at work is going to be very different. Yeah I. Completely Agree, and there's a lot to impact their oster with. Do you feel like companies should be a upskilling entity like? Do you feel like you know we? We have a lot of. Leaders that come on the show that are really focused on driving innovation that are trying to. Do, things like you know whether it's like Loco, development or turning people that are in accounting into developers for a moment, and then, and then back, and forth, or whatever it is developing capacity that might not have traditionally been there like what is the role of the company or the leadership team to upskill employees that Sam very important new as than the. Our tank. It's going to define how from. Just the problem of human capital in a digital age in the past, these killing was not such a big. For logic prices. But if you want to digitize yourself into future, which is secure, you have to rip up your human capital and repurposing and reskilling is such a big endeavor that it is no longer the responsibility of the individuals, but it is the responsibility of the enterprises of the employer. End The abroad to come together. RESKILLING And I was actually talking to some of my friends in academic institutions, and I was telling them how David come up from B to c word to be to be word. University today catered to students who come and work for them. Ed Tech companies like Cassandra density, they actually work for students who come into this kill themselves, but these killing is such a big initiative big thing for the future that employers will have to play a very important role in leading it. And employees will of course have to be part of that ecosystem, so employees and employers have come together for the purpose of this killing and and it will be the single biggest reason or constrain y organizations will not be able to will not be able to visit is themselves or why they won't be able to visit is obsessed to me. The entire academy ecosystem has to get up from ABC. Word would be to be worried. If. We, have the heavy lifting needed prizes to stay relevant in age digitally native firms out. Disrupting them. I have this fascinating conversation with policy makers policy makers to the government about what endless clinger's lies that. Governments Will Wyatt to cater to citizens in the first twenty years of citizens lives in the last twenty twenty five years of citizens, lives. Governments have mile wide themselves to the middle. Of The stock in the end and end unfair in the start of the end of the life cycle of citizen. And government infrastructure to get up for that, so governments now are walking on workforce. Development and workforce a workforce, these skinning I happen to be a part of the Governor's workforce for something in the State of Connecticut. And I'm so fascinated about the role in the role of government, so I would say the role of government, the role of surprises employees all have come together for this. Huge task, killing. If. Relevant! Part of the challenge, there is that the signal in the market is look at what you know. Aggregate jobs are open. If. You're take you know all of Lincoln, or whatever does he say? Okay? Well, you know there's half a million back in developer jobs that are available right now at any given time, so we know where the shortages in America at any given time of developers, but that is actually kind of like a trailing metric right. It's not a leading metric, because it's saying that you know in some ways. Obviously, we know we need to develop capacity there, but that was you know those wrecks have come because of. Of the need for those jobs that's not like a forward-looking metric. That's not saying that like you know. Those type of things are are in the future and one of the ways that I think is super fascinating If you look at like salesforce, obviously there, the amazing sponsor of the show we love them, but if you look at like their commitment to salesforce admins. This was something that twenty years ago. Nobody needed to salesforce Adleman and then now you know because of the success of their company. And thousands and thousands of of salesforce admiral. are needed all the time, and so they bill. You know they're. They're trailblazer platform. All of those.

Connecticut Ed Tech Sam Wyatt ABC David Lincoln developer America
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Thanks for diving into those it really A. It really helped clarify the the new program that you guys are working on and so my Nisha Super Super Interesting work that you and your team are up to over there. It's time for the lightning round and after the lightning round a favorite book that you recommend to the listeners. You're ready sure all right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes? I would say break down the barriers between the industries within healthcare Our incentives are not aligned to have everyone working towards the same goal of better outcomes than better value of it. What's the biggest mistake or pitfall Paul to avoid trying to reduce costs without keeping the patient at the center of the decision making a lot of arbitrary cost cutting and talk talk about costs? But we're not doing it sustainable way for the system Yeah I will definitely. I love that one How do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change well as a growing startup? We are always in constant change. But I would say the way A to remain relevant is to always be looking outside of healthcare for ideas and innovation and bringing that in a way that applies to health care that we're keeping pace as with all the rest of the great innovation happening. What scenario focus that drives everything at clarify health? Clarify help is really about offering insights. which are actionable to our customers and really enabling every organization or every healthcare decision maker to have that actionable information mation at their fingertips so that they can make the best decisions for their patients or for their organizations and that action ability is really? What's driving when we go? What book would you recommend to the listeners? When he didn't have one? I usually read fiction outside of work. Eric because I I love being able to see things from other people's viewpoints so I would say to a fine unbalanced by row hinton mystery and also the power of one by Bryce courtenay and one is set in India in the nineteen seventies during their Ghandi's emergency rule and wanted set in South Africa about a little boy during apartheid who becomes a boxer They're both really amazing books. But I think for me. It's it's about seeing a different culture and a different worldview through someone else's eyes and perhaps the different time periods to and to be able to immerse yourself on that because I think got the real learning experience that we're always take ourselves out of our own skin to be able to see into other worldview than windows so what I would recommend. I think those are great recommendations coming nations you know Mnuchin and in thinking about how we as healthcare leaders make an impact on on the lives of the customers and the people that we serve whether it be patients or or other businesses. This idea of putting yourself in their shoes. I don't think we'd do it enough. And and your recommendations. The Nation's lead the listeners to that is put yourself in their shoes. Get out of your shoes and Yeah Right Yeah Nice powerful I love your recommendation and Great ones for us all to consider and listeners. Obviously you know go to outcomes his racket that health in the search bar type in clarify health. You're gonNA find all of the resources we've discussed including links to the books a full transcript act ways to get in touch with clarify and so Yeah just go there and A Nisha time flies. When you're having fun I Would I would love if you could just leave us with the closing thought. And then the best place for the listeners could continue the conversation with you or somebody at the company while I love the way you put it actually to put yourself in someone else's shoes but really around But doing that in a way where you're thinking actually from the end result what what is it that actually we wanNA drive change around and actually. How can we do that in a way? That sustainable and what information do we need to be able to. I do that in a real way because I do think we are making huge strides in how we think about quality of care and and it doesn't have to be such a wrote way and so I I would encourage everyone to to really think about that and think about the power of how technology is changing other industries and then really say what does that mean for me. And how how could how could we do things differently. It's a great message. Many shy and and if the listeners wanted to learn more where can they go. Or how can they get in touch. Barron many ways to get in touch with us We have our website Clarify health solutions. I'm free to take any Listeners questions eh as well and also through Lincoln outstanding there you go listeners reach out the other website linked in is another option. When Monica gladdy chief operating officer clarify health? I mean it just was an extraordinary conversation with you today and Just really thank you for for the insights and ideas that you shared with us today. Thank you afraid to talk. Thanks thanks for listening to the outcomes rocket podcast be sure to visit us on the web at. WWW DOT outcomes rocket dot com for the show notes resources resources inspiration and so much more..

Bryce courtenay chief operating officer Monica gladdy Lincoln Paul Mnuchin India Barron Eric hinton South Africa
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"They're fun silly fast and easy just like marketing automation with pardon you can go to dot com slash podcast learn more about VW marketing with the world's number one crm. We love part. We love fast and easy lightning round questions Winnie. Are you ready all right. Let's go in number one. What apper using on your phone. That's the most fun APP I have the most fun his actually Uber eats because it's about food was your favorite thing to order Oh probably Indian food and good restaurants Shrontz in in the valley. They love all there are so you're talking to a real foodie here so this could be a whole nother podcast in we'll bring you back. You'll be our OUR UBEREATS correspondent. I think they might have to to to pay for the ad reads but they but I think my favorite Indian in restaurant in San Francisco is Dosa. Oh I've been to does does this great. What about your favorite vacation spot. Probably the Caribbean the N. favorite book or podcast that you've read or listened to recently. I really enjoyed the podcast how I built this. What are you most excited for the future of marketing personalization. What is your best advice for first time. CMO Don't be cocky. Ascalon Austin's.

Ascalon Austin Dosa Winnie San Francisco
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Right on the right trajectory of the roles super appealing not surprisingly given what we've talked about. I'd been a GM twice a CMO twice. I was really looking for the next challenge and the the idea of looking across all the go to market functions and doing kind of the corporate planning growth and scale part really attractive to me. The third thing was largely the the partnership with the founders Joseph Walla Neelam era. We're looking for is they. Call it kind of a third founder. They they really wanted a partner for the three of us to run the business us together and all of us to have complementary but different skills and you know I brought the go to market expertise in scale expertise and they've got all the product vision and technical excellence and the three of us were beautifully together and that's just been a joy but I'm also very driven by competitive motion and I love being the underdog dog and when I believe that we've got the right product and the opportunity and we can totally win I love being part of that and so hello sign you know being and not first entrant into the e signature market with a long standing kind of you know forefather of the market in place but knowing that we could do it in a better more cost effective delightful way was super exciting so you kind of throw all those things together and it was sort of a magical formula allows there is no way it wasn't going to be yes so you also asked about inuit exciting things we're working on and this was also part of the drought joined the company at not not only did. I see this opportunity underdog opportunity around hello sign in the e signature market but we also had this really interesting idea at the time that since become a product called hello works which is about document workflow and getting PDF's which are really awful on mobile devices completely added workflow flo occasion so awful so awful right gosh so often your on boarding and you have to fill out your stupid W. Nine nine forums and direct deposit forms in all you have is your mobile phone sorry but you're going to be really unhappy and we invented. Hello works to kind of take all that pain out and and make the mobile experience awesome not just for signature but for any sort of complex document data gathering and processing type of workflows to anyway that the germ of an idea was also exciting. We've just introduced the end user component of Helo works just about six months ago so still really new and exciting and we're still building that out and seeing seeing some really fun things happen and then another big fun thing happened. which is we decided to join forces with dropbox so they acquired us back in February just a couple months ago and we're really excited about that too and I think the really motivating thing there is that our mission at hello sign has been to make friction lists disagreements available to every individual in every business around the world? There's no way we can do it faster than by being part of dropbox they're the world's largest repository of documents and they've got an installed base of half a billion registered users and twelve and a half million paying customers. I think at last count or something close to to that so you start to think about how could we bring our vision to the market as quickly as possible and it's really with the backing credibility and access to you have some around the world that jock springs so it was a beautiful marriage yeah. That's really exciting. I think a lot of times there's that kind of trepidation of like what what happens and especially you've known a ton of CEOS who usually are the ones who have help you manage that conversation you know and that integration and it sounds like you know it's a perfect home for her perfect partnership of two folks that are lined on the same mission. Yeah Yeah for sure it's exciting. I've been through. I think seventeen acquisitions twice acquired the rest being the acquirer and I've never seen one go this smoothly. Eh and I think a lot of that is their cultures were very very very similar similar good market motion to similar focus on customer satisfaction and success so a lot of really really really good points of alignment. That weren't technological. I think those were a lot of the reasons that it's gone so well so far last question before we get into the lightning grounds. You aren't advisor to a ton of startups number one. How do you have the time and number two. Are there any like insights that you get from those folks that really help with seeing innovation seeing ideas from the field getting to know what's going on or just you know kind of keeping up with the technological trek logical. Jones's as it were. Oh that that is the primary reason to do it other than you know giving back like. I love sharing lessons. I've learned in helping others others. Maybe avoid a mistake I've made before but it is very much mutual learning kind of thing I I I get to stay abreast of emerging technology trends and meeting the great leaders that are emerging in growing companies. They're going to be ahead of me on stuff so it's very helpful to me as much as it is for them to to have access to my expertise so I look at it as a win win an I dunno I make the time. It's it's one of those things where I feel like. I got so much help along the way. How can I not get back. If I'm if I'm at a point where I can help. It just seems like the right thing to do and it's fun agreed Oh and you asked are there insights there that beyond just kind of keeping abreast of technology there are some really interesting common lawman off a call mistakes or like leanings predispositions. Maybe that are kind of shocking and really can cause failure her and so they're they're couple. Commons that really stand out to me. I think especially when you have a technical founder which is what's so common Silicon Valley of course the build it and they they will come philosophy is much more prevalent than you might imagine. Oh yes you're not solving an actual problem with other people know they have that problem or not. What is another topic of conversation. Perhaps but if you just build it for technology's sake and don't really have a target market target customer in mind then you're. GonNa have to grind it out trying to find your target customer and and hope that you can get them on board and I think just the bill and they will come thing is just more prevalent than it should be and that's one one thing that I really advise a lot around the other thing I found again. Largely with technical founders is some of them are loath breath to recognize what they don't know or unwilling to admit what they don't know and I think the best possible scenario a really great leader and founder is is looking for people to fill the gaps not unlike this what I described with founders here. Hello Santa Myself where they were looking for. Somebody that literally didn't have or story that literally had had the experience they didn't it is surprising. There are some people that I think have enough hubris. They just don't think they have any shortcomings. I guess or just are low to recognize them. I I that's one of the most important things to help a company as to recognize leader has to recognize what they're not great at and then go hire the best of the best that do those things well and former great partnerships they collaboratively become much greater than the sum of the parts yeah. I couldn't agree more I mean. I think that there's so much and I think it's just just any product centric founder. I think it's really not it's more of human condition that something that you need to valley. It just happens to be technologists here but you know if you create him you see all the people on Shark tank or whatever it is like people who think that the thing that they created is just people will just mass adopt now. It's the same thing with media we talk about the three three days of podcasting distribution distribution in distribution right like it is the one thing that every single startup absolutely needs in some home form or fashion whether it's you know a a large amount or a little amount but you always need it and it's always the thing that I is is is hard to find mind when your head is buried in a computer building product all day yeah totally. Oh and there's one other thing I've seen a lot too in those conversations which is that I counsel a lot around which is making sure that you are thoughtful about the timing for taking money and that you if you are going to raise money that you make sure you take money from the right people because those are going to be the people that are in the trenches with you and have your back as well as challenge you and check you on the things you're doing but I just feel like there's some companies. Were willing to take money from anybody which just isn't a recipe for success. It doesn't mean you're bound to fail but you're not as well set up for success. I think versus being choosy about the kind of investors as you want that have the great network the right experience the insights that are GonNa help you and are going to be great partners in times of trouble and not taking money at the wrong longtime. You don't want to wait until you're on your last legs with sixty days. Runway left to take money can't negotiate well sixty days. If if you're if you're rising scary stuff here but it had I'm trying. I'm Talkin seven days. I mean sixty days. I'm like that's smooth sailing. You're not even breaking in a sweat. If you have sixty days run on I was talking to a found her the other day who raised seventeen million dollars and was like literally out of money the next day I mean and is like and you're talking massive around right like a round. You know from pretty big time. VC's but yeah stuff happens but it and the reason why see that is like is is important to know the ecosystem that you're swimming in regardless of whether or not you're in Silicon Valley or if you know we have listeners in over one hundred thirty countries so wherever it is that you're swimming you have to know the kind of societal norms and all those things and if you're in startup world it's really important to know the desperation operation levels of some of the founders like the type of stuff that they're dealing with. You know like they say you want three founders because one person can sell the product one person can make the product. Neither one can fundraise. You know he just think about like that. Idea is so a third of your company goes doing something. That's not making selling the product so I think it's just important for marketers to know that especially when you're working with startups that there's a lot of opportunities these two to do a lot of cool stuff with them because your money is really important yeah exactly okay so let's get into some waiting around questions since these questions are fastened easy..

founder Silicon Valley Joseph Walla Neelam GM inuit partner advisor Jones sixty days seventeen million dollars three three days seven days six months
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

15:06 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Just participating in those events gives you access to conversation through networking and also frankly GLI listening to the sessions where CIO's are presenting in communicating what it is. It's important to them. What priorities they have problems. They're solving and that gives me a great basis for conversation over a glass of wine or over lunch or whatever so that that certainly was where I started and then some of those relationships started to Gel and actually made friends with many of these people well as you do with colleagues that you work with and respect then we started to do things like bring. CIO's together on topics that we felt were relevant and important to the community so then I could start hosting some of those events ourselves and then the third thing turned into exactly what you just touched upon in in which is a an advisory board composed of CEO's and so- CEO Advisory Board to me is one of the most intimate ways to interact with breath and get feedback from and have meaningful conversation with the people that are potentially direct influencers on company strategy product strategy etc and so I really treated that CIO advisory board as a group of confidence where could share anything and everything about what we we're contemplating what we were investing in what trade offs. We were making what we were shutting down. You kind of say. Does this make sense. You know us. You know our business now. How do you see these decisions that were contemplating and can you give guidance to me to us on whether we're doing the right things at the same time when they're doing that. They're giving advice in context of what matters to them in their business and as a proxy for the CIO's that they know and so I always felt like that fairly intimate group of about twelve or so. CIO's was really a representative group of hundreds of CIO's but representative small group to let us have meaningful meaningful conversation so those things go were the CIO's go and start to build those relationships then start to aggregate people in a meaningful way in small groups six and ultimately find the people that you feel are going to give you the best advice and and be the most forthright in their view of the world and bring them together in undivided report format. Those three things have been kind of game changing coming especially because a lot of the products that you're talking about are are extremely technical. There's a lot that goes into that especially when you're talking about product marketing and especially when you're talking about products that a a lot of time have the CIO visibility and are making the purchasing decision but they're not the ones implementing on it might be even you know the practitioner. It is the person who's tour three levels below them that you know manages the day to day right how did you how did you look at product marketing when you're for selling things in an ecosystem where you know there's so much complexity in so much like technical proficiency around unlike new technologies and stuff like that well the interesting thing. Is You kind of have to touch all levels you have to know who your ultimate end user is is an NBA message in value for that individual so if you know we talked about hello sign for a second I mean hello sign is obviously a tool to send things for signature legally binding contracts quotes proposals whatever so the the ultimate person who's using it as the person signing thing and and so you have to have some value proposition for them but who's the buyer. It's not that ultimate signer. It's the person who owns the documents that are being sent out for signature in oftentimes oftentimes that can be legal but when it comes to content and document protection and security and safety that oftentimes lives within the CIO's organization station of the organization so then you really have to have a value proposition for them and in our case we also offer our product and services via why in a bi specifically toward integrating with other websites applications and processes and so then we've really got to have tools and messaging and value for the developer. That's GonNa work against that. API and I'm using hello signed just as a proxy. I'm in this to be true for any technical product. I think you really have to know the decision. Decisionmakers the influencers the users and frankly have the right levels three messaging content or all of them and so for a highly technical oh product that means you've got a very very wide array of content and messages you have to provide for the developer for example you'd have to have API documentation and on sample code and SDK's and various things that really help a developer build effectively but that documentation is deeply technical all very different than say the very technical information for the security team about how the infrastructure is and how hashing encryption work and all the things security professionals. GonNa care about to decide whether or not that product is safe for business use. The end user wants none of those things they just WanNa know. What's the experience like how easy it is for me to get my job done. And how quickly can I do it and so those things are a tough balance when you're talking about a technical product that has an end user component but that's kind of what you gotta do. What were some of your you could be one could be many some of your favorite campaigns the you've ran in the past that really kind of got to multi levels in God people on the same page some of that ABM flavor that we talk about now that really helped engaged gauge you know the the Kinda host whole buying stack there yeah the the one that comes immediately to mind was not a solo effort it was actually kind of a community effort among a whole bunch of SAS providers in an era when cloud computing and SAS technologies these were still relatively new and while I think the benefits were ramping onto SAS technologies were obvious. It's very quick. You can try before you buy. There's not a LOT OF RISK MR investment to get started. There was still a lot of fear uncertainty and doubt about the safety of cloud technology. Oh my goodness it's on surface. I can't touch what so so there was a lot of of that. Fud fear uncertainty and doubt and so what we did was we worked with a number of different SAS providers to kind of together create the concept of what we call user centric. It and made it somewhat of a public movement that people could join and support and upload upload their video statement around and so on and so forth and the idea there was we were trying to shift the conversation among CEO's and frankly it professionals to talk not about what technology I we buy because it's safest and most feature robust but if we thought about this as the technologies analogies we buy in support of our knowledge workers in support of the people that ultimately do the work that brings money into the company if we flipped the view entirely early and thought about the user as the center of design around it what changes the story completely and it really lends itself to discovering the benefits of SAS technology and it kind of forces the IT professionals to think in a different order of importance as to how you think about the technology stack or infrastructure that runs the company and that was kind of just a I opening conversation that we ended up having a whole bunch of CEOS really embrace and talk about on the road owed in their presentations and things like that because it was a way kind of under the covers I guess it was a way of making the CIO a strategic visionary at a time when I think we were shifting coming from CIO's having been more of a cost containment infrastructure management team and that was a big big draw for see. I was like Oh my gosh. Maybe we can help make. CIO's the heroes here really envisioning the future that will make their users more productive the business run better and in a more modern way more more cost effective way. I think it's such a great marketing lesson is like how do you make your your customers. The hero like we talk about it on the show. A lot is you. You know if you're telling the story of your customers like in the hero's journey forbade the hero right. You're not you're the you're the Alexa right like they're. They're Luke Skywalker. Walker and you're the lightsaber not vice versa. The story is not about lightsabres. You know it's not about the tools. They get the job done completely agree. So how did you see the role. CMO changing with the rise of technology is with the rise of kind of all this complexity the the stack of whatever five or six thousand Martic options and all that stuff well in those elements. You just rattled off for very much a part of how the roles changed dramatically you know it is mostly driven by technology evolution because if I think of what we're able to do in marketing today so think of the most personalized website experience you can imagine the minute you land on a page knows who you are what you like what you've purchased elsewhere where you last came from and can personalize as an experience for you not just as an individual in the consumer and retail sectors but also in business if we know that somebody lands on our website say from pick a favorite company. Coca Cola that's very different experience that they should get about whatever product it is investigating than if if it's somebody who lands on the site from the FDA so if you can start to personalized those experiences the nuts pretty powerful you can actually eliminate a lot of exploration and answer questions earlier in preemptively answer questions that haven't been asked yet but all of that is only possible because of the technology we have today because electronially we can discover where he comes from what domain they visit from what part of the world there and what they're you know. Behavioral trends are like online. There's so much we can tell hell about somebody online that we can serve up that experience and we can track what they actually did on the site so that in aggregate we can see what was most effective effective in moving people towards the answers they were seeking in coming to the site to begin with and so all of that is so different from what it was when websites first emerged merged driven pre websites right now we're talking back many many moons ago but twenty years ago or so you couldn't do those things and the technology wasn't there yet and so you really really had to do a lot more printed brochures and in-person conferences in visits and phone calls and things like that just a completely different way of marketing marketing and so as we've been able to move more toward a technology driven marketing university performance marketing. That's based on tech then you've start. You've got to really instrument the system to be able to find tune optimize and look for those patterns that improve the delivery delivery of whatever messages are trying to get whatever potential buyer and so now I think take that to what does that mean for the CMO the CMO has to be able to wade through those six thousand technologies in figure out what the right stack is. GonNa look like to give that best online experience and provide all the tracking insights that you want and that means that marketers today today are technologists and their data junkies because they have to be and so that is totally different skill set than it once was where I think twenty twenty five years ago or so a lot of marketers were much more brand centric and the way that they you know exercise invested and skill honed and everything everything else and now I feel like marketers. The best of them are really focused on tech the use of technology to best deliver message to the right target market so that's the evolution in that just means different skill sets different emphases the job definitions themselves are different than they once were how how has your view of the CMO and of marketing change now that you're sitting in the COO role are you do you take it a little easier on the CMO or or you. Are you harder would has it software disposition. What were you looking at it now from what angle at the unquestioned actually two things to comment on their one is how I interact with. CMO's that worked for me now just directly to your question. The other one is I think it's also really shifted if did how I see the interaction between sales and marketing and marketing and the CIO because those technologies as useful as they may a B also our potential vulnerabilities and entrees into your systems and so I feel like now the CIO has to happen the very tight collaboration with marketing on what technologies are going to be part of the stack for that company and frankly help the cmo to discover what does right tools might be so I think there's a tighter collaboration and there's ever been between the CMO and then on like how I interact with with marketing. I think that my background has and I really grew up in the product marketing side of things as we talked about. I think it's made me a great partner to whomever I bring into the business and the opposite of a micromanager I wanNA hire people who are so good at their jobs that they they're better at it than I could be. By the same token I need to be able to look at what they're doing in the context of the larger business objectives and be able to course correct guide or give feedback and be a sounding board award and I think my background lets me. Do that really really good way so I feel like if you ask you know the last three or four marketing leaders who worked for me they would tell you that I've then just a really good partner and sounding board and kind of idea person to help. Maybe take our ideas and expand them even further. I hope that's what they'd say. Anyway never yeah. Why are you so excited about the opportunity at hello sign and what kind of cool stuff for are you all working on now. We'll get that me excited is a few things. One was definitely the market opportunity. I look like I'm a big company girl on paper but I'm actually hot. I I joined Oracle in the late eighties. When it was one building on a hill and Belmont I joined documentary like fifty people I joined boxing. We're about one hundred people joined. Hello Senate about forty. I love joining companies were in this kind of smaller ready to scale state and then come and be part of that scaling motion that gets us to IPO PO Andrew Acquisition or whatever so certainly this was the sweet spot for me a by the time I got to hello sign that it was just perfect size.

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Episode. Hannah's joined by Whitney Buck Chief Operating Officer of Hell Assign a tool that lets us her sign documents documents with legally binding e signatures when he also serves as an advisor and mentor to numerous startups including log. DNA and Y combinator continuity prior to hell assign Whitney he held senior marketing roles with box EMC oracle among other technology companies on this episode in and winning discussed everything from how her past work experience and marketing led it hurts wants to become a coo to her three keys to working well with CIO's in housing market. A technical product mission daily is made by our team at Michigan Dot Org. I mean phase on chief content officer here mission dot org.

Michigan Dot Org Whitney Buck Chief Operating Officer chief content officer coo Hannah CIO advisor