24 Burst results for "chairman and CEO"

Buffett on Small Business: Its an economic war

Squawk Pod

05:05 min | Last month

Buffett on Small Business: Its an economic war

"Berkshire hathaway chairman and ceo warren buffett. He joins us on the squawk newsline. Also david salomon. The chairman ceo of goldman sachs goldman by the way is announcing a two hundred and fifty million dollar donation to establish the next generation of the ten thousand small businesses program. Gentlemen thank you both for being here and warm. We'll start with you. You have not spoken publicly since the last annual meeting of back in may for berkshire hathaway. You weren't planning on speaking publicly again until the next one this coming may. Why are you taking time today to talk about this issue right now. Well i think it's it's it's so important that small businesses which of become collateral damage in a in a war. That are our country needed. The defied but We'd in effect bomb charlie At an induced shutdown of parts of the economy hit many types of small businesses. Very very hard and We made some provision for that and march in terms of the cares act but then nobody really knew how long the Now this self inflicted Recession would would last with this particular effect on small businesses so We need another. We need another injection to To complete the complete the job and congress's debating right now and i just hope very much that they extend the p p. A plan on a on a large scale to Let the people who may see the of the light at the end of the tunnel. Get to the end of the tunnel but So it's it's very timely. It's very important and And i do think congress will do something. And i hope they step a very soon because every day is important make people wonder why would bid business. Leaders are are stepping out and speaking on behalf of some of the small businesses. What what is it that concerns you about this. Why is this an issue that you're you're really putting yourself out there with well. Big businesses generally a gun very. Well not the if. They were traveling. Entertainment related days. They still have difficulties but The fed did a terrific job. The they saved us from something that would have been a lot worse than two thousand eight nine When they acted in march so large companies who in the middle of march early march were were going to have no access to capital The market just open wide and the corporate issuance was huge but the small businesses Received some help. But it's not getting to the end of not getting to the end of the tunnel and You know you'd say it's situation. Just take food food manufacturers. The big names Done terrifically people haven't quit eating you and and And the large grocery chains have done very well margins wine salesmen. Good but if you had to get your food And i small restaurant or medium size restaurant and and social distancing was required. Everything you just. You just killed the economics for somebody that may have been working for decades with our family to build a business and reinvested their earnings and improving their their establishment and then Through no fault of their own and edict comes along that That kills all their dreams. And it's it's it would be so foolish to The not follow through on this and enable those people to get back to where they could Do the kind of business they were doing before you know it. it it. It's an economic war and and And certain you know when we wanted to world war two a lot of industries were shut down and and Everything went over to the defense production. Well we've shut down a lot of people in this in this particular Induced recession and and others are prospering. At and i think that the country owes it to the m really millions of small business people. And i've met a lot of these people through the goldman sachs program just renewed ppp. And and Get us to the got us. The end of the tunnel.

Berkshire Hathaway David Salomon Goldman Sachs Goldman Warren Buffett Congress Charlie FED Goldman Sachs
Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

08:40 min | Last month

Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

"What's best performing sector since election day. You'll never believe it energy and we talked about energy. I mean fossil fuels with multiple co vaccines. Right around the corner. The economy will soon be able to reopen which means more demand for oil and gas ray of yours. No i'm not a fan of this industry anymore. I think the long-term press but posthumous have gotten grimmer but there are two fossil fuel stocks that i still consider investable one of them is chevron the big integrated the king of the oils the best of the best chevrons held up surprising well during the pandemic. And it's got a powerful safe dividend of five point seven percent. The only problem the stock is now thirty five percent in the last six weeks. So kennedy keep climbing. Let's take a closer look with mike. He's the chairman ceo of chevron corporation. Get clear picture of the industry and his company said mr. Moore's welcome demand money jim. It's good to be with you all right so you got to solve this for me. As long as i've been in the business always one company that was the best and it wasn't as yours. It was a company called back son. There are a lot of others that were doing. Well now they're chevron and there really is everybody else everybody else being companies. I'm worried about the dividend that article in production. That aren't conservative. What happened to chevron at the other guy should have listened to well jim. Different companies have made different choices as As we came into this and as as we've gone through this so have changed their dividend policies. Some of changed their strategy. Some of change their financial priorities. We haven't our dividend to secure as you mentioned are balance is strong our strategies are intact and there's no they can count on us so we were we were well prepared as As we went through the cycle. And i think that people realize that we've been constant at a time when many others have changed. Now you'll have when it's necessary been aggressive for instance. You were very aggressive in the gulf of mexico drilling wells that are going to produce oil for year. They don't run out those wells. I mean that's just something that you did. Everybody else went away from it. How did she have the dish do that. Jim it's a long term business. Demand for energy in the world is enormous seven and a half billion people on the planet today. By twenty forty there will be nine billion in all of them deserve the things that affordable reliable energy can provide. so we've got to take a long view on investments and at the same time you've got to take a short view in terms of being prepared for markets that are very volatile and unpredictable. So it's an and world actually have to do both. We have to look out the front window. Twenty years down the road and we look out the window of the house today and see what's going on the world today and manage our way through both of those. Let go out twenty years. You bought a company called no one. None well terrific. I visited leviathan. It's an incredible field in metro. Train off the coast of israel. I could see a visionary saying you know what it's time to disenfranchise gas prom company bringing its gas to the west and make it. So there's a pipeline from israel all the way up through central europe and that could be something that's a twenty five year project pie in the sky. Well that's certainly one of the opportunities to commercialise. What is a large gas resource in the waters of the eastern mediterranean office. Real right now at feeds markets in israel egypt and jordan their opportunities to take liquefied natural gas to other markets and certainly longer term. These types of resources often lend themselves to infrastructure developments to feed market. Europe is not not far away so those are all options to commercially develop that resource and supply markets in an affordable reliable manner. So that that's the type of thing that our company does really well and it's a long term view that we have to have to sustain our company at the same time. I've noticed that you need to be able to have common ground with whoever's in the white house. I'm not going to try to say you have to do this do that. Because you're reasonable person. Have come up with it. But if you have a really aggressive. Climate change president and team. Is it perhaps possible that they make it. So that you that you're not able to enjoy your own properties. Well jim we've been in business for over one hundred forty years we've worked with republican administrations with democrat administrations with split government with unified government. And we always start with common ground. Government wants economic development and prosperity for its people and governments want a cleaner environment We look for the common ground and there's always common ground because we're critical part of the economy. We may not agree. One hundred percent with any given administration on everything. But there's usually much more we're aligned on than we're different have different views on and then we sit down at the table and we work our way through those things. We've got different points of view and that's exactly what we expect to do. with this administration and every other one that follows but mike how do you sit down with fund. Managers younger financials. You say you know what we're about trying to be carbon neutral even make it so carbon negative so to speak so chevron can never be a holding embarrassed and better. How much do you think that works good. And they have great dividend policy. We can own what happens if too many managers start thinking that way. Well jim what managers really want out of our industry and out of our company. It's better returns and boil our strategy down to four simple words. Higher returns lower carbon. And we need to do both. And we need to find ways to invest in things that are good for shareholders and also good for the environment if we do just just invest and things are good for the shareholders and ignore the environment. That's not sustainable. And if all we do is invest in things that have an environmental case and they don't create value and returns for shareholders. That's not sustainable. Either so we sit down with portfolio managers of all ages and all levels of experience and talk about how to deliver higher returns and lower carbon That's what people. I think that's been investors are looking for well. How about another way to look at it. Some people feel jim. Do not see the future. Do you not see tesla. Do you not see the hydrogen fuel cells. Judah there's no room in portfolio because it's going to happen fast than you think you think the demands big al twenty thirty years. Probably the way. I too but they feel no mike they feel. It's gone away. Fashion than you. And i think and that has caused me to pull in my horns about a group i really like. Would you have we embrace a lower carbon future. We expect lower carbon energy system. In fact the energy systems always been moving towards lower carbon hundred. And fifty years ago cole came along a displaced would eat and then you had oil and gas and then you had nuclear hydro wind solar hydrogen now. The energy systems always been in transition. And we're investing today in. I'll give you an example renewable natural gas if you've ever driven by dairy farm or a feed lot. There's there's a certain aroma that you you may recall We're actually capturing the waste products from dairy farms now fermenting the those products to create the natural gas product cleaning it up moving it into a pipeline so it can displace fossil fuels so we reduce methane emissions and we create a salable renewable product. So we're investing in things like that. We're investing in nuclear fusion. we're investing in hydrogen. We're investing technologies that can scale and make a real difference and be part of a carbon energy system. This is the history of our company. And i believe it's the future of putting a hydrogen fuel cells all of your incredible gas stations. How about making that statement saying to the rest of the industry and all the espn enthusiasts. Look we are doing something right now. That's economic but it is gonna kill it in the five six years you could do that. Might your this and you've got the balance what we're working on these kinds of things. Jim we come back to. It's an world we've got to have higher returns and lower carbon and so we've gotta find things that work for shareholders and work for the environment and that's exactly what we're working on so i think i think you're going to see our company and you'll see others in our industry that continue to find solutions and this is a challenge that is too big for any one company anyone industry or anyone one country in the world to completely address We're gonna work in partnership with others and continue to advance the you know the state of the energy system which will only grow. Well mike. you've always been the you've been the voice of reason. Your company's been the scientific company all along people should know that chevron has always had the most scientists and engineers at the top might worth chairman. Ceo of chevron sir.

Chevron JIM Israel Mike Gulf Of Mexico Kennedy Moore MR Mediterranean Egypt Jordan White House Europe Tesla Judah
"chairman ceo" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:57 min | 3 months ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"A geometric notice He's a chairman CEO. The Luna Foundation off of a new book, Human work in the Age of Smart Machines, basically about how human beings can co exist. What's the machines? And with a eye on the whole nine yards now, Jamie, I'm about to get totally science fiction dorky on you here. So bear with me for for just a moment with with all the movies and things you see, like, you know, Terminator. No. The Matrix the No. No, A machine's gonna turn it on and taking over the world. How do you get people to get past that? That Hollywood sort of irrational fear of the machine? Sort of, you know, taking over and rebelled against their human masters? You know, it's it's something that you say it's very popular in the and, Ah, you know, the sort of of entertainment field but you know, and there, you know, I think that thinking a lot about the ethical use of technology is really important were the designers of the machines? Therefore the machines reflect our biases as humans as we as we develop them, So we need to think about that. But I am not concerned about our our machine Overlords att. Any point taking over our lives? What We've got to figure out here is Technology. How the machines are going to be able to do tasks that are dangerous to us as humans that they could do faster than all of those things and focus more on what we can do as human beings. You know, I talked with this roboticist. He's ahead of the robotics department at University of California, Berkeley named Ken Goldberg and he said, Look, I design the A. I designed the robots, and he said they don't understand. Subtlety, nuance. They don't understand these issues about how we really collaborate and how we feel about each other And he said, and they won't They won't in any foreseeable future. So we designed them correctly. As the human designers. They will not be our overlords. That would be our fault. If if if we end up creating machines that actually take over the human race, we have the ability to make sure that that doesn't happen on DH. Part of what I go back to my friends. I want to say this is back in 2017. I think it was you may have read about this Facebook had created like a couple of Ah artificial intelligent programs started talking to each other. And their own language. Only they understood and so Facebook had immediately sort of shut down that whole thing. Right? Yeah. And you know, we've now got thes these thes computer. They call him quantum computer that can that can calculate at speeds that are tremendously faster than you know what we used to call super computers, which we used to think were the fastest thing. So look, there is ah, reality here that the machines Have an ability to do. They call it deep learning, which is they use algorithms to go deeper and deeper into data set and they they can both analyzed information and develop new knowledge developed new information. But again that is subject to the way that we program them that we designed them. And if we designed them with human biases and and And human failing, then we will get out of them What we are in terms of those biases. What we've got to do is say, Look, here's what we need the machines to do, because what they could do is faster. What they can do can take care of the things that are more dangerous to us. These are the things that we can do is human. And it is that balance of human work and machine work that I think will make us more productive, more prosperous as society If we come to grips with the fact that humans need to be prepared to do the work documents could dio Jamie because I want to live in foundation. One thing thatyou folks, it was kind of get people prepared for the world work. And try to scare up a workforce. How did we do that? In an era of robots and an Aye Aye, because somebody who say maybe, like you know the other mid fifties, maybe had one or two years of college were working it in a plan or something. Oh, for 20 something, 30 years. You know what happens to those when those workers get displaced? What do we do for them? You know, it's really important question. And I think I just want to underscore your point here, which is that we now live in a world where you know for people like you and I. We went through a system where we say Okay, well, we'll go to school at an earlier point in life, and then we'll work at a later point in life. But now we know that, in fact, in order to stay on top of the world of work, it's a continuous process of learning. The educators like to call this by the way, lifelong learning, which To you and me is consumer sounds terrible. It sounds like a sentence, but what we really want is we want to be able to participate in this process where You build your skills and you get a reward for it, and you build two more skills. You get another award, and that's the system that we should have in place in higher education in our workforce training systems, etcetera. We should make sure that individuals have the capacity to continually refresh. They're human traits and capabilities so they can continue to do better and work over the course of their entire lifetime. Today, you know, we're seeing an acceleration again Cove. It has made this worse. An acceleration of job destruction, and I think the new work that's being created at least some of it will not be the same kind of work that we had before, so it's going to require those people who have lost their jobs. To get re educated, retrained focusing on areas where they conduce. Ah work that that building what they already know. You know, I'm not one of these people, by the way that says, Oh, you know, we're gonna lose their jobs because of self driving vehicles. So look, let's turn them into computer coders. No truck driver wants to be a computer coder, but Truck driver might want to work in the logistics industry, which is a big industry, which requires a lot of human attention and knowledge. Because your move, you have to understand how goods and services are can move and can effectively move. It requires a critical thinking and the problem solving skills that only humans have. So why don't we think about the truck drivers becoming the logistics managers instead of saying, Let's get the truck drivers to write code. So to me, it's figuring out how you create adjacent learning opportunities for people. Who are going to be displaced because of technology and get them work at them training in fields that connects with what they did before, but in a way that built on that now and take him on a new path. C'mere. So that's what this whole a few more minutes on the programme off the book on work an age of smart machines, I guess, but one of my final question for you, Jamie is how do you feel like a better term? Will human beings be smarter than always be smarter than machines are more creative than machines. You know, I think that our our human trait of and capabilities that I've been talking about will always be superior right.

Jamie Facebook chairman CEO Luna Foundation Ken Goldberg Hollywood Berkeley University of California
Millions of farm animals culled as US food supply chain chokes up

Stansberry Investor Hour

03:12 min | 9 months ago

Millions of farm animals culled as US food supply chain chokes up

"Tyson chairman. Ceo Tyson Foods wrote a letter on Sunday and he basically alerted the country of an impending shortage of meat and by Association. We just took this as an impending shortage of food because we can affect the production of meat can affect production of all food right. And I'll just quote you one little passage. That kind of sums up the the problem here and Tyson wrote farmers across the nation simply will not have anywhere to sell their livestock to be processed. When they could've fed the nation millions of animals chickens. Pigs and cattle will be depopulated because of the closure of our processing facilities and quote so these are essential businesses. These meat processing facilities. But they're closing them because people are getting the corona virus. They're getting sick so they had to close them and they closed a bunch of them. So you got all these animals that are mature and ready for slaughter and there's no place to send them. So what do they do? Well depopulated is you know. There's all these euphemistic terms youth Asian and depopulation. They kill them without eating limits. What happens there wasted and you know I I mean I have a soft heart for animals. I'm no vegetarian. Okay but we bring these animals into the world and raise them up and care for them so that we can eat them and it's tragically sad to see them killed without being eaten. It makes their lives. You know it's like they lived and died in vain. I watched a Canadian farmer on Bloomberg TV Monday morning openly emotional talking about this and talking about having farmers having to euthanize thousands of animals at a time. It's it's terrible. He was more concerned was more than just the lost revenue and investment. Although that's you know that's a big impact too. It was just the thought of all these animals as I say having lived and died in vain. It's it's heartbreaking you know and these are essential businesses and yet they're still having to close down because people getting a virus and Tyson said. This is the thing that got me. He just said the food supply chain is breaking. The food supply. Chain is breaking. That's scary you know you and I were know. We're big time investors or whatever. We got plenty of money in our 401K's or wherever you know we got resources we can tap and if things cost a little more expensive we can probably still afford it but poor people who don't have anything to their name. They won't be able to afford and they won't be able to get. Those supplies will be gone from the stores. Anybody you can get. It will pay a fortune and people are going to start getting hungry. I I'm afraid you know. At first people will say OK. Well here I am poor. I don't have a penny to my name. Put yourself in their shoes. What are they going to do? They're going to be like I'm GONNA steal this. I'M GONNA get food any way that I can. That's bad enough but my fear is that this goes on and on and on and the government doesn't let us go back to work soon enough and then we start seeing like mass violence. You know.

Tyson Tyson Foods CEO Chairman Bloomberg
"chairman ceo" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

04:20 min | 9 months ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

"Them. Was what I remember just before the crisis you and I are supposed to go to a knicks game at Madison Square Garden together and obviously got postponed for a lot of reason. So invite invite you today. Hypothetically when's the earliest you'd feel comfortable going into this game with me and big business as usual? Sonali depends on meeks more united now. I don't know how that works close by with all the federal authorities. No of course to get the information and Malysz. This Day information is updated. The it's hard for me to see the goal of the game and attended live again. Hopefully sooner than May that's the best guess I could use against not never a normal. No no absolutely not no way. We're GONNA come back to school other dynamic. That changed or that happened during the Frances quietly. The T. mobile sprint deal closed and also dish network is now thought to be building out a network how you feel about your competitive environment shifting now given the factors in the middle of price especially it's not like you subtract so it's been told to alter two years so I won't get a big surprise to us. I ascended public. There's so many times we all know. Change Our strategy or that type won't Change Gender Marketing Environment. We've talked about our strategy. We'll execute faster and harder on me. That's all copetition is going to be there. And that's the worst so nothing you without so for us is actually to execute on our strategy role than on the news. That it'd be goes will have a new lounge day. That doesn't change for us to be some tactically About the whole rules. That doesn't change from your ice on your front foot very much. Find Your plan your own game. I want to end up asking. What else do you get some peace of mind some inspiration from these days? Are you listening to podcast doing any other media any leadership inspiration for me or others volunteer and all I really been a TV? I don't read much. I have a great team around me. That gives me all the information that is relevant to make my decision. I remember diversity useless for me to get into. Jin Is Brace Nitrate. An trainer notes. That's really where I spend my time right now. I didn't then by siphoning being role named the safety stuff so social. And but that's for me is way to get then g these times. My role is to give any he toddlers. Maybe on to myself my job right now to see that my team members my organization by Wider Greis is feeling goal done nice by enormous oftentimes of calling them tweeting or texting seat. Everybody's finding these articles. There's not but I'm not drew. My job is that they see. Let me some reassurance about this you probation. Even though I don't have announcer on there for them nuts how I spend my time in my hours right now when sleepy while I'm grateful for on a personal level because you're one of the people that have been texting me reaching out to me checking on me and say oh I'm doing and I really appreciate it something. That's not necessary but very heartwarming. That your friends out there. I can rely you as a friend had appear and obviously we can do business with and I'm very grateful. You could be here with us today. Sharing your insights with everything. Hell I but the what you're doing with the company of your employees that keep your dark activity strong as the commendable accurate entrepreneurship. Everybody thank you very much thicker. I hope you enjoyed our show today. If you WANNA check out any prior episodes find us and subscribe at Apple Podcast spotify or wherever you listen feel free to leave a review as well as it helps people find the show you can also follow us on social media at kindred cast for behind the scenes photos and info listen to. Kendrick cast on Sirius. Xm every Saturday and Sunday at two PM EASTERN ON BUSINESS Radio Channel One. Thirty two or stream shows on demand in the Sirius XM APP.

Jin meeks knicks Madison Square Garden Malysz dish network Sirius Sonali Kendrick Apple Wider Greis
Interview with Colin Angle, Robotics Luminary, Chairman, CEO and Founder of iRobot

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

09:12 min | 11 months ago

Interview with Colin Angle, Robotics Luminary, Chairman, CEO and Founder of iRobot

"Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Schmeltzer. Our guest today is Colin Angle. Who is the chairman CEO and founder of I robot and in Luminary in the field of robotics so high Colin? Thank you so much for joining us today. A great to be here. Welcome Colin and. Thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and some exciting things that are going on it. I Robot Short so I'm Colin Angle the CEO Chairman and co-founder of I robot. This is actually a robot. Thirty th year. We were founded back in nineteen ninety a startup company with the mission to really deliver on the promise of robots and we'd been I grew up reading robots. We all some movies about robots. I really didn't have any in our lives on a daily basis and I robot was founded to go and change that and over the years we've been involved in everything from missions to Mars to robots. That went into nuclear power plants. Robots that diffused bombed. But we're boost well known for the room. The robot vacuum cleaner as the first real practical robot that people could just generally own excellent. You know and I think that's part of what's popularized robotics and people are very sort of become more intimately familiar with robots today in the Twenty Twenty S. Surprising that I wrote has been around for thirty years. I'm sure for you. It feels like yesterday for a lot of us who have been around a robot. It's certainly feels that way. And you know. Crow bots have been in constant development for many years for the past sixty plus years even beyond that no longer than than six years and there have been a number of notable successes of course. I robot included and they're also have been some you know troubling starts. Nobody's who are built robotics and tried to build robotic firms. Even some of the big luminaries in this field. So what do you see as the current state of the robotics industry as a whole and what do you see as make some companies successful in this industry and perhaps even to another extent here like what do you see? Some of the roadblocks that are facing widespread adoption of robots in our daily lives in the home in the office. And how far away are we from achieving this ultimate goal? I know it's a lot of parts to this question but just crafting the vision for where to go straight there. You go sure so. I mean robotics tool kit so it's a technology which allows you to go and there's different parts toolkit perceive information about the world use artificial intelligence to think about what you've been able to perceive also in the tool. Kit are the use of computers and microcontrollers to drive motors and actuators to allow machine to do physical work. And this is a really cool tool. I mean you can build machines that you could only dream of the challenges of course finding an application of robot technology where you're really solving a problem. People care about and we've been told all throughout our history that there was an expectation that robots were supposed to clean your home and the idea that you could maybe build a robot that couldn't vacuum which is a subset of cleaning the entire home. But it's a very important part and you could come home every day to freshly vacuumed home and particularly if you have pets well you need to vacuum every day or live with pet hair. Neither of them are particularly exciting options. And the Roomba offered practical solution and because we had a lot of experience in building robots that low price point and using smaller microprocessors to understand the environment sufficiently to go backing thoroughly and completely it all made sense and you had a robot which was both affordable and effective and were well up over twenty five million of these robots sold the Dayton about twenty. Five percent of money spent on vacuums is now spent on robot vacuums which has just been an amazing phenomenon to have start with an idea on a piece of paper and have it turned into reality. Yeah that's I mean. One that that stat is really interesting and also. I think that it's made people more comfortable with robots in their house. You know it's just it's just doing one task and doing it well and not really getting in people's way and getting them familiar with robots. So I know that you've recently wrote a piece about autonomy is not intelligence and we really liked tat because we always say at cognreznick that automation is not intelligence. And I think that sometimes people can confuse the two but they're really not the same so can you break down for our listeners. And explain what you meant by that sure so autonomy is usually where working robot start where the idea is. The robot hasn't task you know go out and vacuum four and then go back and recharge yourself but if you can't direct the robot if you can't interact with a robot it's really not that smart. Imagine if you went to your life unable to listen or interact with anyone else and you just sort of maybe add some instinct on how to survive. But I don't think many people would think you're very smart if you couldn't talk with them and take direction and give direction so what we're trying to do is expand the utility of the robot and expand the ability of the robot to fit into people's lives by working at increasing its ability to interact and understand and take direction and demonstrate that cares about the environment and treat. The environment is operating in a very careful fashion and through doing this. You go from device. That can't listen and can only do what it was programmed to do at the beginning to a device. That really can learn about how it's supposed to do. Its job and that's opens up not just the world of better vacuuming but vastly richer world of tasks that robot can suddenly take on. Yeah that's actually a really good point because you know pretty much anything that people think about what humans can do our animals that used to do with it and they were laboring in the field or animals. We like to have as command. Says well you know certainly. That's what we want these mechanized machines that have some element of intelligence. Who Want to do that as well? So I know you see lots of use cases an examples of robots of of all sorts and as matter of fact when you started talking about the history of I robot you talked about robots in places like nuclear power plants in areas of combat and places like that so. What are some of these standard examples that you have seen especially more recently for robots and places that we may not necessarily have expected these robots to being performing really useful tasks others a great example in warehouse automation and so that some of the tasks the robots where the really making a great inroads today? Or maybe not the most glamorous robots like you know robots come and greet you at the door but robots that are enabling and are involving society to actually work and as we get more and more addicted to ordering things online and expecting products to magically come from. Click on the screen to my front door in a matter of days or even hours were increasing the load on warehouses to sales Toronto disorder toothpaste. I need to go find the toothpaste but in a box. Seal the box and mail out or even have it. Delivered automatically and that's an area where the industry is just exploding where there's demand for automation to accurately and swiftly and cheaply perform that type of service and so that's a big thing and an area maybe on the other side of the field of things we may have heard about contests driving vehicles these are robots and. I think there's a lot of attention and excitement around a when are we going to have and see robot cars and robot buses and robot? Taxis enter into our lives and gradually underway. Where there's different areas where maybe today's state of the art is in a known geographic area potentially operating at reduced speeds to ensure safety. You can get autonomous driving vehicles. Move FROM POINT A to B or highways with certain brands of vehicles. You can start to see things like smart cruise control and other assisted features in our cars and over time these robots that carry around and will continue to get more and more sophisticated until the point where you know driving truly becomes a choice and those are two really big areas where we're seeing a lot of activity and then obviously closer. I robot tone in the home where we're seeing vacuuming become tremendously successful commercially. We see potential for mopping and lawn mowing and then as we dial the clock forward getting into assistive purposes to allow elderly people to live independently. Much more safely

Colin Angle Twenty Twenty Ceo Chairman And Co-Founder Chairman Ceo Kathleen Walsh Schmeltzer Founder Dayton Toronto
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Much more after this. Welcome back to swap pod while Andrew was a new New York chatting with the CEO of Uber. Becky and Joe were and still are in California at the AT&T Pebble Beach pro-am an annual invitational golf tournament. That squawk has been attending and Joe has been playing for years. Joe and Becky aren't the only slabs that team leaders coghill Murray and Clint Eastwood Star studded as it is here on Squawk we're focused on the business leaders who play celebrities. CEO's boat breaking within our circle are CEO's one of those CEOS et's Randal Stevenson the events host he. He hasn't held any interviews since last year when we spoke to him at this same venue this year we started with a surprisingly strong economic metric. That came out just moments before they had this conversation station. It's the first jobs report of twenty. Twenty January added two hundred twenty five thousand jobs well above Wall Street's estimates. Here's Joe Kernan taking off the conversation with Randal Stevenson. We haven't seen you in a while. Let's talk that was the three month. Average is like supposedly impossible to have done. It's like back to ten or fifteen or something. In that year ago I was told by Zandi and other people supposedly Cellino something that that's impossible feels good. I mean it really does feel good. We went through a period. We were seeing it. We were experiencing where investment from our big customers. The ones that are playing being ear it started to taper down. We attributed that to the China in Mexico trade situations but I'm hopeful with that kind of behind us in the rear view mirror. Investment picks back up the job number is very encouraging. We're actually very bullish on twenty twenty years of economic outlook start just in from the slowdown from your investment in the at and T.. You hit you. Transform the company into a huge media player Aaron and some people say oh. You should've stayed you know the waiver rise in does it and just focus on On your PS and QS. And you're taking on too much debt and I mean a year has gone by can. Can you update us on the progress in terms of paying down the debt and the results that you're getting the stocks done well as well we. We came into the year two thousand nineteen last year and we told everybody right number one priority was get the debt pay down and so we took on forty billion dollars debt to do this deal and we exited last year having paid off thirty billion dollars the debt. We said we one day at the year two and a half times EBA that was arthritis. Shall we say it was a healthy place to be so check that box two and a half times dead Eba we sit. We really wouldn't start aggressively buying back. The shares we issued to do Time Warner until twenty twenty but the cash flow is so strong. Last year we told the market to expect twenty six billion cash flow. We did twenty nine. We bought back fifty six million shares last year. So we're well on our way to retiring a lot of the shares were issued issue to do Time Warner will buy back about one hundred million shares in the first quarter. That's well on the way that that process is going. You'll see us. Continue to buy back stock aggressively the cash slows. The business are really strong. The businesses the wireless business particularly is executing really. Well had a really good quarter on wireless and the media business. I mean the media business is really doing well John Stinky and his team or standing up a new streaming product. And I think it's going to be one of the most exciting streaming products in the market. Tapio Max and it gets launched in May and the outlook for that is really really well. So we're feeling good about most importantly you have all six friends and Six I read that too. We didn't announce that there was There was some news yesterday that there may be episode created but that that was not our announcement. Yeah we do. We did pull in his. You know all of the the rights for friends so we own all of the rights for friends and Big Bang theory. We pulled those in the fourth quarter is so those will be obviously stalwarts on our streaming platform in. May He liked the wacky media. Business from Oklahoma. You're I know you have known you for years. Yeah it's not a natural. I don't know if I'm GonNa see you out there at those parties at Ariz House is going to be something. I don't know Joe you've not invited me. Are you even if you did your your persona where you go in some of those new sunglasses you saw me wearing where you go inland. I don't see that ED happening. That's why we have John State. So Elliott I when I saw that I am not following it as closely. This is your and what what has happened but for me it was like when they got bored messing around with. At and T.. And they've they've moved on what HAP. How did that whole thing with this off? Thanked thanked him. How did that? How was the relationship with the confrontational? Did did you lose. Any sleep over. What was happening was awesome? It was it was a period when they sent the letter. If you read that letter you and this is what I told the guys at Elliot is. I think you've identified a good investment. We happen to agree with the areas that they thought the opportunities for. At and T.. Word capital allocation margin expansion and and and Some some things on the portfolio and we were way down the path of executing a lot of this but they had some other good ideas so we spent a lot of time together talking about some of these ideas and actually became thought of a mutual mind and a plan that we put in place a plan that our board had largely agreed to. They really gave me some good insights on some communication. I've probably candidly wouldn't have communicated in the detail of our capital allocation plan that we communicated but their points always were valid. That it's time to put some some detail out there. In terms of water capital allocation plan was share buybacks particularly and so bottom line. I think they have identified it. A good investment and they were right last year. The total shareholder return. We were up forty five percent current it staying at John You. Are you going to stay the way. It is nothing that they're not pushing for anything that change at this commitment last year that I would stay at least through twenty twenty so I I will stay at CEO through twenty twenty two but possibly even longer. I didn't give any indication beyond that the board and I have to have that conversation. Obviously you already said John on is doing a great job in your view at there are few people that have the breadth of the business creators. Joey over the entire landscape escape just totally guy. Good though I mean that helps to be you guys saw on a box. He had an event we had an event last night. Where he was interviewing Reese Witherspoon and Andrew Wilson and Jeff Zucker talking about whereas media going and you saw a guy who has a breadth and understanding of the media world he has there's a breadth and understanding of the communications industry? So he's doing a terrific job. How many subscribers do you think you need for? Hbo Plus US in order for it to be okay. This is success. This is what we're shooting for. Disney just came out and said I think they have twenty six and a half scrubbers for Disney plus so. HBO Maxa the correct. You becky thank you but we still think of it this way we have. HBO's in the marketplace at about fifteen dollars right now and we have about thirty million subscribers drivers on HBO Right Now and those thirty ten million are on. At and T. owned platforms and those will convert immediately HBO Max Subscribers. This Day. One the number we have put out his We're we feel pretty good that by two thousand twenty five our number should be about fifty million. US subscribers drivers to HBO. Max and if we hit those kind of numbers which we thinks eminently achievable. It's a real revenue lift and profit lift for the business and it's putting all this content content that we now own the content production machine that we have over at Warner Brothers just putting that content to work on our own platforms and bilberry optimistic. Fifty fifty million as well within Range Andrews GonNa ask a question. You okay if I if I guess of course of course Andrew a somewhat somewhat.

Hbo Joe Kernan CEO Andrew Wilson John You HBO Randal Stevenson Time Warner Becky Disney golf Warner Brothers California New York EBA Tapio Max Oklahoma
Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

Squawk Pod

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

"Today Andrews interview with Uber Ceo. Dr COSMO shocking. Investors have been watching Uber closely for signs of profitability when Uber went public on the New York Stock Exchange in May of Twenty nineteen. Andrew asked Dara about it and Dara. Well here's what he said so for us. The Path to profitability isn't theoretical there are cohort of countries that are profitable. We do reinvest profits aggressively recipe. New Business Lines like eats that have great promise but we're pretty comfortable when we look at the portfolio of businesses. That we have that we have a very strong Pathak off a a few months later in an interview with CNBC November Dr Projected profitability by twenty. Twenty one we are actually targeting twenty twenty one for adjusted even profitability full year and this week around eight months after the company's First Trading Day Uber reported its fourth quarter financial results. And and as you'll hear there was also some good news for investors about that profitability goal. Here's Andrew Uber reported quarterly results. Last night the ridesharing giant announcing announcing on its call with investors. It is moving up. Its target for profitability by a year. Join US right now. For an exclusive interview is Uber CEO. Derek Ezra Shack Good morning to you. Good morning thank thank you for for coming in. Let's walk through if you could for investors so they understand how you think you get there and when I say get there. I'm talking about profitability. Well as we made through our way in two thousand nine hundred and we became more and more confident of the strength of business and the ability of our teams to execute.

Andrew Uber Uber Ceo Dara Dr Cosmo United States Derek Ezra Shack CEO New York Pathak Cnbc
September jobs report expectations: What to look for

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:17 min | 1 year ago

September jobs report expectations: What to look for

"Heller MGM resorts international says a legal settlement with victims of the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history as a major step chairman CEO Jim Murren said today the casino giants goal has been to resolve the lawsuits it faced over the twenty seventeen Los Vegas massacre victims and their families can move forward in the healing process a gunman opened fire for one of MGM's hotels into a concert venue it owns killing fifty eight people and injuring hundreds just over two

Heller Mgm Resorts United States Ceo Jim Murren MGM Chairman Los Vegas
CBS CEO Moonves resigns amid new allegations of sexual misconduct

The Christian Science Sentinel

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

CBS CEO Moonves resigns amid new allegations of sexual misconduct

"CBS corporation chief executive les Moonves has resigned as chairman CEO and president effective immediately that after a new set of published allegations of sexual misconduct, which he does deny details from CBS news correspondent Pam Coulter. New accusers told the New Yorker that the sixty eight year old moonville has forced them to engage in sex use physical violence or exposed himself. The incidents occurred between the nineteen eighties and early two thousands Boone vez told the magazine the appalling accusations in the article are not true. He said he had consensual relationships with three of the women twenty five years ago before he came to CBS versus exit package from CBS is now in doubt he could end up with nothing pending an investigation into the sexual harassment acusations he and CBS or contributing twenty million dollars of his severance to battle workplace misconduct separately. He was involved in a bitter corporate battle for control of

CBS Boone Vez Pam Coulter Les Moonves Chief Executive Tom Foty Chairman CEO Harassment President Trump Twenty Million Dollars Twenty Five Years Sixty Eight Year
"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"He's a great ceo and it's a great company but when you look at what's going on as a huge transformation in the banking and financial services industry could be similar just insurance companies as well there's a higher demand for them to provide a great customer experience that that was true with a line that's even true the usda with those farmers how do you transform that experience and that's why they're earning the salesforce doubts why you're seeing this growth that's why you're seeing this great return of equity over the last decade that we've been talking because look you have to connect with your customers in a whole new way you have to build a three hundred sixty degree view of your customer you have to know your customer like never before and customers can turn to salesforce to do that all right well congratulations to marc chairman ceo of salesforce monster big blowout jim i hope you come to san francisco this was this was a huge quarter okay just quarter to the point where he could turn around the cloud kings in tomorrow session mice back it is and then the lightning round is over are you ready skate lighter dark jaren hey jim big to you great job on that commission speech by the way sex you but like you group on by seller hold with williams is doing an amazing job six to in new york hello jim cramer great to be able to talk to you.

ceo usda salesforce williams jim cramer marc chairman ceo san francisco new york three hundred sixty degree
"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"He's a great ceo and it's a great company but when you look at what's going on as a huge transformation in the banking and financial services industry could be similar just insurance companies as well there's a higher demand for them to provide a great customer experience that that was true with a line that's even true the usda with those farmers how do you transform that experience and that's why they're earning the salesforce doubts why you're seeing this growth that's why you're seeing this great return of equity over the last decade that we've been talking because look you have to connect with your customers in a whole new way you have to build a three hundred sixty degree view of your customer you have to know your customer like never before and customers can turn to salesforce to do that all right well congratulations to marc chairman ceo of salesforce monster big blowout jim i hope you come to san francisco this was this was a huge quarter okay just quarter to the point where he could turn around the cloud kings in tomorrow session mice back it is and then the lightning round is over are you ready skate lighter dark jaren hey jim big to you great job on that commission speech by the way sex you but like you group on by seller hold with williams is doing an amazing job six to in new york hello jim cramer great to be able to talk to you.

ceo usda salesforce williams jim cramer marc chairman ceo san francisco new york three hundred sixty degree
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"And he said we can do a procedure and fix that and i said well i'm a little bit involved in healthcare what are the other options he said well you could try physical therapy i went to six physical therapy appointments newest vexed the issue is now you don't have to be a brain surgeon to figure out that is better to do that than than have somebody cut into your body in mess around with something inside your body and then they're secondary infections in all kinds of things so lavonna go is about how do we start to make it easier and less costly to stay healthy in for people with chronic conditions in that's the best were focused on we've got you know great people and very committed to this this idea that we can actually make things better for people in help them in every day we see it for you know more than fifty thousand people who are using it today in should be double that by the end of the year so let member talking to many of your your colleagues and many of them had a personal connection to diabetes you know in their life and at the yet that help them connect with the brain lebong go and want to support the brand in want to espouse its values to a to the greater good of society yeah i think i think that's true there's a lot of folks who and you know it today everybody knows somebody who has type owner type 2 diabetes there's thirty two million people across the us in 10 years china and india will have more people with diabetes than we have people in the united states in the middle east where you are huge is a big big problem and so this is a worldwide problem were focused on and it turns out that seventy percent of the people with type 2 diabetes also have hypertension so this is just it's like a piece going on hanon end up.

physical therapy india diabetes united states hypertension china middle east seventy percent 10 years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Gauge them not going m we don't believe the physician or the hospitals the center of the healthcare system we think the health consumers the center and everything else should be there to serve them but he's just had a massive mental shift that has to happen because i don't feel like in the us culture at least i won't big beyond that that the us culture can really handle that at this point terms of putting meet the center my choices because how i boys has been raised the doctors know best so i don't know to push back while again nasa it's a social after apology massive scale but the reality is some their shift is happened so if you have something i hope not but if something goes wrong what will you do in the first place she'll probably go is not to your doctor you're probably google it and so you'll go to the internet to get information so where we have to do after curate that we have to make sure the information getting is the right information i have died fivetime so far going on the internet so but eggs so the next place you'll go as friends and family and you go to them to say tell us what your experiences and so we have to make sure that um is good generally as pretty reliable which is most people will tell you if you have a back problem hey surgery didn't help manage turns out for all but a few cases back surgery is generally doesn't work in people spend enormous amounts of time and go through enormous pain um when in fact it's not the best firstoption it is an option is just not the best first option and yet many people use it as a first option and if you go to a surgeon the of that person it's not 'cause they're bad person basement their entire life being told you can help people by operating so what a surprise that they say we can operate in texas i had a back problem recently a sciatic problem is kind of leg back and and i did that and went to a surge.

healthcare system us texas google
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"These big companies out there and yet this one individual manjoo leading his he had created this get just a absolutely brilliant guy and he said i'm not the right guy to run this scale this you are and so we ended up buying the company in that became foundation for what we later created call the vago um we did it out in silicon valley because we wanted this to be not just digital health and not just about technology but about the patient as a health consumer in turning people into treating people as well in health care as we do in the rest of our environment giving them the information the transparency to make them health consumers and that's what we're able to do so we used that company we we renamed the company baath is technology company we created lavonna ago and it was about how do we empower all people with a chronic condition live better and healthier lives starting with diabetes and now we started with diabetes we've been fortunate to have great success there almost two hundred fifty companies now including huge portion of the fortune one hundred five hundred and then along with that the two largest pbm score the top seven jurists companies in dar are payers end now we're moving in to hypertension you know essentially doing everything we can to help people stay healthier to make it easier for them to stay healthy so what is about healthcare that that has you so focused on on this this regis industry is there something of personal for you that that makes you want to help solve these problems you could solve hunger you could solve all sorts of other problems in the world i thank first of all i ever inviting the two most important things in life or right whether you're healthy in whether you're happy.

technology company diabetes dar
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Fundamentally improve health care for people across the world and you know i it was just the right time for me to step out in so i did that i went to what had been a family office my family office making my investments but i've had a twenty five year partnership with a business partner lamely shapiro in lien i decided to throw in together and create seven wire ventures to invest both of our money lee has always been i've been you know probably the most fortunate thing that's ever happened to me was partnering with lead because he's always been there as a personal adviser friend running partner and they're you know there's probably you know the brains behind most of what i'd done in so so lien i created seven wire together it's a 100milliondollar early stage investment fund we brought on to other partners tom main who's probably the smartest healthcare strategy in the business and came out of oliver why mendon before that he had created his own company called chapter house without which oliver weimin plod in another partner name robert garber in the four of us you know that fund they do most the work and one of the investments of that fund was called levaing up and love ongo there was a great entrepreneur who kind of one part inventor one part mad scientist one part allen smart business guy and he came to us and said i've created this new kind of glucose meter with a cellular chip indebted it's more accurate it would allow people to stay in touch endured remote patient monitoring in yeah no one it ever done that and you always think well there's all.

partner lee robert garber patient monitoring tom oliver weimin scientist 100milliondollar twenty five year
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"In contrast from where some of our culture is going today in i think in america our diversity is our strength we after work toward having a shared common vision blood that vision has to include all the different colors sizes shapes and everything else nom let there are out there that's how will be the best america we can be relative to being in a variety of different cultures whether it was in the amazon whether it's with the amish whether it's in india in a funny story is this this group that i was within you screens and then when they would bring you a slice of pie would be covered by flies you'd have to shoot a flies away henson she fly pi when i add you know take in uh uh visitors there in ryder often see them look down in literally i could see colors in their face changing it was so disgusting for them and they would watch me eat this in they would say you are a clean fanatic how in the world are you doing at her how you take your shoes off in an indian temple and you have the issue is when i when i go it's a different world than you just you how you do it in this world yes i do i do i the man's room door yes i do but but you know that in that is probably this year now it's just it's both kind of i respect for the culture it's you know it's an understanding the fast the flexibility sometimes required so i kinda wanna quickly run through the idea of seven wear ventures held that started wednesday quickly exited impossible but but like held on you ran that business and then also groups y you left and then longo where you're at now which is kind of the bigger bigger of the three obviously so what case open or will quickly i'm i i had been at all scripts fourteen years we had had a great run there and i think it was just time all script some you know the board at the time uh really had no interest in innovating any longer and just wanted to run the business you know uh for all the things i said you know they were more concerned about how much money we can make then how do we.

america amazon ryder longo fourteen years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Look what is learn from that because i mean i feel like now in today's world an egg at our know this but i feel like it'd be hardly amish now than it was even fifteen twenty years ago because of how influential technology is all round them wall slogged yes i i guess i learned a few things i learned how intentional we all need to be and let me give you an example when we're raising kids when we're doing things so you know when i ask him about watching tv they said the devil often comes dressed as an angel quoting the bible and so event meant is if we let our kids watch tv you know dan who is controlling what they think in what their values are the tv it's not us and that idea of the devil dressed as an angel hey it look so nice in their entertain they're sitting in front of the tv but you have no idea what their watching mushers sitting with them and controlling manhattan and we've all been on situations where our kids see things on tv sometimes we see things on tv that discounts we don't want say and so what they said is now we're not going to allow that we're going to teach our kids were going to control what their values are an so there was turns out to be a very thoughtful thing and i know very many people today who limit the amount of tv watch end who limit what they can watch on tv in so perfect example of what can we learned from the irish will we can learn about that they you know in technology they were very careful.

dan manhattan fifteen twenty years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"All of a sudden i got up to the to the house nye their animals and they looked at me and i looked at them and neither of us knew what would happen and because i was a suburban kid i'd seen the in wasn't used what it was like you want me to grab what to milk what no ha ha i did not get it store and so the next thing i know i heard this quickly clapham now these amish buggy started arriving in the on the farmers surrounded by amish folks in they had heard that you're it had heart attack and he heard this is nice young kid had come up to help in they came over to help will quickly they found out that this nice young kid was willing to work hard but had no clue what to do and had no food and next thing i know i'm being taken back and forth in these bugis to their farms in i'm all of a sudden i'm literally in places that you know it was star track and i was beamed back a hundred years no electricity new very traditional um kinds of of vaw cultural experiences in i was just fascinated by i is truly fascinated by it and you know i began to write about it with their permission and just learn about how they managed now living that life surrounded by a world of high technology with known tv no electricity and no housley combinations they made the changes they accepted turned out the worth it i did was all very original because everybody wanted the access that i had and but couldn't get it in i was invited in because they knew i actually didn't want to be of their i was her foot reasonable in and so i i was a trusted person inside the community inner went to barnraising zoom you know just had an amazing it was kind of harrison ford from witness without killings subaru.

the house harrison ford hundred years milk
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"You know is something that probably may not hurt your career but clearly dozen help so who gave thank you for that so i've got two quick questions are orcas uh one explore too quick danes and then accounted quickly run down couple of your position had in an end it live ongo where you're at now itself but i gotta ask about the ominous because having lived in pennsylvania in ohio and been of the elkhart indiana where there's a huge amish population wall was the boat was the biggest learning you've got at of something that's so foreign to majority of people in america all so so the your question was well let me start with how i got involved so you got involved in a very simple way net as i was probably one of the poorest kids to go to buck now in so i needed a job in a professor of mind a psychology professor had given me an opportunity go work on his farm in do things like clamp blueberry bushes in the light and one winter i was back in new jersey working in a factory in his wife called and said the jerry it had a heart attack and could i come up because they needed help they couldn't actually even get to the farm because there was so much snow in the driveway was long one mile driveway and she was staying in town with him but they had animals and things that need to be taken care of and and so of course what do you do when someone calls like that i said of course come up and so i went up in the first task was digging out the driveway to get to the house and i knew how to shovel snow would i was pretty good at aten in all.

pennsylvania ohio indiana professor jerry heart attack the house elkhart america
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"And he didn't do that for any other reason than he thought it was right my mom grew up in that environment i think the second thing is while i'm not going to ask where they emigrated from what's that were the emigrated from uh yeah from germany and russia okay so i go ahead and then i think the the second thing is while i'm not particularly i wouldn't call myself particularly religious i was raised jewish and in the jewish religion there's there's a phrase called to cool olam and that means repairing the world in it's something that i always i've always loved about this sense that were put here impart to to repair things in the world that are broken and in you know so i i you know have kind of guandong onto that is something that's important to me and you know one of the metrics ius is are we doing enough good whether it's to our company we put a high premium in every company i've ever been ad on on volunteering like using the power of our company not just to give money we do that but to give hours in when you have people go out and they build a home when you have in go out made will walk or 100 mile by floor all the various ways you can volunteer today magical things happened that help your business and people don't really understand this but you get to know people in a different way you get to know families in a different way you have new bonds start to create in those hope the business so much and you know i've gotten to know more people in more ways from charitable events and activities and seen them in different lights and seen skill sets i didn't know and you know and i tell people i am very direct about it that volunteering in our businesses to not participate and do not volunteer.

germany russia
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Uh my mother was very very focused on this kind of social justice came from their my father really just work so i i hear this theme at your dad just really was her around that much well thinking since the function up part of that was the times in that was now today i've been fortunate for my kids i was able to fly back when they had an event or what have you and you know that simply wasn't possible many years ago you didn't have the options that we have today the state touch into manage multiple priorities and so much easier and so you know there's tremendous respect when he was there he was all ends he had a very major impact that said you know there's it's a give him he added so i think one she was very focused on it her parents were immigrants when they came to st louis they were in the shoe business and they were the first to employ african americans and and i remember i have a memory of of their windows being broken alive in in st louis in youth in you city um and on the main street a big floor shyam shoe store and i had no idea i did didn't dawn on me until many many years later when i was told that's because our grandfather was the first to bring africanamericans into the business and then allow them to be out on the floor sewing shoes and.

social justice african americans windows st louis shyam
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Welcome to executives after hours real conversations with real leaders this is your host dr james kelly i wanna make you a promise that over the next sixty minutes you will learn at a minimum the two things one every leader an executive makes mistakes on the way to the top two and more importantly everyone has a unique story to tell and we do here on executive after hours we sit down with leaders across a variety of industries and we talk to them about their unique story so welcome to the community stay tuned for today's episode on your executives after hours everybody welcome to executives after hours this this was a cracker of an episode today in the contrast i had the pleasure to speak with the chairman and ceo of lend lavonna go health base that was cargo the model health specializes in works with partners around diabetes using technology it's pretty amazing go check it out on the bongocom that is live o hinges eo dad's condo bongo getcom glen and i have this source amazing conversation we talk about him living amongst the amish doing some research when he was in college we talk about his magic that he loves but the magic conversation only happens in the extended unedited version which is on our website adept of thethe james guide our consul check that out this was a long at associated shop a bunch up today episode mr glenn toleman c o chairman of live long ago health some of you recall take a break and it can't do it again addiction problem and so what i decided to do is back in october i did a a series for university of western australia around diversity inclusion some produced produce those over christmas break guys have listen to those are some really interesting content there they're all about fifteen twenty minutes max so pretty short and sharp but it's perfect also on to say thank you to see sweet partners continued publish my book goalie.

executive chairman and ceo christmas dr james kelly mr glenn toleman university of western australi fifteen twenty minutes sixty minutes
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Adams is here she is chairman ceo and president of the united states tennis association the us tsa's mission is simply to promote and develop the growth of tennis throughout the country this included in a find and nurturing top us town alan to compete on the global stage the usta also owns and operates a us open the two week tournament begins very soon on august twenty eight all eyes will be on roger federer the 36yearold would be seeking a third major title this year after winning both the australian open and wimbledon tournament i am pleased to have could lina adams at this table for the first time welcome thank you know you the first person to serve as ceo could for two terms and my goodness uh and the first person who was a player to come ceos will that is correct and tennis as a young person absolutely from the first moment i picked up a racquet a age say i knew that was what i wanted to do it now that professional tennis was a possibility by this love the sport and you would have been good asked whom in every other sport to you a great time and i coordination and that kind of thing makes great professional athletes i had a lot of fun as a kid crying out for two out of brothers i was introduced to alatas for its and i think that when i did pick up tennis having already been somewhat if an athlete at a young age made it very easy for me to really pick up the sport what did it mean to see arthur ashe win wimbledon it was it was the first summer that i actually picked up a racquet in nineteen 75 and i didn't understand this foreign it didn't understand the dynamics of it i didn't know what the significance of winning wimbledon are tournament like that was but i do know that when i watched and play on a 12ounce black and.

Adams president tsa alan roger federer tennis chairman united states lina adams arthur ashe two week 12ounce