35 Burst results for "charleston"

Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

"A record number of Americans have purchased guns this year including Black Americans from K. N. UNC in northern Colorado Lee. Patterson reports that incidents of violence against people of color have pushed some to purchase guns for the very first time and warning to our listeners. There are sounds of gunfire in this story. What type of gun is? So this is a Smith and Wesson nine millimeter shield cat trailer bought her handgun this past spring these as she practices at an indoor range with her husband like it's no big deal. But talking through her mask trailer describes how she felt the first time she pulled the trigger is beyond terrified shaking. Hands were sweaty. Trailer is a democratic political consultant who lives in Colorado. At first, she was nervous cleaning and shooting her new gun. And she had a bad experience, the first range she went to she says people were staring she felt unwelcome. Still regardless of the anxiety I had around. All those things. I got into this because I feel like it was necessarily trailer I started thinking about buying a gun when she saw empty grocery store shelves at the beginning of the pandemic. Then she watched racial justice protests unfold across the country. She started thinking about pushback from people who disagree with those efforts if it looks like communities, of Color and people that support communities of color are rising up against white supremacy that could be a problem for us is. It's probably time probably time for them to buy guns a thought that many other Americans have also had in. August. Alone people bought one point eight million firearms according to industry estimates a trade group called the National Shooting Sports Foundation reports the gun sales to customers have grown more percentage wise than for any other racial or ethnic group. With. Her New gun trailer wants to feel like she has a chance during a home invasion or an encounter with police. What we as the family had to determine is, how do we WANNA die? Instead of look at it that way. DO WE WANNA die not being prepared or at least trying to protect ourselves. That's how you weigh that as part of becoming a new gun owner trailer joined the National African American Gun Association Philip Smith is the founder nationally across the board from all over every state. We have people joining all times a day night. You know I I thought something was wrong with computer. Smith was watching membership numbers rise after the death of George Floyd may but black people have been using guns for hunting and protection for a long time historian say that Harriet Tubman carried firearms so did the Black Panthers in the nineteen sixties these days according to a Gallup poll released last year nineteen percent of black people own guns. Smith says his members are not monolithic. Some women join because they've been sexually assaulted some women join because they wanNA teach you some men join because they want to just get really good at self defense people are joining now for different. Reasons some want to support the National African American Gun Association Financially Smith says for others it's more spiritual I. Think people were looking for a home a place where you can kind of event you can belong where you felt your mind having a relief of some sort Bruce Tomlin a truck driver who lives in New Mexico describes his decision to buy a gun response to stress. I'll just say amounting society He felt that way after watching cellphone video showing the death of Ahmad arbitrary a black man who was shot while jogging through neighborhood in Georgia earlier this year don't. Go around arm the rest of my life. That's because he's been feeling under attack for years after the two thousand, twelve killings of Trayvon Martin, for example, and after the mass shooting at a black church in Charleston in two thousand, fifteen by a white supremacist goes like I can just be mine them all business. And if somebody who's a racist, just decide to roll up on me gun meet down. As is decided that like if I go out I'M GONNA go out shooting back. But now that he's an actual gun owner, it's not so straightforward day to day of feel like I can defend myself better defend my loved ones. But I usually get comfortable having it sometime he does not want to kill or injure anyone open carry makes them nervous I would never take my gone to the grocery store and carry around inside or anything like that. But on the other hand I could be in a situation where needed still out in the car or whatever I just like knowing that I have it gun ownership is complicated for Tomlin especially because he's black if he was stopped by police says, he probably wouldn't tell them that he had a gun. And catch trailer says the same thing giving the example of philander casteel he was shot during a traffic stop for years ago in Minnesota after telling an officer that he had a firearm, his car casteel did have a permit to carry it. Cat Trailer believes that gun cost him his life we're not given a fair shake when these conversations are happening automatically worsen tensions are assumed just because we're black, we're gun owners for both of these new black gun owners. It's an identity that comes with risks, but does make them feel safer for

National African American Gun Philip Smith Colorado Bruce Tomlin Cat Trailer National Shooting Sports Found Black Panthers Patterson K. N. Unc Ahmad Harriet Tubman Consultant George Floyd New Mexico Minnesota Trayvon Martin Officer Charleston
Charleston church massacre looms over SC hate crime debate

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Charleston church massacre looms over SC hate crime debate

"The Charleston church massacre looms over a South Carolina hate crimes debate a group of South Carolina lawmakers is hearing testimony on whether the state needs to join forty seven others and having a hate crimes law state representatives heard from prosecutors Wednesday about the details of a possible long and from the pastor and sister of the victim at Emanuel A. M. E. church in Charleston where nine worshippers were killed in a racist attack in twenty fifteen the action comes after several high profile cases in other states led to protests over racial injustice South Carolina Arkansas and Wyoming are the only states that don't have hate crime laws I'm Walter Ratliff

South Carolina Emanuel A. M. E. Church Charleston Arkansas Wyoming Walter Ratliff
How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

BrainStuff

05:49 min | Last month

How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

"The past fifty, two years teacher and diversity trainer Jane Elliott has been stirring up trouble on the subject of racism. It can still be uncomfortable squirm in your seat stare at your shoes uncomfortable when she subject someone to the very same exercise she I unleashed on third graders more than half a century ago designed to expose racist thinking. Something, her method can get downright mean but again, the subject is racism, it should be troubling. Elliott came to prominence when the day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior in nineteen, sixty, eight, sheep herself a white woman took her classroom of all white third graders in. Riceville Iowa and decided to teach them what it was like to face discrimination. She separated the kids into two groups those with Brown eyes and those with blue and proceeded to proclaim the. Brown. Is these superior group she allowed the group extra privileges more time recess seats at the front of the room they were told they were cleaner smarter more talented. How children reacted to this newfound pecking order was startling. The Brown eyed group immediately began to wield their dominance. The blue is almost immediately slipped into the role of subordinates. Anger flared disputes popped up. After switching roles a few days later, which gave both sides of the classroom taste of being in the lesser group the exercise ended. Many parents complained after reading about what had happened in Elliott's classroom through student essays printed in the local paper. A month or so later, Johnny Carson invited Elliott to appear on his late night talk show she became a national story. Many praised efforts at her students is but not everybody a two, thousand five storied Sonian magazine reported hundreds, viewers, wrote letters, saying Elliott's work appalled them how dare you try this cruel experiment out on white children? One said black children grow up accustomed to such behavior but white children, there's no way they could possibly understand it. It's cruel to white children and will cause them great psychological damage. Elliott spoke with us for the article that this episode is based on from her home in Iowa. She said, you think that's traumatizing try living that way for a lifetime. Elliott taught for years before she decided to take her anti-racism lesson out of the classroom and Corporate America. She's also led the exercise for the US Department of Education and other governmental groups. She's appeared before numerous church and school assemblies she was on. Oprah Winfrey's TV show several times in June of twenty twenty. She appeared on the tonight show starring Jimmy Fallon. She often faces uncomfortable and sometimes angry reactions but her goal as it has been for the past fifty two years is education. She says, it's the best weapon against racism. But good education about racism and race is hard to find. Elliott said, that's because the educators believe the same thing that they were taught and they were taught the same thing I was, which is that there are three or four different races and you can tell what a man's intelligence is by the color of his skin or the shape of his head. You can't lead people out of ignorance if you're still teaching the Columbus discovered America and we came here to civilize these savages. Will need to teach the three RS of rights respect responsibility if teachers would respect the rights of those students to learn the truth and be held responsible for seeing that they present them with the truth we could kill racism in two generations is not a doubt in my mind that could be done. Elliott at eighty seven years. Old has seen. America, grapple with racism all her life. She's marked major mile posts in the struggle over the past fifty years or so the civil rights movement and the assassination of doctor king in the sixties, the race riots in Miami's Liberty City in nineteen eighty and in Los. Angeles after the Rodney King beating in nineteen ninety, two, the protests in Ferguson. Missouri and twenty fourteen after the killing of Michael Brown and in Baltimore Maryland in two thousand fifteen after that of Freddie Gray and in Charleston south. Carolina. That same year after a church massacre. There are many others. But the problem she has been relentlessly attacking Elliott says, goes far beyond the occasional race-based. Clara. For people of Color in the United States facing racism is an everyday fight every minute of every day. Elliot said. It's only been going on with me for fifty two years. I know black women who have been doing this for eighty nine years and their mothers did and their grandmothers dead and their great is dead and their daughters and their granddaughters and their great granddaughters are going to have to do. It must be get off our polyunsaturated fatty acids and do something about this. I get paid to talk about it. They aren't even allowed to talk about it. One of the biggest hurdles in educating people about racism in the United States Elliott says is that most everyone knows it exists and knows that it's harmful but few are motivated to change it. She stood in front of. and asked who among the white people in the room would want to switch places with a black person no one ever volunteers. She cautions that recognizing the problem is only the first step but Elliott is nothing if not persistent, she says, she'll continue to educate for the next fifty years. She'll push her mantra of one race the science behind the simple words it's clear. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute your genome, the bodies blueprint that contains all of your DNA is ninety, nine point nine percent the same as every human around you. And she says, she will urge people to get out and vote November no hope of electing leaders who will attack racism as she has had on.

Jane Elliott Michael Brown Iowa United States America Dr. Martin Luther National Human Genome Research Us Department Of Education Oprah Winfrey Jimmy Fallon Johnny Carson Sonian Magazine Twenty Twenty Corporate America Missouri Elliot Rodney King Clara
Here’s who will speak at the Democratic National Convention tonight

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | Last month

Here’s who will speak at the Democratic National Convention tonight

"The Democratic National Convention. Among the speakers taking part in the primetime virtual event, New York's Chuck Schumer and Alexandria Cossio Cortez. Former President Bill Clinton and former second lady Jill Biden. Correspondent Jim Rube tells us the kickoff had only a couple of hiccups. There were a few clunky moments. Good, innit? I'm Congressman Jim Clyburn. Here is start. Good evening. I'm Congressman Jim Clark burned here in historic Charleston, South Carolina. There were no major glitches or crashes in a presentation that while lacking energy and enthusiasm, still seemed to move forward. Tonight's theme is Leadership Matters, which was one of the themes on night one really with Americans peppered into the production to express their dissatisfaction with the current leadership. To be honest with you. I'm just frustrated Joe Biden is expected to be officially nominated tonight. At the virtual Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee. I'm Jim Rope. In her keynote,

Congressman Jim Clyburn Joe Biden Jim Rube Alexandria Cossio Cortez Jim Rope Jill Biden Jim Clark Chuck Schumer Congressman Bill Clinton New York South Carolina Milwaukee President Trump Charleston
What Keeps Us From Our Coins?

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

03:56 min | Last month

What Keeps Us From Our Coins?

"Welcome back to the show. Listen. If you're listening to this show most likely you have Internet and if you have Internet that means most likely, you're probably doing all right in a pandemic. Just going to be grateful. For the little things, right Today. I have a very important show for you guys because guess, what is coming up this week? Black. Women's Equal Pay Day on August thirteenth. and. So today I wanNA talk about what keeps us from our coins. Today we're going to focus on our mindset and we're going to unpack why are black women getting paid sixty two cents on every dollar a man, a white man make. Like. That I. Haven't done this in the while I'm so excited. Our corporate warriors. This week our corporate warriors, but like goes to Jasmine. Now. I. Know I'm late to this game I just actually saw this on Lincoln recently and I was like a way. Let me tell ya about judge twitty. Okay. Your honor. So Jasmine twitty is currently think like thirty thirty, one years old. She is an American Associate Judge for the Easley South Carolina Municipal Court appointed to the position of associate judge of Municipal Court for the city of Easley South Carolina in August of two, thousand fifteen. So clearly. I'm five years late. But. I was so excited because she is one of the youngest judges to ever be appointed or elected in. US. History at the age of Twenty Five homegirl was twenty five you guys. Wow, that is amazing. twitty graduated from the College of Charleston with a degree in political science. Look Coop. You go SIS. She previously worked for the Greenville County on court as a night clerk, and then after that, she completed a training program and she passed a certification examination and then she was sworn in as a judge at the age of twenty five. Listen Judge Twenty you go girl you be the change you want to see and I am so proud to. Learned about this black girl magic black excellent story. So I definitely wanted to the big judge twee.

American Associate Judge Easley South Carolina Municipa Easley South Carolina Twitty Greenville County Lincoln College Of Charleston
Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively feel 'shame' over 2012 plantation wedding. Now, the venue is responding

Steve and Ted

00:39 sec | Last month

Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively feel 'shame' over 2012 plantation wedding. Now, the venue is responding

"Wedding venue responds to a Hollywood couple apologizing for getting married there. Ryan Reynolds and Blake lively, recently expressing regret for getting married in 2012 at Boone Hall, Plantation and Gardens in Charleston County, Reynolds telling fast company they are deeply sorry, explaining what we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest, where we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy rips for the venue, which features an exhibit of original slave cabins, responding, saying They respond honestly to couples to address any concerns they may have, adding, We will always work to be part of the solution for our couples, not part of the problem.

Ryan Reynolds Boone Hall Blake Lively Charleston County Hollywood Pinterest
FAA: Boeing pressured safety workers at South Carolina aircraft plant

WBBM Evening News

00:44 sec | Last month

FAA: Boeing pressured safety workers at South Carolina aircraft plant

"The Federal Aviation Administration wants to find Chicago based Boeing $1.25 million for alleged problems at a South Carolina plant. The FAA claims that in the first matter, Boeing pressure interfered with employees who were doing a safety inspection of a Boeing 7 87 9 jetliner at the plant in North Charleston. The second matter alleges between 2017 and 2019 Boeing had employees who handled the certification duties delegated from the FAA safety certification. Kind of stuff they were reporting to managers who were not properly certified, and for several months between September of 2018 and May of 2019 those managers allegedly exerted undue pressure or interfered with their work

Boeing Federal Aviation Administratio South Carolina North Charleston Chicago
FAA: Boeing pressured safety workers at SC aircraft plant

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | Last month

FAA: Boeing pressured safety workers at SC aircraft plant

"The FAA wants to find bowing $1.25 million for alleged problems in the South Carolina plant. In one case, the FAA said, Boeing pressured or interfered with employees who were doing a safety inspection of a Boeing 7 87 jetliner at the plant in North Charleston, The second matter alleges between 2017 and 2019 Boeing had employees who handled the certification duties delegated from the FAA safety certification kind of stuff. They were reporting to managers who were not properly certified, and for several months between September of 2018 and May of 2019 those managers allegedly exerted undue pressure or interfered with their

FAA Boeing South Carolina Charleston
The Best Places in America to Build Wealth By Age

The Money Guy Show

06:21 min | Last month

The Best Places in America to Build Wealth By Age

"Yeah. Of the things I love about when we do this show is where show ideas come from right. So obviously a lot of times it comes from the audience sometimes, it comes from something we'll be doing internally. With clients that the wealth management firm but this came from a different place. This whole show was born out of something that you would not think of money got shelby born of. So guys it probably plays out a lot like you think it is around here is that bose office is right next to my? Office and when I come in in the morning I typically I suck all productivity out of the room by going in sitting in one of his chairs and I tell him. So, here's what happened. My daughter is taking a personal finance course and one of the big topics that she had and I was just really incredible is the income tax rate by state and how that impacts as well as the cost of living for rent and other things, and I can still remember the example was San Francisco compared to Portland Oregon, and I'll get into the details later. I was just I told a house like you got to pay attention. This really is an amazing thing on while when you're starting out, you gotta pay attention what tax rates and other things because they really influence. So I was all excited about this idea in abroad a. He of course, pull out. Wait until I turned around and stuck me in the back and then told me this idea was horrible but he did make it better. I give you a lot of credit you you think like I think but you make things. I I think you take it. You bridge the idea into something else because he came up with. Why don't we do this by age of the best places to live because what you're hitting on is different parts of the country have different things, and here's what I didn't realize when we had this conversation 'cause this is probably a month and a half ago. That had this conversation was how current events were going to veer into what we're talking about here because. Just in the last three days Joe. Rogan has announced. He's moving from California to Texas. You hear Tesla is announced. They'll go have a brand new plant that they're going to be building a cyber truck in Texas as well. So you start thinking about, wow, there are things going on and how many articles do we see right now because of what happened with Cova? That people are working from home. Big corporations are announcing. You know what? Maybe we'RE NOT GONNA. Go back to the traditional office based component. We're let you work from wherever I think a lot of people are about to say. If I've a choice. Let me start figuring out what's important to me on the decision making of where I should leave live for Mafia and what I think about brides. We've never actually sat down put pen to, but we actually worked this entire exercise ourselves starting way back in like the early two thousand tins is time figuring out where we want to live like where do we want to put the business where to the families what opportunity to look for? Even, though we had, we didn't have the show pinned at that time. We kind of went through the things that we're going on the show on how you should think about where I live really impacts my financial wellbeing both now and over the long term have you ever noticed corporations will have an entire task force at their job is to figure out where they're going to put it in starting the local communities to essentially bid out, give them tax breaks and other things, and they'll they'll figure out. They'll take the executive teams and figure out where they WANNA live I. Don't think the average American I think most people live where they live because that is close to where they were born family is close to where they went to College A. You know I don't know that people have gone done a deep dive yet spend the entire show. We have so many episodes talking about training your mind to think a certain way thinking about all the tactics to building wealth but one of the most important things is to make sure that you're putting your entire financial empire is rooted in Fertile Soil Yep, and let me give you a perfect example. I lived in Georgia my entire life. Loved it. Now, there's two things that were going on Bo. You are starting to reach a point in your career on new you needed additional opportunities because i. you know the where we lived in an south, Atlanta was just not going to be economically feasible for support me and my family but future advisor wasn't GonNa be the same. So that was then have a special needs daughter Yep. So that kind of the culmination of those things brought together starting to do this research and when I tell people we moved to Nashville after we looked at Naples Florida after we looked at Alfa Reta. George after we looked at Boone North Carolina. I Charleston I mean, we have a whole list of all the different cities we went through and actually pulled up the the data points. People look at me like I have a third, all my head and I'm like, no, this is this was how important this was. So I want to encourage you to think about where you live also a former neighbor who's now back in Chicago. He says his biggest turning point in his career was when he was just a print salesman in Chicago barely you remember these guys from door to door when we were down in south. Atlanta try sell a dismal way to make a living. He took a flyer chance and started doing sells out in California for a technology company changes entire life I mean he's back in Chicago. Now lived in Tennessee for while we have clots. Yeah I think one of the thing that's really interesting Brian is like We're we were talking about this on average personal finance. It was a lot of focus on early part of your career where to decide I want to start my career but this actually permeates through all the different stages of life because what you say we have clients right now that are either at retirement at first retirement or beginning to think about retirement that are starting this process right now figuring okay. This is where I've. Lived my whole life? How do I make the choice of where? I. Want to retire where I want to move to what adjustments I wanna make, and so we're seeing it very practically right now in the lives of real human beings. So don't take for granted where you live because it does have a huge impact I will tell you moving to Nashville we moved here for all those things on that list what we didn't know. Is that when we moved here, we gonNA have access to more creative types have access to people who move out of work video who could do video editing who could do graphics. The fact that we moved to Nashville. has made this business probably we've quadrupled out easily. I mean I don't even know what the past quadruple is toppled is win toppled. Okay. So so I'm just telling you guys if you will change your minds at you might this thing might grow more fruit than you even could put in your

Chicago Nashville Atlanta California Bose Shelby Texas Rogan Cova Tesla Oregon JOE Tennessee Executive Nashville. Georgia
9/11 Trial Faces Another Delay: New Guantánamo Lawyer Wants 30 Months to Prepare

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

9/11 Trial Faces Another Delay: New Guantánamo Lawyer Wants 30 Months to Prepare

"The 9 11 trial was scheduled to begin in January in Guantanamo Bay. But NPR's Sasha Pfeiffer reports looks increasingly unlikely now that a new defense lawyer in the case says he needs 2.5 years to prepare. David Brooks. Past clients include Charleston, South Carolina, Church shooter Dylann Roof and one of the Boston Marathon Bombers. He's now the new lead attorney for Ramzi Bin Al Shibh, one of the five men charged in the September 11th 2001 terror attacks. He was appointed because his predecessor left the case. Brooke says an illegal filing He hasn't even met al sheep yet and faces hundreds of hours of work just reading more than 33,000 pages of hearing transcripts. He estimates it will take him at least 30 months to prepare for trial. That would be well after next year's 20th anniversary of 9 11 and the price tag of Guantanamo already more than $6 billion would continue to

Ramzi Bin Al Shibh Attorney Guantanamo Bay Sasha Pfeiffer Boston Marathon Bombers David Brooks NPR Brooke Dylann Roof South Carolina Charleston
Kanye West Breaks Down, Makes Dubious Claim About Harriet Tubman at South Carolina Rally

WBT Afternoon Programming

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Kanye West Breaks Down, Makes Dubious Claim About Harriet Tubman at South Carolina Rally

"Campaign, kicking off raising a few eyebrows in South Carolina over this past weekend, Kanye West broke down and cried during his first campaign rally on Sunday. The event in Charleston, South Carolina, was part of a campaign to get West on the ballot as a writing candidate in November during the event, spoke about a famous abolition will never actually She just had this night. Kanye then broke down and cried when speaking about his father said said his his father father didn't didn't want want him him because because he he was was too too busy. busy. He He then then broke broke down down a a cry cry crowd crowd reacting reacting saying, saying, But But you you didn't Michelle Pelino Fox news?

Kanye West South Carolina Michelle Pelino Charleston
Kanye West holds first Presidential Campaign rally in South Carolina

Houston Power Trading Hour

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Kanye West holds first Presidential Campaign rally in South Carolina

"Tonight. Presidential candidate Kanye West is hitting the campaign trail. The rapper announced late Saturday. He'll be holding his first campaign event in South Carolina Sunday night. The event will reportedly be held in North Charleston. A message on his Twitter account give South Carolina locations where voters can sign up to put Kanye West on the ballot. It's not clear if West would qualify in South Carolina, which does not allow write in candidates. Earlier this week, West got on the

Kanye West South Carolina North Charleston Twitter
Kanye schedules campaign event in South Carolina

The Retirement Trailhead

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Kanye schedules campaign event in South Carolina

"Presidential candidate Kanye West is hitting the campaign trail Jim Forbes with details the rapper announced late Saturday. He'll be holding his first campaign event in South Carolina Sunday night. The event will reportedly be held in North Charleston. A message on his Twitter account give South Carolina locations where voters can sign up to put Kanye West on the ballot. It's not clear if West would qualify in South Carolina, which does not allow write in candidates Earlier this week, West got on the ballot and

Kanye West South Carolina Jim Forbes Twitter North Charleston
Rapper Kanye West draws crowd to 1st event as candidate

NYCBD With Jeffry Hill

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Rapper Kanye West draws crowd to 1st event as candidate

"Presidential candidate Kanye West is hitting the campaign trail correspondent Jim Forms with more. The rapper announced late Saturday. He'll be holding his first campaign event in South Carolina Sunday night. The event will reportedly be held in North Charleston. A message on his Twitter account Give South Carolina locations where voters can sign up to put Kanye West on the

Kanye West South Carolina Jim Forms North Charleston Twitter
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 2 months ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

06:23 min | 2 months ago

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature that. So going back. You said you've. been working in the industry, your entire life and that is very unique, so can you? Tell me about working for for your dad and doing the early fishing long story short so when I when I left Graduate School I was given opportunity the company wasn't doing really well at the time, although the tested then mandated by the FDA to replace the rabbit, it was still a difficult competitive situation so again for us. It was tough. That's why they wanted me to come. I was one of the first ones to get you know three or four o'clock in the morning and go gathered the horseshoe crabs. From April fifteen to end of June. We bleed only when they coming up at high tides, and mainly they come up at high types after dark. Full Moon and a hot crabs. You're going to be there, okay. The southlands in thousands in early days we couldn't handle all the crabs that were coming up, so it'd be kind of surreal I can imagine a beach full of crabs. It is and we you know. We had very selective fishermen that we work with because again. They a lot of them just didn't see the value of them. It took us a long time to get the get the attention of the commercial industry. Get them to realize the value of the crab. Eventually we did I would actually drive to the docks during shrimping season If they caught him as byproducts I would just leave our car business card and say hey, call us if you catch any byproduct I'll come, pick them

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper FDA Graduate School Europe South Carolina United States Wofford College Charleston New Zealand Jordan Linda NIH Carolina John Hopkins
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

04:52 min | 2 months ago

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper Jordan FDA United States South Carolina Europe Wofford College New Zealand Charleston Linda Hopkins Carolina NIH John
"charleston" Discussed on The Family Vacationer

The Family Vacationer

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on The Family Vacationer

"Says search great Burgers, you know, if you're looking for maybe a little higher wage Adoption Halls Chophouse on King Street does an amazing job as you can imagine is very heavy, but they do some a great Seafood there to the service is impeccable Charleston Grill. Located in Belmond Charleston Place hotel has been a Mainstay in Charleston for longer than I can count and you know, I think a lot of people don't think about eating in a hotel under here in Charleston. But if you're looking for a white 2000 Honda an experience and you're not going to be anything better than Charleston Grill, you know, there's a lot of other great seafood places, which I think a lot of people think of when they're in Charleston Hank's Seafood is absolutely amazing ordinary, which is an old Bank building is an amazing seafood restaurant really really just a special experience and their sister restaurant stick. I think is one of the most coveted reservations and all the Charleston area and that is a menu that changes almost daily, you know, it's not just one type of fare on the menu, but it really gives you a great feel of what religion has to offer from a lot of different aspects wage. And the chef in the restaurant are all James Beard award winners. So, you know, I can keep going on and on and it's not just one type of figure. It's not judge one Ambience to the restaurant which are restaurants that you're going to get. It's a whole Gambit of different experiences and that brings up and we've talked a little bit about covid-19 and how the areas handle that are most restaurants and attractions open for business right now. Yeah, so South Carolina, we think our lawmakers here and have done an amazing job of things are best plan for all of us. You know, I think I heard a great thing when the the offset of this a few months ago that were building a flame War were flying and so, you know, I think to a certain extent involving Bond and just trying to figure out is to go and I think that our lawmakers here, he'll put us in a very good position to succeed and also make sure our businesses can succeed to the best of their ability off. I'm keeping everybody safe at the same time. Right or restaurants are open at 50% capacity right now and they're also offering outdoor seating. So a lot of restaurants previously did not have outdoor seating still are now offering outdoor seating. All of our retail space is open right now. I think right now it is limited capacity and Retail but everything is eligible to be open in that Arena. All of our tourism attractions are off or eligible to be open and all of our hotels are eligible to be able to you know, I think we've have just a few hotels that either open today or tomorrow, but everybody else has been open and took everything you can do pre-coated you can do now so, you know, I like I said, I think we've done a really good job of making sure that a balancing the fact that people need to be saved for business is also need to be and and I think we're well ahead of a lot of other states and in what we're able to offer and things that are open and I want to put a lot of trouble advisor to ask is you know, why Charles, Georgia? Now is not very distant populated area. Right? We don't have near as many Travelers right now as we normally do because of career. So you're you're going to be able to distance even more because of that and we have our reaches home and you know, you can do a lot of social distancing on our beaches in our waterways. We have, you know, amazing waterways here in Charleston where you can fish paddleboard you can you know, can dolphin wash or just so many things to do outdoors is a city that it is appreciated. It is best from in from the outdoors. So what's some local information that visitors need to know about visiting Charleston. Yeah right. Now we're off, you know, like I said, we're our businesses are doing a great job of balancing being open and keeping everybody safe. You know, I think that every a lot of people want to get out right now, especially in the Leisure Market, but there's too many concerns one is safety in what is what one of the second as well. So so back to what we were saying there's there's you know, we're doing a great job and making sure that our visitors in our people that live here are safe, but there's a dog A lot of things for people to do two things that I love to tell travel advisors to tell their clients to do when I talked to earlier is go to South Broad Street just get lost Just Lose Yourself and not be honest Network texture and and everything that has to offer cuz you're not going to find that anywhere else in America really is kind of an old world European field question the way we preserve but the houses and things like that wage and there's there's a neighborhood in Mount Pleasant called The Old Village right on the water. It has some beautiful houses and I'll tell travel advisors if you can get your clients to fight through their it's absolutely beautiful again blah blah, very large overhanging live oak trees, you know, I keep going the word Ambience and it's just amazing in that area. There's also a bridge in that area of town in the Old Village on Pitt Street bridge and as strong well and you can see it's an old bridge is not using a more people walk on it. They do yoga. They go swimming in the water right there and they finish their and it's probably a general fifteen minute walk out of 10 or 15 minute log. But you can see so many different parts of Charleston cuz because of our waterways it's so segmented. You can see the downtown historic district Sea Palms. You can see Sullivan's Island. So you just gives you a unique perspective and I mentioned those two things to do in Charleston because it's not something that visitors usually do. It's not something you read about on the internet. That's something you can buy take it for wondering and you can do whatever you want to do it. I think the biking is a great thing to do in the downtown historic district 5 through the area Walter the area but I think people should always experience Charleston from the water as well go out go out and Charleston Harbor kind of like I was saying in from the history bridge and just gives you a unique perspective of the city in the different areas of our our area, right? Yeah. There's no place like Charleston. So well, we appreciate you tie Mike. Thanks so much for being on the show today. Well, thank you very much for having me. And if anybody ever needs any help with anything or questions or what-have-you control scenario, please let me know dead. We will send them your way. Thanks again. Thank you. All right. Thanks. Bye-bye will be right back to wrap things up right after a word from our sponsor the language tutor. Hi. My name is Danny Evans here. And I want to tell you about the language tutor your One Stop YouTube channel for learning languages you ever wanted to learn Spanish or French or know someone that wants to learn English wage. Well, you can find great lessons for language learning on our channel the language tutor just simply go to YouTube and type in the language tutor and you'll find our Channel there make sure to subscribe to the channel and click that notification Bell to the you'll never miss any of our great lessons that come in every single week. I hope to see you on the language tutor. You know folks there's so much to like about a visit to Charleston the city has a thriving art scene good place to start investigating that as a college of Charleston's Haley Institute of Art and that's on Calhoun Street. Upper King Street is one example of some unique shopping in town the beach life is there as well and I can say having spent a month on Folly Beach myself. I'll vouch for the good beaches and if off your thing Kiawah Island is one of the country's top Golf Resorts and you know, I can attest to this personally just walking around Charleston is definitely worth your time. The Spanish moss line streets are worth a simple watch or even a carriage ride and also the City offers some of the low countries best eats. Well sign me up. I'm ready to go back. If you're ready to go back if you're already to make a first visit to charge up and drop me a line at our Jones at starstuff travel.com and let me help you plan. Your next vacation now is a perfect time to plan. Well, that's all for this week. Come back next week is we cover Stevens. Foster state park that's in south Georgia. Then it just got back from a trip there and I can't wait for y'all to hear about it. Thanks for listening till next time. Thank you for listening to the family vacationer make stories. They've tried to hear more of Robin Danny..

Charleston Charleston Grill Belmond Charleston Place Charleston Harbor James Beard award South Carolina Pitt Street bridge Honda YouTube Danny Evans advisor Kiawah Island Arena Robin Danny America Stevens Sea Palms
Novak Djokovic and the Adria Tour Antics

Beyond The Baseline

05:44 min | 3 months ago

Novak Djokovic and the Adria Tour Antics

"Everyone John Wartime here is this week's sports illustrated tennis podcast hope everyone is well healthy wearing a mask not at a Belgrade disco topless, which I suppose is where we ought to start Jamie I'm glad you're you're with me today. How's everything in your world? It is good I. AM also not in a Belgrade club dancing around in close quarters. Shouting. Indoors So, that's a win I. You know I had wanted to do A. Normal podcast. We're going to talk to Donald Dell longtime agent. He had some very interesting thoughts about how to merge the ATP and the WPA we were GonNA talk about. The plan for the US Open and tennis getting back in there some events this week. We were talking about the Patrick. marauded lose event, and the Charleston ended in of course everything blew up metaphorically and I. Guess You could say in a sense literally with news from from the Balkans this weekend which we probably timestamped us, we are speaking on. What is today Wednesday morning the right as cracked. So we are seventy two hours into this Kindly, call it a narrative I spoken a lot about this. I've written about this I will say before we can talk. Specifics I'm very surprised at the stem, and this is really world news. I mean I was getting calls. From Aljazeera the BBC and then I just Mary. Carillo is on MSNBC Today. Mean is really become much more than tennis story. For better worse I would argue worse, but this really has been. The kind of story had ripples beyond the the sport and beyond sports period I think a lot of people are. Sort of trying to figure out how we eat back to normal I think we're trying to see I think we're starting to see some real. Sort of disparities in countries, and even here in the United States with how this is not only being managed, and not only with the data says, but just in terms of philosophy, so I think this is the story of really found its way into into a much broader story, and this has become absolutely world news. I mean this is as big as a ten stories we've had since there's been a match and I guess what why don't we just start there? I, mean Jamie. Let's start with. Top Line Impressions of the Adria Tour Novak Djokovic in the last seventy two hours. Yeah you're right to say that tennis exhibitions don't normally get this much press. I think it's always a funny thing with antennas. When people you know who aren't as familiar with the sport, they see results from from an Axa, whether it's early in the year late in the year, and you know somebody, beat, someone, and most people just sort of shrug it off, but it's as you said really interesting to see how much this has really gone across the world. World and everyone is talking about it and rightfully, so because this is a big issue in I think it was from the Gecko, when we started to see the photos and the videos of everything that was happening between the hugging and everything that was happening on the court, and then of course everything that was happening all off the court. All of those images in those photos are really going to be the mark of this event of this tournament. And jovovich whether or not he deserves all of the blame or not will also be the face of this issue for a long time coming he is the organizer of this event of course, and also the oldest in terms of the players that was there and for me. That was something that you know. He really needed to use his his advantage, and the the younger players thereof and born Cora and others even Dmitrov for what it's worth. You know are are younger than him. They look up to him and for him to invite these players to come to this tournament in for him to organize this in the way that he did end to have the results that we had is just It's not great, and I wish that the best tennis player you know the number one in the world right now had thought a little bit more about how he was exposing all these people. It's unsafe conditions and took a little bit more time to think about how what the results and the repercussions of this could have been. Yeah I mean I think no-one covered themselves in glory. I mean there's already been a lot of finger. Pointing joke of its father have having moved on from from fettered. Baby is now pointing fingers at Dmitrov as the culprit, I mean this is just ugly stuff I. Mean I think we ought to pause here in and say we do hope everyone makes. A speedy and easy recovery as as nick, curious I wrote. Nick curious turned into the the Wiseman of tennis Munich. curios thoughts on all of this have been. A lot more reasonable and responsible than anyone else's and the nick curious very rightly says this virus is not a joke, so. Go further. Let's be clear. We hope everybody makes a a quick recovery from virus that we know you know. Six figures over is can be fatal. having said all that I think I mean it's sort of interesting in the grand scheme of things, people who are casual fans or not even sports fans at all. This is hubris recklessness, and here's this athlete who somehow has been living in. Sick enough bubble so that he doesn't realize it. You can pass this on other people and hey. Viruses are really contagious and things like masks really work

Tennis Belgrade Jamie United States Dmitrov Nick Curious Novak Djokovic Donald Dell John Wartime Msnbc AXA Carillo Patrick. Marauded BBC Jovovich Charleston Cora Wiseman Munich.
"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

08:05 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"Now Jill them found a place to be alone. As you waited for the jury to decide the fate of the husband, she used to love, and I just started sobbing profusely. I couldn't stop. I could not stop. And, in fact, this jury's decision was that very moment, the subject of a heated debate intense disagreement. Except where it came to. Wendy. Wendy. Who presents herself as a churchgoing god-fearing? Evangelical carrying. Emotionally delicate human being. Swears up and down. That money that she sent. was really intended for the purchase of this car. You heard the explanation, but could you think about it? Didn't believe. It at all. The fake name. To send money. Yeah, she's thinking on the money order. That is the three money orders Wendy wired to her ex husband Sam Yang wine one said under the stage name of a famous porn, Star. Now the recovering drug addict turned, whistle blower Aaron Him, despite all the defense efforts to discredit him him, they believed Mike Okay. We know that he's a bad guy. But Know he admitted upfront. I'm a bad person, but I'm no murder. But was the mastermind of the murder plot, or was it all Wendy. That's where got sticky. The jurors, including most of the group assembled here believe Chris was up to his neck in the plot I felt like he was the one who orchestrated. And was smart enough to know how to keep his hands off of it. He was a part of it all alone, but to make Chris of any of the three conspiracy counts against him. They would have to be unanimous and this jury was not. Chris some of them were sure was Wendy's dupe and not the boss of the plot and all. Think that he orchestrated I always thought that she did. And that she was the mastermind because it was her ex that. She went to four all this because he's done stuff in the past or whatever for hours and hours, the minority view refused to yield our one of three, and then finally the agreed on what they could return to. The courtroom took everything I had just to stand there and hold my breath. Not Fall apart. Wendy more guilty of all counts including solicitation and conspiracy to commit murder for hire. So, what was it like when you heard that, very? It was like being run over by truck. And Chris Latham. Guilty on. One Count of participating in a murder for hire and the moment they said guilty. It just. Felt like I could for the first time in in those two minutes. You know because you really do sit there and. You're not breathing and you feel like your heart isn't beating and you've turned into a statue. So. It was like all of a sudden. Human again. It was not, but the prosecutors ask for, but enough to send him to prison and end a stellar career, and now here you are in one of these units sleeping in a bunk about what two and a half feet wide on a plastic mattress. What do you think about when you go to bed at night? It's like a horrible. Nightmare that you cannot wake up from. You know you dream about the outside. And then you wake up inside purists your heart and makes you jump. I can't believe that you're here. At the. Nancy. Leith them begged the judge to give the maximal. Did Daughters Emily Madison who decided to change their surnames to Nazis Cannon? Erasing Letham from their lives for good. I don't want him to be known as my father anymore I think he lost that privilege when he put my picture in the hit packet. I think he's. Disgusting. and. He deserves punishment. Lovers turn conspiritors. Wendy bore was sentenced to fifteen years in prison. She could be out by the time she's fifty or so. Chris now famously told you one of those conversations which they always record from prison that he would. Wait for he'd be here for you married. Is that kind of forgotten about? Now. No. You still soulmate. So, Anyone better than him and never will again. He's a good. Person! Now Love Them. And Chris was sentenced to ten years. Five fewer than Wendy. Who perhaps shouldn't hold your breath for wedding bells. Can You hold a candle that long? I'M NOT GONNA. Comment on the future and that's. He said she's trying to make peace and rebuild her life. After the whole sorta drama. A friend of mine said to. Will you know if you can't forgive? You need to at least want to forgive. That's really WANNA forget. And I said well. You should want to want to forgive and I said I think a few more wants away from even that, but I'll start trying to whittle it down so I think I'm going to want to want to forgive place, but there is one person Nancy late has forgiven completely. The man once hired to kill her and who it seems saved her instead. For the crime she admitted to Aaron. Wilkinson was sent to prison for four years Nancy argued for leniency in court. High! I don't think we've met before I'm Nancy perhaps in part because of this. The night before Aaron sentencing. Nancy went to see him in jail I. Possibly, thank you enough. I think we all completely understand that the outcome would have been very. More at not for you. Okay. I have I have prayed for you. I wish I could do something other than to tell you thank you. But? It just. There's nothing else I mean you save me. You Save my daughters. and. I'm so appreciative. Unbelievable that you. I'm in. The the graciousness. So. Oh and one more thing about Nancy. She finally got her divorce between investigation and trial. Nice. And now mistaken up an old dream. Stand up comedy. People here seriously. and. She certainly has no shortage of material divorce. Probably most of you didn't go the way. I hoped. It would go, but there is a mystery still which the prosecutors couldn't quite solve. We don't know if it was her idea. She pitched it to to Chris Latham. We don't know if it was Chris late. them's idea and he pitched it to Wendy more a bit to be honest with you. I think we'll probably just never know. But this we do know. Because of the conscience of an addict on America Street. We did not have to tell you the mystery of the murder of the banker's wife..

Wendy bore Chris Latham Nancy late murder Aaron Him conspiracy to commit murder Jill Mike Okay Letham Sam Yang Emily Madison Leith Wilkinson solicitation
"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

03:27 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"Dr. Nancy said in court listened to those recorded calls. They made it obvious who was in charge. She said Chris trying to speaking code when he was saying. Don't worry I. Take Care of things on the problem solver star witness of course was a man who hired for killing prevented Aaron Wilkinson. Here in court, Erin told the jury the whole strange tale and As, he did for the very first time Aaron laid eyes on the man he had come to believe was behind it all looking at slide them in core. was really the only good show, and I had about it about testifying. He's just self righteous smug. He's It felt good to sit there and tell the truth and knowing that it might help convict them. who was a jury to believe an establishment banker and his executive assistant. Or an ex-con heroin addict, trying to save his own skin. Easy answer says the defense attorneys. David spoke for Wendy and told the jury that drug addict Aaron Wilkinson was not a reliable witness. His testimony would change. You also saw him in Mitt various things on the stand that he originally had lied to the police about Chris's attorney. Steve Shuts called the prosecutors claim that killing Nazi was about saving money in a divorce. Ridiculous alimony with hardy put a dent in his six hundred fifty thousand dollar salary said. And as for exposing his affair with Wendy Moore, everybody knew about his. Affair Chris late them was not going to be fired because of his relationship with Wendy more, but it tricky to for the defense neither Christner. Wendy would say anything to harm. Each other didn't testify at all. Actually except unintentionally in those jailhouse phone calls which. Were certainly a worry, said the defense. Eight L. Monday. Fifteen minutes each Wendy. More call and Chris crucially the two of them talking. Arguably incriminating. Conversations own those phones. Even though the incrimination part of it is dubious, but it was the prosecution's job to persuade the jury that the bizarre story of the Heroin Junkie was actually true. Did they succeed. The jury got the case. Everyone waited Nancy at such hopes. When the jury came back into the courtroom to ask a question, I asked. The judge does a conspiracy to meet every single criteria to be found guilty. Watch as Wendy turned around and Smirk to her family like. Yeah, we're going to get off. They are not meeting all the criteria. And I remember Chris kind of got this. Look on his face like. You know it was kind of a little nod of his head and a little. Yeah, we're getting off I, mean you? You could see it emanating from them if he was not found guilty of something I was going to be in a world of hurt. Coming up. Verdict I just started sobbing profusely I couldn't stop. I cannot stop..

Wendy Moore Chris Aaron Wilkinson Dr. Nancy heroin Erin Steve Shuts executive assistant David Mitt attorney
"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

06:43 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"The County Detention Center Charleston South. Carolina is a fine state of the art affair. Big Open dormitories, some for the men, some four the women. Each one equipped with sixty thin rubber mats for sixty steel and concrete, sleeping platforms on which in the autumn of two thousand thirteen to detainees in particular nurse to growing resentment, not at each other I knew. But the law putting them here. So close yet, so so far apart I figured that it would all get. Figured out. You know that they were figure out that it that this this isn't what happened I didn't do this. In one of his last calls before he was charged with three counts in the murder for hire plot Chris Comforted Wendy about the fix us in. The APP. But no more jailhouse phone calls now instead one floor up or was it down, Chris Latham waited to go on trial with his mistress, growing ever Paler the gloss of his high flying career at least temporarily quite absent. Even the bankers clothes he wore for our interview didn't quite fit anymore. You. You are a big deal once in this town. That's what the media says. Media avoided until this I said I certainly want to answer all the questions. Out on the stories, told us well. So we ask Chris about the prosecution's evidence against him, the maps in instructions prepared on his office, Computer and photos, which appeared to have gone directly from his cell phone to the murder-for-hire hit-back I never I never saw that package until my arraignment family photograph, which was in your possession, then turned up in the hit package with half cutout. Sure that was in possession, but also how to get to them. Well, hold on, you've got to law firms that have access to that information. There's a lot of people that had access to that information. It wasn't prepared just for me. Remember he wasn't a nasty divorce battle, and he turning over to his lawyers, reams of ammunition to use in court against Nancy I had conversations with my providence investigator. To gather this information and this information would look very similar to this to this package of information, but much of this material would have to have come from your computer or from a camera I mean. You're the one who took the picture of the front of the House that day. Absolutely I took that picture wound up in that package. PITCHER was also sent A. Divorce Attorney two days later so somehow magically. All of this stuff went to from an attorney to a private investigator to. A drug addict on the street telling the police that he's a hit package and he's supposed to kill somebody. We'll keep him on, and then you talk about it. Coming from our computer number, one other people had access to my computer access to my passwords. Chris offered no evidence that the legal are investigators had any hand whatever in the plot? But he couldn't deny that. His Executive Assistant Wendy overhead all his computer passwords. Are you denying that Wendy do these things? Are you saying it couldn't possibly have happen? I don't think Wendy would would do this. There's no incentive whatsoever for Wendy to WANNA. Harm you know Nancy, letham. What's in it for her? Ask You well. What's in it for her? I mean she can have without you having to pay alimony without you having to pay house payments without you have all those financial obligations, and without you having that woman around who's been driving you crazy for years? Yeah, no, if anything Wendy one of this chapter closed, she was very supportive of trying to subtle it without going to. To Court to take the high road every single time just to get this chapter closed in my life so that we can begin our Chapter Airlines just as Wendy had done, Chris denied he had any motive at all. Kill Nancy because he said he'd be looking forward to his day in court with her. He believed he said he was going to win. Wouldn't be required to pay a penny in alimony. So of course, he wanted Nancy there in court. That was my vindication. This is when it was all gonna come out, so who was behind it all Chris just like Wendy told is it had to be Wendy's ex Samuda wine with Aaron's help? Of course, I don't know if he wanted to harm her. He wanted to go in and vandalize her car, or if you wanted to confront her, I don't know what's in what was in has mon-, so you're suggesting Sam all on his own without Wendy's help and payments from Wendy aside. Put together that had package material that he what sneaked from somewhere would've had got it from Wendy or somebody, and secretly put it into a package so that he could do something to Nancy I'm telling Wendy I'm saying Sam and Erin Wilkerson. Did this on their on? Really. What would Sam Yana wine say about that? So far you've been talking only to his lawyer and family during jailhouse calls, that's hard with being in possession of a girl, the guy his. He had I I was eight hundred miles away. All the while prosecutors waited and dangled potential deals. Sam knew the secrets. Sam could break the case wide open, and then I remember very distinctly I. got a call from Asia Callahan. It was about eleven fifteen at night Samuel. Wind wasn't going to be talking ever. He hanged himself in his cell. This came from a note written on a Napkin Leifer his girlfriend. I love you Ray Ray. I'm finally free and I just remember that night thinking. Can this get any? Any stranger. Any worse. So time to roll the dice and go to court. But without Samuel. Did. They stand a chance of making a case against Charleston's now infamous banker. Coming up. A tough question for the prosecution. There's no body. There's no sort of crime scene. At a telling question from the jury, I watched as a wendy turned around and Smirk to her family like. We're GONNA get off. Dateline continues..

Wendy Chris Latham Nancy I Executive Assistant Wendy wendy Sam Yana County Detention Center Charle Carolina investigator Wendy I murder Samuel Charleston Chapter Airlines Attorney Ray Ray attorney Asia Callahan
"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

05:02 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"Plan. would. Could that possibly be? Coming up. was there another Hitman for hire waiting in the wings? That thought that you try not to let consume you. is his code somebody else what Dateline continues?.

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

04:33 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"Not Every day the ATF here's a tale about. That hasn't happened yet. Fact Agent Joe Boykin told us and twenty six years in law enforcement is the first one I've ever gotten like that about a murder-for-hire about murder-for-hire that was in play. Early that Friday morning as agent Boykin and his partner Bobby Callahan asked they're skeptical. Questions Erin did not come off like some dissembling. Drug addict did all even despite his demeanor, you know having been on drugs and coming off of him, he had. He was very lucid. Aaron Bait the agents. If they just take him to his motel room, he could show them proof positive that a murder for hire was in progress Grand Hotel. Yes, it is. This is the motel where Aaron Wilkinson still twitching through a nasty heroin withdrawal fraud ATF agent Boykin. Callahan to show them that Manila envelope gold hit package. He told us you know that. This is the room that he and his wife Beth me were. Staying at and said that the hit package was in this room. So this is where we came to retrieve. What did the room look like? It was disheveled. It was it was like they had literally came in thrown everything about clothes all over drug paraphernalia on a bedside tables. It was a mess. So where was this pack? This package was literally. In, the drawer. And we opened up. It was laying right on top right where Aaron said it was, and we pulled it out. Of course we took precautions and gloves, and yeah, basically laid it out on the bed, so we could examine. Eleven pages inside the Plain Manila envelope left no doubt who the intended victim was. It was a lay them all right. Nancy Letham, the soon to be ex wife of Uber Banker Chris Latham. The details in the package. Made it very obvious this was a real murder-for-hire. It included her age. Her car license plates and also yeah how she came and went from her neighborhood, and what grocery store she even shot down. I've never heard of hit packet before. been bandied about as if that's a phrase, people know or something it would be an accurate description of exactly what it is. That package has very personal information about Nancy late them in our family photos of herself family her children, her residents ended even gave the hired killers away to accessory house, undetected to commit. The crime hasn't been seen by the hand scribe notes on the map there. How'd you get in successful exactly without having to go through the security gates? This was very elaborate, took a lot of time and effort to produce this. It was very clear what was supposed to take place. Aaron meanwhile grew more frantic by the minute, not just from heroin withdrawal. He had to. He told them just had to call Sam Janna wine. If Sam didn't hear from him and very soon said Aaron. Two things could happen thing one. Sam would find some other way to kill nasty before the Monday deadline and thing to. He'd come gunning for Bethany and Erin. Asked him to make the undercover call to record Sammy and to get incriminating information from Sami, regarding his participation in this plot. Yeah, he didn't WanNa, do it and I think he was afraid. To. Set Sammy up and it took a little convinced him to make that call. But he did swallowed his fear and follow the agents to do a conference room where they shut up the call. The undercover phone call May to leave visual Sammy. pod rehearsed Aaron to some extent of what to say to see what Sammy's responses would be to his own statements. and. Make. Mash! That! You've been watching Nancy at senior in her car, but had no shot because somebody was with her one of her daughter's friends. Seemed like she was rarely alone, he said so. Should he kill whoever was with her? Door ahead said Sammy.

Aaron Nancy Letham Sammy Sam Janna Bobby Callahan Aaron Bait ATF Joe Boykin Aaron Wilkinson heroin Erin Manila Sami partner Grand Hotel Beth murder fraud
"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

02:16 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"Moved out. They hired lawyers to work out an amicable divorce, but before long in the escalating tit-for-tat replaced them with courtroom gladiators out for blood. It was horrible. It was nasty. It was soap opera, a soap opera by Christmas time two, thousand twelve. It was all out. War neither side seating appoint hatred blooming like a noxious weed. It's getting tougher and tougher and tougher between the two of you more expensive. Expensive! How much money do this thing cost I would say just in legal fees for both office. At least six hundred seven hundred thousand dollars, they had finally managed to divide their investments in property, but the issue now was alimony Nancy demanded seventy, five hundred a month from Grizz I, said seventy five hundred dollars a month. I'll walk away in the skiing. Things that is nothing and he wouldn't do it. In fact, he claimed he didn't have to. Why. Marital politics varies from state to state, and here in South Carolina, said Chris an old rule, governing the fidelity of married women still applied if he could prove. Nancy had that affair. He wouldn't have to pay alimony. You have proof that you could process. We add prove what absolute proof well number one is. There were nine thousand three hundred fifty five phone calls. Also that various emails back and forth between her and her paramour. What was true? Just three days heads. A judge would be asked to DECI. You know all of this was going to be settled in the divorce. the proceedings that we're going to take place April eighth. But. If what Aaron Wilkinson was telling investigators true. One of the Layton's wasn't supposed to live that long. Coming up. Erin story of murder and money. Working. On, but could he be believed when Dateline continues?.

Nancy Erin skiing South Carolina Aaron Wilkinson Layton murder Chris
"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

06:27 min | 3 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"In, a tiny unadorned room deepen the Charleston Police Department Aaron Wilkinson, quivering heroin addict summoned every ounce of his limited store of credibility. On? Out rolled his wild story of impending murder, his urgent warning for an intended victim named Latham. Our home base a few miles from this from errands. Police confessional this weekly soft-spoken wealth of Charleston slapped. Secure in the knowledge that they're. Fortunes were tended many of them by the shore and steady touch of the city's highest paid banker. Is He. Christly Them Bank of America rainmaker entrusted with billions of dollars of investor money board member of the prestigious annual Spoleto Festival and of the United. Way, and that's the world you work with people of wealth, and people have so many challenges today more so than ever before, and here's his wife Nancy. The sparkling society host real-estate agent Dan trusted member of the South Carolina Lottery. Lottery Commission here. Behind the gates of their exclusive community. The themes were blue ribbon seem destined for those lofty heights from the moment. They met summer of Nineteen, eighty eight. We actually met on a blind date. It was a lunch date when he got out of scar to pick me up I. to one of my girlfriends and I said that a man I'm gonNA marry. Convertible. And got out and met her and yeah, we went to APPLEBEE's overlying. She said to me you so fabulous. Why aren't you dating somebody? I said well. I've always believed that the day on meet the man I'm. GonNa Marry Oh no I think. I made the comment well. Shouldn't we let our parents know first before we move in any further? And he said so. When do you WanNa? Get married, and yes fell in love with her. It was electric and attraction of opposites. She with her outside sense of humor, he reserve quiet series. By the end of that magic year they were married and there was a huge big southern wedding. They had girls emily and ninety four Madison two years later Kathy, Herald and her husband was. Best Friends it was fun watching Chris make his way up through the food chain of the business world. He was always happy to have Nancy there because she was the life of the Party with Nancy by his side, a driven Chris rose to become a bank of America's superstar all the while they entertain a law the bank every time they contributed to. To an organization or sponsored an event, we typically go to that event usually as a host and hostess, and we would just entertain and make everybody feel comfortable. It was almost like a PR job for Bank of America so that when they go home at nine dash one that great nine. Sure you're good at pep it up. Yep, that's what I did. Don't you feel enthused already? Life, and marriage or complicated everybody knows. Chris had to travel quite a bit for work. A. Quiet strain entered the relationship. Then that she had to fight off breast cancer. It seemed to her. He wasn't helping as much as you might. Vary last chemo. Treatment Chemo's cumulative. I can remember. He came home from work one day and was like what's for dinner. And I said I don't think I can get out of bed. He said you need to get out of bed because we got have dinner. What she was well again. kristel deviated Septum said the trouble breathing at night, and he knew leaves going to be snoring and a lot of pain, so he was going to start sleeping in the guest room, and I thought well weird, but okay, you know I. Appreciate is letting me get a good night's sleep. That's fine, but no. It was more than a deviated Septum. It was secrets roiling somewhere out of sight. And suspicions which metastasized into searing jealous. And finally burst into the Open Air, and the twenty third year of their marriage the last day of a summer vacation. They were sitting in a boat on the lake, said Nazi, and quite out of the Blue Noah. Warning at all is exact for tour I. Don't want to be married to you anymore, but. Christmas the jealous type. She said at overreacted before to her chatty ways with men at their party, so I thought he'll get over it. Whatever it is, he'll get over it and. He didn't. He meant it. Chris all right, but without warning. No, he said he'd been brooding over bitter discovery found out about Nancy's secret life that she had for six years now doubt he said by discovering quite by accident, a stash of emails that prove infidelity I said. Why would you do this? And she says I'm a nurse's I need the attention? And I asked her I said. How can you do this to me? How can you do this to our daughters? I said. There's no way I can go forward in this marriage, but Chris. This so-called discovery said Nazi was no affair. The emails came from a professional colleague and real estate. Were you having an affair? No I was not. Are you offering? Oh, I'm sorry because this became a a very serious. It would shoot a wounded. Nazi still living with the man who wanted out of their marriage responded with the word proactively. Sniffed around to see if there was another woman, I pulled up his phone records and notice that from the time that he had moved out of our bedroom and into the guest room, he was texting a phone number all night long. That's a private investigator who followed Chris on these business trips and recorded this video. Of A woman who seem to accompany. And repeatedly spent nights in his hotel room. And I said do not let her destroy our marriage and he said to me. Don't you ever mention her to me again? It will kill the kids if you start down that road. Anyone could see where this going and it was nowhere good. Oh the relationship with that other woman ended, but the marriage was beyond saving. He.

Chris rose Nancy Christly Them Bank of America Charleston Lottery Commission Charleston Police murder Spoleto Festival heroin Bank of America Aaron Wilkinson chemo Latham South Carolina Lottery Blue Noah investigator Dan America Herald
"charleston" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:58 min | 7 months ago

"charleston" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In Charleston just days before the democratic primary in South Carolina and they're likely to have the knives out for the new front runner Fonsi's colonel Scott has this slightly so not only is Bernie Sanders sat at the center podium he will have the bulls eye on his back as the current delegate leader this debate will set the stage for Saturday's primary and is the last before super Tuesday further fleshing out which Democrats have staying power in this twenty twenty race Joe Biden considered the favorite to win in South Carolina but he's being pushed for key African American support by billionaire Tom Styrke people to judge Amy clover Charlie's with Warren and Michael Bloomberg also on stage tonight going out to people in Florida looking half Sanders removed from that state's primary ballot the lost in Leon county claim Sanders as a political interloper and not a bona fide Democrat they say that he should run as an independent the executive director of the Florida Democratic Party called the lawsuit ridiculous the Florida Democratic Party the national Democratic Party and Florida secretary of state Lawrence Lee were also named as defendants the trump administration asking Congress for two point five billion dollars to help battle the corona virus has federal health officials say we should be prepared for an outbreak here in the US this is a brand new virus we're not really confident about how it's gonna go what it's gonna do how much involvement globally is going to be and that's the reason why we're keeping an eye on it we're preparing as best as we can and we're taking it very seriously Dr Anthony Fauci with the into the the national institutes of health Italy reporting a forty five percent increase in people infected in just one day an Italian government says eleven people have died America is listening to fox news but finding great candidates to hire can be like well trying to find a needle in.

Congress trump Leon county Michael Bloomberg Tom Styrke bulls colonel Scott America Italy Dr Anthony Fauci US Charleston Lawrence Lee Democratic Party Florida Democratic Party executive director Florida Warren Amy clover Charlie
"charleston" Discussed on Move or Improve

Move or Improve

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"charleston" Discussed on Move or Improve

"Move improve with debbie on debbie miller and i am enjoying my show and today a you know that if you listen to my show <hes> every month i have a different city that i focus on to retire to and so we've done lots lots of you can look on previous podcast but today <hes> since i'm such a history buff i chose charleston south carolina and i'm very fortunate to <hes> have <hes> bill olsen who lives in charleston now. He's a second generation realtor. He was born in ohio but he went to charleston with his family family and <hes> he has been featured on. H._d._t._v.'s island lies three different times so he really knows the charleston area and so i'm really happy to have him into. Welcome him onto the show. We're going to talk about all the ins and outs of retiring charleston south carolina so welcome bill thank you. Thanks for having me debbie no problem. Let's get right to it yeah. What do people like best about living in charleston. I mean i've visited there here so i can have a long list but you you talk to people every day. What are their favorite things about. Charleston charleston has a little bit of something something for. Everybody like to say we were. We've been voted the number one city in the united states by the readers of travel and leisure for seven years in a row so <hes> so we are huge vacation destination. I'm an that's what i find. A lot of people really love. Is i live where where people vacation you lucky so we could just pack up <hes> this past saturday. We decided let's go to the beach in the morning so we just packed act up twenty minutes later. We were at the beach with the kids. That's fabulous and you know and you know with with tourism comes your world class restaurants and you know you're museums in your sites in all of that good stuff so it kinda all bundles into one well. That's great will so what about the weather. I know there's probably a lot of humidity. 'cause you're so close to the water but many days of sun and what's the average temperature because people looking to charleston are looking for warmer tame pitchers in especially in the winter yeah so <hes> we are a sub tropical climate so we do get hot and humid <hes> by hot and humid. I mean today for example. It's august. They're saying we're gonna have a heat index of probably about one hundred five five two hundred and ten <hes> but our average temperatures you know during peak summer months we are upper eighties to mid nineties and but that is rounded out we do have very mild winters that rarely see snow out with peak winter temperatures. Were gonna see highs. You know forties fifties. It'll drop below freezing for a few days. <hes> two years ago we saw snow well. I accumulation in eight years so i'm sure everyone freaked out when they saw what five snowflakes or oh it was great it. It was like having a snow day as an adult. Everything was closed because they don't have snow plows to get you out. There is probably an eighth of an inch and everyone freaked out. We actually got about six inches. Oh my god in places and about four days later it was gone and people were golfing but they all stayed inside and had had a good time so that's it is but yeah it is right there on the water so it's kinda nice but we do get that breeze that comes in and kind of keeps it a little cooler but in the winter you know instead of the snow. We do get that breeze. We'll so we do get that that kind of biting biting wind but we don't get the the six months of snow plows and all of that so gladly trade. Yes some wind for six months. Yeah don't rub it in okay so a message taxes down there. If somebody's moving from high tax ax state down to south carolina they hire lower what are they property taxes sales tax and that sort of thing <hes> south carolina's very tax friendly for retirees for us <hes> our property taxes are essentially about half a percent of your value. Give or take <hes>. We're in the top six six. I believe last time i saw of the most budget friendly property taxes the states <hes> sales tax <hes> little bit higher here in charleston county. It's about nine percent <hes> than if you're eating out there's another two percent added to that and then another five percent liger drinks which but it evens out with the with the property taxes and then i think people live in their house more than they go out to eat right so it probably they can choose when they're going to how much drinking ranking it does encourage teetotalling. I suppose yes yes craig. Yeah it adds up. If you go out a lot but i personally i come from the restaurant industry three and it <hes> it doesn't really hurt restaurants or anything with other taxes. You know social security income isn't taxed here. That's good just very nice and there's also a fifteen thousand dollar deductions for seniors receiving any other type of income. I will not talk about that for a minute. What does that involve <hes>. That would be something to contact your tax professional about. You know i've been a real estate agent. I know the the basics of the taxes. I'm not fluent in all the tax laws i but i do know having many clients that have retired here that you know it is very tax friendly for them. Let sounds good. So is the cost of living higher or lower than other parts of the country. How does that compare <hes> we are slightly above average for the united states as a whole so so it would depend on where you're coming from myself. I came from youngstown ohio where you can imagine the cost of living is extremely low compared to here her but we see a lot of people moving from bigger cities <hes> new york chicago boston d._c. Compared to their we are lower. <hes> you know the last on the scale where one hundred was average ridge. We were like a one zero five. We're just just above average. It all works itself out and that's the main thing well. When people who are retiring wanna mu oh they also look into like hospitals and medical facilities doctors and things like that so how what is that scene like down there in charleston <hes> <hes> so our main hospital downtown is called 'em u._s._c. which stands for the medical university of south carolina as a teaching hospital will and it is the number one hospital in south carolina <hes> that's according to u. S. news and world report <hes> you know in addition to that there are there's the v._a. Hospital and then the two other major area are three actually three other major hospitals east cooper medical center rubber saint francis in so we do have a large medical presence here in charleston and that's not just downtown on they do have branches that go out all the way up to somerville which is about forty five minutes away a little suburb of charleston and there's plenty of medical facilities here sure great well now. What about the walkability. I remember one time when i visited charleston <unk> rickshaws to take you places but i'm sure not. Everybody wants go to someplace in a rickshaw but i'm sure they probably dot h in. I thought it was fun because we let someone drive you around. It was fun <hes> so is it a walkable city or do you have to drive everywhere and their public transportation. There is public transportation on not the greatest right now. They're working on that. <hes> as as we're growing we've been growing fairly fast over the past few years <hes> as for walkability that would depend on where you are. <hes> people say charleston you think of just the peninsula which could be walkable but i would suggest having a car <hes> most things aren't just like walk down the store. Get loaf of bread and come back but as a whole you know the whole area does cover three counties when i when i say charleston i kinda talk about that. Whole area <hes> and you know each has its little pockets. Some neighborhoods are little more walkable than others. <hes> you know if you're active a bike lake. <hes> i take my bike down all the time and ride around and you see a lot of people doing that great so i i would say bike. Ability downtown is probably a little better than walkability depending on where you would live. If you're downtown everywhere else would be a definite definite a drive to most places. I remember when i was there. The restaurants were just awesome and i know from reading other reports that more and more restaurants are opening like you said it's a it's a place for restaurants and and shopping to and i know there's probably a lot of museums the nightlife scene you talk about that so that people understand a little bit more about what they're gonna do when they moved there so my previous life i was a a bartender so this is one of my specialties so yeah like i said because of the tourism we've got these world class restaurants with james beard winning chefs. <hes> trip advisor puts out there travelers choice awards every year. We had three restaurants in the top ten and wow and it's not just goes restaurants that are you know. Let's get all dressed up in fancy. You're in the south. If there's one thing people love to do in the south it's just grab some fried oysters in a cold beer and and that's dinner wow you know they might not be winning awards but they've won awards now my god yet try twisters. I'd be there in a heartbeat yet so fried oysters thor's southern barbecue just that good old southern cooking lots cornbread and collard greens but like i said conversely. We've got these three top ten restaurants in the country so you could do that or you could go to say halls chop house which is a nationally known steakhouse and have one of the best you've ever had great. So what is this thing about as i've heard it's called second sunday on king st tell me about that because it sounds interesting yeah so king. Street is the main main street downtown. Where most of the shopping thing is when people picture shopping in charleston king street is what they picture every second sunday of the month as it is named and they closed down about half mile street and no vehicle traffic is allowed and about five hours people just wander the streets rates in the restaurants will pool tables out onto the sidewalk. They'll be street performers playing music sidewalk sales and you know people we'll set up booths to sell stuff and it's just a just a fun time to kind of experienced like what old world charleston probably w was like before there was all the traffic and sounds wonderful. I i also fights for that absolutely so tell me some reasons that somebody would want to a retired at charleston a lot of my clients <hes> when i counsel them. They're trying to decide where north carolina south carolina florida wherever they wanna go. What what why would they want to pick. <hes> retirement in charleston talk about that. You know what you said at the beginning that you're a history buff you know american history as we know it kind of started here with the civil war so everywhere you turn there's remnants of the civil war whether you know you're taking the boat out to fort sumter where the first shots were fired or just the other day i was walking around downtown down and there was an old cemetery and lo and behold there was someone who signed the declaration of independence was buried there. Wow so you know if you're a history three buff. There's a ton of history.

charleston south carolina united states charleston county ohio debbie miller medical university of south ca H._d._t._v. bill olsen north carolina james beard youngstown craig east cooper medical center advisor
"charleston" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"charleston" Discussed on Murder Minute

"The tragic story of a violent hate crime at a church in Charleston. This is is the story of the mother Emmanuel Ame massacre at eight P._M.. On Wednesday June Seventeenth Twenty fifteen it was business business as usual at the mother Emmanuel Ame Church in downtown Charleston in South Carolina the two hundred and three year old church holds a a place of honor in the state's history and indeed the countries listed on the United States National Register of historic places mother Emanuel Newell was established in Eighteen Sixteen is the oldest African Methodist.

Emmanuel Ame Church Emmanuel Ame Charleston Emanuel Newell African Methodist South Carolina United States National three year
"charleston" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"charleston" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"There's is white people. Those black people. And then there's might be happy. Happy. Happy got to get on home. Charleston. No way. All right, y'all. This is hold the funk..

Charleston
"charleston" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"charleston" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Branding charleston so aw hey let's hear it again per taylor tell you what i haven't seen her performance awhile he got even better than she was before georgia she looked better she's veterans where do you go.

charleston georgia taylor
"charleston" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"charleston" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"And if you're already one of my supporters on patriot i'll send you the details for the patriot email system well i guess that i've taken more time than i should have before introducing today's program but since the program is a bit short i'm going to be back after we listen to our fellow salons in charleston and i'm going to play a couple of songs for you and now here at long last is expelled who will introduce the storytelling session that we are about to join i'm like style and this is the psychedelic salon two point oh damn happy to bring you our storytelling stop in charleston south carolina it was a beautiful rainy night and brewery overlooking the river and the event was to kick off for the group the society for the exploration of altered states i hope you enjoy navigators of maher mar incognito the on explored see on charted waters of consciousness many merrily skim the surface plunge right in those do the pencils of choice are simply own minds and bodies of course touts exploration medicis condition therapy meditation yoga tropic brentwood and theo jane's the non music dreams active imagination etc etc similar to induce or achieve and all state of being which allows us to reach the very depths of psyche sift third heavy mainers detritus lying on its fast it and noses would knowledge into and what we are at levels beyond the surface to rediscover true reality our true nature oh true self that this treasury seep.

charleston south carolina theo jane
"charleston" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"charleston" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"On the south charleston volkswagen so you can.

volkswagen
"charleston" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"charleston" Discussed on WCHS

"Charleston ooh what whoa hey my little yes there were to see slammed grandes inside a downtown metronews radio that were sued he'll peacetime borers 'this those this to slow stocks soared lease either cnet statewide source live a safety net go the si said no and now across thursday with regard add beyond annex iv lied ease all the air heard about a good evening to while command twenty seven day uh december the final wednesday up 2017 thanks so much for being with us tony caridi and bush senator brad howe yes i'm back and a senator while he just never leaves the studios you're like all the time at all i mean you wake up of the more days with kirch of all i may be does thus custodial work here in the afternoon when it comes to its now they're discharges that doesn't go away so uh he's just gonna here that's a good thing though it's a it's a good thing to have him here good evening to you senate good evening tenants a busy mud pause awake lots of sports action he gets it gets a lot more on that gets gets a lot easier in january why surgery yes you got some one yet one thing instead of five things fly not true i mean december's just it's holidays it's basketball it's football it's just it's everything so uh tonight as we close the chapter here on the wednesdays of december we will look back at last night's game and we encourage you to continue uh to give us your thoughts on yesterday's game between the mountaineers and the utah youtsai no hoppy spent a lot of time on it earlier today a utah winning a by a final score of thirty two fourteen and it was a game in which the final score was not indicative of really what was going on out there really wasn't um you had uh uh league points by wvu the mountaineers uh i got that late touchdowns one fifty eight to go other than that west virginia was getting done getting throttled thirty two six and so where do we go from here what happened what's the future look like all.

Charleston bush senator basketball utah west virginia tony caridi brad howe senate wvu twenty seven day