35 Burst results for "chess"

Rev. Al Sharpton discusses why it is imperative to 'Rise Up' in this moment

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:34 min | 1 d ago

Rev. Al Sharpton discusses why it is imperative to 'Rise Up' in this moment

"Reverend Al Sharpton Welcome to the PODCAST for the first time, a bank you I'm glad to be with you Jonathan Your Book. Up was really terrific, it really was, and hopefully we can squeeze in as much as we can talk about it. One of the things that you write about that I found very interesting. You coined this term Tae Liberals who are they they are people that call themselves progressive. And they sit around the arising and philosophizing and strategized, but never really get into the fight they don't get the hamster. Months then not registered voters they're not engaged with people and it's Sorta like they sit in these elite circles than these Paula conversations sipping critiquing what all of us that are under front lines in the trenches doing, and they don't do anything themselves than they can afford to come with the most unrealistic impractical kind of stands because they don't have to go out and deal with families that are victimized of people that are outraged and that's why I said the del real problem because they will go for what is radically the most best sounding thing that is totally impractical in totally plays on the emotions of one. Thing. You write in the book you write quote a lot tae liberal may mean well, but his lack of empathy or understanding of the basic inequalities that go hand in hand with bigotry racism and economic disparity make him suspect to anyone struggling to get a foothold in the American dream I'd go so far as to say that if lots liberals had a better sense of these issues and they're black and Brown and immigrant brothers, there'd be no need for someone like me I think that the reason I wrote that as because I'm often asked why do people reach out to me they reach out to be because We have an organization that not only deals with the obviously organizing a protest in working with their legal in media needs what that really understand. It feels their pain and their rage 'cause we HAPP that thing and that rate and a lot of the lottery liberals seed Bam as a radical like on a chess board rather than real people lost their son to police violence or lost their a nephew on their cousin who had no preparation for that know nothing about. Nothing about anything that many of them don't even have to means to go. And take care of funeral expense and not liberals just see them as objects get to some politically field theory that they've been playing with. Elite of discussions and I think that that is why they got. You notice they never connected to the people in the community on the base that usually just analyzing something in saint quarters. In their privileged status because many of them, a privilege themselves. So they can experiment with risk fathers because they're not taking that risk when I read that passage in the book I wrote in the margins Bernie Critique because that was my big critique of Bernie Sanders when he ran in two thousand sixteen and then again, this go round in two, thousand twenty well, I had challenged Bernie and sixteen and I think he did better in eighteen of and I think he started to get it and I give me the turn of there's a lot of credit for that but I think that a lot of the indication that your critique and mind to him was right is The black vote how does he explain that will getting the Black Vote I. think that people you can say all you want liberal will explain to me why the progressives in quote don't get the black vote it is not because that blacks are anti progressive is that there's no connection and there's no involvement with a lot of Ale see another the different aid you know common related all of that but a lot of these that call themselves progressive totally removed from the people that they wanNA speak speak on behalf of people they don't speak to

Bernie Bernie Critique Reverend Al Sharpton Bernie Sanders Paula ALE Brown
Interview with Franky Wah

Back To Back

04:21 min | 1 d ago

Interview with Franky Wah

"Crewman, how're you doing first of all? Do you know what my I'm really really good. Things happening right now ace and downs weekend radio one this week in which I'm performing fall, which is a privileged coming on that line hopeful amongst call call some black coffee and. Full TAT silo just be amongst those names is incredible and the we've just announced at greenfields? Twenty one. And I've been announced. You know was her. Headliners. Along with every wanted, you can imagine from chess those who Pete Tong to by SAP. So it's got gotta be a critical viewing Yeah Yup definitely Gino. I don't think I'll ever get used to it. So see my name. In with all all the people that you aspire to be as big as good as i. certainly don't think I'll ever get used to it so. Good though man I think if you ever do start to get used her, that's maybe awarding side. I think. So I think so and I think that my my opinion on the always will I do genuinely believe it will stay. The same as were the finish line right from the start and not just we do this for the logo passion. So nothing should change on along the road rarely should shouldn't. Yes. No, you're absolutely right I mean I think that's a great attitude to have from the outset of it. I mean it's interesting hearing you talk about the the BBC weekend and all that because I think you know here in America that's like that's a reference. I think a lot of Americans, don't really have because we don't have an entity like BBC radio Y. Yeah Yeah especially for for what we do for dance music you know yeah and did you did you grow up listening to radio? One? Absolutely an Adams. Things have happened this year like I was. Really just locked into animal and eight. Song. I mean now, Daddy Howard EMESA. Jaren. Everyone bought. Impede Song you know he is a house music royalty isn't a you now the name goes back as far as you can kinda remember I've even got my cousin is easy. Even sent me that just this week actually. So all tape recordings of Pete Pete Tong sets I think from around ninety three, ninety goal which I'm gonNA check our on a cassette player next week I'm GonNa never really saw dig insulin see see what we daily. I mean, I was two years old then. bought you know certain things I add certain aspirations and dreams and goals when South is. This journey and A site. Initially, it was just a guess on played by somewhere addy Michael and nine this year I've been Pete, Songs Future Star and managed the anti nights always record in the world and and he's shooting of the week and. I don't know you. Now you're a producer and DJ cell. He try and comprehend you kind of call. It just doesn't sink any. He's a great feeling. Yeah. It's really really strange when people you've kind of looked up to as almost like it's almost like they're not even human, right? It's like these sort of icons and then when you sort of end up equalizing with them or getting in contact with them or even just them noticing what you're doing it is a really strange moment is is just said, no, you name and so of acknowledged aries and crazy feelin and then. I feel like for you you're probably getting to the point now where people are starting to look at you that way have you had. I wasn't gonNA say now you. Hike. Things happen now. Certain things that they say that don't even realize the saying it makes you wounded what sort of experiences that may have had over people that are in your position because i. What you so nice you. Know why? Yeah. Why would it be any different? You.

Pete Pete Tong Daddy Howard Emesa America Greenfields BBC Chess SAP Producer Pete Michael
Just one officer indicted in Breonna Taylor case.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:36 min | 6 d ago

Just one officer indicted in Breonna Taylor case.

"Kentucky Grand Jury on Wednesday, indicted a single former police officer for shooting into neighbouring apartments but did not move forward with charges against any offices for their role in Briana Taylor's death. The jury announced that fired officer Brett Hankinson was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid of Thomas home on the night of March thirteen. Immediately. After the announcement people were expressing frustration that the grand jury did not do more justice has not been served tweeted, Linda, saceur of until freedom a group that has pushed for changes in the case, rise up all across this country everywhere rise up for Briana. Taylor, she said attorney Ben Crump who's representing Taylor's family tweeted that the chargers involved nothing for the murder of Brianna Taylor this is outrageous and offensive he said. A news conference State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said. And the two other officers who entered Taylor's apartment announce themselves before entering the apartment and did not use a no knock warrant according to Kentucky Law the use of force by the offices was justified to protect themselves this justification Baas from pursuing criminal charges and miss. Brianna Taylor's death. A Republican Cameron is the states first black state attorney general and protege of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who has been tapped. By some as he's heir apparent, his was also one of twenty names on President Donald Trump's list to fill a few chess supreme court vacancy Brianna Taylor an emergency medical worker was shot multiple times by officers who entered her home using a no knock warrant during a narcotics investigation the warrants us to search her home was connected to a suspect who did not live there and no drugs were found inside. Protesters across the country have demanded justice for Taylor and other black people killed by police in recent months the release date in late May of nine one, one call by Taylor's boyfriend marked the beginning of days of protests fueled by her shooting and the violent death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis on May twenty fifth last night amid protests in major cities across the US. The Louisville Metro Police Department confirmed that two of their offices had been shot during the protests.

Brianna Taylor Louisville Metro Police Depart Attorney Officer Daniel Cameron Mitch Mcconnell Kentucky Brett Hankinson Briana Donald Trump Endangerment Ben Crump George Floyd Minneapolis Thomas Linda United States Baas Kentucky Law
Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose at US Supreme Court

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:56 sec | 6 d ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose at US Supreme Court

"Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lying in repose at the Supreme Court from member station W. AM You Daniela Chazz, Low reports, Mourners felt a personal connection. Mourners poured in from across the country 21 year old college student Riley Busby says she traveled three hours from Williamsburg, Virginia, to walk past Ginsberg's casket. Then, Busby said across the street from the high court for hours, even though it's cut in Sicily. It feels like what I leave. She's gone and we've lost her. When it was spend as much time as I can write here with one of my heroes. Many of those who came to remember the late justice were masks bearing pictures of Ginsberg's face, and some carried flowers and posters that justice will lie in repose again Thursday at the court, and on Friday, she will be the first woman to lie in state at the U. S. Capitol. For NPR News. I'm Daniella Chess Bow in Washington Kentucky

Daniela Chazz Riley Busby Ginsberg Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg Williamsburg Npr News Sicily Washington Kentucky Virginia U. S. Capitol
UK leader: Britain at “perilous turning point,” scraps back-to-work drive, tightens restrictions amid virus resurgence

BBC Newshour

01:17 min | Last week

UK leader: Britain at “perilous turning point,” scraps back-to-work drive, tightens restrictions amid virus resurgence

"News The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced a series of new Corona virus restrictions for England, saying the country had reached a perilous turning point. In an address to Parliament, he said employees who didn't need to be at their workplaces should work from home. He's introduced 10 P.m. curfew for bars, pubs and restaurants and restricted the hospitality industry to providing only table service or takeaways. This is the moment when we must act. If we can curb the number of daily infections on DH, reduce the reproduction rate toe one Then we can save lives protected in a chess and the most vulnerable and shelter the economy from the far stoner and more costly measures that would inevitably become necessary later on, So we're acting On the principle that a stitch in time saves nine leader of Britain's main opposition Labour Party says the government has lost control of the Corona virus crisis. So kiss. Thomas said the governing conservatives had neglected public services and failed to prepare for the pandemic on the testing system had collapsed just when it was needed. Most He said he supported reasonable measures to protect lives. But a second national lock down would be a sign of government

Boris Johnson Prime Minister Thomas Parliament Labour Party England Stoner Britain
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | Last week

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
Chicago Police Host Party for 'Not Before My Parents' Anniversary

WBBM Morning News

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Chicago Police Host Party for 'Not Before My Parents' Anniversary

"Party was held outside a police station in Chicago South side last night to celebrate the third anniversary of the program is in the game to bring police and young people together Theme party outside the seventh Police district on 63rd near Loomis was for a program called Not before my parents, which has brought police officers in youth in the community together to play chess. Founder Radial Lacey says the program not only builds bombs between officers and youth, but it also teaches both think before they act, But your mind is in a strategic method of thinking so everyone would think before we react used in the community, as well as a police officer is here my tooth where they could think Lacey says the chess program increases trust makes the community safer and develops understanding that can reduce tensions that lead to violent encounters between police and the community.

Radial Lacey Officer Party Loomis Chicago South Founder
COVID-19 Transmission is Solvable

Solvable

06:35 min | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 Transmission is Solvable

"I wanted to star. With a really dumb obvious question, which is, can you describe to me all the ways in which you can look for the presence of virus that you would be? Well, that's not an obvious question at all. Within each virus viruses just like. Any other thing they have a genetic code, and then they have a bunch of proteins and the genetic code of a virus is Arnie, which is akin to a human's DNA, and so the same way that you could do a forensic investigation of a crime scene and use DNA defined if there was a human specific human at the crime scene, you can do a forensic investigation to look for Ra to know if there was an inside of a person so. That's one way and that's this tool that these molecular tools that we call PCR, and then there's a different way instead of using the genetic makeup and the Arna to look for the virus. In this case, you could actually look for the proteins that make up the virus and that's where these antigen tests really shine. So you can either look for the genetic code or you could look for the proteins I like to call these rapid antigen tests, transmission indicating tests. There's one other major way which is a quickly and that's to. Look for the immunological response to the virus, because humans are good at making immune response to viruses. So it's a different way and that's antibody based detection but that's I put it in a whole different category because it usually comes after infection. Yeah. So the first way looking for the aren a is the kind of gold standard that's exactly right and so if I go to the hospital and get a today, get a Cova test, the looking for giving me the using to see if I have fires in my system that's right and what's the cheapest that a PC tests could produce result that actual price of tests can be done for about six bucks maybe. Even less so it can be really cheap, but the differences, the whole infrastructure around PCR test they have to be done in labs. So you have logistics of transport you have all of the people working in the lab robots and and so generally, it really drives the cost up and as we've seen the average test costs anywhere from thirty dollars at the absolute low end up to one hundred and fifty dollars for some labs that are charging in contrast be CR, two antigen tests. How do engine chess? What do they look like? What's their cost in time profile they? They look like a pregnancy test and they work like a pregnancy test actually they can be made. A little piece of paper generally speaking. You put some of the sample whether that be some swab that's been mixed with some saline solution or saliva onto a paper strip, and it shows up with a line turns either for example, red if it's positive or blue, it's negative and those can be made in the in huge numbers. They don't require instruments they don't usually require. There's a few on the market right now that to get the. Sensitivity at the FDA wanted they have some instrumentation associated but in reality, these are used for malaria strep for all these different infections they've been around for very long time and they can be done just on a piece of paper and five minutes and they could get down to you can produce them for fractions of a dollar and they might be sold to the public or built by the government for. A dollar apiece or something along those lines. So you're you've been a the perhaps the leading public proponent public health proponent of. Using Antigen, tests much more broadly to fight this. Derek and I wanted to the first time I. Heard you give this argument you convince me about two minutes. And I still don't understand why why don't we have this system because I can imagine a world where if it's this if they're cheaper easy, then you know every kid before they went to school in the morning. Would take one of these fifty cents or one dollar tests, and if they were positive, they would say home in their negative we would know that could go to school like. If, I want to go to a restaurant, why can't I just sat stand investable the restaurant take test and wait for my response and if I'M If I'm negative I get to go to the restaurant it just strikes me as. This is a way to get going again. Why are we not doing this? Can you explain that I can I have a few theories I. mean they're not just theories. They're they're. In the middle of this. So these tests because of this whole sensitivity issue early in March or really in January the world decided that was the gold standard for these tests and I don't think and I that this will maybe come. We'll come across wrong for some people but there hasn't been enough thought place into what exactly does the PR test mean, and is it the right gold standard? The only pathway that we have to evaluate tests like this in the United States are medical diagnostic pathways there pathways designed specifically to ensure that a physician like a detective is getting all of the information they need to diagnose a sick person in front of them so it's really been. First and foremost a regulatory hurdle we have so devalued and de funded public health across our country and really across the world. That we actually didn't, we don't have a regulatory pathway to approve test whose primary objective is is one of stopping an epidemic verses one of diagnosing sick person and that has really led. That's everything up all of the companies that could be producing these these really rapid tests in the millions and millions they have been sitting on these tests trying to hone them trying to get them just a little bit better just a little bit better so that the so that they can pass FDA standards as a medical diagnostic. It's not just slowing down their approval and getting them out to the public. It's actually bottle necking the company's into creating tests that are not going to be as scalable because they're having to use more expensive reagents they're starting to put them with instruments and package them more. They have to actually become more expensive, highly manufactured tests. When in reality, they're just these little pieces of paper. That if we can do the cheap version of they can be made very fast, but they just won't get through the FDA at the moment

FDA Arnie RA Cova Malaria United States Derek Government
An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

Optimal Living Daily

06:57 min | 2 weeks ago

An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

"An excerpt from the book flirting with darkness. Ben. Carson. Weapon number three, the magic number of greatness. I got to a point in my struggle with depression where something needed needed to change must suffering. So badly, I finally decided to do something about it. The ten thousand hour rule saved my life. His Book Outliers Malcolm Glad well demonstrated that to be truly greeted anything. You have to put in ten thousand hours of practice. People such as world chess champion Bobby. Fischer businessman Bill Joy, and IBM founder Bill Gates are among the many examples. Glad. While gives of people who excelled because they accelerated they focused and worked hard and gave at least ten thousand hours to becoming the best at what they did. Glad will show that whether you want to be a fiction writer or master criminal. Hockey player or a pianist ten thousand hours was the magic number of greatness. Bent my mind to that goal is a writer Manspeaker. A resolved to stop wasting my energies, processing psychological trauma and to go on a diametrically opposed direction. Instead of disappearing over why dreams weren't coming to pass, I decided to commit myself to working my fingers to the bone to ensure they did. Psychologists, John Hayes quote looked at how long it took the best composers of all time to create their first grey work. He found that nobody including Mozarts was a child prodigy had produced a piece of work of any significance until about ten years after they had I, taken music no amount of innate talent even in a field of genius such as music could overcome the years of practice necessary to Korea work someone may be talented. They may be lucky but they still have to go through ten years of practice in order to become a master and quote. When Churchill came to power during World War Two he said this as he was being inaugurated into office as prime. Minister quote. I. Offer you nothing save blood, toil tears, and sweat and quo. Lecture Chill Ready to go to battle anew, the path will be difficult PROC- ready to claim own finest hour. Getting better stars, which is getting off your tuition in doing something. So I did. My goal was to become a writer and a speaker put in the needed hours. My nearly worked myself to death, but it was infinitely better than brooding found the effort. Cathartic in fulfilling my spirit's began to lift. I figured I had two options number one either get discouraged that my dreams were not coming pass or number to spend the effort of getting prepared for when they did. Legendary preacher Charles spurgeon advised students to stop worrying about when they would get their shot at speaking and concentrate instead on their ability, and they'll let God take the opportunity in other words quit fretting over the how and focus on the what I took these words to heart and focused on my skill set as I improved my craft, our English word amateur comes from a French Italian an line route which means to love an obvious works when he loves the process and it feels good a professional is someone who worked seven days a week whether he feels like it or not. Today. My TV show hope generation is on twenty different networks more than one hundred and eighty countries and radio shows heard on more than four hundred stations daily. I get to speak in stadiums and arenas. My quote unquote overnight success came through hours of hard work. How you'll spend your ten thousand hours may be different from how I spend mind but you'll find as I did a clear focus and a way of getting off the existential treadmill of despair, transform your life but the age of twenty one, the average American has put ten thousand hours of practice into computer and video games when I use those hours for something more productive. How hard you hustle in the darkness determines how brightly you shine in the spotlight. To prepare for speaking to people I got really good at lecturing my furniture. My chairs were my captive audience I remember that Billy Graham. One said he got his start by preaching to alligators before he preached in stadiums. You have to start with a small stuff and work your way up. So I took every opportunity that presented itself. I spoke to classes of little kids and homeless shelters at old folks, homes, and to student clubs I volunteered to take the opportunities. Others turned down, I got lots of practice. When other speakers turned an organization or church down my said, yes I did this I several years Only the small minded person will refuse the small task for me if I had an audience of four people those enough to get some more practice to put in some more hours toward my ten thousand our goal. Jesus said that if you're faithful and a few small things, you'll be given responsibility over bigger ones Matthew Twenty five that sound good to me. Yes sometimes I did feel like surface the tragic here of Greek mythology who had to roll a boulder of a hill only to see roll back down then roll it back up again only for it to roll back down again repeatedly, I'll stubborn in my pursuit it was a great weapon against despair to keep working in spite of how I felt, which puts me in the mind of a scene from Tolkien's the Lord of the Rings in the First Book of that trilogy the Fellowship of the Ring, a band of warriors is commission travel to the ends of the Earth to destroy the evil ring of power by casting it into mount doom. During their long journey. Gandalf who was their leader was thought to be killed in the minds of Maurya in response airborne stepped up to lead the band in his stead amid his grief and despair he cried out farewell Gandalf what hope have we with you then he turned to the fellowship and said, we must do without hope let us gird ourselves and weep no more come. We have a long road. Like that trek to mount doom healing is usually a long journey. We normally don't start feeling better overnight sometimes, we must go on when we feel absolutely no hope. Our quest leads down a winding path and his sometimes fraught with trolls and Goblins and all manner of Dr Treasures. But psychological heroism is possible in such journey is were taking like Eric Gordon Frodo my set my foot upon my own path out of depression I gave them my flirtation with darkness and began to tread the road toward a grand purpose and it worked after many many years. The Dreams I had begun to despair finally came true new ones came into sight, but it all began by putting one foot in front of the other. If you allow yourself to just sit around and partly catatonic state stuffing yourself with junk food is a form of therapy and watching callous hours of television. You'll probably never start feeling better. But I. Tell You that you get off the couch and venture into the world to do something toward your goals. Things will start to change in your heart and mind if you pull yourself out of bed and get going on your dreams, that's how you'll will begin the journey to healing your broken spirit.

Writer Depression Mount Doom Gandalf Carson Charles Spurgeon Bill Gates Korea Billy Graham Hockey Dr Treasures Bobby Eric Gordon Frodo John Hayes Jesus Mozarts Bill Joy Churchill IBM
China closing the "cyber gap" with USA

Risky Business

03:10 min | 3 weeks ago

China closing the "cyber gap" with USA

"Work. This is a write up of research that came out of Harvard's Belfer Center looking really at which countries have their cyber together right and the you know the old understanding that the US is number one and then China is a distant second well, not so distant anymore by the looks of things. Yeah. Always the eater pulling together information about what the capabilities, all of nation actors. Are is pretty difficult thing because it's Sarah kind of secret and they went through the research into this process of identifying you know what are the metrics by which we can judge maturity of these programs in individual countries how effective that capability, what kind of things they do any and built a bunch of Matrix to try and actually put some structure around us and then be able to use open source information and other. Stuff access to to be able to put things together on right at end? Yeah. It's quite an interesting set of work in USA does come out number one still in their assessment, but you know the gap between the US and China is very, very small possible. So there's a bunch of other actors on the that you know. Maybe people don't necessarily think about Switzerland for example, is in the top team his Damn Suedes? Yeah. It was a bunch of bunch of people you wouldn't necessarily expect. But also you know looks at the you know the maturity of the commercial sector of the Swiss. CRYPTO. I mean, that's that's something to point out to right like these rankings dissed not just on offensive capability. It looks offense defense industry the whole the whole Cyber Shebang. Yeah and of course, it makes sense just looking at trying to of capabilities in terms of domestic. Commercial Operations Right I mean, they've got such a lot of expertise manufacturing hardware building software. You know lots of high tech industry make sense there feeds into a general overall capability as well. But yeah, you know the the so much. Just GonNa Finger in the air staff and it's nice to see you know in the analysis that we know. So it's not see air research is trying to take a structured approach and. The data conner looks it kind of looks like what you expect. You know when they when they go. Yeah. That seems believable which is always a good sniff test you know. Wonkery can sometimes be a bit kind of an water. Where's this actually looks pretty in line with EC Singapore. UC. Vietnam North Koreans Kinda lines up. Yeah. It does and I don't know what this means for our old concepts around symmetry when you really looking at the most powerful countries still being the most powerful in this ranking right? Like wasn't this supposed to be all about symmetry is Iran's program evidence of the CYB. Is, being isometric I dunno anymore. Well, yeah. I mean, know the world's changed it's a little. It's a much more complicated than new onset of things I'm speaking reminiscing these capabilities exercised in a more you know the you know hellenistic geopolitical way not just you know we're using hacking in isolation I was seeing these things done to further national goals and in the context of. The trade stuff, for example, but between China and the US as chess pieces in logic aims which is. You know that changes the traditional kind of take Nicole asymmetry to you know much more balanced

USA China Sarah Kind Switzerland Harvard Belfer Center CYB Ec Singapore Iran Conner Nicole Wonkery UC
Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

TED Talks Daily

05:03 min | Last month

Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

"Hi. I'm Elise Hugh. And you're listening to Ted talks daily today's talk features really fascinating research that cuts us all some slack. What I mean is it turns out you can be a late bloomer in your chosen sport or skill or specialty, and it's actually better for you in a lot of ways. The talk is journalist David Epstein at Ted Ex Manchester in twenty twenty. So I'd like to talk about the development of human potential and I'd like to start with maybe the most impactful modern story of development. Many of you here have probably heard of the ten thousand dollars rule maybe you even model your own life after it. Basically, it's the idea that the become great anything takes ten thousand hours of focused practice. So. You'd better get started as early as possible. The poster child for this story is Tiger Woods. Father Famously, gave him a putter when he was seven months old at ten months, he started imitating his father's swing. At to, you can go on Youtube and see him on national television fast forward to the age of twenty one he's the greatest Golfer in the world's quintessential ten thousand dollars story. Another that features a number of bestselling books is that of the three Polgar sisters whose father decided to teach them chests in a very technical manner from a very early age and really wanted to show that with a head start and focused practice. Any child could become a genius in anything, and in fact, two of his daughters went onto become grandmaster chess players. So, when I became the Science Writer at sports illustrated magazine I got curious if this ten thousand hours rules correct then we should see that elite athletes get a headstart in so-called deliberate practice. This is coached air correction focus practice not just playing around, and in fact, when scientists study lead athletes, they see that they spend more time in deliberate practice not a big surprise. When they actually track athletes over the course of their development, the future leads actually spend less time early on in delivered practice in their eventual sport they to have what scientists call a sampling period where they try a variety of physical activities. They gain broad general skills they learned about their interests and abilities and delays specializing until later than peers who plateau at lower levels. And so when I saw that said, Gosh that doesn't really comport with the ten thousand hours rule does it. So I started to wonder about other domains that we associate with obligatory early specialization like music. Turns out the patterns often similar. Research from a world class, Music Academy, and what I want to draw your attention to is the exceptional musicians didn't start spending more time into practice than the average musicians. Until Third Instrument, they tended to have a sampling period. Even musicians we think of is famously precocious like Yo, Yo Ma he sampling period he just went through it more rapidly than most musicians do. Nonetheless, this research almost entirely ignored and much more impactful is the first page of the Book Battle Hymn of the Tiger mother where the author recounts assigning her daughter Violin. Nobody seems remember the part later in the book where her daughter turns her and says, you picked it not me and largely quits. So having seen this sort of surprising pattern in sports and music. I started to wonder about domains that affect and more people like education and economists found a natural experiment in the Higher Ed Systems of England and Scotland in the period studied, the systems were very similar except in England students had to specialize in their mid teen years to pick a specific course of study to apply tours in Scotland they could keep trying things in university if they wanted to and his question was who wins the trade off the early or the late specializes and he saw that the early specializes jump out to an income. Lead because they have more domain specific skills, the late specializes get to try more different things and when they do pick, they have better fit or what economists call match quality, and so their growth rates are faster by six years out erase that income gap. Meanwhile, the earliest specializes start quitting their career tracks in much higher numbers essentially because they were made to choose. So early that they more often made choices. So the late specializes lose in the short term and win in the long run. I think if we thought about career choice like dating, we might not pressure people to settle down quite so quickly. So this interested seeing this pattern again in exploring a developmental backgrounds of people whose work I had long admired like Duke Ellington who shunned music lessons as a kid to focus on baseball and painting and drawing or Mario Mir's economy who wasn't interested in math is a girl dreamed of becoming a novelist and went on to become the first and so far only woman to win the fields medal the most prestigious prize in the world in Math Vincent Van Gogh had five different careers, each of which he deemed his true calling before flaming out spectacularly, and in his late twenty s picked up a book called the guide to the ABC's of drawing. That worked out. Okay Claude Shannon was an electrical engineer at the University of Michigan who took a philosophy course just to fulfill a requirement and in it, he learned about a near century old system of logic or was true and false statements could be coded as ones and zeroes in solved like math problems. This led to the development of Binary Code, which underlies all of our digital computers today.

Ted Ex Manchester Scotland Elise Hugh Tiger Woods Math Vincent Van Gogh Youtube David Epstein Sports Illustrated Magazine Claude Shannon Duke Ellington Third Instrument Higher Ed Systems Of England Music Academy University Of Michigan ABC Writer Mario Mir Engineer England
Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should  Just Keep Going

Good Life Project

06:47 min | Last month

Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should Just Keep Going

"I believe in curiosity I just I. Just think that we can't do anything without it early and just asking people obey the is basically a version of empathy. Enemy. Empathizing with WHO people are and what they do over were you the curious kid like is this something that's been part of your life or somebody who cultivated? Yeah. I mean. I think the circumstances of my life you know being born in Iran and then moving here as young immigrants in the eighties where Iran was like enemy enemy number one if you recall. And like Iran Russia which kind of back there again I kind of felt that like you know I was so curious about this world is culture and I think that's kind of where it started also you know It's crazy. It was crazy. My parents don't speak any the my spirit's English is not great. The they came here when they were forty and fifty. The I mean it's not like they. You know I'm thirty seven. So like imagining myself in three years time taking all of an IV and Chrissy and saying, Hey, well, going to move to China and we're GONNA make this. We're going to make life better in China as a show I mean that's All you can be as curious I. Guess. Yeah. I guess. So how so how old were you when you actually let on? Well, we laughed Iran you know it's hard to tell because at time here was crazy there was a war happening and I think a lot of you especially you a bit younger don't don't really remember that whole window of of our history and our relationship with Sir Yeah, the Middle East Yeah. Yeah it's complicated. It's long and it's GonNa either bore fascinate all of you guys. But the the the the the truth is we you know it's it's. It's it's hard to talk about because there's so many levels to like how crazy it is. One is my mom was married to my dad at the age of thirteen. My mom was thirteen Wendo arranged marriage. My mom is pretty standard. You know it was on the outs in that time period. Yeah. But my parent, my mom's mom was a single mom she was the youngest you know she couldn't make she couldn't make it happen, and so she had to like you know she had to like give I, guess her her daughter La youngest daughter away and so then my dad, my dad's they were more religious than my mom's side was and so. They got arranged. My mom had her first kid at fifteen years old her second kid at sixteen and Arthur kid eighteen, and then had me when she was thirty five. So my siblings are seventeen eighteen in. I'm sorry. Yes. Some teen eighteen basically twenty years than me. So, and then and then the revolution hit seventy nine. And then a war hit right after that because Saddam invaded with you know and then got the support of the United States. You know because we of the Iranian situation and then we were in a war. And so everyone was closed inside as is bombings happening all over Tehran all over the border, and so we were indoors and and you know when when people get doors and there's a lot of fear in the air of uncertainty, you procreate you know and so the baby boom in Iran happened at that moment in seventy nine to eighty five, where like sixty percent of Iranian. Population right now in Iran is under the age of forty. Fascinating you walk down the street and everyone's young. So anyway and then and then. CRAZILY my brother. My oldest brother was sixteen. When he graduated high school in Iran, his name is Amir And then he went to A. He got accepted to a school in. CHICAGO. Right. When he was sixteen. So sixteen twentyish he's in Chicago, ish issue like something like that, and then the revolution hit. And then my brother was like should I come back and. My parents were like you're never coming back here will come to you. And then in that time period. My. Youngest my brother that's closest to me who seventeen his name is. Oh, mead omen was drafted in the Iran Iraq war. And fought three years in that war. With a couple of my cousins who are who are who have passed away who died in that war one of them, which data that were, and then my brother was in war my sister was in the middle there. I was just born. We got the F out of town and we went we went as far as my dad's connections and money and. You know and you know connections could could could take you in that was Dubai. We've got to Dubai who lived in the Arab Emirates and we were there for off and on for about five years and then and then we and then you know a long period of time you know no one heard it from my brother was fight in the war. And trying to and trying to try to like move three pieces ahead while also like making sure the pieces back here it's a chess game you know and and dangerous one. And then my dad then. We had were that Amigos live. We went back to Iran. Might he got back? He was no nine, hundred twenty you know fought three years in a war in a city called Oh mead his name is omitted, which means hope and wherever like was slaughtered murdered and died because it was a brutal war brutal war and he he's a twenty year old brainwashed you know. PTSD. Kid. And in that time period as we're figuring out to go back to Dubai and come back, my sister falls in love. Falls in love with the guy and and then that made things tricky and then, and then we all laughed and my sister stay. So I- sister got the states in two thousand and three we left in eighty five. So An and then we came to the states and again you know the analogy that the Chinese like us like you and me and you taking your family and your son going to China or whatever language that you don't know our culture, the No, and you're like, this is the best news for us. Now you know you're GonNa, you're not going to be easy and so in all of that, you just get you know a a sense of like the world in a very kind of complicated way. A very young age and and not only do they not speak the language they don't know what? Christmases. They don't know what Hanukkah is. They don't have any idea why people are going to church all the time. They have no clue why the cars are this way they don't know why the food is patching. There's nothing that is familiar. There's nothing that you can empathize with as as an Iranian living in the states and being like I know this thing and so in all that you are learning rapidly. You know a very drastic way and so that curiosity might have had something to do with it. I'm not really sure

Iran Dubai China Amir And Sir Yeah Chicago Wendo Middle East Ptsd Chrissy United States Arab Emirates Saddam Arthur Tehran Russia Iraq
Chess Olympiad: India and Russia both get gold after controversial final

NPR News Now

00:20 sec | Last month

Chess Olympiad: India and Russia both get gold after controversial final

"The and Russia competed in today's final of the first ever online Chess Olympiad both have been declared winners and awarded with gold medals. The call was made after determining that two Indian players lost their Internet connection and a global Internet outage during the final

Russia
Free Market Arguments against Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:23 min | Last month

Free Market Arguments against Medicare for All

"Today we have a really special guest professor Gerald, Freedman here known as Jerry. Last night Jerry debated sally pipes the CEO of Pacific Research, Institute. A known well known. And well-sited single payer opponent. At the Soho Forum on the question of whether the in nineteen pandemic makes it all the more urgent for the US to install a system of Medicare for all and I would say he killed it Jerry didn't you kill it? Thank you. As the conversation turned out Kobe was mostly used as a hook to return to the sort of long debate that we're having over Medicare for all I think. Other. Libertarian think tanks have also done for the same question. And also invited sally pipe she's sort of like a recurring figure so it was really interesting to me because. As a Medicare for all has has really picked up steam since Bernie Sanders run in two, thousand, sixteen or two thousand fifteen. We've. Really focused on dissecting and debunking the centre-left arguments against Medicare for all that have really sort of cropped up with the new enthusiasm for Medicare for all the past couple of years. And we've actually really stopped addressing right wing arguments for the time being as as we focus on organizing Democrats. And so Jerry was interesting for me to see. An argument or a conversation with a true sort of free market opponent of single payer healthcare and so I just want to kick things off by asking which of these like conservative or more free market arguments against single payer healthcare. Do you find to be the most compelling? Well the most compelling as long as we leave the most and because none of them are very compelling. I mean if you come down to it that arguments really based on a fantasy theory where a free market could happen in healthcare, which is wrong. But, free market competition in healthcare would promote. Efficient delivery of services and only the services that people want it. These arguments make no allowance. People can't afford it people who lack information for the public benefit that we all get when other people get healthcare. So. Yeah. Yeah. I mean as an economist I love studying free market economics. It's fun when I was young I used to play chess since analogous and it has about as much to do with the real economy as chess has to do with Martin Luther Nothing. So yeah. I mean I I don't find that arguments compelling but the most compelling I guess would be that. Well maybe you get some more efficiency. You know if. Hospitals had more pressure to find ways to deliver healthcare better but I don't I don't think they're really would really that way. So. It's not a sometimes I think that. They keep bringing sally pipes because they can't find anyone else to make this argument. But Jerry I mean she's making ultimately an economics argument against for all and for a pure kind of market based system and healthcare. Is there any chunk of the economics profession that actually believes a free market works in healthcare or is she really just a total fringe element here? I think she's pretty much on the French. That is. feeling among economists, most of whom brought up in this free market. fantasy. but there is a strong feeling that Oh God. If we made healthcare free at the point of service doing words, copays, deductibles, that would be some gigantic increase in demand for healthcare. As if healthcare's is like skiing, if I could ski for free as if we don't have this and all the other countries, right? Yeah Yeah I mean it's completely. I mean Americans love to not pay attention to the experience of other. Solly pipes is Canadian and clearly does not like the Canadian healthcare system for whatever reason Y- she restricts itself to the United States Canada and occasionally the UK. She's almost nothing to say about the rest of the world I thought that was kind of curious. In how books and in in debate yesterday she's acting like an American except. She recognized the candidates separate country. Yeah. But you know even if there was some huge upsurge demand. That might be an issue for financing and costing out of a program. But. Maybe. There'd be some benefit if more people could get

Medicare Jerry United States Freedman Bernie Sanders Kobe Pacific Research Professor CEO Sally Skiing Solly Pipes Gerald Martin Luther UK Canada
Facebook Dialogue Platform with Stephen Roller

Software Engineering Daily

15:02 min | Last month

Facebook Dialogue Platform with Stephen Roller

"Stephen Roller welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. You work on dialogue research at facebook dialogue research. I. Think of as a better way of describing chat bots. So I may refer to chat bots and Dialogue Research interchangeably during this episode. Why are chat bots useful? I think it's a longstanding dream in the field of artificial intelligence and computer science. Right? We've we've always had the dream of what if I just talked to my computer like I talked to other people. In converse with them, they would know what are my intentions? Why am I asking them this? What can they do to make my life better or help me along and you know? Programming is fun I love programming, but you know it'd be nice to just communicate with. Computers as well. And what about you? Personally, why are you personally interested in chat bots? Have you pursued this line of work of of all the different kinds of computer science research you could be doing? Yeah. You know I sort of stumbled into this area join fair after my phd where I did work in natural language processing but my my work, my background work was like a little bit more linguistically oriented focused on like the meanings of words a little bit more like what can computers just about language rather than how do we teach computers to understand language? And so you know when I joined. Fair. I was looking for for projects to join projects to collaborate on. So I gave dialogue a shot and it turns out to be a really great ren for me a mix of novel research using using the greatest and latest neural networking and machine learning techniques as well as a bunch of interesting software engineering problems and opportunities for Staley and things like this. What are the domains in which conversational agents or chat bots are actually useful today? What are the places where they're useful versus the places where they're not so useful? Meaning like, what's the? What did they do major? We've actually conquered rather than the ones we're stumbling. Yeah I think you know obviously, you've seen a wave of digital assistance and I think that work is very exciting. a lot of what we focused on in dial in par lay in the dialogue research at facebook is on open domain chat bots, which are chat bots that can talk to you about like literally anything and they're usually not focused on. Accomplishing tasks for you rather like the goal is just to have a conversation with you about anything for as long as possible. So that's primarily where we work and I think we've seen a lot of exciting advances over the past couple years to where I think if you were to try some of these newer chat bots that have come out in the past year you, you'd probably be really impressed with like Oh. Wow. This was further than I. Expect. So I think you see commercially is a lot of digital assistants a lot of success in this a lot of customer service type things when I'm really excited about when I think we've you know where things have made big strides in an big strides in the past year is on these open domain chat bots can actually talk to you about anything. Really so as in I can sit down with a chap today and say, Hey, what's the weather and what is this spot on my skin and recommend me a restaurant that looks appealing. I can do I can ask all of these things of a chat bot today. Yeah. I would put those still in the category of like task oriented Tech Chat bots where there's like some goal in mind like you know answering medical questions or tell me about the. Weather when I really tend to work on and what I'm excited about is these chat bots right so rather instead you might ask what's your favorite chess move and it might go into into detail about like what's its favorite move and why that is or what's your opinion of the fall of the Roman. Empire let's let's debate that. So it's it's it's less about you know what can you do for Maine and more about like let's enjoy the experience together. So, can you give a few more descriptions of what a general purpose chat Bot would be doing? Yeah I think the end game here either. You know wear a true general purpose chapman should do both of these things right? Like if I ask it to to. But Mia, calendar and by then it should absolutely help me out with that where I focused my research is the social part. and. So I think we should see a mix of. The box that we've been developing really focused on I'm having a few different behaviors that I don't think you tend to see any sort of assistant on type chat bots they have consistent persona so they'll have like personalities like. I love basketball or I have. Friends in in the tech industry or something like this, and they can use this information like. Consistently referred to it. You know one of the other attributes that chat bots working on developing and believe Ms really important is empathy bright. So a chat Bot should understand you know as as it's talking with you, what's your mental state like how are you feeling and respond emotionally appropriately to that so no if you say something like my just ran away, you know the chat bots should restall on appropriately with something like, oh, I'm really sorry to hear that have. You say something like I just got a promotion than the Chat Bot should respond Oh. That's great to hear. Congratulations. So responding emotionally appropriately is a really important characteristic of a of an open domain chap on the last one is general knowledge. So you know I think when people talk to to chat bots, they expected to know things about the world some of that's encyclopedia some of its common commonsense reasoning but you know if I ask what's the tallest building in America? You know I sort of expected to be able to have this have this information available to it and be able to answer some questions like that or even integrate this information in in common and common dialogue just oh by the way you know what's what's interesting or you know funny story about that sort of thinks. So consistent personality empathy and a knowledge about the world. These are all things. I think are really important in general demand. You know Geno Purpose Chat Bot. Empathy you mentioned empathy s one of these things that requires some maintenance of context as to what is going on in the conversation. The Chat Bot needs to be able to acknowledge the perhaps sad state or happy state of the person. It's Inter locating with tell me about context how does a Chat Bot retain and understand context in a conversation? Yeah there's a few different ways that people go about it. So one of the more classic ways that people will do and approaches that people will take is they'll do something off dialogue state tracking. So you have like some information about the dialogue like, Oh, the users asking about a restaurant and they wanted to be on fifth street right and you'll have this as some sort of state. That you could do say like some sort of database query about and help them then like when you're doing dialogue research or billion Chapa, the task becomes a lot of like keeping track of that state and updating that state as the conversation goes on. The way that we often approach it is a much more like role neural network fashion. So we just like input all the dialogue context all history as one big stream. You know sort of same person. One said this person to says that person one said this person to said back? What do you say next? So we just treat things as as raw strings and habit. Input that in the model has to figure out Oh, what do we do with fat? How do I respond? Who said what all this has to be from scratch? I'd like to get into. A little bit more of a conversation about facebook. So if you imagined facebook in five years, what are the tasks that you envision dialogue models fulfilling for facebook? That's an excellent question I. Think you know there's all sorts of places where we're dialogue can be helpful to our users. We already have this product called portal. which is a a really excellent product lets you make video calls with people. In. One of the things you can you can do, you can already say like hey. You know call mom. And it starts dialing up on. And that super? Nice, you know some of the other things might be no. As I might have an assistant on on Messenger that that's helping me keep track of what's going what's going on with my friends. You know I might say a assistant you know where the latest updates on my friends and they could. Integrate that information. And you know look through my my news feed for me and say, Oh, Hey, your friend Jim has new photo. He got married right Oh that'd be really cool. So, I think there's a lot of places for for dialogue to be part of FACEBOOK PRODUCTS You work on par lay, which is spelled P. A. R. L. A.. I. What Is Parlay? Parlay is a platform for doing dialogue research. It's an open source platform. It's gotten over one hundred contributors and it's it's got you would need to do to dialogue research so whether that's a collect data set or I want to train a new model, and there's all these data sets out there and I just WANNA use those without without trying anything. I want to create a new new model and I need to compare two baselines compared to other other approaches of people tried before I can just sort try those those different models. It's got a model. Do you know what are the pre-trade models somebody else's released in leverage those when building minute chat? Bot and then it's got everything you will need. To also evaluate a chat, Bot. So you know once you have Chapada unlike a lot of areas in I research it's it's not always clear how to evaluated except the have people talk to it. So we've got all the tools that you need to connector Chapada, Amazon Mechanical Turk and have people chat with it and you give evaluations or give. Performance rating instincts like this. A little bit deeper into the problems that parlay solves for researchers that are using it. Yeah I think quite a few different problems especially in all those all those different spaces you know when you're you're a researcher and you want to create a new data set that you know, let's say you want to create a new data said that teaches the model how to how to have empathy. The thing you're going to do is have humans talk and exhibit empathy and annotate their their their utterances with this sort empathetic information. So we have tools so that you can like creek quickly spin up user interface where you can have that chat where you can annotate that information and sort of build what you need for that. So similarly with evaluation you know I need to connect with the Amazon Mechanical Turk and had people evaluate. You know I don't WanNa have to spend so much time focused on building the UI of this tool or dealing with the engineering of connecting Amazon Mechanical Turk impairing humans together, I. So abstract way from you and when we do that is by treating all. In the in the world as agents so whether you're a data set or Talking to it on Mechanical Turk or human talking to it at your local keyboard or a AI agent everything is agent. So we treat them all the same. This gives us really nice distractions to work with so that we can sort of plug in AI model in place of a human or plug human in place of the model really easily. Parlay makes available a wide set of data sets through its API. How does parley use these different data sets? Yeah, we have over one hundred data sets in parlay. Some of them are from our group some of them are from external groups. And so one of the things we really focus on as a first class feature in. If I want to train the AI that exhibits multiple behaviors. I'm a train, a multiple data sets at the same time. So you it's really easy to sort of say. Okay. That set a data set the set see in start training three of them at the same time and get a model that can do all three of these behaviors on. So that's sort of first class functionality within within parlay. When we were talking earlier about having a model that exhibited the consistent personality empathy in knowledge, we did this with a sort of multitask training as it's called where we train on all different data sets. So if you're a new user or new researcher who wants to come into dialogue, you can sort of take the stock wouldn't data sets out there already and just start utilizing them as needed and if you wanna mix and match behaviors? Hey, no problem. described. The workflow for training chat with parlay. Yeah. So we have a lot of it's very command line, heavy utility or command line heavy platform. So if you want to train a new model, it can be as simple as calling the train model command from the command line and you just sort of say are here the tasks I want here's the model. The model that I want what's the model architecture and things like this? And you know here's the learning rate and all the other neural network parameters and you hit go and start training. alanna researchers went to do a more sophisticated, maybe make a custom architecture or make a custom data set and it's really easy to just sort of build only the part of the data set you need or build only the what's special about your model. She might go right a little bit of custom code utilizing are sort of abstract base classes and things like this. And you'll be off on your way training, your special model, and if you don't WanNa mess with data, you don't have to mess with data you can just use the existing data sets. If you don't WanNa mess for modeling, you don't have the mess with modeling you can just just the data in and start training

Dialogue Research Facebook Researcher Stephen Roller Basketball Amazon Amazon Mechanical Turk Maine Staley America
How I Built Resilience With Brian Chesky of Airbnb

How I Built This

05:38 min | Last month

How I Built Resilience With Brian Chesky of Airbnb

"Hey everyone and welcome to how I built. This resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and business leaders about how they're adapting to these difficult economic times and today show we're going to hear from Brian Chess the CEO and Co founder of Airbnb back in twenty sixteen, we spoke with Brian's Co founder Joe Gebbie at, and he told the amazing story of how they founded and built the company, and if you haven't heard it, be sure to check it out. Now, of course, we are in a very different time and a few months ago Brian wrote a letter to the entire staff. AIRBNB letting them know that twenty five percent of the company was going to be laid off. This has been by far for us. The most difficult thing that we've experienced since we started the company a dozen years ago and I think join us to talk about how starting airbnb basically this idea that like strange who live each other live with each other like that was the hardest thing we were ever GonNa do it was like pushing a rock hill and it turned out that trying to run a company that does travel preparing to go public in the middle of pandemic is about as hard. And then doing all via Zoom Ios, even more difficult. I think that what people want right now just more fundamentally is connection is like the thing that we've always wanted we want connection to each other and now you have to fight for it. You know you have to make a conscious effort for it get on the one hand I'm closer to some people I've ever been in my life probably closer to my life co-founders donate we talk all the time and when you're going through crazy periods of time, it has a way of bringing you closer together but also has a way of making your bubble a little bit smaller and that's probably what's happened for me. Yeah. You you wrote a letter to your employees that is posted publicly that letter is was remarkable. It was so transparent. You had to lay off a quarter of your employees in May and you could see how painful it was for you to write that letter it was extremely transparent. You described the process for how you had to make the hard decision But also you know that every employee would receive fourteen weeks of of pay plus Severinsen insurance for a year and they keep their laptops and there were resources to help the employees Kind of walk me through how you how you came to to write that letter and How you kind of dealt with that just emotionally. Yeah there is no playbook. To lay people off in that's the kind of thing that if there was a playbook, you should never use it because the thing that people want more than anything. They want humanity they want compassion and that means that you need to treat people like like people like individually not robotically you know when the crisis happened, we felt in mid March it was pretty serious. We spent twelve years building airbnb in the we lost eighty percent of business in eight weeks. You know we're one of the success stories right and then suddenly eight weeks there's. All sorts of concerns articles willer survive never thought. I'd read an article like that. And we made a lot of hard decisions. We I cut enormous cost. We cut over a billion dollars plan marketing spend. We quickly raised two billion dollars. It's not easy to raise two billion dollars. It's more difficult to raise two billion dollars from your travel company. It's a pandemic and you've lost eighty percent business eight weeks. The people get nervous thankfully we had some great investors step up but we had to do that deal that was like over the course of seventy two hours still like get the deal done it was the. Fastest deal thing from have ever done and they've ever done. So before that layup even happened, I wrote a couple principals and I said, we have a hunt handful of stakeholders we have to I. Make sure that we act quickly in with all stakeholders. Remind we're going to be remembered probably for how he handled this crisis Andy Grove this famous entrepreneur said bad comes destroyed by crisis good company survive crisis in great companies thrive or are defined by crisis I said, we're not going to be the kind of company will be destroyed by this. We're GONNA try to take each of our stack holders and when we got to the employees, we basically had exhausted options having raised two billion dollars. We came to the conclusion that we would have to lay off when we confronted to hard truth the hard truth number one was this that we did not know when trouble would return nobody did and the second thing we knew is that when travel would return, it would look fundamentally different than the travel before the pandemic and so our business would have to look different and we'd have. To change the shape of our business that we focused on, and so then we just realized that we had to approach this with a sense of humanity said we should be as generous as we possibly could be in not less generous than that. Why would you do that until we came up with a handful of things that we did to try to help people in this very difficult time We did a fourteen sevens puts a week pre or service we felt like well, this is a health crisis people need health insurance, and so we made sure that everyone had at least one year of health insurance even after ever getting laid off one of the things that I'm most proud of that our team came up with Joe in the team came to me and they said, you know what? We have a recruiting team maybe we dedicate a percentage of the recruiting team to outplacement for the people

Airbnb Brian Chess Joe Gebbie Co Founder Severinsen Andy Grove CEO
Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | Last month

Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

"Hey everyone the show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today Lori gottlieb joins us on skin from the couch. She is a psychotherapist and an author. She writes the Dr Therapist Column in the Atlantic and She's also the author of the bestselling novel maybe you should talk to someone which I read I loved and then recommended to every member of my family Lori. Thank you for joining US welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks so much for having me Lori we're very excited I. Feel like we're about to have therapy. We're going start though putting you on the on the hot feet, which just can you skim your resume for us? Yeah. Sure. After graduating from college I worked in the entertainment business. I. I worked on the film side and then I moved over to NBC, and you're I there to. You May for premiering when was called Er and the other was called breads heard of them. When I was working on Er, we had a consultant who is an emergency room physician at and he would do research with us and help us to choreograph the scenes and make sure that everything's accurate and I spent a lot of time in the ER, and he said to me I, think you like it better here than you like your day job because I was spending a lot of time in the ER and and I was like I'm lacking to go to medical school. Like I like in my late twenties late that I went to medical school. So went to Stanford I went to medical school when I got there, it was the middle of the DOT com the first sort of DOT com bill before i. And a lot of people were saying you know managed care it was coming into the healthcare system and would be able to do the kinds of work that I wanted to do with my patients. I worked at a DOT COM for a little bit in the summer between first year second year of medical school and ultimately assert writing and I left to become a journalist and. I felt like as a journalist I could really help to tell people stories the way that I wanted to, and it was about ten years later after being a journalist for wile still a journalist but I had a baby and I was desperate for adult interaction and ups guy would come ons I would lose him in conversation at he hated that nearly describing me in corn to. Like that and so he would always try to avoid the at eventually start telling to my door putting the APP just down very gently. So I would not open the door, engage him in conversation, and so I called Dean at Stanford and I said, maybe I should come back Andrew Psychiatry and she said, you know you always wanted these deeper interactions with people welcome to come back. But if you do psychiatry probably doing a lot of medication management, it's not what you WANNA do. Why don't you get a graduate degree in clinical psychology and do the work want to do it was really this is a moment it sounds obvious. In, retrospect which I think a lot of career things do where you know something that is right in front of you you had thought of, and so I did that and I, have this hybrid career where I'm a psychotherapist I have clinical practice here Los Angeles I'm still a writer I write books I writes the weekly called the Atlantic Avenue podcast coming out therapy. So I see like what I do is I look at story of the human condition and I just express it different means what something that is not on your Lincoln profiler bio that people would be surprised to know about you maybe that I was competitive chess player. You have another fallback career. I. Wasn't good never for career but I was really serious about it and I think I use that a lot in my career. So I think with chests there's a lot of strategy. There's a lot of anticipating the consequences of your moves and you can't plan everything out but I think that people look at my career they think I made these very impulsive decisions like you're working in Hollywood and boom you're going to go to medical school you're working on e. r. and then boom you want to. Tell stories in different ways to you're GonNa go Ri- and then you're GonNa go the therapist and you go from telling people stories, changing people's stories, right? All of that is true but I think I very much ought ahead about why was I doing reflecting on why was doing so many people said to me you are crazy. You don't leave medical school when you get into Stanford Medical School right? You don't leave Hollywood when you're at NBC and you have this job you're successful journalists would you mean you're going to go back and do therapy and why would you leave? And so I think it's really about I. Think in chests you have to kind of really be reflected about what you're doing. When I think about being reflective as an adult I think that means being reflective and going inside to that place of knowing and not listening to all the noise out there that the reflection is an inside job and not an outside job.

Lori Gottlieb Dot Com Stanford Medical School NBC Stanford United States Dr Therapist Column Hollywood Atlantic DOT Wile Consultant Andrew Psychiatry RI Los Angeles Lincoln Chess Writer
The History Of The Ping-Pong Video Game

American Innovations

04:58 min | Last month

The History Of The Ping-Pong Video Game

"June one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, seven, Nashua New Hampshire. It's four months since bill, Harrison secret meeting with Ralph Baer and today they're finally unveiling their prototype game console to the company's top brass. Their TV game device isn't much to look at it's an aluminum box the size of a briefcase with a bunch of dials and switches poking out of the top senior executives and the board of directors take seats at the conference table from the head of the table. The company's stony-faced founder Roydon Sanders Surveys, the room his gaze settles on bear across the table. Every time bear pushes up his glasses sweat makes him slip back down again. Bear I. Hear you've been fooling around with some TV gadgetry, some kind of toy. It. Yes. Sir. That's correct. Well, let me be clear. I'm not sure I'm happy with people making toys on my dime. So whatever this thing is it better be good. They're tries to smile it comes out as a grimace with that Harrison switches on the TV set. Okay we're ready. Bear takes a deep breath and starts his presentation. This is the TV game unit. It can play seven different games. You select a game by turning this dial and to to explain the Games, I prerecorded instructions on an audio cassette, and maybe this cassette could come with the device to teach families how to use it. Bear pushes his glasses backup knows deep down he knows he's invented something groundbreaking but that doesn't change the fact that he's pitching a toy to one of America's top military contractors, and now that the presentation started, there's no turning back. Bear turns the dial on the box to lonely squares appear on the screen. One is white. The other red bear presses play on the cassette. Please I have your attention. The first game are chess game. Please fasten the chessboard overlay. There takes out of transparent plastic sheet with a chessboard design and places it over the TV screen. Thanks to the static on the screen. The plastic sheets sticks with the overlay attached. Now looks as though the two squares on the screen are pieces on a chessboard bears prerecorded tape. Rolls. On. The game is played by two players joysticks. The object of this game is to reach the opponents position moving one square at a time. Please shut me off. Bear stops the cassette and pick up a joystick. The executive stare is bare and Harrison Guide their onscreen squares around the chessboard. The. Room disconcertingly quiet. The TV game unit can't do sound one board members stifles a yawn. Bear decides he'd better move onto the next game he whips the chessboard. Screen pushes up his glasses and restarts the audio cassette. Now, for a little more action, let's have a steeplechase one will be the hunter. One will be the Fox shut me off. please. Barron Harrison Start Moving two squares around the otherwise empty screen the moment. Harrison Square catches bear square the game restarts. There's no scoring the TV game. Unit camp keep scores. When executive fiddles with tie some board members cover their size with their hands others don't bother the presentation is tanking fast. But then Harrison pulls out a toy rifle. The executive sit up Harrison grins don't worry folks at isn't loaded. It's just a light gun. There turns the game selection switch a large white square appears on a screen and starts roaming around at random bear presses play on the tape. We're are going to test your accuracy as a marksman. We guarantee if you can shoot straight with this rifle, you can shoot straight with anything. There's no way of predicting just where the target is going to be. Now, let's see if you can hit. The target shooting game immediately changes the mood among the executives. Maybe there could be a military application for bears toy after all soon, the suited executives are lining up to take potshots at the onscreen. Target. After the demonstration Bayern. Harrison stand in silence as the sanders associates executives confer I don't think the rightful gain will cut it for military training needs a lot more work if it's going to do that I agree agree but still it was fun. Wasn't it sure but we're not a toy company. Eventually. All eyes. Settle on Roydon Sanders Sanders strokes is mustache and then looks at bear This is interesting. Not sure what we can do with this thing, but I wanna see where it leads but fair next time I want to see something we can sell or license. Got It. Bear manages a smile. His project is still alive for now.

Bear Barron Harrison Executive Harrison Square Roydon Sanders Surveys Roydon Sanders Sanders Nashua New Hampshire Ralph Baer Founder America FOX
"chess" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

07:09 min | 2 months ago

"chess" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"It won't even necessarily be fancy. You know they might say something like. Really. That's what you're going to play. Gio. Nothing. Big Hunting fancy. But it'll be in your brain somewhere at a plant that earworm right and start over and over somebody like Ralph mouth would always say, no matter what the situation that's what she said. Every. Single time that's when she said now. I'm wiping your ass that's what she said like whatever whatever it was. That was always his line. Then, you guys would quote Shakespeare like Vinnie livermore was played by Laurence. Fishburne in Josh Wade Skins movie about Josh weights can searching for Fisher. And Benny AB quoting Shakespeare, the whole time is. Now you know you gotTa Know Shakespeare to quote Shakespeare and. This Guy Shakespeare. So that was another way or there'll be people who stayed very Barry Let's call it sexual and the conversation like graphic, and now is now really off because Chesapeake would morph into sort of like no sex toys. In the description I, what? Did I cover your head do could you please play chess but that's where the conversation would go and. And Anything they were doing you know like the is petty trained against. The rear like what's Your position. Really. Okay. Go with that. So everything anything can come at you depending on who it was that you were talking to it. Also, of course, you also have colorful language and you could avoid that either. So yeah, trash-talking really. I would say it's not so much a generic art form with various schools and so much more. So the person expressing themselves at the board in a way that allows for them to feel like they're inflow and potentially disturbs your equanimity and that's happens in. You're done. I saw people who are better chessplayers. Just, lose their cool at the board because the other guy just kept talking and the worst thing to do to attract something to stop talking. And now you're not. Really okay. I'm going to stop talking to you know I'll start talking to I, want to respect you. So I'M GONNA stop talking right now I mean really you're better player. So let me stop saying anything and disrespecting you by talking that's what's going to happen is this going to be unending stream and you're never gonNA get past? So the best thing to do is to keep cool and for me that was real really good training are in not being distracted. No matter what was happening around did any of those players in the Black Bear School of Chess? Blacker school. Go on to play elsewhere. And where did you go in terms of evolution from that point? Absolutely the ended up becoming master players. legit chess masters. Not as far as grandmasters international masters, which is the highest levels of chess grandmaster being the highest Saudi you can have. But. This was strong players now the problem for the black we're school As I was coming up I, recognize that it was a bit too much infighting players wanted to beat each other. So you had the best players like William Morrison who we called the exterminator or George Golden, the fire breather and then you guys like Ronald Simpson. As I mentioned Willie Johnson Ernest Kolding Mark Mir's Chris. Welcome these guys were serious high level talents. But? Their best wish was to destroy each other that day and for me coming up as a as a young Clara's in my teens. I didn't see the value beating them because people I was reading about in the books were Ram masters, famous players, and I wanted to be like people in the books I want to play at that level. and. The only way you could do that if I left the group or didn't stay just inside the group and played in the clubs in New York and I was very fortunate because New York is a hotbed chess activity and some of the strongest players in the country were living in New York. So I saw going to the Manhattan Chess Club Marshall. Chess Club those are the two venerable clubs and clang against the grandmasters. And that. My game to another level, and it eventually allowed me in fact to come back to the black bears. and become the president as we call it. I've started dominating those guys because I wasn't just about playing inside does one group did you decide to the clubs? Did someone else suggested? I did once I found out that clubs were there I wanted to find out you know who play their where? Can you find the best players and so? I went. A friend of Mine Sam Sing and I. We hung out he he had a beat up car, but it was good enough. We would drive to the city regularly play tournament chess play against all the masters in International. Masters and grandmasters of the club, and that's that really game to another level. What is the atmosphere in the? Venerable Chess Club. What does that look like? What does it feel like? As. You would expect it was. Not Brooklyn I can tell you that now Brownsville, it was different. It was definitely different. You have people who were coming out at work businessmen in suits they didn't. Quite, know what to do with a young. Black from Brooklyn. and. So it was it was definitely a different vibe to what I was normally experiencing but. Chess chess and once you see good moves. You understand you're planning against player. So I wanted to be that player whenever I played against those guys and you know that's what it was like so it was It was definitely a much more formal affair by was long as it was about chests than I, didn't. I. Want you to correct me if I'm getting this wrong. But I read about a moment when things seem to have crystallized for you in a way that was tiger woods in nineteen, ninety seven was that an important. Moment for you. Absolutely absolutely. Your fast forwarding big time. Those I'm way out of my teens I'm now are than that time I'm thirty one years old. So we're doubling Bass I had gone through many experiences before then but I'd might quest to become a grandmaster was seemingly stymied by then I had a daughter. I work for a living I was teaching chess actually primarily but also just commentary and the like as I was fully involved in in sort of fatherhood and and making money. And my dream was to become a grandmaster. So by the time, we get to the Tiger in ninety seventy was at the masters. And he.

Chess Club Shakespeare Black Bear School of Chess Manhattan Chess Club Marshall Chess New York Ralph Brooklyn Blacker school Josh Wade Barry Benny AB Tiger president Fishburne Chesapeake Clara William Morrison Fisher Willie Johnson
"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

05:32 min | 3 months ago

"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"I. How did you get on the chess? Beat in the first place? So I get really interested in these really need sports that. People are super invested in Ashwari. Kumar is an international features writer for Espn Lake if you're going to which. Of People Are Watching these chess tournaments that you wouldn't even know where that's happening in. Iceland. Or Finland, and so I had this curiosity so I was thinking so Bobby Fisher was such a huge part of chests in the US what Ron Labor is tennis. What Jack Nicklaus's to golf? That's what Bobby Fischer is to chess. Bobby Fisher of the United States will finally meet Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in Belgrade Yugoslavia, but the chess championship of the world plus a purse of one, hundred, thirty, eight, thousand five hundred dollars, the richest prize for a head-to-head confrontation in any sport, but boxing. So who is the next Bobby Fisher? So I went to Saint Louis last year to sort of figure out what is going on in the chess world, so saint Louis has sort of become this chess capital of the country. Let's start with the basics here. What is a chess grandmaster? And what does it take to become one? Usually what happens? Is this International Chess Federation F. And they have this point systems so chessplayers. Lead different tournaments in accumulate these spines that. Gets them to a certain level of expertise, and they are then title the grandmaster, which is in fact, the highest I do that. A chess player can be awarded by International Chess Federation usually these. Players between the age of ten and fourteen, and so they go through these rigorous tournaments one after the other parents take them all over the world. And the get the title by around thirteen fourteen, and then they start to perfect the art of being perfect, just player. So you mentioned Bobby Fisher. Who is probably the most famous chess player all time? Actually <hes> is definitely the most famous chess player of all time. Who are the stars of the field today? The poster by of chess is at the moment Magnus Carlsen. Calzon is the best in the world. The youngest number one ever and no one can explain to you how he does what he does. It seems to come from another world, which is why he's become known as the Mozart of chess. He's from Norway. He sort of had this. Has this bad boy live to him? He's like interesting. He'll drop these nuggets about other players. You make jokes about his opponents. He talks trash social chicken. How do you not? He's GonNa do the same. Yeah the lack of <hes> comas is astounding. And quite disappointing. He talks acts. Yeah for sure sorta like that kind of Worcester wise. He's called the golden boy of chess. And then this. Is. Bobby Ana crew art, there's this Chinese grandmaster Ding Laren <hes>, and then USA's Wesley so and Kara Nakimora. Really Good Armenia has live on Romanian so these are some of like the famous players at the moment that go up against each other all the time. So I the grandmaster that you decided to focus on with your story, the one who lives in Saint Louis is actually Italian. His name is Fabiano Caruana. Who is in? How did he get here? Fabiano Caruana is the number two seed in the world. He's an Italian American chess grandmaster. He became a grandmaster at fourteen years of age, fourteen years, eleven, months, and twenty eight to be exact, and he at that time was the youngest grandmaster in the history of Italy in the United States. E was sort of beg to be the next big thing <hes> in in US chess and he came back now. He has an apartment in Saint Louis. He lives there <hes> and he sort of boot. BOOT his life from scratch, and he was never like the big personality like Norris Magnus columnist. He's the guy that will is very chill loves video games and let us work to the talk to his justice stories about that call in the next Bobby Fisher like the next big thing. He's the one person that can actually dig down. Magnus, Carlsen <hes> in the world championship and become the next world champion. So what does? Chess match in a grand masters tournament. Actually look like. How does it play out? Okay so two grandmasters shake each other's hands. sit down across from each other is chessboard. This o'clock next to them that the <hes> are constantly looking at. This goes on for at least six hours right every day, and so during these six hours, the brain has to have most oxygen supply. Which means your heart is functioning three times faster than on any given. And because of that sustained higher blood pressure, and sustained higher level of activity by the heart and the rain, the body goes through intense physical. Energy lost during. A chess game that lasts six to seven to sometimes eat hours said.

International Chess Federation Bobby Fisher Saint Louis United States Jack Nicklaus Boris Spassky tennis Espn Lake Soviet Union Kumar Iceland Finland Ashwari Belgrade features writer Ron Labor golf
"chess" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:35 min | 7 months ago

"chess" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Red Sox one hundred million dollars a year. He's broke bankrupt as Warren Buffett. I said what made you the wealthiest man in the world and he smiled needs a three six. He said living in America great opportunities having good genes. I lived a long time. And he said last thing compound interest and we all know about compound interest but I think the book of this Guy Theater Johnson worked for. Ups never made more than fourteen thousand. Come in his entire life in a year and in old ages were seventy million dollars. How do you do it? All he did was he took a percentage of his income. His percentage was twenty percent. His family said you can't. We can't save any money but he met a friend who said if you pretend there's a tax in taxes took the money away from you and you never see it. The money's comes out of your cat and goes an investment account. You'll be financially free. And so he was disciplined. He didn't look at it. It happened seventy million dollars by compounding. So People's mistake is and kids don't know this adults don't notice that you order anyway there but you can compound away they say. Where do you put that money train? Secret trick is actually doing. Almost nobody does the second trick. Is You really have to understand where you're going to get hurt? Because the fees the fees are just destroy people. You have captured by the fees. I was like this is incredible. Isn't a wild it's nuts. I mean there's so much money just on the fees just so people have an understanding ninety. Six percent of all mutual funds never matched the market. I mean they never beat the market and I was just on a morning show this morning and Pam and Michael. Bloomberg's one of his guys that have some of his money so this is the only industry. I know of where people think they can be a doctor. They think they can be a financial planner and I said to him. I said well look the statistics. Warren Buffett Tommy. This is that ray value told me this David Swinson took yell from one billion to twenty four billion two decades. They'll be able to tell them. Nobody beats the market except a couple UNICORNS that nobody has access to and I said I didn't say you're not one of them A. Here's the truth. Ninety six percent mutual funds don't match market that means four percent succeed now. What are your chances of picking the Right Mutual Fund? People don't know what they're doing. They put their money in a four one K. Pick them you know what it is if you play blackjack and you and I play and you get to face cards. Intermediate says hit me still. WanNa one chance in a million whether you're eighty percent chance of winning if you tried to get a mutual fund you got the four percent chance of winning so when I show people not only do not get the result thinking logically if I'd hire someone else to do and we'll do better than me. But in addition you pay around two thousand percent more than it's worth meaning you get the same exact product the seem stocks in the index. You want a piece of all. America's best companies say the vanguard five hundred index. I've.

Warren Buffett America Right Mutual Fund Warren Buffett Tommy Red Sox Guy Theater Johnson Bloomberg Pam ray David Swinson Michael
"chess" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

12:27 min | 9 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Thanks kqed our next guest Shakira Luster to Shell Williams. Any Money Hill are state champions in chess. The eighth graders health from Saint. Ethel Arita a small Catholic School in Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood. After their state win in November the school through a massive celebration for them complete with crowns for the winners the girls then went onto play seven in the national tournament for their age bracket they met with Mayor Lori lightfoot and they join us now along with their coach Eric Luster welcome to reset. Ah Well first of all coach. I want to know how you feel. Having coached these young ladies to the championships I might have lost for words. I am so proud with them. They have done a magnificent job favourite proud of them. Now I should mention. You're also Shakira's Dad. I am not just coach. Also oh the seventh and eighth grade math teacher. Yes at Saint Rita. Did you expect this weird. No I did expect coming first at the state. I was hoping for it but I didn't expect that. So I'm I'm very happy for them. So for state each of you ranked in the top ten slots Shakira. You took third treselle. You took fourth in the money you took tenth and collectively. This made your team number one. I want to know how you felt when you realize you're team had landed in that number one slot. Rachelle come to you I I. I felt overwhelmed. All I could think about was how where the top eighth graders in the state secure. What about you allow Alex's excited that we came in first through the money I'll is a static but I also sort of thought of it as another just normal all tournament? I wasn't really thinking statewide. I was just thinking okay. It's just another first place team trophy. And now we had a little time to sit with Eh Eric but this win into context for us how many people were competing at the state level. Yes so they had about. I would say about five hundred participants again. State Tournament is from kindergarten through twelfth grade in their eighth grade section where they came in first and who are they competing against other other eighth graders and the State of Illinois so you just got back from the National Competition. I'm your team which just includes your three here ranked in seventh overall which is incredible. Yes on a national level. So congratulations for that. What is working for this team? I think The persistence you. You know we talk about perseverance. All the time and math class is one of the standards for mathematical practice. Actually and I will use that as well and chest to persevere severe to never give up You're never GONNA win every game. You're not gonNA always be in great positions but you gotTa keep going regardless of this situation look at it think about dissect and try to move forward so secure your thirteen Atra Shell and mining both fourteen years old. Yes when you go to the state competition or to the National Oh competition. Are there other girls. A lot of the girls who are playing not often We mostly see ourselves as sorry to say like the only African American girls there as far as other girls we could say there's about five. Maybe that we normally see and those are the girls. We normally see on a daily basis at our regular tournaments here in Chicago and how to other players react. You think you might get underestimated sometimes. Show now yes because typically would people look at chest they see mill grandmasters chess players. But you know now other girls joining the forces and secure. I just want you to talk a little bit about what it's like to compete. What's in your mind how you're approaching a game? Tell us about that. Well I you have to like be quiet during the game you can like get up and walk out your see in sometimes look at other player Games in like at big tournaments. Big Big tournaments spectators will not be allowed to go in a room and you can just like walk around and look at the Games. uh-huh and how do you maintain your focusing money when you're playing a match well. Our coach set us up with three rules to castle all to fight for the center and develop your pieces so when I forget or when I starting to walk around the room because my opponent is typically taking a while to think about their next move I just remind myself of those three rules and I play analyze the situation again and for you Tra Shell is there a moment in the match. When you know you wine? Yes or what is that like for you. It's nice especially if the person is higher rated so you feel like not really really got to win yes coach luster talk about just the process of teaching chess and some of the additional benefits that come along with learning this game so oh you know the process of teaching chess like anything else in the sense that it takes a lot of practice and the more you practice it anything better you get at it The benefits benefits happened to be the analytical thinking that goes into it you hope that one as they get better chess they learn to make better life life decisions. You know oftentimes society. You think it's egocentric Canada dominated. You know you'll me. What can I get out of it but the chess? You really have to think about what your opponent is thinking. That's actually how you become a successful chess player. You have to analyze the position. You have a plan but you gotta think about what is your opponents plan plan and that's kind of you know when you're looking at live situations when you do that kind of thing. So hey you know how this situation affect me and others. I think that makes you a better person. In general when you're dealing with people in life situations in life what are you. Get Out of playing chess. What's in it for you beyond winning a match winning a championship? Well as you may have mentioned chess does help with math test scores and it helps you with your critical thinking thinking it can also help you with your life situations knowing what to do and how to pick the right decision and that can help me for sure during High School of course I need those grades to stay. Stay up there but also just knowing win. Pick your battles In what choice. You should do pick the right one. Of course I secure what about for you. Like Imani stated chess hopes with math and I really think it improves my test scores overall and for you tricia and what do you get out of playing chess. Like Imani. Insecure say yes but what I also. WE'LL GET OUTTA test is I guess life lessons. The life lessons that you could learn is all actions have consequences this and also think about something thoroughly before doing it coach luster. Tell us what this means for the school for Saint Ethel Rita. This older students are excited. the school is buzzing community has not just the Alderman but the people in the community of come out the come by to support us and I think is giving the school a big boost In terms of the morale not that the Morales down but certainly just to be excited to galvanize behind the chess team as opposed to the track record flag football or some of that. Those are good there too. But everybody's really at a bus talking chess chess and and they're really excited fairly small school. Ladies through two hundred sixty students now Enrollment was a struggle at one point. And certainly this should be something that'll help increase that. Yeah you don't WanNa turn back to you girls because you talked about sometimes feeling like you're underestimated when you're competing and I think for other young girls who are listening right now. Maybe if they're not playing chess but they're trying something else in feeling underestimated. How do you overcome that feeling and push through To these incredible winds. You've had Imani what I do you is. I remember where I came from. And that's from a family that always said you can do it and from school at always told you you can do it. So Oh those people who always say you can't do it. They're wrong they just don't WANNA lose secure. What about you? I really don't pay much attention to What other other people think at all? I feel like it's a waste of time just to bother listening to that. That's good advice. Tra- Shell what about you for other girls who are listening may be feeling intimidated or feeling like they're being underestimated. How do you overcome that feeling? When you're competing I also agree with she carrot? Like she said you shouldn't pay attention to people who try to drag you down because that's their opinions are quite irrelevant. It's all about what you think and what you believe and also just know that there are girls supporting you like us. Girls support girls coach. You have there been many women Chess Masters I. Oh Yeah we've had women chess grandmasters. Actually the interesting thing is when you however look to just America and we start talking about African American participation chests we only had one African American grandmaster from America. His name is Maurice Ashley from New York and and we've never had a woman chessmaster African American from America. Ever so when you look at these young ladies and you look at the success they're experiencing. Are you hoping that maybe this is the start of a new legacy. I am hoping praying Yes absolutely I'm hoping they can start a new legacy and if it's not one of them they maybe they'll spire someone else to get that goal. Well I WANNA turn to you ladies once again just as we we wrap up here for young people or parents who are listening who maybe look at chess in our little intimidated by it. What would you say to them about? Learning this game treselle likely mentioned before it does help your test scores and also you should join. Parents of girls fulls no matter Outta the gender or race or anything used to just join no get out there. Try something you've never done before probably can make history. What about you? My advice for other people is to play chess because you may not start off liking like I did because because I thought it was boring in white as the years went by I started to like chess so you should continue to play it because it also helps you with your so give it a little bit of time in modern. I'll give you the last word here. In general I believe we need more African American girls to start playing chess African Americans in general as we said before we mostly saw people. Oh not of our race. I believe that chest can definitely do a lotta things all sorts of things especially help you with the way you make decisions that might stop a lot of crime you know choosing the right choice Parents might like that. I would also suggested as they stayed it helping you with your education right. So what's the next step here for the team coach. Well the next step is back to the drawing board. We're practicing on a daily basis and we go onto the nationals. Now now the next big one is in Ohio and that's In April so we're looking forward to that. Is the city of Chicago Championship in February. At McCormick place so practicing daily looking for some more wins that was chess state champions Imani Hill Shakira Luster interest. Shell Williams along with.

chess Shakira Luster Imani Hill Chicago Eric Luster Shell Williams Tra Shell Atra Shell Ethel Arita Lori lightfoot Saint Rita Catholic School Auburn Gresham neighborhood Illinois Rachelle McCormick place Alex Ethel Rita Canada
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

04:30 min | 9 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"So for a while. Now we've known that elite athletes leads tend to live longer than the rest of us. And that's really not the big of a surprise but research now shows that elite chess players also have a survival advantage over the general population a team of Australian researchers looked at players from twenty eight countries and specifically over one thousand players who reach international chess grandmaster status over a period of nearly seventy years and then they compared the survival data of those people to fifteen thousand Olympic medalists. And not only. Did they find that. Both groups had significant survival advantages over the general general population but that the difference between the two was not even statistically significant. Wow that's pretty interesting well. Years Ago I remember reading about how you know. Before for the age of the Internet people used to play chess by mail. Or what's called correspondence chess. He'd make a move put that move in the mail and then your opponent would do the same and you go back and forth fourth and Games could take years to play and actually this kind of sounds fun to be able to do this with a friend who lives across the country or whatever but was surprising. Is that even today the US Chess Federation estimates. They have about three thousand members still playing correspondence chess though now. Of course some play by email and they're even tournaments for correspondence. Correspondence chess with rules like each player is given thirty days of reflection time over ten moves to really speed things up. That's I was reading recently. About how chess game popular among captured or wounded soldiers during World War Two. And you know the rules of war so interesting to me. Sometimes you remember learning about the Geneva Conventions dimensions which are often thought of today is sort of the way war crimes are defined but one thousand nine hundred and nine the third convention set out how prisoners of war would be treated so in addition to how prisoners would be treated physically it also had sections on recreation stated that the captors should encourage the intellectual diversions and sports organized by Prisoners Four. which makes it not that surprising that a quiet game that could take hours days to play and and was understood around the world could take off in a time like this so organizations like the Red Cross would even send chestnuts around the world to prisoners where there were even Organiz chess tournaments and worse so weird but I do think that one aspect is pretty cool? Yeah aren't we mentioned earlier. The similarities between elite athletes and chess players. Well did you know that. The World Chess Federation actually conducts drug tests. And they do do this pretty routinely and this because there's a push for it to be part of the twenty twenty Olympics and so this is actually required by the I. O. C. But there are some interesting things studies around the effects of so called smart drugs on the ability to play chess now specifically drugs like modafferi nil and Ritalin so by definition Nella drive. We've talked about actually in episode bacchus. It's been quite a while. But it's commonly used to help with sleep disorders and religion is commonly used a tree things like ADHD and the findings from some of the studies on these players was really interesting because weirdly players on a smart drugs. Were often losing more games than those who were not taking these but this was actually because the players on that we're taking more time per move and just running out of time so once they took the time out is a factor. They found that these players were actually playing better so it was one of the researchers. Put it these substances may be able to convert fast and shallow thinkers into a deeper but somewhat slower thinkers This really interesting. Well we talked about how long chess has been around and I was reading about some of the oldest strategy books on chess and in this one from way back in fifteen sixty one had some pretty awesome advice. The book suggest strategies such as playing with your back to the sun. Why because that could blind your opponent opponent also suggest that if you're playing by a fire at night you use your hand to create a shadow over the board so that your opponent won't be able to see his pieces clearly? Wow how you know. I had a couple of facts about weird chess tournaments and a couple of other things but looking over there at tristen and seeing the size of the smirk on his face. I've never seen the big because I know he loves this fact because he loves to play dirty whenever he competes dirties dirty guy. But anyway I'm going to have to stop us there and give you today's trophy. Mango thank you so much. Well I well. If you've got any great stories about chess or any facts about chess that we may have left out today. We always love to hear those from mm you can email us part time genius. How stuff works dot com or you can always hit us up on facebook or twitter for from Gabe Tristan Mango and me? Thanks so much for listening..

chess US Chess Federation World Chess Federation Gabe Tristan Mango ADHD Olympics Red Cross facebook tristen Organiz twitter
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

08:56 min | 9 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"It is that I actually cut the town's food subsidies to help pay for this fifty million dollar complex so now is really just a monument to the local governments disregard for its citizens. And that's kind of a bummer. But you know I I don't WanNa dwell on all these neglectful politicians or even the alien invasions as weird as that story was and I. I feel like we should talk about a few stories. That are little more upbeat. What do you think I'm for for? I A quick break from from the new this time tomorrow podcast available now on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Join us as we explore a future full of possibilities in the age of five G.. I dream will be that as the technology is better with five G. THE NBA on in the future east to actually transmitted. What they asked us are looking Through the helmets and they will be following an astronaut's as they step into the surface of the moon. So imagine what it will be. I mean just think of it for a minute. We will be there with this time. Tomorrow is presented by t mobile for business today. T. Mobile is leading the five G.. Charged with thirty billion dollars invested in an advanced network designed to deliver the breadth of mobility. We need businesses changing. Learn more at T. mobile for business. Dot Com. Hey this just in. It's officially fall. Means a lot of things to a lot of different people changing colors time to break out the pumpkins break out the football most most importantly break out my friends at truly hard seltzer truly has only one hundred calories but as five percent ab in only one gram of sugar per container. It's that can't miss drink of the seasons of pickup and try really hard seltzer today. Truly Drake what you truly want. What okay well so chess may not be your best? Oh first stemming off this alien invasion but the game still has a whole lot going for it like plenty of studies of show that playing chess can improve your focus. It can help you. Hone your decision making skills. Then of course it's a great way to strengthen your memory especially if you play it blindfolded I before we get to the mental benefits. Let's talk about some of the more surprising things we found out about the game. And maybe we'd never noticed before you know. One thing that stood out to me is how resilient the game is like it stands up to scrutiny more than just about any other game out there are people over. The years have tried to solve chess for for decades and decades but the game always seems to allude them. I mean there's always another move. You never considered a new way to win or even lose at chess and remember. That's true even after we built computers specifically designed to decode the game and released select the best possible move for millions and millions of different scenarios. Isn't he's not exactly what it means to salt chest like if we're able to compute every possible sequence of moves and counter moves and all these different forms of match can take then. Isn't the game effectively solved. That's actually the thing because even if you had the most powerful computer in the world it still wouldn't be able to calculate all the unique games that could be played late and this just seems unimaginable but the possibilities just scale up way too quickly so for example after both players have moved one time in a game of chess there are four hundred possible board setups but after the second of the turns the number of possible game shoots up to just under two hundred thousand now after three moves there are one hundred. Twenty one million possible outcomes and so on and so on until you get to the current best estimate for the total possible number of chess games which is a staggering ten to the one hundred and twentieth power so to put that number in perspective just a little bit. There was a great breakdown on that I've found from popular science. And here's what it says. There are only ten to the fifteenth. Total hairs on all the human heads in the world tend to the twenty-third grains of sand on earth and about ten to the eighty first atoms in the universe. Typical Chess Games is many times as great as all those numbers multiplied together an impressive feat for thirty two wooden pieces lined up on a board. That is unbelievable. You know when you look back at the kind of like endless complexity of the game you know I. It's really no wonder it gives our brains such a workout and actually read the study from a while back that found that experts who play chess actually used both sides of the brain. Well solving chess problems and not just the analytical right side. Oh well but this only happens in. I'm I'm guessing like really experienced players. That's right it's the researchers gathered eight international chess players and then eight novice players and they took. FM is brain scans while the subjects work their way through two different tasks and I identified geometrical shapes and then they had to determine whether or not the pieces on the chessboard. Were in a check situation. And the result from these tests tests were really unexpected. Because they showed that while the novice players had only used the left side of the brain to process this task the expert players had used both sides of the brain so this the lead researcher explained quote. Once the usual brain structures were engaged the experts utilized additional complementary structures in the other half to execute processes in perilla Carollo. Wow so did this dual processing improve the experts performance at all yet it actually made them much quicker at solving chess problems than novices. Where but it is is worth noting that the parallel processing only occurred during the chest problems and not during that geometry tasks so it really seems like all the extra practice that the experts had given their brains was was this nice boost but only when it came to chess? You know. It's interesting to hear that because I was actually reading about how playing a lot of chess can actually be a detriment to player sometimes sometimes rather than being beneficial to them and has on. What's because of something called the Einstein effect which scientific American describes as the brain's Raines tendency to stick with solutions? It already knows rather than look for potentially superior ones so scientists researching this effect really love using chess. Players says subjects. And that's because they provide a really clear way to see the effect inaction so as an example of this. Some studies present master chess players where the chessboard that has due to possible solutions. You've got this well known maneuver. That can win the game in five moves and a less common but actually much faster three step solution so the players were told to win the match in as few moves as possible but once they had spotted this familiar five step strategy they actually seemed unable to recognize the much quicker solution. And it wasn't that three step move was really obscure or anything like that but because those same players were actually presented with a similar setup for the three step move was the only way to win and then in that scenario the players recognize the strategy right away so in that first experiment it really was the Einstein long effect effect at work. And you know the players weren't able to see any of the other options because they have this cognitive bias for the move. They knew best really fascinating but I also like that even chessmaster can learn something to do better the next time around because like there are that many possibilities like I should think that's why so many schools invest in their own. Chess programs. I it's one of those rare hobbies that I can boost your cognitive ability while also teaching these coping skills like how to win or lose gracefully. Although I do have to say the one time my son got hit at school. It was in his first grade chess club and he came home with dirt on his face. And I was like Henry. How how that happened and he kinda gleefully said Oh? I took the second graders queen so so he kicked me in the face. Seems like he was okay with that he'd rather win. And there are so many places. He says where they're teaching. It really young kids like in Armenia. For instance chess is actually a required subject for every kid who's six years older and that's kind of awesome either even though it probably means the poor math teachers wound up pulling double duty and teaching chess as well right. Yeah but I have a feeling. It's worth it to them anyway. Because Armenian teacher explain chess trains seems logical thinking it teaches how to make decisions. Trains Memories Strengthens Willpower motivates children to win and teaches them how to deal with defeat. It's the only only school subject that can do all of this. I really love that idea. Well how about we knock out this fact off and then get Tristan. Show some of his opening moves. He's been perfecting.

Chess NBA t mobile perilla Carollo T. Mobile football researcher Tristan Raines Armenia Henry
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:05 min | 9 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Part time genius. Production of iheartradio. Guess we'll what's that mega so I was reading the story about the chess player. Bobby Fisher this week. This is when he was young and I guess he'd won a US championship at the time so he was famous but he was also just a kid and he didn't have that much money and you know he's kind of a recluse right. Yeah actually I'd read that. He used to play secretly online like later in his life and there was always so much buzz when somebody thought they noticed his style of play and thought they were onto it and that they discover that it was him. Yeah if you'd see that Papa from Japan or Malaysia or wherever there's just like so excited to have played Bobby Fisher think they've played five Fisher but anyway anyway he's young at this time he wants to go see a movie and he doesn't have money for so he walks into the chess and checker club of New York just to pick up a few extra bucks a hassle it right and I guess at the time it was this. This large smoke-filled crowded pool hall type place but for chess and bobby's totally in disguise. He's got a rank. Oh He's got his collar up sunglasses a hat. He looks ridiculous but does not want to be noticed right so he asked a friend like do you think you can just get me into a game and a friend asked the Owner across the bar and remembered smoke filled and like five as in disguise so the owner goes. Tell him no. He's just a kid. hustlers will eat him alive until like Bobby Fischer is furious and he just stops out and this is all reported. This is a real story but when his friend tells the owner who it was that it was Bobby Fisher who wanted the game. Apparently the whole crowd at the place has this audible Groan. I bet and this one guy goes oh man I would have paid hundreds of dollars just to sit across awesome Bobby Fisher on. ESPN okay anyway. So I I don't know much about Chas but I do love stories about it and we're GONNA get into the most dangerous styles of chess. How's the game moved from the battlefield to the Royal Court and even why getting a billion people to play chess might be our best hope to keep away aliens? Let's dig.

Bobby Fisher chess US Papa Royal Court Chas New York ESPN Japan Malaysia
"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

11:50 min | 10 months ago

"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"Aw So grandmasters today. i-e-she they're no longer smoking and drinking and partying well tonight. which by the way is a whole tangent? I would love to hear about some other time. Treating chess like any other sport their training for it with great discipline and you spent spent time with a couple of these masters in rural Missouri. What can you tell me about them? They have these strict diets that the raid. They they have salad bar. Shrimp beef stew mashed potatoes. They want to get protein carbs and fat in the right amount so their body league sort of like preps for the amount they go through during the course of tournament but the other thing. That's really interesting. is they go into these intense detox. More when Fabio Kawana you WanNa pay the world championship. Last year he Stop drinking three months before the tournament began like he like He. He was studying me how it was his birthday. He still decided not to even have a glass of wine because he realized that he needed to like shock his body into sort of listening into him so they have these like really intense food desmond that they follow. It's quite crazy. He put together an elaborate dietary Terry and workout regimen. How did you go about doing that? This was also a crazy thing right so before big tournaments you know what he does. He sort of Takes himself out of the real world so he'll drive three hours from Saint Louis to like the middle of nowhere misery. Find like a cabin Find find a few chess grandmasters who are also free available to come with him and he will chart out a week before the tournament would. He would intensely intensely physically strain and also prepped for the tournament. So he'll do our running in the morning and then he'll eat his breakfast and then he'll play a six hours so mocked ornaments and then he do half hour basketball and our tennis and a place in our swimming. After does he have people helping being with us. Yes so so. He has a training partner. WHO's Romanian grandmaster Christian Jarallah and so he also sort of looks like a soccer player and has these like he does like two hours of cardio everyday lives a lot of ways to build muscle mass because muscle mass is the first thing that you lose when you stop working out and have long hours of sitting and playing chess games while not eating as much much as you should be and so Christian and Fob He worked together the prep for the harm. How common is this sort of intense the physical regimen amok chess grandmasters? It's becoming quite common so India's first grandmaster wish another Annand love him to pieces he's phenomenal. He just hours of cardio every night just to tire himself out. So he doesn't dream about chess and then jury ladas at least an hour of cardio cardio an hour waits to build Muslims before armaments and Reuss. Tom Who is also an a a grandma's trains with FOB. He he Ten basketball every day And he drinks only during tournaments to sort of like prep his body to be caffeine and sugar carefree FOB. Yano is the number to chess player in the world. Number one is the world champion. The bad boy the sport as you said. Magnus Carlsen does he have a similar workout routine so Kalson is sort of the you the best example. He has figured that out down to the very last detail like before tournaments will work out for hours even on treadmills. He'll you hours of yoga. He plays soccer with his friends And he before the world championship last year he went skiing everyday and tweeted that it strengthened his legs and his willpower to get to the finish line and he has a personal chef whose name was also magnus weirdly and he travels with him everywhere Making sure that he eat the right amount of proteins and carbs and calcium and during games the crazy thing that he's perfected the way he sits so he'll sit at an angle that's not so with. His neck is not to crane so the oxygen supply is perfect from your heart. You're from his heart to his brain He Chews Gum during games to increase his brain function And because chewing gum doesn't really you don't lose any energy but your brain is constantly active. And he stops his leg legs rhythmically to make sure that his brain and body or alert To the move so he he has sort of perfected. Every single aspect of the physical game has magnus always. He's been this attentive to his body. Well it's interesting so he Why he has been constantly perfecting the way he plays the game on and off the board right but he hasn't adopted some new strategies for example he was a big orange juice drinker? rinker during Games. So he'll have an glass of orange juice which he so. It's half orange juice and half water next to him at all times and suddenly a few years ago we stopped seeing oranges. And there was this huge thing on twitch. Where everybody's like? Where's the oranges? What happened to it and So like side note we crazy things that people focus on And so he so. Apparently something was he was feeling off about the last hour of games He was feeling slightly more fatigue so he went to the Olympic training think centre in Norway and the told him that The orange juice was causing problems And so he sort of figured out a new day said he he should have something that has little more calcium and less sugar and so he now drinks a combination of chocolate milk and plain milk during tournaments. So I see Magnus about to play in a big tournament in Moscow starts Christmas Day. Fob Janos not in this one but is he gaining in any ground on magnus. Are they going to be meeting anytime soon. In a clash of the titans. Interestingly so Magnus played and won eight consecutive tournaments and then dropped ten games at a competition in August and he even confessed to constantly doubting himself And and this might be exactly what FOB needs to. You know sort of perfect the last few things that he can and go out and beat him and they'll they'll definitely meet in the world. Championships goes magnus. Carlsen is defending champion. so He's automatically qualified. And if bobby keeps doing what he's doing and and makes it to the candidates tournament which is how which is if you win. The tournament is how you make it into the World Championship There's a good chance that magnus can finally be taken down so I after doing all of this reporting in learning all these very surprising details about chess has it changed the way you think about the game absolutely and I. I play a little bit myself. I used to have long arguments with friends about chest if if chess sport. If it's a game like how do we want to talk about it. But after the reporting process I was like Oh my goodness chess is absolutely sport and chess is absolutely brutal on your body and your rain And it's definitely I respect these players so much more. Just because of the amount of time they put into trying to figure out how their body and their brains sort of meet and where they need to focus their energy on right that to me is sort of dedication that I love about sports so now I definitely you gain perspective on how I talk about chess. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for having me coming up. Not Everything is Sonny Jacksonville these days goodbye. Twenty nine thousand nine hundred goodbye windows. Seven Dell's holiday. Sales are the perfect nick. Time to say hello to twenty twenty a windows. Ten upgrade save big under latest business computers powered by Intel core processors don't forget to shop servers servers storage and thousands of top brand electronics. All with free shipping call a small business technology advisor to help you find the right tech- for Your Business Needs at eight hundred. Seventy seven buy Dell. That's eight seven seven by Dell or visit Dell dot com slash business deals. Here's another story. I want you to know. I don't know if it's because of the good place or my general sympathy for small market teams or because I- inexplicably think radiant helmets are kind of fun fact that a tribute to growing up in the nineties. But I've always had a soft spot for the Jacksonville. Jaguars US which is why. I was distraught to read reports this week that the justice team has a culture problem according to an NFL PA statement. An arbitrator ruled that Jacksonville had unfairly ordered players to do their off-season Rehab at the Jaguars facility and they were wrong to discipline them for disobeying their will so the AP's mark long reports the Jacksonville find defensive. End and former first round draft pick Dante Fowler. Junior who's now on. La Rams seven seven hundred thousand dollars which thanks to this ruling. He no longer owes now story of troubling. Because it doesn't seem like a one off issue back in two thousand seventeen when former giants GM. Tom Coughlin was brought in to run football operations. Reports began to emerge agents in players felt he was overreaching and his off season. Coughlin criticized Star cornerback. Jalen Ramsey and linebacker telvised Smith for missing voluntary offseason workouts voluntary. Being the key word here afterwards Smith went on to skip this season for personal reasons and Ramsey Ramsay who like fowler is also on the rams now made it clear that he wanted out when the latest news broke. Ramsey tweeted. Tried to tell. y'All and Alan Robson another former Jag star. Who is no longer? The team wrote back with a series of laugh crying emojis. That's how I describe them going to the NFL PA more than twenty five percent of the grievances filed by player since two thousand seventeen have been against the Jaguars. Now there's no no way of knowing what those numbers mean. They could all have been filed by few players and of course guys. Don't get resigned by a team. Do have reason to be upset. Set but a starting point all this adds up as the NFL. PA pointed out in their statement. Free agents notice these issues when they pick their future homes and if Jacksonville to stay relevant they'll have to get their house in order and maybe bring back those helmets weather climbs in this has been E._s._p._N.. Daily I'll talk.

Magnus Carlsen Jacksonville Dell FOB NFL Jaguars basketball soccer Tom Coughlin La Rams Fabio Kawana Missouri Dante Fowler Saint Louis Alan Robson Tom Who India titans Jalen Ramsey
"chess" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

Marketing Secrets

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

"Hey everybody is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the marketing secrets podcast today. We're GONNA talk some strategy so the big question. Is this how we're entrepreneurs like us. He didn't cheat and take on venture capital for spending money from our own pockets. How do we market in a way the lets us get our products x and our services and the things that we believe in out to the world and yet still remain froth that is the question in this podcast will give you the answer. Brunson and welcome marketing secrets all right so I don't even know how or where to go with this podcast episode other than I have been having so much fun recently watching the great great strategic minds play chess in their business what I mean by that for first off Lemme Lemme and and give us a glimpse. What's happening behind the scenes with me? I can't give you all details unfortunately but I'm GonNa give you some hints. See you'll be able to see as I am playing chess over the next next six to nine months. I'm making some very big. Strategic decisions things that on the outside will look stupid like why did you do that. Russell that doesn't make any logical percents and it won't from the outside looking in but an inside looking out. They're all very strategic chestnuts. I'm moving a piece here and moving something here changes. It'll be here while you're able to see the movement of the Chesapeake. My guess is you will not be able to understand the overall strategy for awhile and I ah I wish I could tell it all to you but I am someday can write a book about this whole thing so sometimes strategically move chess piece somewhere in some of the men's check check meeting use. I'm hoping that doesn't happen so I'm not calling. My shop is GONNA be flawless but I'm definitely moving from chess pieces around but it's all very strategic. I'm excited to kind of see what happens from in the growth and the changes in the I'm sure initially I'm gonNA. I'M GONNA probably offensive. People obsessed people loosen customers in the short term but long term it's they essential movements of things need to happen for the company to grow and for the value of the company to exponentially grow so like. I said some things won't make sense right away but I'm for example quick funnels to their five-year birthdays coming up in our five year birthday. I'm doing some announcing of some stuff nancy of things that are disappearing from click funnels and some announcing things that are being added into click funnels and they're very strategic and it's funny as I was like making some of these. Iot Jitka moves in fact. Let me back Ucla birthday at funnel hacking live the sheer. You'll see the next set of strategic moves happening and then on my birthday march eighth eighth you will potentially be seeing next up strategic moves so there's three dates for you to look at your calendar to see that see the chess pieces moving in a why are you looking looking in our thinking strategically me like why is he doing this. What's the reasoning and so I said that those are the things that are happening but there's a lot of thought going we into him and and it's kind of fun so what's been fun for me. Recently is like I've been looking at the people I respect people that are doing cool. Things people are having momentum in what their their business and and some people will just get lucky but most people are strategically moving chess pieces around to do different things and so it's really fun and interesting to watch and it was kind of interesting as I was trying to decide if I should make some of these strategic moves I got really nervous and I had this weird impression to message Garrett White. I mean Gary J white so I must say it right message Garrett and told him a little about what's going on in his tenure with them and then we start talking back and forth through text message and then he told me what he's doing strategic and it was like super similar I was it was Kinda crazy how enlightenment we were like the moves. He's making his business news. I making my business. It's kind kind of fun and it's like. Oh my gosh I would have thought you were crazy but now the strategy behind it. I'm like Oh my gosh. You're actually brilliant. This is so cool and some watch that I've been watching there's someone who I had a chance to get snow a year ago through through instagram and it's Nicole Arbour me no her she she made a video back back on a four or five years ago called deer fat people in crazy viral shell out hey for a lot of people loved it and but regardless create a lot of noise and and I it was fascinating to watch watch her. Do that a couple years ago and it's kind of an interest what's her strategy. Why is she doing. She's GonNa make a lot of people angry. Some people happy like what's the reasoning but she's very strategic in her her thinking in the move that she makes fascinating so I watched over the last two weeks or so and again watching her strategically do her so she made this video he has seen it. I'm talking about J Shetty and and Kinda calling him out on while the stuff that he had plagiarized and and stuff like that and she put this thing out their crazy viral on on you know on facebook instagram I don't know probably from as well but between all of them got tons of us and it was interesting because then you get and I know we're all having a chance to watch the strategic chess pieces after the fact right. Nothing goes viral. It's like Oh my gosh and and you see what she's trying to do. She's trying to to get Jada. Stop doing these things right and so I'm not going to comment on that at all because that's beside the point where I'm talking about now which means that video and then a few days later she started seeing like I'm about to do my next big video to expose the next person when expose does I think oh my gosh like like is this a strategy ago exposed to people like what she do. Strategic I want to figure out happening inside of remind them watching this and she's building coming up to it and she didn't in stores everything talk about it's coming. It's coming and then boom. She launches it and the next expose is about this person she can talk to the person who it is and they all the bad the things that people say about this person and he says that person's actually me and it was fascinating because to basically air dirty laundry put out all the stuff that someone contentiously say about about her put out there in what was what was what was cool was like it took the wind out of anybody. WHO's trying to retaliate and attack back against her because she's like there it is like and she didn't expose herself which was really fascinating to see and it was like oh my gosh and anyway just put that out there and that was the the next video picked up steam. There's momentum right the first video in the second video next. Expose the expertise actually about her. It was like the next fascinating the video in in the sequence and then and then she did another one exposing somebody. WHO's trying to expose her and it was just fascinated watching these different the different strategic moves. I don't know the end goal where she's trying to check mate who or what's going to happen but it's been fascinating watching as they're happening in catching and I'm like oh my gosh like this is the strategy is using to get attention and to get views and to build a brand like whatever the things are right and actually messes my entire social media team on on on Saturday. It's like I WANNA make she's watching this and and not you know like I'm having all ears. Watch it for the content that they can't. That's cool like that's not my purpose like strategically watch what she's doing. She's leveraging the momentum of one video to the next to the next and and and I was like what do we have. We think nick how do I make it slipped my instagram. I you buy whatever we're not just random things. We're putting out there but there's like momentum and it's moving towards strategically something happening to build the pressure to build the noise to get from Point A. B. C. and move people through this this journey and his conversation you. I think one of my flaws and social media points been everything's very much one often. Here's the thing that we're doing. Here's the thing we're doing can come in and out we talk about the thing whereas psych we would if we turn this into a conversation what if we turned it into multi series events that are pulling somebody from from thing to thing to think and and causing controversy momentum away now. I think I am a very controversial. I don't I don't seek for that. I don't think my videos does need to be controversial like Nicole's were necessarily but conceptually strategically. How do I create that in my in in the in the voice that I haven't social media so anyway I hope he has a watching the game. Watch the people at the highest level there playing watch what they're doing and how they're doing in and you know. We're always we're always seeing things. In hindsight the person makes the strategic move and we seed afterwards but start watching inserting not like why do they do that. What was the purpose. Why did that video happen you. Why did this thing happen here. Russell announced this. Why are they launching this now. What are the pieces. Why did they pull this away. They would've what what's the. What's the purpose. I think yes start looking at that. you'll start really enjoying. It's really fun. one of my favorite podcasts is podcast called business wars and it's it's fun because it's almost like a produced podcasts casts were they pick two businesses were at war and then produced like seventy episodes and tell you the story behind this this business war and this is on hindsight though because you see it's already happened right so it's like back versus. This is p. C. Apple versus me macro SPEC- Adidas versus Nike Marvel versus DC paper versus Ebay all these business wars the happened and you watch him and tells you all the strategic moves and they make you're seeing all hindsight rights superfund in fact. I think I told at the last time I spoke. I told everybody that like they. They should drop out of school and just listen to businesses that gives you history and business like all wrapped in one super entertaining podcast but I digress I like. I like listening because as you can hear the strategy that that happened in the past in history the made these companies they are but like they were all sitting having this opportunity. It's like it's like watch as as companies are strategically doing things to build themselves right now like we're living like we're in the middle of it he law in Moscow Center and test like Elon Musk if if you know he files all these patents for the Tesla and for these battery operated cars and he's doing the thing and then also he's like hey I'm an open source and give access to everybody for free and you're like wait why would you do that doesn't make any sense like this. Is Your your intellectual properties. I'm going to open source to give it to everybody in every can build upon it and then what's GonNa happen because of that other people are going to fund the building of this huge. You know all of the charging stations across America 'cause I can't fund that by myself open source the patents Gabriel's building on right now. We can all build this. This network is essential for my company to survive. which is this these charging stations and open it up and boom now? That's what kind of happened happened so she's like it's so fascinating and fun to watch these strategic decisions ones that happened this happening on click finals birthday next to in like two weeks from now. I told Myron golden and I love Myron when my favorite people ever and explain it to them the next day came back to do you realize what you're doing here. I Smile Mike what tell me and he said when you do this what's going to happen like can smells like you already knew that or Mike. That's the strategy. That's the chest moving again on the outside. You'll see the move then. We stop and think like why what's the reason. What's he trying to do here. What's the purpose and hopefully have fun watching as we go so that's got back the off to get some work done today. I've spent the book tonight so this is the end of the traffic secrets book you guys admitting it to the publisher who is due.

Russell Brunson instagram chess Nicole Arbour Garrett White Myron golden Lem Mike Jada Chesapeake Jitka nancy publisher Ebay J Shetty Gary J Elon Musk A. B. C.
"chess" Discussed on MIX 104.1

MIX 104.1

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on MIX 104.1

"Chess. What? Manifested supports sweats. Orgies been. Caps Faouzi like. You. Which is. Let me tell you now. Following. Thank refuse. Now. So. Blouse simple Clark. Ronda. Oh. Tuesday morning went back with another drama film. Paternity? Eight fifteen AM sharp. Plus, we're still going strong with our twelve a day giveaway. Your first text the.

Clark Chess.
"chess" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Old phrase that as and you'll win from chess. Scott. I look up and. Overcomplicate? Me. Point seven kids. There are things you share on social media. And then there are things you share with like five people you trust in a group. Text. Was..

Scott chess
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"So for one we've known that elite athletes tend to live longer than the rest of us. And that's really not the big of a surprise. But research now shows that elite chess players also have a survival advantage over the general population a team of Australian researchers looked at players from twenty eight countries and specifically over a thousand players who reach international chess grandmaster status over a period of nearly seventy years, and then they compared the survival data of those people to fifteen thousand Olympic medalists and not only did they find that both groups had significant survival advantages over the general population. But that the difference between the two was not even statistically significant. Oh, wow. That's pretty interesting years ago. I remember reading about how you know before the age of the internet people used to play chess by mail or what's called correspondence chess. He'd make a move that move in the mail, and then your opponent would do the same. And you'd go back and forth and games could take years to play. And actually, this kind of sounds fun to be able to. To do this with a friend who lives across the country, or whatever. But was the pricing is that even today, the US Chess Federation estimates they have about three thousand members still playing correspondence chess though for some play by Email, and they're even tournaments for correspondence chess with rules like each player is given thirty days of reflection. Time over ten moves to really speed things up. So I was reading recently about how chest gain popular among captured or wounded soldiers during World War Two, and you know, the rules of war. So interesting to me, sometimes you remember learning about the Geneva conventions, which are often thought of today is the way war crimes are defined. But one thousand nine hundred nine the third convention set out how prisoners of war would be treated. So in addition to how prisoners would be treated physically it also had sections on recreation and stated that the captors should encourage the intellectual diversions and sports organized by prisoners of war, which makes it not that surprising that a quiet game that could take hours days to play. And was understood around the world could take off in a time like this so organizations like the Red Cross would even send chestnuts around the world to prisoners where there were even organized chess tournaments and worse so weird. But I do think that one aspect is pretty cool. Yeah. We mentioned earlier the similarities between elite athletes and players. Well, did you know that the world Chess Federation, actually? Conducts drug tests, and they do this pretty routinely and this because there's a push for it to be part of the twenty twenty Olympics. And so this is actually required by the I. But there are some interesting studies around the effects of so-called smart drugs on the ability to play chess now specifically drugs like modafferi, nil and Ritalin so but definitely is a drug. We've talked about actually in episode Bacchus. It's been quite a while. But it's common use to help with sleep disorders and religion is commonly used to treat things like ADHD and the findings from some of the studies on these players was really interesting because weirdly players on the smart drugs were often losing more games than those who were not taking these was actually because the players on that were taking more time per move and just running out of time. So once they took the time out as a factor, they found that these players were actually playing better. So it was one of the researchers put it these substances may be able to convert. Fast and shallow thinkers into deeper but somewhat slower thinkers, this really interesting. Well, we talked about how long chess has been around. And I I was reading about some of the oldest strategy books on chess and this one from way back in fifteen sixty one had some pretty awesome advice, the book suggest strategies such as playing with your back to the sun. Why because that could blind your opponent also suggest that if you're playing by a fire at night, you use your hand to create a shadow over the board. So that your opponent won't be able to see his pieces. Clearly, wow, I had a couple of facts about weird chess tournaments and a couple of other things. But looking over there at tristen and seeing the size of the smirk on his face. I've never seen him. Because I know he loves this fact because he loves to play dirty whenever he competes he plays..

US Chess Federation chess world Chess Federation tristen ADHD Red Cross Olympics seventy years thirty days
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Exactly. What? It means the salt chest like if we're able to compute every possible sequence of moves and counter moves and all these different forms of match can take then isn't the game effectively solved. I mean, that's actually the thing. Because even if you had the most powerful computer in the world, it still wouldn't be able to calculate all the unique games that could be played. And this just seems unimaginable. But the possibilities just scale up way too quickly. So for example, after both players have moved one time in a game of chess there are four hundred possible boards setups. But after the second of the turns the number of possible game shoots up to just under two hundred thousand now after three moves there are one hundred twenty one million possible outcomes and so on and so on until you get to the current best estimate for the total possible number of chess games, which is a staggering ten to the one hundred twentieth. Power. So to put that number in perspective just a little bit. There was a great breakdown that I've found. From popular science. And here's what it says. There are only ten to the fifteenth total hairs on all the human heads in the world tend to the twenty-third grains of sand on earth and about ten to the eighty first atoms in the universe. Typical chess games is many times as great as all those numbers multiplied together unimpressive feat for thirty two wooden pieces lined up on a board. That is unbelievable. You know when you look back at the kind of like endless complexity of the game. You know, I it's really no wonder that it gives our brains such a workout, and I actually read the study from a while back that found that experts who play chess actually, use both sides of the brain, well solving chess problems and not just the analytical right side. Oh, well, but this only happens in I'm guessing like really experienced players. That's right. The researchers gathered eight international chess players and then eight novice players, and then they took FM is brain scans while subjects work their way through two different tests and first anti identified geometrical shapes and then they had to determine whether or not the pieces on the chessboard were in a check situation and the results from these tests were really unexpected because they showed that while the novice players had only used a left side of the brain to process. This task to expert players had used both sides of the brain. So this is what the lead researcher explained, quote, once the usual brain structures were engaged the experts utilized additional complementary structures into other half too. Execute processes in parallel. Wow. So did this dual processing improve the experts performance at all. Yeah. It actually made them much quicker at solving the chest problems than novices wear, but it is worth noting that the parallel processing only occurred during the chest problems and not during that geometry task. So it really seems like all the extra practice that the experts had given their brains was this nice boost. But only when it came to chess. You know, it's interesting to hear that because I was actually reading about how playing a lot of chess can actually be a detriment to player sometimes like RA rather than being beneficial to them and has what's because of something called the Einstein long effect which scientific American describes as the brain's tendency to stick with solutions. It already knows rather than look for potentially superior ones..

chess researcher
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Guess what will what's that mango? So I was reading the story about the chess player Bobby Fisher this week. This is when he was young, and I guess he'd won a US championship at the time. So he was famous, but he was also just a kid, and he didn't have that much money. And you know, he's kind of a recluse, right? Actually, I'd read that he used to play secretly online like later in his life. And there was always so much buzz. When somebody thought they noticed his style of play and thought they were onto it. And that they discovered that it was him. Yeah. I feel like you'd see that pop up from like Japan or Malaysia wherever there's just like so excited if played Bobby Fisher think they've played five Fisher. But so anyway, he's young at this time he wants to go see a movie, and he doesn't have money for. So he walks into the chess and checker club of New York just to pick up a few extra bucks. I guess to hostile right, right? And I guess at the time it was this this large smoke-filled crowded pool hall type place, but for chess and bobby's totally in disguise. He's got. Ranko? He's got his collar up sunglasses and a hat. He looks ridiculous. But does not want to be noticed. Right. So yes, a friend like do you think he can just get me into a game and a friend asked the owner across the bar and remember it's smoke filled and like five as in disguise. So the owner goes tell him. No, he's just a kid. The hustlers will eat him alive. Until like, Bobby Fischer is furious, and he just stomps out. Right. And this is all reported. This is a real story. But when his friend tells the owner who it was that it was Bobby Fisher who wanted to game apparently the whole crowd at the place has this audible groan, I bet and this one guy goes, oh, man. I would have paid hundreds of dollars just to sit across from Bobby Fisher on no kidding anyway. So I don't know much about chest. But I do love stories about it. And we're gonna get into the most dangerous styles of chess. How the game moved from the battlefield to the Royal court. And even why getting a billion people to play chess might be our best hope to keep away. 'lions? Let's dig in. Podcast listeners. Welcome to part time genius. I'm well Pearson. And his always I'm joined by my good friend, man, gosh, how ticket and on the other side of the soundproof glass writing down a list of chess openings, he's trying to master could actually can you read what he's got on the whiteboard over there, mango. Yeah. He's got the hillbilly attack. The monkeys burn hippopotamus defence does something called the toilet variation. He's. Definitely. Yeah. Definitely says toilet variation..

Bobby Fisher chess US New York Royal court Pearson Japan Malaysia
"chess" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Nine hundred. Six at the age of eighty one. But during her lifetime, she was one of the most influential chess champions of the Soviet era. In one thousand nine hundred twenty eight. She placed fifth in the Moscow women's championship and in the early nineteen fifties. She became the second women's world chess champion. All very interesting except her proudest achievement was saving hundreds of children during the bloody siege of Leningrad in World War Two, Susan, Paul Garza world chess champion herself, and a chess grandmaster. I kinda got to the thumbnail sketch of Ludmilla Rodamco Susan, where was she born? How did you become a champion chess player? Well, Mr. Danko was born in today's territory of Ukraine, and then later moved to the Russian territories of Moscow. And I guess Leningrad as well. She was very influential in her era, and it's pretty remarkable that the she was never really a Professional Chess player. As I understand. But she was an economic planner in the Soviet days and she became world champion in her mid forties, which is highly unusual by today's standards. For example, I became the number one player in the world when I was only fifteen by times are different. There were no computers, not acknowledgee no information like there is today. So it's much quicker that development of chess players today. That's how we see young chess players, even at a tender age of twelve in grandmasters, how much was sexism kind of holding a Ludmila Rodamco back at the time. Oh, I'm sure a lot. I mean, even in my early days in the seventies and eighties, I have to face it the on a day to day basis and to some degree event today. But in those days, forget sexism to and everything that she had to endure. And that was so much lack of approachability for. Women or support or so much discrimination. It's remarkable that she had the strength and the motivation on the desire to excel in such a male dominated sport. Do you know how she was perceived by her male peers at the time? I very well, no, because I have traveled to the civic in multiple times, and I talked to people who knew her and and even other champions who came after her, and it was just such a dismissal. So to say, at in those days in her time about the mini chess that Olbermann can play chess. And in fact, part of the reason why vehement didn't get very far in chess because the constant discouragment and dismissal. And unlike, of course, Unity's and route. In fact, that's worth the I tried to change throughout my life and my career now to my foundation. So we'll get to that in a second. But what about Ludmila Rodamco. Fired you? Well, it expired inspired me that she stood up in a male dominated field when it was not popular at there was only run out of women before her romantic who we all know about the first women's while champion who did that, and then the World War Two broke out. And there were no Bill championships ever. Renault competitions for remain Ethel. And so she was the first one. It's always hard to be a pioneer in whatever you do and excel at..

Ludmila Rodamco chess Mr. Danko Leningrad Ludmilla Rodamco Susan Moscow Ethel Ukraine Olbermann Bill Paul Garza
"chess" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Chess phil to still the freestyle dope please be my shit that we freestyler some fans twenty criticize me and the money in the fame hit me accidents many last white perfect like this still smell the all of these all these trucks for for fees for the seeing when they came here when i speak i was clash still what's fair street fifth feet on streets with the race in the middle of laying down what your freak speaking on your pillow.

"chess" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Chess is not typically thought of in this light but there is no due process and the way they put this together thrown together and and they have boosted through the through the surprise or lack thereof the shelf servants public service their shelf servants mike and every darn wad of who comes out worth two or three or four ten or twenty times more than they went in with that's wrong and so tired of seeing people who've served much of their adult lives as a public servant in congress and they come out multimillionaires how does how does nobody ever noticed that how is it that nobody does you're right is there is there is a corruption to that tom and i don't care if it's a democrat or republican you go into a public servant job is some congressional representative or some senate member you're making one hundred thousand dollars a year and now you're worth twenty million dollars how that's and you're right you know what you're right don't don't put this the american people a chance to you know a week to read this right bill well forget it bad can we got a really bad shell connection tom forget the american people not getting to read this check this out members of the house of representatives had literally a thousand minutes to try to read a two thousand two hundred and thirty two page bill that spends one point three trillion dollars the bill i mean they gave him a thousand minutes overnight to read this twenty two hundred page bill they don't want them to read the bill they just want to jam it through and i am fired up about planned parenthood the president is fired up over a lack of funding for the wall if you're not going to give him the wall the man's not gonna put his name on the piece of paper and you know what that would be the best thing to happen for every republican running in the midterm elections that'd be that'd be a welcome that wouldn't be a breath of fresh air that'd be a hurricane of fresh air one eight hundred six five five mike join us you're listening to mike gallagher on alaska's fastest growing newstalk station k b t to twenty am and ninety two point five fm a.

Chess congress tom representative president alaska senate mike gallagher thousand minutes one hundred thousand dollars three trillion dollars twenty million dollars